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The

Press

“The entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity.” –Peter Drucker

PUBLISHER Dan Mathers dan@thewcpress.com ADVERTISING MANAGER Nick Vecchio nick@thewcpress.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Julie Ryan jryan@mathersproductions.com Daniela Pinto behance.net/danielapintophoto COPY EDITOR Jon Roth jroth@thewcpress.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Jesse Piersol jpiersol@thewcpress.com Kate Chadwick kchadwick@thewcpress.com STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Andrew Hutchins hutch@mathersproductions.com

Worth

COLUMNISTS Becca Boyd bboyd@thewcpress.com Diane LeBold dlebold@thewcpress.com Brad Liermann bliermann@thewcpress.com Dr Geoff Winkley drwinkley@thewcpress.com DJ Romeo romeo@thewcpress.com Published By... Mathers Productions 13 South Church Street West Chester, PA 19382 mathersproductions.com 610-344-3463 The WC Press is a monthly magazine distributed free of charge to more than 250 businesses. For a free digital subscription, visit thewcpress.com. For more information about specific distribution locations, visit thewcpress.com/distribution.

Noting

Our no-nonsense table of contents

For an issue celebrating business in West Chester, it made sense to collaborate with the Greater West Chester Chamber of Commerce. Look for this symbol throughout the magazine—it designates our advertisers as proud members of the Chamber.

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LOCAL TALENT The story of how Dave Yori came to open Yori’s Bakery GETTING YOUR STARTUP STARTED Local resources to help new businesses PRO TIPS Words of wisdom from West Chester’s top entrepreneurs THE MAKEOVER La Difference Salon & Spa restyles a lucky lady FRESH FACES Meet the owners of West Chester Coffee and Ice Cream Bar CHANGING SPACES Walnut Street Labs’ vision to redefine how people work BARTENDER OF THE MONTH Chatting with Kristen Langford of Side Bar and Restaurant THE LOOK Aimee Beaver of Moonflower models cozy winter knits OWNERS OF THE MONTH Marisa Giunta and Sean Powell of Pietro’s Prime

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From the

Editor

“The thing most people don’t pick up when they become an entrepreneur is that it never ends. It’s 24/7.” –Robert Klyosaki

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If I dedicated this space to doling out advice, it would be a short column: don’t start a print media company. The pitfalls are too numerous, the cost is too high, and finding a market that’s interested in reading 64 pages of anything, let alone your magazine, is more about luck than skill. Since the success of this publication is as orchestrated as a role of the dice, I’ll skip the platitudes. Instead, here’s three things I learned while starting the company. You’ll need to cut expenses. I lived more like a grasshopper than an ant from the moment I graduated. I rented a house that was beyond my budget, bought drinks for all my jobless friends and ate out every night. When I decided to start this company at age 24, the balance of my savings account was three digits. Because it took more than a year to turn a profit, I lived exceptionally frugally. I sublet a room in my apartment, ate a whole bunch of potatoes and had a drawer full of holey socks. Business will test your friendships. In his first year working for me, Adam Jones grew immensely as a photographer. He also became one of my closest friends. The problem with his growth was that he, rightfully, wanted to make more money, but I couldn’t offer it without jeopardizing my ability to pay rent; my unemployment had run out and the company was barely scraping by. After helping build The WC Press’ reputation, Adam left the company. It was years before we spoke again, and I’d still wonder if his friendly “hellos” masked lurking resentment. Get familiar with panic attacks. Nothing prepared me for the stress of running a startup—I’d have a nightmare about bouncing a check to our printer, or Verizon shutting off the internet, and I’d wake up sweating. My heart would race, I’d struggle for breath, and I’d lay awake for hours, silently chanting affirmations that I was doing everything within my power to ensure the company would be around for another day, another week, another month. Every entrepreneur opens their business with hopes and aspirations, visions of wealth and success. The entrepreneurial spirit is eternally optimistic, and that spirit often comes with a willingness to overlook inevitable difficulties. The truth is that I was frequently miserable in the early months and the rewarding moments were few and far between. But it’s not all bad. Knowing that I was the only limit to my success motivated me like nothing ever has. I lived for those rare moments when someone would say, “You run The WC Press? I love your magazine!” That’s because I love running this magazine. I love the challenge, I love the freedom, I love making the joke, “Yeah, I can take off tomorrow; my boss is pretty cool.” I only highlight my struggles because entrepreneurs have to be prepared to face the most stressful months (and years) of their lives. But if you can maintain your resolve, the rewards can be limitless. For anyone with an idea and a willingness to face the best and worst in themselves, I say give entrepreneurship a shot. Whatever you’ve been quietly planning, go for it. Well, anything other than a print media company—I don’t like competition.

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Local Talent PHOTO Andrew Hutchins INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Dave Yori opened Yori's Church Street Bakery when he was only 25, but he already had a decade of experience under his belt Did you go to school for this? I went to West Chester University for business management. So that taught the business end. Going to school helps you get an understanding for things like accounting and human resources and managing people, and it helped, but what really helped was working in a bakery. When did you get your first bakery job? I was 15, and I was looking for a summer job, and this bakery wanted a pair of hands—someone to clean, take out the trash, sweep, mop, that kind of stuff. Kind of a lowly beginning. I didn’t plan on this career. It just happened that they needed somebody, and I was willing to

go talk to them. Plus, I could ride my bike there from my parents’ house. How'd you get into the baking? At first I helped the baker with stuff that didn’t need much skill—putting cookies on pans, greasing pans, busywork that needed to get done. I was slowly taking on new tasks—started putting donuts on screens, then frying them, then I was making cookies. It didn’t require baking skill, but I learned a lot just from watching him. Eventually it reached the point where he’d leave me a list of stuff: make these cookies, or this buttercream. Still, at the end of the day I was washing pots and pans. What was the next step in your evolution? When I got to college I still worked a couple days a week, but I wasn’t a potwasher anymore. I started getting jobs like making danishes or the cookies, or he’d leave me a recipe for sweet dough and say, "Make this for tomorrow." What'd you do when you graduated? After I graduated college in 2009 I went back home and I went to work for him part-time. I was also working at a bagel place three days a week because I wanted varied experience. After a year I left the bagel shop and went full-time at the bakery.

I also found another bakery in Broomall where I got a part-time job after I told the owner I was looking to learn more. How many hours a week were you working? I was probably working 60 to 70 hours a week. I was living with my parents, working a lot, making decent money, and I was able to put a lot away. In fall of 2011 I started looking around for potential properties and in January of 2012 I was able to sign the lease with Zukin. That's when my girlfriend, Alyssa Cannon, who's now my fiancée, and I started really getting things together here. How’d you decided on this type of bakery? I was familiar with it—a GermanAmerican type of bakery with the danishes, and sticky buns, and cakes, and cookies, and butter cakes. I’d been doing that, and I liked it. Four years later, you happy with the way things have worked out? West Chester is a great town. The people here like to support small, local businesses, and they go out of their way to do so. I couldn’t have asked for a better location. I love my job; I enjoy putting out a great product, and every year has been better than the last, so at least I’m going in the right direction.

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By Jesse Piersol

R

eady to turn your Big Idea into a Big Success? West Chester’s got a wealth of resources to support you on your quest. From workshops and counseling to business idea competitions, there’s no reason to go it alone.

SCORE CHESTER AND DELAWARE COUNTY 601 Westtown Road, NO. 281 «» chestercounty.score.org Founded 50 years ago, SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives) connects new (and established) business owners with training and mentorship. “We work with clients for the life of their business,” says Kerry Francis, who manages the scheduling and day-to-day operations of the SCORE chapter. She’sgenerally the first person you’ll encounter when calling or visiting the offices on Westtown Road. “Clients will call up for the first time to see if their new business idea is even viable. Ten years later, and they’re still coming in quarterly to keep their business up to date.” Today, the Chester & Delaware chapter boasts a roster of 104 volunteers. One third of those volunteers are retired executives, with another third semi-retired or working independently, and the remaining third fully employed. And, you’re in good hands: In

2015, the Chester & Delaware chapter was voted Chapter of the Year out of more than 300 chapters nationally. Free counseling services pair clients with a team of SCORE volunteers. Appointments are available six mornings of the week, and also Monday evenings. “We have clients who come in weekly when they’re just getting started,” says Kerry. Workshops are another valuable SCORE learning opportunity, with more than 140 scheduled throughout the year. Themes include social media marketing, QuickBooks, and cyber security. “We offer our ‘How to Start and Operate a Small Business Workshop’ ten times a year,” she relates. The free two-hour workshop takes place at the Chester County Library and is run by a business attorney and a Certified Pubic Accountant. “The workshop is so popular that it’s often closed out. It’s great for those just starting out as well as business owners who want a refresher course. It also targets clients who might not be ready for face-to-face counseling by giving them ideas to think about and a mindset.” The next session is February 17 from 6 to 8pm.

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She recommends two other upcoming workshops. “Is Entrepreneurship for You?” on February 22 from 10am to noon introduces potential entrepreneurs to various aspects of starting a business. Topics range from purchasing an existing business or franchise, starting from scratch, to evaluating whether you have the right personality to be successful on your own. The four-session “Business Planning” series is all about business plan development. On Thursday evenings starting February 25, you’ll be guided through a step-by-step process to create a business plan or update your current plan. Each week addresses a different area: Planning for Business Success, Marketing your Products, Services and Company, and Financial Management of your Business/Financing. “Participants learn the importance of sticking to their business plan, but also the importance of making it a live document,” Kerry explains. SCORE even offers email counseling. “It’s certainly for people who live in the area,” she says, “but we’ll get people from all over, like Missouri, too.”

GREATER WEST CHESTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 119 N. High St «» greaterwestchester.com One of the things you’ll need to build as a new business owner is a robust network, and the local Chamber of Commerce can provide a solid foundation. You’ll find support in the form of networking events, advocacy, education, and volunteer opportunities. “The Greater West Chester Chamber of Commerce is fortunate to include so many unique and engaging members that demonstrate true entrepreneurial spirit

and support of our community,” Chamber President Mark Yoder says. “The Chamber strives to provide all of our businesses with the resources and support they need to grow and prosper.” Membership includes a listing for your business in the Chamber’s ThinkShopBuy…LOCAL app, which helps consumers shop locally by connecting them with Chamber-related businesses.

DR. EDWIN COTTRELL ENTREPRENEURIAL LEADERSHIP CENTER AT WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY WCU Graduate Center 1160 McDermott Dr., Room 319 wcupa.edu/_academics/sch_sba/CottrellCenter/ Even though it is a part of West Chester University, the Cottrell Entrepreneurial Leadership Center caters to more than just formal students of business. “The Cottrell Center is here to help all students, not just business students, find their inner entrepreneur through interactions with experienced entrepreneurs, regional business leaders,

and distinguished alumni,” says Cottrell Center Director Matthew Shea, also an Assistant Professor in the Management Department at WCU. The Center hosted a Global Entrepreneurship Week in November open to the university community and beyond. Presentations included Jim Bricker and Brendan Steer talking about their startup Waste Oil Recyclers, as well as workshops on business plan development and understanding the link between social and mobile marketing. CELC’s keystone event, however, is the yearly Business Idea Pitch Competition. Participants can compete either solo or in teams of up to six members, with the winners announced on April 20 this year. There are separate divisions for WCU undergraduate, graduate students, alumni, faculty, and staff, as well as clients of SCORE Chester and Delaware counties, members of the Greater West Chester Chamber of Commerce, and even local high school students. If you submit an idea by March 2, you’ll be throwing your hat in the ring for the grand prize of $3,000 and the opportunity to pitch your idea at the Keiretsu Forum Angel Capital Expo in October. First place in each category is $1,000, with $500 going to the best idea from a student in the West Chester Area School District.

SO GET GOING In addition to all of the resources mentioned, don’t forget one of the basics: your public library. “The Chester County Library System has business librarians on staff to help you,” shares SCORE’s Kerry Francis. With mentors, training, and a strong network to support you, it’s time to roll up your sleeves and get started.

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Tell Me something

Good

Kate Chadwick takes a moment to spotlight local citizens for doing something swell.

Who she is: Tricia Cosgrove What she does: Tricia is a stylist at La Difference Salon and Day Spa. She and her husband, John, live in West Goshen, are both WC area natives, and have raised their five children here. Why she’s on this page: Dan Cosgrove, who is both Tricia’s brother-inlaw and boss, nominated her because he believes, correctly, that the initiative she helped start, the Parent Advisory Council for Drug and Alcohol and Emotional and Mental Health, is important due to “rampant” addiction problems in the WC community, particularly among young people. Says Tricia, “I realized, in the fall of 2014, that more parents would get help for their kids with drug and/or alcohol problems if they knew where to get the help,” she said. So, she contacted the superintendent of the West Chester Area School District. “I wanted to get a list of all the services available into the hands of all the parents,” Tricia told us. “And I wanted to start a hotline for parents to call anonymously, to be able to speak with other parents who had been in similar circumstances.” With the help of the Pupil Services Department, “specifically Carol Rothera, who works in the department,” the Parent Advisory Council for Drug and Alcohol and Emotional and Mental Health initiative was launched at WCASD. “The ‘mental health’ aspect was added because there are so many cross-diagnoses,” Tricia said. “And we were successful in getting the directory out to the homes of 15,000 kids and in starting the hotline.” What we like about her: Tricia’s not only concerned with the immediacy of addressing a compelling community issue, but the repercussions of that issue. “We are now working on bringing awareness - through parent support and speakers - to dispel the shame that parents feel when their kids are afflicted with this disease.” What she likes about West Chester: “I love that we have a nice town but lots of beautiful countryside, too,” she told us. “I like hiking the local trails along the Brandywine, or the Stroud or Cheslen Preserve with my family and our dog.” As for places to dine, Roots is Tricia’s favorite. And, being the good employee that she is, she added this: “My favorite place of business in WC is the salon where I work, because I get to spend all day with some of my favorite people in a fabulous environment.” Moral of the story: Step up. If you see a glimmer of space where you can make a difference, make the call and get the ball rolling. If you need help for your child, contact Pupil Services at wcasd. net, or call the hotline at 610-350-9301. kchadwick@thewcpress.com

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Pro Tips Words of wisdom from West Chester’s top entrepreneurs by Kate Chadwick

The best part of being a freelance writer is that “free” element: the freedom to make your own

hours, to choose—or reject—your own assignments, and to decide when (and more importantly, where—your couch, for instance) you’ll work. Ultimately, though, you’re not really your own boss. Someone else is giving you a word count, a deadline, a topic, and a dollar figure for your time and talent. So while that excludes me from the “entrepreneur” category, my admiration for them remains unswerving. There’s something so fearless about the idea of striking out into often unknown territory and planting your “I’m-the-boss” flag, for following your bliss despite both real and imagined risks. So, at the request of one of the entrepreneurs I admire most, I reached out to some of those trailblazers in the WC community for their thoughts on just how it’s done.

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Larry Albert

Dave Aloisio

Mainline Custom Clothiers

Dave's Automotive Repair Enterprises

mainlinecustomclothiers.com

dareauto.com Larry Albert has been in the business of outfitting the area’s sharp-dressed men for the past 41 years (thank you, Larry). Making a successful business of high end men’s clothing can be a challenge that requires adaptability. “As a retailer, you have to adjust to the climate of the economy,” he said. “The best time to go into business or to expand is during bad times. And the two things that cause businesses to go under are not having enough control, and taking too much cash out of the business. I can only say ‘do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life.’ Find that business or career and get an education working for a company."

Dave discovered that magic link between work and play a long time ago, connecting the dots between doing what you love and loving what you do. His motivation was a pretty simple one. “I wanted to race cars,” Dave told us. “And I needed more income, so in October of 1976 I opened my business.” That business, Dave’s Automotive Repair Enterprises on Gay Street in West Chester, is still a successful one today, thanks to help from his family, coupled with his own enthusiasm and well…drive. “My passion became my business,” he says.

Pro Tip: "Formal education is one thing, but street education is another. Don't look for the paycheck, look for the internship.”

Pro Tip: “What I’d tell anyone who’s starting their own business is to find something you love to do, stay focused, and seek and accept advice from others. And advertise."

Maryellen Bowers

Kit Anstey

Cakes & Candies by Maryellen

Kit Anstey Real Estate Team

cakesandcandiesbymaryellen.com

ansteyteam.com

Maryellen always knew she wanted to work for herself, she just didn’t always know in what capacity. Given that Cakes and Candies by Maryellen will celebrate five years in business this March, it would appear she figured it out. “I’ve always had that drive, for as long as I can remember,” she said. “What you also need, though, is dedication, perseverance, and heart and soul.” And she may have also suggested that being an entrepreneur in the food industry might take a little bit of crazy.

Kit likes to say he owned numerous high-end retail stores in West Chester and Wilmington “in my first life.” When the large shopping malls came along and took over in the mid-'80s, though, “It was time for me to find a new profession, and that profession was real estate.” Kit and his team have a pretty simple formula for beings so successful with buyers and sellers, he says: “By putting your client first and giving world class service, the business – and the results--will follow.”

Pro Tip: “Dig down deep inside and see what you would really like to do. Devote yourself to excellence and passion for that business, and success will follow it.”

Justin Dougherty

Side Bar & Restaurant

Pro Tip: “Surround yourself with good people, but always remember it comes down to you. At the end of the day, it’s your name and your face that’s out there.”

sidebarandrestaurant.com

Almost without exception, every boss has been an employee at one time or another, something that Justin Dougherty of Side Bar knows all too well. And he doesn’t want his employees to just be good at their jobs. “One thing I’ve always tried to do as an owner is to make sure my employees are better than me at their jobs,” he told us. “It’s because I have been there, and I have dealt with the situations they are dealing with—both inside and outside of work—and I always felt I did my job to the absolute best of my ability.”

Pro Tip: High expectations. “Expecting my employees to do something better than I could do it: that is the recipe for a successful restaurant and bar!" FEBRUARY 2016 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Mike Guerriero

Frank Herron

Disc Hounds

Saloon 151

dischounds.com

saloon151.com

Disc Hounds was started in 1998, when the band Mike was in recorded a demo and was sending out cassettes to get gigs. “We decided to try out the relatively new process of Recordable CDs (CD-Rs),” Mike said. “It was an expensive and difficult process then.” Thinking that other bands could use a service tailored to creating professional CDs in short runs, Mike researched the technology, purchased an all-in-one CD authoring and duplication station, and started marketing to local/regional recording studios and musicians, constantly adding new services over the years to keep pace with changing technology and customer needs.

Frank bought his first business at the age of 23, and one lesson he has learned after owning several bars and restaurants in West Chester for over 25 years is to expect the unexpected. “You will always run into unexpected costs,” he said. “Most small businesses fail because of underfunded startups. You need to have capital in reserve to start up. Cash flow is king.” Frank has worked both on his own and in partnerships. “I love being able to help others find their passion in life.”

Pro Tip: Just do it. “I have never met a person on their deathbed who regretted chasing their dreams.”

Pro Tip: “Being successful for us has meant really listening to our customers, and creating solutions to help them achieve their goals.”

Dave Magrogan Dave Magrogan Group davemagrogangroup.com

John Lawless Sterling Optical sterlingoptical.com John was just 23 years old when he stumbled into the optical business by responding to a classified ad. “One thing led to another and I moved from an optician to manager to district manager in the space of two years,” John said. From there, John expanded into selling franchises for the parent company, eventually, well—selling to himself. “After another year, I decided to buy my own office with one of my office managers as a business partner,” John said. “From there we continued to expand, and have had many offices over the last 30 years in Pennsylvania and Delaware.”

Pro Tip: Get moving. “If you want to be in business for yourself, don't put it off. Start today.”

Alison Maguire

Moore Maguire Group

This is clearly a man who goes all in, as evidenced by the fact that the Dave Magrogan Group currently owns five successful restaurants in the region. “For me, the most fulfilling way to live is where you follow your passions, dreams and goals,” he said. “If you have a vision, follow it. Charge towards your goals like a 3,000 pound rhinoceros, when you get knocked down get back up and charge again.” Dave feels it’s also important to accept failure as part of the process and learn from each setback. “Ignore the critics and false friends, focus on the good people, the opportunities and possibilities because they are always there. Life rewards those with a positive attitude that find the opportunities in the failures.”

Pro Tip: Dave’s favorite quote about being an entrepreneur is not his own—it’s by Robert Jarvis. “Leaders are visionaries with a poorly-developed sense of fear and no concept of the odds against them.”

mooremaguiregroup.com

Alison and partner Brad Moore have assembled an award-winning real estate team. “We’d established ourselves as successful individual agents at our previous brokerage, but felt that we’d hit a ceiling in terms of what we could do on our own,” she said. “Our ambitions seemed much bigger than what we could achieve on an individual basis—we could accomplish more and fulfill our goals of making a greater impact on our community if we formed a team. We joined Keller Williams as the Moore Maguire Real Estate Group, and will be celebrating our second business anniversary this February.”

Pro Tips: “Be a risk taker. Everyone has ideas, but successful entrepreneurs take the risk and

put their ideas into action. Become a great leader. Ultimately, as an entrepreneur, you‘re limited as to what you, individually, can accomplish on your own. By creating a stellar team, and guiding each person to their own success, you create the key to unlock unlimited potential.”

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Malena Martinez

Kevin Mash

Malena's Vintage Boutique

Computer Doctors

malenasboutique.com

wcpcmd.com

This boutique of quality vintage clothing has grown by leaps and bounds in the 13 years since Malena established it. “I opened my boutique shortly after my 23rd birthday in 2003,” she said. “It has grown from a 600 square-foot boutique to three times that size, along with a global-selling website. I find entrepreneurship is rewarding, time consuming, and your work is constantly evolving. Be ready to learn, change, make mistakes, and work hard. But ultimately, doing what you love is intensely gratifying."

West Chester Computer Doctors is the evolution of the small computer and network services company that Kevin began with is dad while still a Henderson High School student. “I worked my way through Penn State providing IT support, training, sales, and consulting for numerous departments on campus," he says. "During the summer I worked on the small networks for a few local lawyers. After graduation and a ten-month stint with a data mining company in Philly, I started working for my father’s consulting company. In 2005 I hired a longtime friend and fellow Henderson alum Greg Palloni and we started supporting more local companies. Finally in 2006 we opened West Chester Computer Doctors.”

Pro Tip: “In order to get others to believe in you, you must first believe in yourself.”

Maria McCool

Pro Tip: “Always put the best interest of [your] customers first, and help guide them, novice or advanced, towards the best resolution of any issue they may have.”

Calista Tools calistatools.com Maria McCool is clearly a woman who believes in the power of positive thinking. "If you can visualize it, and if you believe it’s possible, it always happens,” Maria said. “I love making others feel great about themselves, and I always knew I’d own a salon. At Calista Grand, we’re known for solving beauty challenges, so creating the Calista Tools product line was an organic extension of our existing business.” Calista Tools was created to sell the salon’s shampoos and conditioners, along with brushes, hot rollers, and other beauty implements. But why stop there? Maria didn’t, availing herself of the power of television. “QVC being right in our backyard gave us the opportunity to grow nationally.”

Pro Tip: "If you really love what you do, put your whole heart into it, and then allow your success to unfold.”

Cyndi Meadows

Manny Matsos Fellini Café fellinicafenewtownsquare.com Manny says he’s been “surrounded by food” since a very young age, having worked in pizza stores, hot dog carts, and as a busboy. “Also, I hated school,” he said. Now, the owner of Fellini Café says his success is due largely to the homemade, generous but reasonably-priced topquality food he serves at his bustling Italian eatery. Quality seems to be the operative word here. “Everything is made to order— nothing comes frozen or canned. I buy all my seafood locally from Bywood Seafood, and my produce from Gentiles.”

Pro Tip: “I heard this phrase years ago and it stuck with me: ‘The harder you work, the luckier you get,’ and that's what I keep in the back of my mind to motivate me.”

Paper Moon papermoonwc.com The concept for Paper Moon was inspired when Cyndi Meadows added custom invitation design and printing to Penwick Design, her gift shop in downtown West Chester. Her design background and love of working with people ultimately made the stationery the most successful part of her shop. Paper Moon's site at the event venue of the Chester County Historical Society added the convenience of "one-stop-shopping" to event planning – a win-win for Cyndi’s customers.

Pro Tip: “People can sense when you love what you do, which creates a very positive experience, which in turn leads to a successful business." FEBRUARY 2016 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Frank Mingrino

Kimberly O'Donnell

Limoncello

JACO Juice & Taco

limoncellowc.com

jacojuiceandtaco.com

When it comes to his success, Frank Mingrino blames his mom. “My entrepreneurial mindset, calculated risk-taking, and love of the restaurant business all trace directly back to my mother. She had a powerful influence on my life,” Frank said. While his dad worked full time as a contractor, his mom stayed home to raise Frank and his brother and sister. “During this time, she took a risk and began a small catering business from our home. From there, she opened our first full-service restaurant and small pizza café. I was by her side all the way, and through her mentorship, my passion for the restaurant business grew.” They opened Limoncello in 2006, and more recently a second location in Chester Springs. “We’ve never looked back.”

Kimberly O’Donnell (with husband Patrick and partners Kristen and Albert Delvescovo) felt that West Chester was lacking a place to get from-scratch, to-order fast food, so they remedied that in 2013 with JACO. And it paid off; they’ve since opened a second location in the Georgetown section of Washington, DC. “We wanted to offer quick bites with healthy options for breakfast and lunch, as well as fresh juices and smoothies for your daily dose of vitamins. Customers love food on the go they can enjoy and feel good about.”

Pro Tip: "Don't give up when the going gets tough. You'd be surprised at what you’re capable of.”

Pro Tip: “Have a goal, develop a plan, and then put all your energy into making it happen. And oh, by the way—have FUN along the way.”

Biff Piner Balance Hair Spa balancehairspa.com Biff and his husband and business partner Thomas had extensive experience in the beauty industry before striking out on their own: Thomas had opened and sold multiple salons in the Atlanta area before a stint with Alterna and Biff joined Estee Lauder. They planted their entrepreneurial roots in the area when they opened their first salon in Exton in 2007. “The success of our Exton location led us to open a studio location in West Chester,” Biff said. “We found the space while helping our friend Dan Cellucci of Roots Cafe prepare for his opening of their location on East Gay Street.”

Pro Tip: “Be willing to put in a lot of hard work even when your business isn't open. And you can't do everything, so hire trustworthy people that you can rely on to help with everyday tasks.”

Chet Reber The Painted Plate paintedplatepottery.com The Painted Plate is one of those niche businesses that give West Chester its quirky feel, offering create-yourown masterpiece fun through pottery painting. Chet told us that the reason the Painted Plate came to be was pretty simple: “The Painted Plate started because my wife and I lived in the borough and wanted to open up our own business,” he said. “She came up with the idea of The Painted Plate, and within a few weeks we were up and running.” The Painted Plate now offers everything from Ladies’ Nights to Date Nights to kids’ birthday parties.

Pro Tip: “I’d say that most of our success is due to the fact that we’re in one of the greatest towns around. You can't have a successful business if it's not in the right location.”

Matthew Reed America's Pie somuchmorethanpizza.com

Matthew believes in the power of teamwork for a successful business venture, and it’s worked for America’s Pie, now entering its sixth year. “A few friends and I started this business and worked hard at making our unique menu, service, and name the best it could be,” he said. “Since then, I’ve become the sole owner of our West Chester location.” Matthew runs and manages it with the help and management of his mother, brother and sister, along with many other family members and friends. “We’ve managed to take our store to the next level. We have had a lot of success here at America’s Pie, and we continue to strive to be more creative and inventive every day.”

Pro Tip: “Surround yourself with good, trustworthy people, and be prepared to work very hard. If you do this, the success will come.” FEBRUARY 2016 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Krystal Reinhard

Vincenzo Tettamanti

Old Soul Décor

Gemelli Dessert Café

oldsouldecor.com

gemelligelato.com

West Chester’s newest treasure trove, Old Soul Décor is an affordable blend of vintage and antique furniture, jewelry, home décor, and original artwork, from primitive antiques to midcentury modern. “Old Soul Decor evolved organically out of a love for all things old, combined with a strong background in art, design and business,” Krystal said. “My goal was to create an inspiring, eclectic environment that’s inviting and warm.”

Vincenzo Tettamanti came a long way to become successful in WC, having moved here from Italy in 2009 to follow his now-wife. “I opened Gemelli in 2014 because I was extremely passionate about bringing true, regional Italian desserts and authentic gelato that you cannot find anywhere else to the area,” he said. “I do not compromise on ingredients or quality; in the food industry that is something you cannot ignore or your customers will notice. At Gemelli, we make everything in our kitchen, down to grinding peanuts to make our own peanut butter. Making unique products and telling a compelling story about them makes you stand out.”

Pro Tip: “Set goals and review. If you can't track your success and failure, you can't progress and improve. And marketing, always, and in all ways. Promote yourself and your business as much as you can. Technology's your best friend.”

Geoff Winkley, MD Doctor's Best Immediate Medical Care doctorsbestimmediatecare.com After practicing Emergency Medicine in some of the toughest and busiest ERs in the country, Geoff Winkley realized that something was missing for him on a personal level. “It was the opportunity to not only provide excellent medical care, but to do so in a setting where the patients’ needs were the only focus,” he said. “Doctor’s Best reflects my vision to provide evidence-based medical care in a comfortable, welcoming environment, and in a cost-effective and timely manner. Our goal is to ensure that the patient experience exceeds expectations, and to be the very best resource for their urgent healthcare needs.”

Pro Tip: “It’s not only what you do for your customers, it’s how you make them feel during their experience with your business that sets you apart from the competition.”

David Yori Yori's Church Street Bakery yorisbakery.com

Pro Tip: “Your passion for what you’re doing, rather than just chasing the money, is what will ultimately allow you to succeed and surpass all the challenges you’ll be facing as an entrepreneur.”

Dan Wright Tree Top Builders treetopbuilders.net You probably know a few carpenters, but maybe not many with an imagination like Dan Wright’s. “I saw an opportunity to serve a niche market with few competitors, so I started building treehouses for people in 2003,” Dan said. The company later expanded into serving the DIY market with plans and supplies. And now? Well, now, they’re building Treehouse World, a treehouse-themed amusement park. “It’s a work in progress, but we’re sticking to our theme, and that’s study your customer, deliver value to your customer, and do whatever it takes to leave them feeling 100% great about you after the sale. Long-term success will follow.”

Pro Tip: “Don’t be discouraged by setbacks. Don’t let perfectionism cripple you. This isn’t NASCAR, this is off-road racing, requiring many corrections and changes to the plan along the way. Be rational, be opportunistic, and when you’re unsure, follow your gut instinct.”

Dave took his first job at a bakery because it was close enough to ride his bike from his parents’ house. “They needed someone to wash pots and pans, sweep and take out the trash,” David said. “I liked the job and my boss, so I’d help with the baking. He’d teach me as I went along.” Eventually Dave realized he had a passion for it, working through high school, then college at West Chester University, where he studied business management. “I was familiar with West Chester and noticed there wasn't a bakery. I found a location I liked, signed the lease, bought used equipment, painted the place, put in the proper exhausts, and opened six months later.”

Pro Tip: “Don't be afraid to work your ass off. Nothing that's worth anything is easy.” FEBRUARY 2016 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Ask your

Doctor

Dr. Geoff Winkley is a board-certified emergency medicine physician who operates Doctor's Best Immediate Medical Care

February is American Heart Month. Why do we need still need awareness of heart disease? Nearly 24% of all deaths in the US are caused by heart disease, and it is the leading cause of death in both men and women. Most people think cancer is the leading cause because it is discussed much more in the media, and its diagnose is much more often associated with death. The irony is that most of us have someone in our family living with heart disease or its precursor health conditions, but rarely know about it because its effects happen over a long period of time, and people don’t often talk about it until it’s a crisis such as a heart attack. When we understand how to reduce the risk of heart disease, we should follow that guidance as if it were cancer, and do everything in our power to overcome it. What are the most effective steps to reduce the risk of dying from heart disease? See a primary care physician A primary care physician (PCP) is the quarterback on your healthcare team. The PCP should know about all of your health conditions, health history and any new medical symptoms, so that they can accurately diagnose and treat you. When it comes to your heart, seeing your PCP on an annual basis, or more frequently if recommended, has a demonstrated impact in reducing your risk of developing heart disease. Don't smoke Simply put, cigarette smoking is a primary risk factor in developing heart disease. Control existing conditions If you have already been diagnosed with high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, they are the chronic medical problems that are known to lead to heart disease. Rigorous control of these conditions through regular follow-up as recommended by your PCP is essential to maintaining healthy measures of blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar and thereby reducing the risk of heart disease. Lose weight If you are overweight, you are already at risk for developing heart disease and developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. Losing weight requires lifestyle changes that many struggle to achieve. It sounds simple, but learning to eat less, changing your diet to fruits, vegetables, lean meats, low-fat dairy, avoiding processed and high-sugar foods, and exercising daily, takes time to achieve and sustain. Yet, if you are at risk, you should make the change. Weight loss can independently improve heart function and lower blood pressure and blood sugar levels. If you think you're having a heart attack, what should you do? If you experience chest pain or discomfort; pain or discomfort in the upper body, arms, neck, jaw or upper stomach; breathlessness; nausea; lightheadedness; cold sweats, go to the nearest emergency room or call an ambulance immediately. —drwinkley@thewcpress.com

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The Makeover PHOTO Andrew Hutchins STORY Heather Dickey

La Difference Salon & Spa offers one lucky client some extra-special treatment

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Before: Katie's hair was overly dyed and lacking volume and dimension

atie Jacobs came in with mediumlength, fine-textured hair. She had multiple applications of home-box hair color, so we wanted to lighten her tone a little, because repeated use of storebought color tends to overly darken hair. I added soft, caramel-colored highlights around her face to bring out her beautiful green eyes and warm up her skin tone. I kept her base a rich brown and added warm mocha tones to complement the highlights. I also used two shades—a lighter brown and dark blonde— throughout the mid-lengths and ends of the hair through the sides and back to add dimension and texture to the style. As for the haircut, I started by identifying Katie's face shape: she has an oval face with high cheekbones and well defined eyes. I wanted to draw attention to her eyes, and to do so, cut gradual,

face-framing angles that—when styled with waves directing back away from the cheekbones—accentuate them. The overall shape we decided upon is an inverted (shorter in the back, longer in front) textured bob. Shorter layers through the crown of her head give body and lift to otherwise fine, limp hair. To finish the haircut, I detailed the ends throughout using a razor to create varied lengths. This gives the effect of movement and a piecey feel, for a relaxed, funky look. To begin styling, I used a volumizing spray on damp hair, then tousled the hair with my fingers while gently blow drying and lifting at the scalp for volume. A styling wand was used to give soft waves once the hair was dry. I finished the look with a strong but moveable hairspray and a bit of texturizing paste applied to the ends for definition.

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Home

Becca Boyd has a passion for good food

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Beccanomics

It’s pretty easy to keep resolutions in January—you haven't bored of variations of "salad" yet and are still suffering sticker shock from signing up at the gym. February, friends, is another story. Your budding romance encourages split bottles of wine and take-out pizza while snuggling into your latest netflix binge; alternately, your lack of budding romance can only be assuaged with entire bottles of wine and take-out pizza. Recipes to the rescue! Both of these are made with whole, real ingredients and designed to keep your resolutions on track and your mouth happy. bboyd@thewcpress.com Asian-Style Mushroom, Rice and Chicken Soup 8-10 servings 1 tbsp. vegetable or olive oil; 2 celery stalks, finely diced; 24 oz. white mushrooms, thinly sliced; 1 white onion, finely diced; 1 large carrot, peeled and finely diced; 1 tbsp. minced garlic; 1 tbsp. minced fresh ginger; 1/2 tsp. kosher salt; 1/2 tsp. black pepper; 8 c. chicken broth; 2 c. water; 1 1/2 c. shelled frozen edamame; 1 1/2 c. cooked brown rice; 3 c. cooked and chopped/shredded chicken; juice of 2 limes; 1 tbsp. tamari (or soy sauce); 1 tsp. Sriracha 1. Heat oil in pot or Dutch oven over medium high heat. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, until mushrooms release liquid and liquid evaporates. 2. Reduce heat to medium low and let cook until mushrooms are brown and tender. 3. Add carrot, celery, onion, garlic, ginger, salt and pepper. Stir to combine. Let cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are tender – about 8 minutes. 4. Add chicken broth and water and turn heat to high – bring mixture to a boil, and then reduce. Simmer for about five minutes. 5. Add edamame, rice, chicken, lime juice, tamari and Sriracha. Taste for seasoning. Serve. Mini Peanut Butter Banana Muffins 3 dozen 1/3 c. coconut oil, melted; 1/2 c. honey; 1/2 c. peanut butter; 2 eggs; 3 overripe bananas, mashed; 1/4 c. milk; 1 tsp. vanilla; 1 tsp. baking soda; 1/2 tsp. kosher salt; 1/3 c. old-fashioned oats; 1 3/4 c. white whole wheat flour; 2 tbsp. ground flax seed 1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. 2. Whisk melted coconut oil, honey, peanut butter, eggs, bananas, milk and vanilla until smoothly combined. 3. Whisk baking soda, salt, flour, oats and flax until combined. 4. Add wets to dries and fold to combine – do not over mix. 5. Grease mini muffin pan or, if desired, line with paper liners. Scoop batter into muffin tin, filling 2/3 of the way full. 6. Bake for 12-15 minutes (20-23 for regular sized muffins). Let cool about five minutes in muffin tin and remove to wire rack. Let cool completely and store in airtight container at room temperature.

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Fresh Faces PHOTO Andrew Hutchins

INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Chatting with Brad Liermann and Brad Palmer of West Chester Coffee and Ice Cream Bar So, Brad and Brad. What do I call you guys? P: Liermann and Palmer works. Alright, Liermann. What made you want to start your own business? L: My first job out of college, I’d ride the elevator to the 59th floor and look out over a sea of cubicles. I found it to be as life killing as anything you can imagine. So, I moved to Philly and started my own company. What was the first company you started? L: My first was a property management company that fell flat on it’s face—it didn’t last more than six months. I learned that if you have a safety net job, you’ll use it, so don’t have one, and that going into business with friends is difficult, but you’ve gotta protect your friendship. And Palmer? P: I took out an ad in the Wall Street Journal to sell three specific

types of cowboy hat. I pictured the national audience but forgot they had an international edition. We ended up having to ship hats all around the world, and we quickly discovered we were not prepared. So your first business was also… not a success? P: I remember the feedback from one customer that said, “Mr Palmer, I was eager to open the box of my new hat that you sent me, but when I put it on my head, it sat on top like a beanie.” How’d you meet? P: We shared a common interest, and a friend said, “You should talk to Liermann sometime.” I wanted to open an ice cream bar, Brad wanted a coffee shop, so we put the two together. So your common interest was entrepreneurship. P: I like the startup mentality much better than the status quo; I like creating new things for people to enjoy. L: I like dealing with problems. Once a business is up and operational—and running smoothly—I lose a bit of interest. What went into opening the first location. L: A lot of time. A lot of late nights and a lot of effort (and money) went into building this great community spot. I assume business is doing well, so you decided it was time to start again? P: We always had an unwritten plan to have more

than one location; it was just a matter of where and when. L: West Chester intrigued us. I live here and think you find a beautiful convergence of professionals from government and business in town with this youthful vibrancy that the university provides. What is it about your concept that’s been so successful? L: We want to be a place where families can be families and kids can be kids; an ice cream parlor and a coffee shop can do that very well—nobody is eating ice cream with a frown on their face. The concept for our brand is that we want to bring the best of our region to one place: ReAnimator Coffee and Little Baby’s Ice Cream in Fishtown; Greenstreet Coffee Roasters in South Philly; and Scooped, which was here in town. We’re also the only scoop shop in the country that carries Graeter’s ice cream. P: Graeter’s was my ice cream shop growing up in Ohio. It’s been around for over 100 years—they’ve been making ice cream the same way for generations. It was a gathering place: after the game, for a birthday, for a family night. And that’s the kind of place, the feeling, that we wanted to recapture, and I think we have with West Chester Coffee & Ice Cream Bar.

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W

alnut St. Labs is the most unique place you've never entered.

Perhaps you strolled past 23 North Walnut Street on a Tuesday morning and noticed the throng of people inside. Or, you saw the lights on late on a Wednesday night, illuminating a posse of people hunched over computers or gathered around a 3D printer. If you’ve ever wondered ‘what goes on in there?’ (and how could you not), then read on. For the past two years, Walnut St. Labs has offered everything from events to coworking space and resources for startup businesses. Its most important contribution, however, remains far less tangible.

THE LIFEBLOOD OF WSL It’s a Tuesday at 9am—every single Tuesday since January 2014, actually—and the Walnut St. Labs team assembles for the

weekly “Startup Meetup” (SUMU). Ben Bock, with his long dark hair and punk rock t-shirt, welcomes attendees with his signature brand of charming directness as they filter into the space. Sean Deminski sets up camera equipment for the YouTube live stream, while videographer Mike Luttermoser runs around recording pre-event footage. Graphic designer Jehrin Flanik snaps photo after photo into a collection she edits and posts to myriad social media outlets within hours of the event. The room hums with energy. It’s a diverse crowd that assembles: entrepreneurs with businesses in various states of development, local accountants, lawyers, bankers, technology professionals, and artists, with a typical SUMU

drawing 50 or more people. They’re here to soak in the stories shared by the week’s featured speaker. Every presenter offers a wealth of insight into the entrepreneurial process. Young and old, seasoned leaders of established corporations and first-time entrepreneurs, they all describe their successes—and epic failures—with riveting passion. There’s Melissa Alam, a young entrepreneur who started a womenfocused co-working space in Philly called The Hive. There’s BioBots’ Danny Cabrera, who collaborated with his college roommate on a lower-cost alternative for producing living tissue from a 3D printer. There’s Robert Morris, an inventor who created one of the very first web browsers

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and other groundbreaking technology advances. You’ve never heard of him, though, because he learned too late about the subtleties of patent protection, one of his key lessons.

ORIGINS At some point, Chris Dima steps forward to kick things off. The mastermind behind Walnut St. Labs, he’s an icon in his own right, in oversized dark-rimmed glasses and black t-shirt emblazoned with ANTI HERO. He speaks with an effortlessly expansive vocabulary couched in a subversive drawl, a combo influenced by his roots. “I grew up going to City Gardens, a punk venue in Trenton. It was all ages,” he recalls. “It was insane. Everyone was welcome and accepted. Creativity was valued. Honesty was valued. Grit, too. It was a wreck as you could imagine.” So what—or who—inspired WSL? “People,” he proclaims. “Like, all of them. People do incredible things. A lot of them never think about fame or fortune. They’re just driven.” He cites local entrepreneur Tom Hudzina’s company Rework as a preliminary model for his vision. “My artist friends, too. Back in the day, we’d do ‘salons’ and whoop it up multi-media style. Everyone contributed. I always had my mind blown with how talented and passionate people were.” He’s motivated by his kids. “I figured out that the best thing to give a child is an example of how one can carve out a unique path. It’s the ultimate: both dangerous and thrilling at the same time.” He’s also driven by his mentors. “Michael Guttman, Jeff White, Paul Getman, and Jim Jones—four folks from West Chester, or who have histories in West Chester, who were cowboys. Mostly uber geeks who just held onto a vision way past when normal people would have given up.”

I always had my mind blown with how talented and passionate people were. SO…WHAT IS IT? “Walnut St. Labs is the clubhouse concept,” explains Chris. “People—especially in suburbia—need a place to hang out. A place that inspires others, and allows for unstructured ‘play time’.” The vision has changed along the way. “Well, I don’t know if there was ever one single vision up front,” he admits. “It was mostly this: Let’s do a lot of experiments and learn as fast as we can en route to some unique, more efficient incubator model. We’re pretty close. The last maturation has been to cultivate my inner accountant. Good ideas only become great if they stick around.”

In addition to events, the Lab provided mentorship and investment in startup businesses. “We had 15 to 20 projects that got kicked off between people who met at the Lab,” Chris reflects. “The biggest success is that the space was like a petri dish—stuff grew! Also, one of our startups was almost acquired by a large database company within one year of launch.”

BUILDING THE TEAM Jehrin Flanik was out taking pictures of her newly adopted town of West Chester when fate intervened. “Two guys from WSL walked by and struck up a conversation with me. A few days later, I came to check out the space and met the crew. I had only gone to school for a couple years for graphic design, but they saw enough of something in me to give me a chance,” she contemplates. “It was a great opportunity and I learned so, so much from

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the people there. That year and a half of working in the field with the 23 North Digital team was better than any amount of school. They really built a strong community, and I made some of my best friends through the Lab.” “I first heard about the place by walking past and getting curious,” says intern-turned-developer Wilhem Barnes. “I honestly was just out job hunting and the place itself seemed interesting.” He earned senior developer status when a spot opened up shortly after he started. “The Lab gave me an interesting view for how the culture of businesses can drive the growth of a local economy. The Lab itself was a hub for the local economy and nothing else quite like it existed. It really let me see the heart of West Chester and the heart of a thriving economy.” As the official team grew, so did an informal following of devotees.

I really valued the exposure Walnut St. Labs gave me to businesspeople in the area YOUR NET WORTH IS YOUR NETWORK I personally walked through the door of 23 North Walnut Street for the first time on a Tuesday in June of 2014. And I stuck around. I met my accountant, Kathy Wileczek, through WSL’s Innovation Advisors program, and I in turn had the pleasure of tutoring her in public speaking, one of my own areas of expertise. During my time at the Lab, I created jewelry out of two beautiful pieces of seaglass for the founder and CEO of Dansko Shoes, Mandy Cabot. I learned the fundamentals of social media metrics, became a networking machine, and absorbed some of that fearlessness exuded by the bright, relentless individuals who spent time in the place. My story is not unusual. One of the Lab’s goals was to bridge the gap between the technical and creative worlds. “As an artist, I really valued the exposure Walnut St. Labs gave me to businesspeople in the area,” says Lab frequenter Kelly Murray. “As a creative and a recent transplant to West Chester, WSL served as a way for me to meet new people, build my network, and get my name out there. The energy at WSL was always very welcoming and it's been refreshing to meet like-minded people that value those with a new idea or vision.” In her view, “I think WSL certainly brought people together and offered a place for people to collaborate, exchange ideas, and just network. As for my creative process, being a part of WSL really motivated me to keep moving my projects forward.”

COLLABORATION SPACE Mark Rybarczyk needed some help. The co-founder of Vuier, a video distribution platform, was in the process of a complete redesign of his product in January of 2014. While seeking out someone with the necessary specialized programming skills, he happened upon a posting for “Night Owls,” the Lab’s informal collaborative hangout held from 7 to 10 p.m. on Wednesday nights. There, he met Ruby on Rails developer Brandon Hilkert. “Brandon took a look, saw how he could help, and then took over,” Mark recalls. “A few weeks later we had a nice product we were able to launch.” Brandon Hilkert recalls seeing the sign posted out in front of the Lab around the same time Chris Dima pinged him on LinkedIn. “I stopped by to chat one afternoon,” he says. “I think in December of 2013.” Now an Engineering Team Lead at a com-

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pany called PipelineDeals, he muses that “Walnut St. Labs continues to bring together a community of technology professionals in the surrounding area. As remote work becomes more common, it's the perfect place to selectively surround yourself with other hard-working entrepreneurs and doers.” Fast forward to today, when Mark Rybarczyk is calling me for his interview from an industry trade show in Las Vegas, where Vuier has been nominated for two awards. “We would not be where we are today without the Lab,” he concludes. “Events such as Night Owls gave me the opportunity to meet senior level developers like Brandon.” Software developer Clay Zug also heard about Walnut St. Labs for the first time in January of 2014, and he quickly became a Night Owls regular. “WSL was an amazing grassroots advocate for technology in the Philadelphia area,” he says. “Chris cares deeply about equal opportunity education and he provided the place to go for anyone interested in starting or growing a startup.”

Walnut Street Labs taught me that innovation isn't a space, but a spirit and attitude... THE FUTURE At the end of December, Walnut St. Labs’ location at 23 North Walnut Street shuttered its doors. Outbid on a lease renewal, a new company is now in the process of renovating the space. Chris Dima is no less committed to his vision. “We’re trying to find the right mix between doing what we want—building a culture of innovation—and making money to keep us all caffeinated,” he relates. “There’s a really good product development business in here. We just need to do more of it. But there are only 24 hours in a day. We tried to stay up for all of them, but that only lasts two days before you crash.” For now, the team includes Chris, as well as Mike Luttermoser, two software developers, a writer, and a graphic designer. “I have a large network of senior developers who are consulting on projects, too,” says Chris. As for a new space, he envisions several. “I’d like it to be at least three places. In the middle of West Chester, at new co-working space Biz Tract located in Malvern. And in my basement.” His girls (he has three) love “The Lab.” “They’re getting old enough to start whooping my intellect,” he laughs. “We need access to whiteboards and Arduinos ASAP!” Whatever the future holds, Chris wants people to know about the magic of the WSL community. “WSL was 100 people,” he reflects. “Maybe 10. Perhaps 500. It wasn’t me. For sure, it was a lot of Ben on the Twitter. And Mike behind the lens of the

camera. Dare I get ‘new age?’ It was an energy. People from all walks of life came and got excited. That has to be the norm, with or without WSL. It’s what people want. No more strip malls or sports complexes.” Sean Deminski, the SUMU live streamer, puts it another way. “WSL taught me that innovation isn't a space, but a spirit and attitude that forms where talented and optimistic people gather." The Ramones often blared through the speakers before SUMU as attendees milled around drinking coffee and networking. It was deliberate choice. “Punk rock was pure innovation,” notes Chris. “People decided that playing guitar was more important than actually knowing how to play one. But that passion moved folks from thrashing around to eventually being really good. That’s my orientation.” He mentions the “Blitzkrieg Bop” as capturing the essence. “The juxtaposition of Blitzkrieg, a military word, and Bop, some zany dance, show how creative stuff can pull from opposites, and at times seem incongruous, but get past that and you’ve gotten through the hardest part.” Chris offers these parting words: “Starting is the hardest and only part that matters. And living outside your comfort zone should be a full-time job.”

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Home

Diane LeBold and the West Chester Food Co-Op examine local food production and bring eaters closer to the source of their food.

Grown

Okay, let’s admit it: the strawberries we’re buying this time of year aren’t very good. They look great—big, red, and shiny. But where’s the flavor? Tasteless strawberries are an easy way to make the case for eating seasonal produce. But did you know that eating food that’s in season—or putting local produce by when it’s at its peak—also has health benefits? For example, foods rich in the antioxidant quercetin may reduce susceptibility to the flu. And it so happens that quercetin is found in onions, grapes and apples, crops that become available locally in the fall, just as we’re heading into flu season. Foods that contain the antioxidant allicin also help stave off viruses. These include fall crops garlic and onions. Also, research has shown that, in winter, our brains produce less serotonin—the “feel-good” chemical. This may be why some of us feel depressed during the cold months. So, because carbohydrates trigger serotonin production, we try to cheer up by eating cookies and other high-carb foods. Suggestion: Instead of cookies, try healthy cold-weather carbs like potatoes and sweet potatoes to help your winter mood. Other serotonin-boosting choices include winter squash like butternut and acorn. If you’d like some seasonal menu ideas using local resources, check in with the West Chester Food Co-op. For example, in November, the Co-op held a class in making sauerkraut—a classic way to preserve nutrient-rich fall cabbage. It’s a fermentation process—one of the simplest methods of preserving food. For those who missed the class, here’s the Co-op’s recipe for sauerkraut, courtesy of Co-op Chair Suzanne Adams: Make a brine with two quarts of boiling water and 1 1/2 tablespoons of kosher salt. Remove the tough outer leaves from about six pounds of cabbage and save. Quarter the heads and shred into slices about 1/8” thick. Place the sliced cabbage in a large bowl and add kosher salt—1 1/2 tablespoons for every three pounds of cabbage. Work the salt into the cabbage, kneading to bring up liquid. Set aside for 20 minutes or so to allow more liquid to develop (the salt does this). Pack the cabbage into a non-metallic container and cover with the reserved cabbage leaves. Place a clean weight on top of the leaves to keep the kraut submerged. Top off with brine if kraut is not completely submerged and cover with muslin or a clean towel. Place in a 65- to 70-degree location and allow to ferment for two weeks or more. There’s no hard-and-fast rule for fermentation time—longer fermentation means a more tart kraut. It’s normal for some mold to develop on the top cover of leaves. Remove this as the fermentation is underway or at the end when you’re ready to use your kraut. To stop fermentation, remove the outer leaves and any moldy bits. Put the kraut and liquid into containers with tight fitting lids (or Ziploc bags) and store in the fridge. In a closed container, lack of oxygen causes fermentation to stop. The kraut will keep for months in the fridge as long as it is in brine. –dlebold@TheWCPress.com For more on the West Chester Food Co-op, visit www.wcfood.coop

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Bartender of the

Month

PHOTO Andrew Hutchins

INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Kristen Langford has made a second family working at Side Bar and Restaurant How long have you been in the trade? Well, I’ve been at Side Bar for six years, and before that I had about three years experience, but I had a big break in between. What caused the gap? I worked in a restaurant when I was in high school, but I took some time off from the industry to get a degree and I held a few other jobs. What’s your degree? My degree is in geoscience—I’m a geologist that makes drinks. Did you try anything in the field? Not really. I had worked at Side Bar through finishing my bachelor's. While I was out looking for jobs in the field, nothing I really wanted ever landed in my lap. I’m still

kind of looking, but I love what I’m doing so much that it’s back and forth. What drew you to geoscience? Like a normal college kid, I was sort of lost. I told my advisor, “I like being outside, I like environmental things, what kind of career could I have that’d allow me to enjoy nature as a career as much as I do for fun?” The problem is that, in this area, the job market is a little different than I expected it to be, but I still have a love and interest in nature, soil, environmental conservation… that’s how I earned my nickname And your nickname is...? They just call me hippie. It stuck from day one that I’ve been there. So, a lot of people in town just call me that, whether they’re hanging at my bar or I’m at theirs. Alright, so what brought you to Side Bar? I’d been going to school part-time for a while, and I had a full-time job teaching preschool—I did that for almost nine years—and I was getting tired of it. I wanted a job that allowed me to go to school full-time in the day and work at night. And what's kept you here? I get to talk to people from all walks of life, especially here. People come to West Chester from all over for work and hear we have a great bar, and so they come for lunch.

What is it about Side Bar in particular that you like. My co-workers are unbelievable. I’ve had a multitude of jobs, and I’ve never experienced anything like what we have at Side Bar. Everyone will do anything for anybody; it’s a family environment. We stick together like brothers and sisters, especially those of us who’ve been there since day one. Even when I do move on, they’ll be my friends for life. To what do you attribute the bar’s success? I would have to say that the owners are so dedicated, Justin and Adam, they’re always here, 14, 15, 16 hours a day, both in the beginning and six years later. And let’s not forget the beer. The food and drink selection doesn’t hurt. I believe we’re the number one craft beer bar in West Chester. There are other bars that have an amazing lineup, but I think we have the highest standard. The food speaks for itself. We’ve had the same three sandwiches on the menu since day one that we can’t get rid of because our regulars'd have a fit—they’re a staple in West Chester. And, it’s the staff. There are 14 of us that have been here for six years. I think that leads to us taking a lot of pride in our restaurant—it feels like our restaurant.

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we'll manage your social media for $200 per month find out how: info@mathersproductions.com

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We’ve consistently struggled this month to come up with imagery that encapsulates the intangible essence of entrepreneurship. So, you’re stuck with finding the six differences in this stock image taken from a Google image search of the word “entrepreneur.” Send an email to contests@thewcpress.com listing those changes, and you’ll be entered to win a $20 gift card to a local business.

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Excite all of your senses

at West Chester’s most alternative & unique boutique! A vast array of “one-of-a-kind” products, including...

Hip Clothing • Bags & Accessories • Jewelry Galore • Incense/Oils/Candles • Tapestries/Blankets • Eclectic home/Dorm décor • Hemp products • Grateful Dead, Bob Marley & ‘60s Memorabilia • Tie Dyes & Cool T-shirts • Hand-blown glass & local artwork • Tobacco accessories • Groovy Gifts Gift Certificates Available

130 W. Gay Street 610-431-6607 www.moonflowershop.com A portion of our proceeds go to environmental and pro-peace charities! All major credit cards accepted. Open 7 Days A Week

10% off purchase with student ID! SINCE 1992

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The

Look

Celebrating 25 years in business this year, Moonflower Boutique is continuing to provide unique clothing, handcrafted jewelry and exotic products. Entrepreneur and business owner Aimee Beaver opened the store in 1991 with a specific vision in mind. She discovered her passion for handcrafted jewelry and clothing during a Grateful Dead tour, and after working hard to maintain the business while other boutiques have come and gone, her shop now includes items for a wide variety of customers of all ages.

Moonflowers offers handmade, fair-trade winter wear that’s comfy and cool photo Andrew Hutchins The knit sweater Aimee is wearing is a must-have, perfect to pair with any bare top during the icy days of February. With the cold winter days ahead, Moonflower offers a wide selection of sweaters, handmade, fleece-lined glittens (a combination of gloves and mittens), and other outerwear to keep you warm. The newest addition to the boutique’s inventory is their Soul Flower clothing line, which is meditation and yoga clothing.

story Janae Fecondo

look one moonflower logo tee american apparel $24 sandalwood malabeads $16 shrug sweater by li lotus $45 ombre handmade glittens $24 sterling silver hoop earrings $24 handmade turquoise fringe purse $45 look two grey tank dress tree of life $36 long sleeve popcorn knit tunic sweater li lotus $60 black cotton spandex leggings jayli $30 sterling silver hoop earrings $42 handcrafted snowflake obsidian teardrop necklace $45 suede fringe purse global village imports $60

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February

Hit List

DJ Romeo curates a list of the hottest songs you’ll hear this month

The following is a list of songs that will take over the radio stations in the next few months. You’ll soon know them by heart and play them ‘til they’re tired. But, good news: you can download them first and look like the cool musical genius to all of your friends. djromeo@thewcpress.com

www.djromeo.fm | @DJRomeo24

AudioDamn! - “Radar” AlunaGeorge ft./ Popcaan - “I’m In Control” The 1975 - “The Sound” Lukas Graham - “7 Years” G-Eazy ft./ Bebe Rexha - “Me, Myself & I” Busta Rhymes ft./ Chance The Rapper - “Hello” Netsky ft./ Digital Farm Animals - “Work It Out” DJ Snake ft. Bipolar Sunshine - “Middle” Jonas Blue ft./ Dakota - “Fast Car“ Kanye West - “Facts” Majid Jordan - “Something About You” Taylor Swift - “Out Of The Woods” Shawn Hook - “Sound of Your Heart” Ellie Goulding - “Something In The Way You Move” Alessia Cara - “Here” Netsky ft./ Digital Farm Animals - “Work It Out” Kid Ink ft. Omarion - “Summer In The Winter” Future & The Weeknd - “Low Life” Jess Glynne - “Don’t Be So Hard On Yourself” Kygo ft./ Parson James - “Stole The Show” Mike Posner - “I Took A Pill In Ibiza” Zara Larssib & MNEK - “Never Forget You” Sia - “Unstoppable” James Bay - “Let It Go” Machineheart ft./ Vanic - “Circles” Transviolet - “New Bohemia” Mr. Rogers - “I’ll Take You” Belly ft./ The Weeknd - “Might Not” Shift K3y ft./ BB Diamond - “Gone Missing” Tryon - “Somebody To Love Me”

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Owners of the

Month

PHOTO Andrew Hutchins INTERVIEW Jesse Piersol

Marisa Giunta and Sean Powell of Pietro’s Prime serve up an Emerilworthy dining experience What’s the inspiration behind Pietro’s Prime? Marisa: My great grandfather, Pietro, was a butcher back in Italy and then opened a butcher shop on the corner of Darlington and Biddle in 1927. We wanted to tie our restaurant into the family business—Giunta’s Thriftway— but didn’t want people to think it was a grocery store. Sean: We wanted the restaurant to be the same but separate, because it was just the two of us. Who’s your clientele? Marisa: A mixture of older and younger people. Young professionals. Sean: Generally no college kids. We’re priced a little out of that league. Marisa: But they’re welcome here! We might see them when their parents come to town to visit. What’s the best part of working in the restaurant business? Marisa: You never know what’s going to happen. And it’s fun. People are coming here to have a good time. Not like going to the grocery store. Sean: Coming here is like an escape. What’s the most awesome thing to happen at Pietro’s? Marisa: Emeril Lagasse was here. Sean: He called and asked if we could open up at midnight on a Sunday night. And he’s been back several times. Marisa: He usually comes on Wednesday nights, when John Grecia is playing piano. Emeril actually sings with him. He always says “Oh, I’m not gonna sing” and then he sings. Who does what? Sean: Marisa does the front of the house and I do the back of the house (kitchen). How’s owning a business together? Sean: We don’t overthink it or overanalyze. In the eight years we’ve been here, we still have a lot of the same staff. We

kind of treat them like family. I spend more time with my kitchen staff than I do at home. What do you for fun? Sean: I like to snowboard, check out other restaurants. My favorites are the High Street Caffe, and the Split Rail for the bar environment. Marisa: Side Bar’s fun. Or Four Dogs to get out of town a little bit. What do you love most about West Chester? Marisa: The people. It’s a small town—we both grew up here. Sean: It’s cozy and quaint, with a great community. Even though it’s a nice small town, it has a good energy. My father

used to own a cattle farm in North Carolina, and although it was a fun place to visit for a month every summer, the pace of life there was too slow for me. Best kept secret in town? Marisa: I think we are! A lot of people assume it’s so expensive here, but it’s not. The regulars who come are part of the family. People who come for the first time love it here. Sean: We’re casual upscale. A t-shirt and jeans work. But the quality of our food will match anything in the city. Marisa: And you don’t have to take your hat off.

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Profile for The WC Press

The WC Press Entrepreneur Issue - February 2016  

Voice of the Borough

The WC Press Entrepreneur Issue - February 2016  

Voice of the Borough