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A P S Z SINCE 1948

BEVERAGE A West Chester Tradition Locally owned and operated since 1948, Spaz Beverage has been providing Chester and Delaware Counties with a great selection of imported, specialty and domestic beer. We also offer a variety of soda, mixers, spring water, mineral water and non-alcoholic beer.

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Real Estate Team

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MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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The

Press PUBLISHER Dan Mathers Dan@thewcpress.com ADVERTISING MANAGER Nick Vecchio Nick@thewcpress.com COPY EDITOR Kehan DeSousa kdesousa@thewcpress.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Nazarena Luzzi Castro nazluzzidesign.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Jesse Piersol jpiersol@thewcpress.com Kate Chadwick kchadwick@thewcpress.com CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Luke O’Brien snappedstudio.com PHOTOGRAPHY INTERN Annie Tennyson

Musicians want to be the loud voice for so many quiet hearts. –Billy Joel COLUMNISTS Becca Boyd bboyd@thewcpress.com DJ Romeo romeo@thewcpress.com Jennifer Ozgur jozgur@thewcpress.com Published By... Mathers Productions Limited 13 South Church Street West Chester, PA 19382 mathersproductions.com 610-344-3463

The WC Press is a monthly magazine distributed free of charge to more than 250 businesses. For a free digital subscription, visit thewcpress.com. For more information about specific distribution locations visit thewcpress.com/distribution.

Worth

Noting

Our no-nonsense table of contents

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WC BY THE NUMBERS What our readers are saying about music

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EVENT PHOTOS Here’s what you missed at this year’s WC Bartenders Ball

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SECRETS THAT YOU SING The evolution of singer/songwriter Joel Roberts

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WEST CHESTER’S MUSIC LINEUP The best music coming out of this borough

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THE LOOK Moonflower introduces us to bohemian styles

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BARTENDER OF THE MONTH Alibi’s Jess Urso knows a bar’s only as good as its staff

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MAKEOVER La Difference rescues the victim of shoddy work

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TRIBE SOUND RECORDS Inside West Chester’s full-service recording studio

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OWNERS OF THE MONTH Jason & Eryn Schafer-Balerius of Electric Avenue

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LOCAL TALENT Nicole Zell is a singer/songwriter and radio personality

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Try Our Healthy Options brown rice, wheat tortillas, burrito bowls, salads homemade guacamole, salsa & sauces vegan & vegetarian friendly preservative-free

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1000 Continental Drive, Suite 500 King of Prussia, PA 19406-2820 www.farmersagentpa.com

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Fromthe

Editor

Born down in a dead man’s town The first kick I took was when I hit the ground

I was born before clinical studies proved that listening to classical music early in life can enhance a baby’s intelligence. I came into this world long before pregnant mothers had coordinated playlists they’d port through special bellywrapping headphones to their unborn children in an attempt to promote a state of well being. But I still feel confident saying music’s been a part of my life since the day I was born. Many of my early memories prominently feature a soundtrack, and that’s likely because few of those memories are actually my own. I may have been born before the Baby Einstein craze, but video cameras beat me to the market by quite a few years. My oldest memories are the ones recorded by the black cinder block my dad would strap to his shoulder to commemorate special occasions… or capture his children doing something he’d want to blackmail them with later in life. Those videos serve as evidence of much more than the fact that I’ve had impeccable rhythm and a phenomenal repertoire of dance moves since right around the time I first started walking; they’re proof it wasn’t my decision to become the type of person who can’t help but belt out song lyrics. Whether I’m alone in the shower or in a carful of people, if the music is on, I’m likely singing. To me, a car without music just feels so empty, and a car with music and nobody singing just seems so dead. I’m no Robert Plant, I’m no Eddie Vedder, and I’m not even a decent Bruce Springsteen (And, let’s be honest: have you heard the guy sing lately? It’s getting pretty bad), but I’ve never shied away from singing. I was raised on rock ’n’ roll, and I’m damn proud of it. I’m also damn proud of this magazine. There’s an incredible feature starting on page 25 about some of our favorite bands in town. Photographer Justin Muir did an unbelievable job of capturing the essence of these musicians, and Luke O’Brien’s interview questions do a great job of filling in the details. We also have a piece by Jesse Piersol on West Chester’s own recording studio, TribeSound Records, that highlights how much the people in this town love their music. Heck, my story on singer/songwriter Joel Roberts that starts on page 19 isn’t half bad either. As someone who was born in the ’80s, there were plenty of opportunities for my parents to introduce me to terrible music, but I somehow made it out of that era unscathed and in possession of a solid appreciation for good tunes. And while some months getting this magazine together can really feel arduous, this month has been a pleasure. You see, this issue so thoroughly embraces my life-long passion for music, a passion that dates all the way back to fuzzy VHS recordings of me bouncing around the living room in my underwear belting out “Born in the USA,” that I feel as though I haven’t worked at all.

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Congrats to Michael DeWald, Katelyn Walck and Tom Patterson. They’ve won $20 gift cards to Doc Magrogan’s just for answering our survey.

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2014

BARTENDERS

b ll

The WC Bartenders Ball is the West Chester restaurant community’s annual charity celebration. With the help of area businesses, this event has donated more than $30,000 to philanthropic organizations in Chester County over the past three years. Months of planning culminate in a charity gala at the Chester County Historical Society. However, it’s not just a celebrat—keep in mind that it’s all for a good cause... or causes, plural. West Chester is lucky to have an abundance of charitable and volunteer organizations that help make this town a better place to call home, and the WC Bartenders Ball honors four of those groups in particular... West Chester Fire Department Supporting all four volunteer stations that serve and protect West Chester Chester County Hero Fund Benefitting the families of first responders who are injured or killed in the line of duty West Chester Police Athletic League Providing educational assistance and activities to under-privileged elementary students West Chester Food Cupboard Feeding the children and families of West Chester who cannot feed themselves This past year the event raised more than $15,000 for those local organizations

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WE PUT YOU ON THE MAP!

 Limoncello Ristorante  The WC Press  Subway  Yori’s Bakery  The Note  Kooma Viet  The Social Lounge  Culinary Deliveries  Ram’s Head Bar & Grill  Saladworks  Pietro’s Prime  Pisano & Sons Shoe Repair  Senator Dinniman  Salon Chemistry  Nonna’s  Doc Magrogan’s  Optimal Massage  Cozy Hookah Café  William Shehwen Law Offices  Big Mike’s Barber Shop

 

 Franklin Mint Federal Credit Union  High Roller Tattoo  Giuseppe Cabinets  Mainline Men’s  I Pasta  Chester County Intermediate Unit  D’Ascenzo Gelato  X-treme Ink Tattoo  The Pita Pit  The Olive Branch  Blaze Salon  Balance Hair Spa  Vitesse Sports  Mercado’s  Moonflower  Zazen Nail Spa  The Lunch Box  Jazmine Thai  Elwyn School

WEST CHESTER’S LANDLORD 121 E GAY ST  610.696.0953  ZUKINREALTYINC.COM

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Thanks to our sponsors: Platinum Sponsors SCENE Magazine Southern Wine & Spirits Schaffer Sound Disc Hounds Bud Light Jimmy Duffy’s Catering Barnaby’s of America Gold Sponsors Alibis Cafe Cakes & Candies by Maryellen Zukin Realty Dave Magrogan Group Ram’s Head Bar & Grill WC Computer Doctors Pietro’s Prime Ryan’s Pub

Silver Sponsors Benny’s Pizza Culinary Deliveries Calista Grand Faunbrook B&B Dave’s Automotive Repair Enterprise Landmark Americana Peter’s Salon and Spa The Social Lounge WC Sports & Social The WC Press Yori’s Bakery Wells Fargo Susquehanna Bank Sunset Hill Creekside Cabaret Limoncello Side Bar Spaz Beverage

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e f T n h o i t u Evol O

O

n several different occasions I’ve asked Joe Krauss where his stage name comes from and why he feels the need to perform under a pseudonym. I’ve gotten a different response every time. Once it was that the stage name was a way to distance himself from people who didn’t like him in real life. Once he laughed and told me, “Because Bob Dylan was taken.” I don’t think those answers are particularly untrue—they’re all just a shade of the truth. Joe Krauss is one of the most disarming people I’ve ever met. From my conversations with him, it’s clear that he doesn’t want the focus of this story to be on him, on the man best known in West Chester as the funny server from Roots Café. He’s odd but kind. He’s funny. When he takes your order, he asks, “If you found out today was your last day on earth, what would you want with your Bison Burger?” I’ve only heard a handful of complaints about Roots Café opening a new, bigger venue, and my favorite by far was a friend complaining that now he only rarely gets Joe as his server. 

story

Dan Mathers

photos

Frank Lanigan

& Luke O’Brien MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Joel Roberts is the winner of the Uptown! Entertainment Alliance’s Singer/Songwriter contest. He’s the artist who shouldered out The Arctic Monkeys, Chance the Rapper and Vampire Weekend to produce my favorite album of 2013 (but more about that later). He’s a musician whose music is so sorrowfully beautiful that it sounds like it was written by a melancholy virtuoso who’s seen more years pass him by than he can count. His music is so utterly devoid of casual jokes and off-hand comments that it’s easy to forget Joel Roberts and Joe Krauss are the same 24-year-old kid from nowhere in particular.

oe was born in Kensington, Philadelphia, but his family moved all the time. “I never really felt at home because, by the time I was 17, I’d lived in 11 different houses,” he says. Joe’s not likely to label his childhood as tumultuous or admit to growing up in hard times, but if you pry hard enough, he’ll admit it wasn’t exactly easy. His parents were often splitting up and getting back together; siblings, both older and younger, moving into and out of the house. Song lyrics claim his mother was “crazy,” his father “too far gone.”

J

It’s not surprising that a teenager raised in constant flux might seek a reliable outlet for his thoughts, and for Joe it was always in music. “Even at times where we felt most disconnected, we always had the music thing in common,” he says, when talking about his relationship with his older brother. It was his brother who first lent 14-year-old Joe a guitar, a guitar that, years later, Joe would find out had been stolen from the music department at their school. When he turned 16, Joe’s father gave him an instrument of his own. “My mom never worked and my dad was always behind on things, so I never got anything on holidays,” Joe says. “It was really amazing when my dad fixed up his old guitar and gave it to me for my birthday.”

I’ve tried many times to tell the story of the first time I heard Joel play, but I can never really seem to do it justice. Words always fail to accurately describe the surprise and odd contentment I felt.He’d been invited to come play in our office after expressing an interest in being interviewed. When he showed up with his guitar, harmonica and raspy voice and played three songs seated atop a stool in our Church Street headquarters, he created the most intimate concert I’ve ever witnessed. That performance defined Joel Roberts to me for the next two years—just a man and his guitar rattling off song lyrics that make you think and make you feel something. He sent me over some music after that first performance—just rough cuts performed standing in front of a mic in somebody’s basement or bedroom—but I listened to those recordings over and over again.

ecording music has always had a nostalgic feel for Joe, going back to when, as a kid, his father would holler for him to come downstairs and listen to records. “I remember thinking it was really romantic that people had gone to that level of being like, ‘Here I am. Here are my thoughts. I’m going to record this.’”

R

He recently followed through on those romantic impulses and self-funded a full-length album recorded at Sine Studios in Philadelphia. While he won’t confide how much was sunk into the project, he admits it was substantial. “I had been saving up for a while to get a nice car, but when I got to the lot I thought to myself, ‘Why don’t I just make a really nice album and get a shitty car? That pickup there for $2000 doesn’t look so bad.’” After months in and out of the studio, the album he crafted, titled Someplace I’ve Yet To Be, has the polished finish of a major label debut, and—while I recognize many of the 

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songs—it couldn’t be farther removed from those basement recordings I’d listened to on repeat. I’d grown accustomed to guitar and the occasional harmonica, but his full-length album features cello, violin, mandolin, bass, percussion, vibraphone, and both an upright and Rhodes piano. For a self-taught musician, blending all those instruments to realize his vision was difficult. Joel can’t read or write music, so he’d sit in the studio humming sections over and over again until his hired accompaniment of highly trained classical musicians figured out what he wanted. “I did a whole lot of whistling,” he says. “They’d play these beautiful, amazing things, and I’d feel so controlling telling them, ‘No. You’re doing it wrong. This is what I want.’ Then I’d hum it again.” When it came to laying down guitar tracks, Joel would play the same riff over and over and over again for what felt like hours until it was absolutely perfect. “I found out I wasn’t that good at the guitar,” he jokes. In the end, Joel’s meticulous control has made Someplace I’ve Yet To Be a finely crafted work of art. He once told me that well-written songs are like secrets that you sing. Open up the booklet that comes with the CD, and you’ll see his album lyrics read like diary entries. The record feels as though Joe’s most intimate emotions have been carefully distilled and recorded.

our

Favorite Lyrics Someplace I’ve Yet To Be

from

“Catching Rain” I might be weak, but I’m not broken. I’m not on a losing streak, but my victories are so soft spoken. And I’m not a liar, but I’m pretty good at bending the truth, and I think that one day I’ll probably break bending for you.

“hard luck” And it’s not that I miss you at all—it’s that I hope to see you soon. These things have a way of keeping fingers crossed, so I guess hard luck will do. s Joe most frequently tells it, the stage name exists to create a clear distinction between Joe Krauss and Joel Roberts for the sake of the listener—it’s a tool for helping his fans separate the man from the music. “When people know me as Joe from the Café, that’s what they think of my music,” he says. The same goes for those who know Joe from outside Roots. When friends and family found out he was interested in performing, they assumed he meant standup comedy. “I was heartbroken that I’d been taken as a joke,” he says.

A

But when you talk to Joe, it seems that distinguishing Joe from Joel is just as important for him as it is for the listener. I can’t imagine sharing with the world a fraction of the anguish, insecurity and or even the joy that’s on his album. I have to imagine Joe feels the same, so it’s easy to understand why he worked so hard to craft an alter ego. It’s easy to understand why he doesn’t want Joe Krauss to be part of this story. But, it also doesn’t seem possible to really tell the story of Joel Roberts, the story behind Someplace I’ve Yet To Be, without him.

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH

“Keep me from ruin” Remember when you said these magic nights made life worth living twice? They always end too soon. All of the headlights, they’re cutting through me like a knife, and I’m wondering where they’re going and why I wasn’t invited, too.

“east coast ghost” I keep missing that train, the one I know I’ll never take. But I’m all hell bent on someplace better than this, someplace heaven sent, but I don’t know if it exists.

“dark eyed daughter” I know you cry droplets of pain, falling from your eyes in darker shades of rain. And hopes of better times? We should leave our hopes behind because love’s just a ghost born between you and I.

“Someplace I’ve Yet To Be” I’ve been out collecting feathers in hopes to build myself a set of wings and hanging ’round in the worst of weathers, in hopes to ride home the lightning. And you say I could use a change of direction, so won’t you take me someplace I’ve yet to be.


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BACKWOODS PAYBACK

Their music is dark and aggressive, but don't judge a book by it's cover—Mike

,

Cummings Jessica Baker and Rylan Caspar are are anything but

THERE ARE A LOT OF HARSH WORDS USED WHEN TALKING ABOUT YOUR STYLE OF MUSIC, BUT HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR SOUND?

I’d say our two biggest inspirations are Black Sabbath and Black Flag. I love the expansive doominess of Black Sabbath and the aggressiveness of Black Flag. We draw on those elements to make our own sound.

WHAT CAN WE EXPECT TO SEE AT A LIVE SHOW?

The live show is loud and very bass heavy. We can fit into any venue on any bill, and we have. We have played to 150 people on a Tuesday, 12 on a Wednesday and 1,000 on Friday. It’s always different and we always just adapt and bring our energy to the stage.

TOURING SINCE ’03, YOU GUYS MUST HAVE SOME GREAT ROAD STORIES...

WHAT PROJECTS DO YOU HAVE OUT AND WHAT ARE YOU WORKING ON?

One time we were on the last leg of a tour, and we drove from Green Bay, Wisconsin (where we played the venue that Buddy Holly played his last show in!) towards North Dakota. We got to North Dakota to find out that the promoter was cancelling the last leg of the tour, so we turned around and drove all the way to Cleveland where there was a show opportunity. We played that and then drove home to West Chester. It was a lot of driving on not a lot of sleep, but that’s the nature of the beast and we love it! We have actually played every state in the continental U.S. except North Dakota.

We released a record with Small Stone Records and plan on doing another full-length one. For right now, we are really excited about the upcoming release of In The Ditch. It’s going to be a sixsong project that we recorded at Noisy Little Critter. This record is definitely on the dark/somber side. It will be available on iTunes and Bandcamp, and we’re going to print CDs, and we’re also going to press vinyls this summer. I love the experience of buying a physical form of music, and I want our fans to experience that.

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WHERE DO YOU LIKE TO PLAY IN WEST CHESTER?

LRI: We recently rocked a show at Alibis—the shows there seem to be getting better and better. VINNY: Increasingly, we ask more than just our friends to come out. We’re drawing bigger crowds of people who’ve just heard about us, so every show is more fun than the last.

YOU GUYS OBVIOULSY PLAY A LOT OF BARS WHERE THINGS GET OUT OF HAND. HAVE ANY STORIES?

LISA: We got to this bar and a water main had broke, leaving the power out. We had no PA system, so we started playing an acoustic set basically in the dark. Mike stepped forward to have an audience member sing a lyric into the mic and ended up stepping off stage and into a trashcan.

RAPID FIRE. YOUR FAVORITE SONGS TO PLAY. GO!

LORI: “I Want it That Way” by Backstreet Boys VINNY: “Zombie” by The Cranberries ZACHARY: “Fat Bottom Girls” by Queen LISA: “Paris” by Grace Potter or “Royals” by Lorde MIKE: “Purple Haze” by Jimi Hendrix. Playing Hendrix is a religious experience for me WHERE CAN PEOPLE CATCH YOU NEXT?

LISA: Definitely come see us at the beach this summer. We play the Borgata and Revel in AC, as well as all the fun bars along the East Coast. LORI: And we’re at Alibis on April 5!

CRazy in Stereo Mike Cain, Lori Brown, Lisa White, Vinny

DeRenzis and Zachary Rosais are excitable, upbeat and totally eclectic... everything a cover band should be MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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One bite and you’re hooked

ramsheadbarandgrill.com 40 East Market Street 484-631-0241

It’s hard to beat our California BLT with tots and an IPA 30

THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


Comparing John grecia to Billy Joel or elton John is unavoidable but it’s a comparison the artist

,

is not likely to loathe

john grecia YOUR ALBUM “THIRTEEN” IS AN ECLECTIC MIX OF STYLES. WHY IS THAT?

Well, “Thirteen” is an album that we released in October 2011—it was a long time in the making and took a good number of stars to align for the recording process to begin. It was my first album, and it featured what I felt were the best, most resilient songs out of thirteen years of songwriting. We recorded it here in West Chester at TribeSound Records.

DID THE LENGTH OF TIME IT TOOK TO RECORD THIS ALBUM IMPACT THE FINISHED PRODUCT?

That’s something I love about this album, but it’s definitely something I couldn’t do again… unless I just wait another thirteen years to record. I’m hoping for a quicker turnaround for the next one! WHAT ARE YOUR GOALS FOR 2014?

For the past decade-plus I’ve had a songwriting partnership with a guy named Thom Williams. We wrote upwards of 100 songs together—his words, my music. Tom died in December 2010 from cancer. I have 40 songs we wrote together that I want to record into three albums. My goal is to record part one of this project this year. I’m really proud of this body of work, and I always remember Thom’s greatest desire being to get these songs out there. I want to make that happen.

WHAT CAN ONE EXPECT WHEN THEY COME SEE THE JOHN GRECIA BAND?

I always describe JGB as an “umbrella” under which a bunch of different playing scenarios exist. When we did our record release concert at the Chester County Historical Society, we had thirteen people on stage at one point. Most of the time we’re a five or six-piece band—piano, electric guitar, acoustic guitar, bass, female backing vocals and drums.

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Our Family, yOur TOwn, yOur FlOrisT, since 1957

29 S. Church St 610-696-5200 halladayflorist.com

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LIKE CRAZY

Greg Pearse and Sara Ternyila ( and sometimes Dennis Wilson) make pop Music inspired by mat nathanson

HOW DID YOU MEET?

GREG: We were both servers at a TGIFriday’s and, after talking about music, we realized we had very similar tastes. I had been songwriting since high school and when we put this group together I was especially excited to be writing because of our immediate creative synergy.

and romantic comedies

WHAT IS YOUR WRITING AND RECORDING PROCESS?

SARA: We get together with the intention of writing something, but the process is always different. We may have an idea that we build on, or we’ll start from scratch. GREG: Rob Freeman produced our last EP at Pilot Studios in Boonton, NJ. We wrote it as a self-contained story and thought about putting skits in between songs to further solidify the story, but we nixed that idea. SARA: You still get the story feel, and I think our next record is going to be similar in that sense. We just love love stories. WHAT’S YOUR LIVE SHOW LIKE?

SARA: Well, we don’t always play with drums in our live shows. Our music lends itself to the acoustic setting, but we also like to bring a lot of energy to the stage—and the drums help there. It just depends. GREG: It’s nice to have that flexibility and diversity in our sets. The acoustic set creates more emotion and the full band creates the fun, high-energy show. ANYTHING EXCITING COMING UP?

GREG: We just want to continue to write, record, and play shows. We are at Milkboy this month with Graham Colton, and we’re also doing a show at the First Unitarian Church to benefit the music programs of inner city schools.

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Dan Fisher has been A DJ since he was 1 5, and he 's MADE A NAME FOR HIMSELF IN the

LOVE CITY DJS WHAT GOES INTO DJING?

Every time you play the audience is different; I really enjoy taking cues from them and allowing their reactions and mood to dictate my selections. I’ll spin a mash-up that has a sample of something that is familiar to the audience, followed by something related to that song but not as well-known. My hope is to turn people on to new music.

LOOKING AT YOUR SITE, IT SEEMS YOU’VE PLAYED SOME BIG STAGES, OPENING FOR BIG NAMES.

Opening for A-Trak was a horizon moment for me because he is without a doubt my biggest inspiration. We were the only two on the bill at the Soundgarden in Philly directly following The Roots Picnic this past summer. I watched him win the DMC World DJ Championship when he was 15 years old. I was also 15 at the time, and that was when I said I wanted to DJ. Opening for him is definitely a cool position for me to be in because it allows me to think about how I can complement the headliner and appeal to their fans.

years since SOUNDS LIKE YOU’RE A CHAMELEON.

I would say that when I get on stage, I am trying to create an atmosphere based on the things that I love about music and what I see other people love about music. I love DJing not because it gets me recognition but because it gets music recognition. I just want to stand by my record player and shine a light on good music.

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


WHERE DOES THE BAND NAME COME FROM?

Ryan Warfield, Liam Tinney, Mark Mullen,

There’s a Dr. Seuss book called If I Ran The Circus For A Day with a creature called the “Spotted Atrocious.” I think the quote goes something like:

Mitchell Way and Chris Hall put out emotional, politically fueled rock

spotted atrocious HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR SOUND?

Most people say we sound like a mix of the Foo Fighters, Brand New, Pink Floyd, Say Anything and Elliot Smith. Our live show includes improvisation, jamming and instrumentals, so depending on which part of the show you see, we might sound really different to you. WHAT EMOTIONS DO YOU GUYS HOPE TO EVOKE THROUGH YOUR MUSIC?

Most of our songs are fueled by emotions from our personal experiences or our beliefs about politics, religion, the economy and so forth. We want people to immerse themselves in our music the same way we do when we listen to music, when you find an album or song that really speaks to exactly how you feel in that moment and it moves you. We want to do that for people.

And now here in this cage is a beast most ferocious. Who’s known far and wide as the spotted atrocious. Who growls, howls, and yowls, the most bloodcurdling sounds. And each tooth in his mouth weighs at least sixty pounds ... It sounds like a pretty badass creature if you ask us.

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


swaggboyreek

Originally from Chester and now living in West Chester, TYREEK Dorsey brings a smile and natural swag to hip-hop WHO INSPIRES YOU TO WRITE AND RECORD?

I am a fan of all hip-hop, as well as a lot of what I hear on the radio. Of course I like Jay-Z and Lil’ Wayne, but my biggest inspiration, the person who made me really want to be an artist, is Wiz Khalifa. He seems like a fun person to be around and his music is true to that. WHAT SEPARATES SWAGGBOYREEK FROM OTHER RAPPERS?

I love being out with my fans. People love to come see me live because they can see that I love what I do. I’m an outgoing personality, so I like to be in the mix with everybody. I really see myself as an entertainer as well as a rapper. I offer my presence.

HOW MANY LIVE SHOWS HAVE YOU PLAYED?

I’ve probably done 30 shows now, so I am getting comfortable on stage. I really love being up there. My first show I was nervous. The third show I ever played I was really nervous too, because it was outdoors and there were a lot of people, but by the time we got off stage I felt great and people were taking pictures with us and everything, which is a great feeling as an artist. ARE YOU WORKING ON ANYTHING?

2013 was a breakthrough year for me; I learned a lot by experimenting. In 2014 I want to take it to a new level. We’re gonna tighten up the mixes, get the live show together, and continue to grow and get better. I also have a mix-tape coming out soon called Swaggin Rights 2.

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


TELL ME ABOUT YOUR SOUND

Colin McGetrick, James Mclaughlin and Chris Cotter make eclectic, experimental indie rock

wave radio

COLIN: Our first record, WaveRadio, has a mish-mosh of sounds. In one way we really love the eclectic nature of the record, but in the same breath we feel it might lack the cohesiveness that we are going to capture in this next one. CHRIS: Instead of obsessing over getting music, we’re just letting it come to us. JAMES: We have spent a lot of time together playing and learning as a unit. I think that’s important. We are now in a spot where we all understand what we’re going for.

WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE LIVE SHOWS?

COLIN: Playing The Dewey Beach festival was a huge turning point for us because we met so many cool bands. We connected with a few bands like The Great Socio and John and Brittany, and we’ve stayed in touch and done shows with them because we respect and appreciate what they do. Festivals are great for networking like that. DID THAT EXPOSURE LEAD TO ANY OPPORTUNITIES?

CHRIS: While we were there, Gable Music Ventures scouted us and are going to have us headline their festival at World Café at The Queen in Wilmington. That festival is called Wilmo Rock Circus. And we played the Frozen Harbor Music Festival on February 22nd and rocked it. We’re digging that scene.

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


Moonflower keeps you ahead of the fashion curve with two of this month's best looks

The

Look PHOTO Andrew Hutchins

Moonflower has a cool vibe and a reputation for selling one-of-a-kind, fair-trade items from around the globe. The store sells unique clothing, jewelry, bags and accessories as well as incense, tapestries and eclectic homemade gifts. The shop’s owner, Aimee Beaver, only carries items from like-minded businesses: green, ethics-based small businesses both in the US and around the world. To help do their part, Moonflower gives a portion of their annual proceeds to a variety of environmental, pro-peace and animal rescue organizations. Aimee’s bohemian sensibilities have crafted a store that can make a rock star out of anybody. Just take a look!

"

Rocker-chick Chic: handmade cardigans and tunics Outfit One

Outfit Two

Cowl-neck, handcrocheted tunic/dress with lace-detailed back

Side-tie tunic

by Culture Shop, $48

Hand-knit long cardigan by Maya Papaya, $60

Handmade silver & moldovite pendant $200

Mookaite, carnelian, and earth jasper bracelets

by Culture Shop, $48

Dip-dye scarf/shawl by Maya Papaya, $60

Handwrapped silver pendant with ammonite and abalone shell $120

Clip-in hair feathers $25

$20

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610.436.5222


Home

Becca Boyd has a passion for good food

Beccanomics

With quite the variety of music to choose from in my itunes, I decided I’d be best off sticking to my main man: Bruce Springsteen was “The Boss” ever since I was a tiny thing. I chose three of my favorite songs and within minutes of perusing my blog, www.homebeccanomics.com, found their perfect corresponding recipes. Are you “Born to Run”? Grab a chocolate banana protein muffin before you head out the door. Perhaps you, like me, have realized that even when temperatures are at their chilliest, there’s always room for ice cream in the freezer; whip up this healthy fruit and yogurt version. You don’t have to live on 10th avenue for this freeze-out to be well worth it. Born to Run - Chocolate Banana Protein Muffins Makes 16-18 1 1/2 c. flour; 1/2 c. chocolate protein powder; 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 c. dark unsweetened cocoa powder; 2 tsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp. baking soda; 1/2 c. sugar; 2 eggs; 1/3 c. canola oil 3 over-ripe bananas, mashed; 1/2 c. walnuts, chopped 1/2 c. greek nonfat or lowfat (plain) yogurt; 1 tsp. vanilla 1/2 c. chocolate chips 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. 2. In a medium bowl, whisk flour, protein powder, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. 3. On a plate, mash bananas with a fork. 4. In a large bowl, whisk eggs, bananas, oil, sugar, vanilla, and yogurt until combined. 5. Fold dry ingredients into wet until half way mixed. 6. Add walnuts and chocolate and continue to fold until just combined. 7. Spray two 12 c. muffin tins with nonstick spray or fill with paper liners. 8. Divide batter evenly between the holes, filling each about 2/3 of the way full. 9. Bake for 12-16 minutes, or until you touch the top of a muffin and it’s no longer wet. Whenever a recipe gives you two times, always set your oven for the LOWER time. You can always bake something more but you can never bake it LESS. 10. Let cool in the tin for about five minutes, then remove to a wire wrack to cool completely. These will keep at room temp for several days. They will freeze GREAT; put them in bags of two and take them out as you need them for breakfasts on-the-go. Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out 4 Ingredient Mango Ice cream Serves 4 1 3/4 c. chopped frozen mango; 3 tbsp. honey or agave 1 c. 2% plain Greek yogurt; 2 tbsp. light coconut milk small mint leaves for optional garnish. 1. Puree mango, yogurt, honey and coconut milk in food processor until creamy and well-blended. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and process again, about 10 seconds. 2. Serve immediately or spoon into a glass loaf or cake pan and cover with plastic wrap and freeze. Before serving, let sit out at least 10 minutes or microwave on 50% power for 1 minute. bboyd@thewcpress.com

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


Bartender of the

Month

PHOTO & INTERVIEW Luke O’Brien

Alibi’s Jess Urso knows that a bar’s staff is only as good as its managers... and owners. So Jess, did you grow up in West Chester? I’m a Delaware County girl; I grew up in Springfield. What brought you to West Chester? I went to school here and earned my Master’s in social work. I currently bartend at three different bars. I feel that I’m applying my degree because I’m basically a shrink for all of my customers. People come in with all kinds of stories, and I’m here to listen and keep the drinks flowing. Do you have any serious sob stories? I was hanging and chatting with an older woman who seemed pretty upset and was certainly attempting to drown some kind of sorrow based on the amount of glasses of

wine she’d had. She told me that her husband of 50 years left her that day for another woman. I felt horrible. She finished that bottle off. Another time, I worked a wedding reception and the groom got blackout. His wife of four hours put him to bed in the hotel room upstairs and came back to the bar for some late-night fun. That fun consisted of straddling a random stranger with a cowboy hat… I’m pretty sure they’re gonna last forever. What do you like about working here? Honestly, I love it here. I wouldn’t drive 45 minutes to work if I didn’t. The reason I love it is Chip and Steve; they are the owners and my managers. In this industry a staff is only as good as the managers. These guys get it. They are constantly throwing out compliments to their staff and providing us with positive reinforcement. So good managers encourage the staff. What makes a good bartender? As I said, I am a counselor who keeps alcohol at her office. You have to be a people person. We have regulars during the week, and when they come in, they’re looking for a friend behind the bar to hang out with — that’s me. Alibis also gets a solid college crowd on Thursday nights and weekends, so you have to love that fast-paced environment. I thrive on it. I prefer to be hustling for 6 hours and

earning my tips than standing around watching a clock. Also, you gotta have a repertoire of drinks. I like the Fireball and RumChata shots and I love to make a Rasberry Cosmo. My signature drink is the Whipped Cream Mind Eraser. Most people hear “mind eraser” and think “no, I can’t do those,” but that just means they’ve never had mine. When you’re working and hear the DJ throw on that song, the one that gets you in your zone, who sings it and what is it called? I have an appreciation for all music, but I love Aerosmith! I was going to say Michael Bolton, but let’s leave that out. Aerosmith gets me in my groove. I also love ’90’s hip-hop stuff. We bump that at our dayload tailgates. Dayload tailgate? This must be a DelCo thing because people always respond that way. It’s just what I call “day drinking” or “Sunday Funday”. I love dayloading! Being in the bar biz, you live on a different schedule. On Sunday, while everyone is home recovering from the weekend, yours is just beginning. We go out with our co-workers and basically have the bars to ourselves — that’s fun for us. My ideal night is posted at a bar in sweatpants, cold drink in hand, playing the Megatouch games and running the jukebox. I can tell you love what you do. Thanks so much for your time! No problem! How about that Whipped Cream Mind Eraser?

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Christy Cosgrove is the Creative & Educational Director for her family business, LD Salon & Day Spa. She, and her team, utilize her 20 years of experience as a stylist, a Nationally Board Certified Hair Colorist and an educator for L’Oreal Professionel to ensure your complete satisfaction.

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


The

Makeover photo

This experience was absolutely life-changing.

Luke O’Brien

"

La Difference Salon & Day Spa comes to Kelly’s rescue Letting a novice get their hands on your hair can cause some serious setbacks, something Kelly was unfortunate enough to have first-hand experience with when— pressed for time—she chose to get her hair done by a substitute stylist in Philadelphia. Luckily, Christy Cosgrove, an American Board of Certified Hair Colorist, was able to help save Kelly’s dye-job before her friend’s wedding. The previous stylist had left Kelly with two distinct color regions— copper blonde at the roots and silvery blonde throughout the length. To help break up that contrast, Christy created a formula to take that copper color down to a pale blonde. Then, to finish off the color, she applied an ammoniafree color from the roots down to the ends which helped rid Kelly’s hair of the silvery tones and create a brilliant shine. Christy then complemented Kelly’s slim figure with a long bob, complete with texturized and graduated ends that draw attention to the beautiful angles of her face. Finally, she applied a naturallooking, well-blended makeup and then contoured and filled in Kelly’s eyebrows which helps accentuate on her blue eyes.

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Monday to Friday: 9am-5:30pm | Saturday: 8am-2pm Monday 12/23: 9am-5:30pm | Tuesday 12/24: 8am-2pm Closed 12/25 and 12/26 610.696.9683 | 1009 West Chester Pike

All Baking Done on Premises 15 N Church St ď‚Ą 610-344-9674

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


Inside West Chester's Full-service Recording Studio by jesse piersol

id I ever tell you about the time I had my life threatened because this guy thought I stole his beats?”

Chris Cotter, founder of TribeSound Records, is catching up with old friend Jay Stowell, a local musician known in hip-hop circles as J Scroll. It’s late on a Thursday evening, and the three of us are ensconced in TribeSound’s dimly lit control room, deep within the basement labyrinth underneath Taylor’s Music Store. Chris is telling the story of a hip-hop musician who once accused him of using some of his recorded music without his consent. “Yeah, he left a threatening message on my answering machine, which had the number on it, so I called him back.” At first, the caller hung up on Chris, but Chris persisted, finally making clear the serious nature of threatening someone. “Then, the guy relaxed, and wanted to come in and do some recording. Of course, I told him that he wasn’t welcome in the studio. Ever.” Death threat aside, the day-to-day activities at TribeSound are still anything but mundane. Since 2005, TribeSound has been providing top-shelf recording services, as well as artist management, video production, and pretty much any other service musicians might need to get their sound out to the masses.

Chris is wearing a red scarf, with close-cropped hair and the quiet intensity of a drummer, which he is. “I never wanted to be anything but a drummer. It’s pretty impossible to get by doing that, but I can give music lessons. I can record. Combined with the teaching, it allows me to make a living.” The centerpiece of the studio is the $8,500 Telefunken U47 microphone. The crew at TribeSound became so enamored that they made a video about it, now posted on the front page of their web site. Described as “old-school engineering and modern electronics that deliver timeless U47 tone” by Sweetwater online music store, the characterization aptly captures TribeSound’s philosophy as well. High quality is a TribeSound hallmark, and part of that quality comes from their dedication to using the right equipment. “With our instruments, we try to have what people tend not to own. For example, we have a Les Paul Standard [guitar].

Most people will have a Fender Strat, but they won’t keep a Les Paul around because it’s heavy. But there are times when that’s the sound you want.” A huge fan of vintage sounds, Chris loves old guitar amps and anything built with tubes. “I like the warm analogsounding stuff. Vintage keyboards, the Wurlitzer, the Rhodes. A real organ. “ Creating the quintessential vintage sound requires more than just the proper array of instruments, though. “You want everything to sound great. If you use a $10,000 mic with a $2 cable, it’s

not going to sound great. We have pretty much every tool we can dream of.” He continues, “In a studio, music is forever. The mic can’t buzz. You’ll hear

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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TribeSound arti sts

Annalise curtin

ganou

John grecia band

Local singer and guitar player whose first

“Thirteen” is a compilation of original

album captures the nuances of journeying

West Chester native Ganou uses her “soulful voice to establish a kaleidoscope

into adulthood

of sonic landscapes”

spotted atrocious

the sermon!

“Honest effort of emotionally charged rock ’n’ roll that meets you at all levels” from this five-person ensemble of locals

that blemish over and over and over. “ Technical perfection is a goal, but restraint is also necessary when working with musicians. “It’s not necessarily our job to sit over the artist’s shoulder. As an engineer, I try to capture the song truthfully and efficiently. As a producer, however, it’s more about whether I think this song is the best it can be in its current form. The Beatles would try their songs a million different ways. I try to do some of that, to explore some different things before we make a final decision. “ In the control room, Chris lowers the lights so we can see into the studio where Jay practices the hooks for his

Grooves spin out from the darkness and scroll across the only bright ' thing in the room, Chris computer screen song. Grooves spin out from the darkness and scroll across the only bright thing in the room, Chris’ computer screen. Multicolored pyramids rise and fall on the screen as Jay’s voice is rendered in digital form. Chris tweaks a couple of dials. “I’m using a little bit of compression on his voice. I could do more, but when it’s gone, it’s gone. It makes

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH

piano-driven rock songs from lead singer and pianist John Grecia's five-person band

waveradio

Since 2005, this quartet from West Chester has been playing their unique mix of old-

Experimental rock trio featuring Chris

school soul, funk, and jazz

and engineer Colin McGetrick

me nervous to take it out initially. I like to record it all, then take out what I don’t want.” Jay comes in to listen to the playback. They agree that the second version of Jay’s chorus is the most rhythmically solid and decide to use that for every occurrence of the chorus. Amidst the high-dollar, high-tech surroundings of the studio, I’m struck by the cozy, natural vibe the place emanates. “I hear that from a lot of people, actually,” Chris concurs. Morgan Fouse, a TribeSound artist who performs under the name Ganou, agrees. “They have this way of easing you into comfort, which is crucial for any artist who is about to record their personal music in front of complete strangers. I was astounded to see how much fun they always had while still maintaining a professional atmosphere.” Chris doesn’t just record the local music scene — he’s been a participant in it his whole life. As a kid, he took drum lessons in the same space that TribeSound now calls home. He hosted open mic night at Rex’s in the 1990s as a teenager and has enjoyed regional success over the years as both a session musician and a member of several bands. His current band, WaveRadio [see page 41], started as a session project in the studio. “We thought we had some good songs. As a session band, though, we’re also sort of the backing

Cotter and fellow TribeSound producer

band for a lot of the artists on our web site.” WaveRadio guitar player Colin McGetrick also helps produce on the bigger studio projects. “I’m very rhythm oriented,” says Chris, “while Colin is chordally oriented, with a lot of vocal talents, too.” Chris loves the versatility and diversity of West Chester’s musicians, the backbone of the borough’s music scene. “There’s also a unique sense of community among musicians here. If I have a night off, I can go see my friends in a band. I know when I go there, it’s not just going to be me. There’s going to be a community of like-minded people who are there supporting each other.” Fans of local music can look forward to a summer music festival that TribeSound is planning in conjunction with Roots Café. Despite the inherent appeal of owning a record label, the work isn’t always glamorous. “Today I was here at 10am. I taught some lessons, I’m doing this interview, and then I have a meeting. Tonight I’ll produce with one of my oldest friends until midnight,” says Chris. “It’s a good day. Some days I feel like I work, but mostly, it doesn’t feel like work at all.”


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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


Owner(s) of the

Month

PHOTO

Luke O'Brien

INTERVIEW

Dan Mathers

Jason & Eryn Schafer-Valerius of Electric Avenue believe tangible music will never go out of style Why a record store? Shouldn’t you open an iPod store or something? JASON: We used to work at Rainbow Records, then The Chester County Book & Music Company; towards the end of our time there, we heard a lot of talk about digital music waning. We were interested in seeing what the vinyl market could open up for us, because our sales of vinyl at the old store were starting to grow, but the owners thought we were crazy. Would you say most of your customers are coming in for the nostalgia? ERYN: I think for the used buyers, who tend to be older—40s and above—a lot of it is still nostalgia. For the younger buyers, though, they don’t have anything to be nos-

talgic about, and they buy the new recordings on vinyl. How much of a difference does it make to listen to your music in a digital format like an MP3, versus hearing it on vinyl? JASON: All the highs and lows are cut off in an MP3. When you’re listening to digital music, it’s all zeros and ones. ERYN: There are a lot of intricate sounds on albums that, when listening over and over again from my iPod in the car, I don’t notice Then I get home and I hear so much more. I find myself like, “Hey, I didn’t hear those drums there—I didn’t hear that before.” Then how’d we lose vinyl? JASON: I don’t think either of us ever wanted to stop buying records—record companies just decided they weren’t going to make them on a large scale anymore. ERYN: At the record store, we carried a lot of music through import connections because they weren’t made here in the US. We were willing to pay $30 or $40 for an album to have it on vinyl. So, you think people are willing to invest in quality music. ERYN: People are investing in quality stereo equipment, quality speakers. I guess ear buds and iHomes aren’t cutting it anymore. JASON: It’s part of vinyl being a shared ex-

perience, a social thing. You can have a date night with a bottle of wine and a new record. You sit down and experience the whole album straight through because you can’t just jump track to track. Would you consider the ’90s and 2000s to be the dark ages of music? JASON: Not the dark ages—just a totally pop age. ERYN: If you look at what most people were consuming, it looked bleak, but when you dig deeper there were some really great albums that came out of that period. JASON: They just didn’t get played … ERYN: …because they were drowned out by Britney Spears. JASON: We sell very little pop music because we have more of the customers who are inclined to shop for something that will make a lasting impression. So, what’s the next big trend in music? ERYN: I feel like we’re in the next trend, going back to the vinyl. JASON: There are people who are into streaming or digital radio, and that will always be on offer for mass consumption. Maybe vinyl won’t take over the world again, but there will also be people who place their faith in something more tangible, people who want to buy something where, one day when they’re gone, their kids can hold on to it.

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


Children in

Tow

Jennifer Ozgur is a mother, wife and teacher who still finds time to get out and about with her family

My childhood was not exactly rainbows and unicorns, but music was the glitter that added a muchneeded sparkle. I grew up in the countryside and was raised in a strict environment—the kids at school picked up on my awkwardness pretty easily. I never had a soft place to fall. Until music. When I was in sixth grade I had a teacher who noticed my voice. She didn’t see my bad haircut or bargain-rack clothes—she only heard what came out of my mouth. Despite my non-existent social status, I got the solo at the chorus concert, and it was good! I also played the clarinet. When I got to junior high, the band director suggested I try the bass clarinet. That experience proved to be a gateway to the bassoon. I continued to develop vocally and instrumentally throughout high school. Although music never became my profession, it has always been an important element in my adult life. Earlier this year, my daughter, who’s in third grade, asked to join the strings program at school, and while music was transformative for me, I wanted to be sure she was prepared to put in the effort required to succeed. When I challenged her to persuade me, she hit me with, “I want the opportunity to try new things,” a perfectly logical, well-reasoned response that caught me off guard with no chance for rebuke. “Wow,” I thought, “She’s good.” Over the past few months, my daughter has blossomed into a rhythmic, tone-matching virtuoso. She’s been practicing for her upcoming concert, music filling our house… and it’s good. That’s not to say we have been without a few hiccups. Every instrument comes with its unique pitfalls. For the viola, it’s the cold; the wood contracts, sometimes making the strings too loose to play. In my infinite wisdom, I attempted to adjust the tuning pegs. Apparently my knowledge of reed instruments did not transfer to my daughter’s instrument. Her teacher remedied the problem, but as soon as the frigid air blasted the viola’s case, the issue returned. Defeated, my daughter and I went in town to Taylor’s Music—our orchestral landlord, if you will. At Taylor’s we were greeted by a kind and knowledgeable gentleman who not only fixed her viola once again, but taught me how to do it. He also oiled the instrument and tweaked the case, all the while smiling and talking shop with us. By the end, he sold us a tuner/metronome to enhance her practicing. After we left, I explained to my daughter the importance of making that purchase. How it helps to support local businesses; how it establishes a relationship with them that can develop over the years as her musicality grows. You can’t find that anywhere else. Walking down Gay Street, I was filled with happiness that my daughter and I shared that musical moment together. Turns out, my hometown music store is alive and thriving. Hopefully one day my daughter can share that same experience with her children. There’s something special about local music stores like Taylor’s. And it’s good. jozgur@thewcpress.com

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


Local

Playlist

DJ Romeo curates a playlist that of the best songs by the best musicians in West Chester

Artists utilize their medium to tell a story about who they are—to reveal the inner workings of their lives. And, there is little that shapes our lives more than the place that we call home. Try to imagine Nirvana without Seattle. Try to imagine “Buffalo Soldier” without Jamaica. The place we rest our heads shapes who we are, and it shapes the things we create in our lives. That’s why I find the following list of music to be so incredibly intriguing: all of these musicians are tied to West Chester in some way or another. Before I even hear the music, I know there will be something relatable in its sound, in its lyrics. Many of these musicians are featured in the pages of this magazine, but there are many more worthy of recognition. And this music isn’t just something we can all relate to—it’s something we can be proud of. djromeo@thewcpress.com

HAHA–YO – “What Would Diddy Do?” Like Crazy – “Country Jam” WaveRadio – “I Wanted” Rob Snyder – “Sunday Mornin’ Sunrise” Joel Roberts – “Catching Rain” Spotted Atrocious – “Drop Drop” Backwoods Payback – “You Know How This Works” John Grecia Band – “Everything I Know” SwaggboyReek – “Uptown” (Remix) Mojo Stu – “Bye Bye Baby” Camplo – “Luchini (This is it)” – Love City DJs Mix Northend – “Test of Thyme” Organik Theory – “Psychotic Girl” ft. Voss Mason Porter – “Home for the Harvest” Rivers Monroe – “Moments” The Sermon! – “Ryman Flower” Nomad Clientele – “Give In” Dr. Dog – “The Truth” Nico’s Gun – “Power Back” Crazy in Stereo – “Fat Bottom Girls”

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Nicole Zell is a singer/songwriter and radio personality who’s as spirited as her pursuits How would you describe your sound? When I’m not playing covers at restaurants and wineries I make indie-folk music. I’m pretty far along in this new solo project. My guitar player from the band is helping me produce it, and since my studio is in my home, I have been recording non-stop. What is your live show like? I love playing festivals. I’ve played Turks Head, the Chester County Restaurant Festival and the May Day Festival. My solo pursuit is definitely my passion. Do you have any upcoming shows? I will be at the Steel City Coffee House in Phoenixville on March 22 for the Live Live Concert, which will be raising awareness for suicide prevention. I’ve done live concert broadcasts

at WCHE 1520AM, where I host a weekly radio show called Soundstage, and we have another one coming up on April 4 at Kennett Flash in Kennett Square. Some of our guests will perform at the show, and it will stream live on wche1520.com You host a radio show? What’s that experience like? The show airs live every Thursday from 4-5pm. In that hour, we interview different musical guests and have them perform some of their tracks live in the studio. We draw both local and regional artists, and we broadcast worldwide to anywhere between 30,000 and 40,000 people! How long has the show been around? The show’s been around for five years—we had a celebration on January 2. The original host of Soundstage, Charlie Silvestri, came on the show, and I got to interview him. That was cool because he’s been a radio personality in the area for quite a while, and he took me under his wing when I started. What kind of guests have you brought on the show? We have everything from local musicians, to regional, more prominent ones: from local, 12-year-old girls, to people like Dave Days, who is a huge YouTube celebrity, and even a guitarist for Prince, Andy Allo. We’re also in the works to bring in some really, really big names … but I can’t talk about that yet.

Out of all of the musicians who’ve come on your show, who would you say was the most interesting? I think that would be Andy Allo—her story was just insane. She grew up in Africa, and she met Prince through mutual friends. She only played acoustic guitar when they met, but Prince said, “I want you to learn all these songs on electric guitar and come on tour with me in two weeks.” And she did it. And of the local musicians, who was the best interview you had on the show? I’d probably say Rivers Monroe. They hosted the show before me, and they’re pretty well known. They used to bring me on the show and interview me when they hosted Soundstage, so for me to be interviewing them was cool. In terms of most interesting bands, not necessarily interviews, I have to mention Kings Foil, who are from York, PA. Their drummer is Frankie Muniz, star of the sitcom “Malcolm in the Middle.” What made you decide to become a radio personality? It was just kind of a fluke. I’d always been an interviewee, and then this past July, the previous host, Kevin McQuiston, was leaving for California. They asked me if I wanted to take over. Just being in the music community in this area has led to so many amazing opportunities for me in the last few years. It’s really been great.

MARCH 2014 THEWCPRESS.COM

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The WC Press Music Issue - March 2014  

Voice of the Borough

The WC Press Music Issue - March 2014  

Voice of the Borough