The WC Press Pet Issue - February 2014

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VOICE OF THE BOROUGH  february 2014


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the wc press | voice of the borough


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211 E Market St  610.429.0467

www.chefanti.com

Busy Week Ahead? Let Chefanti do the cooking! Fresh, healthy, order-ahead, familystyle meals available for take-out or delivered to your door. Order online for one night or the whole week!

“Grab & Go” Lunch Available M-F, 11:30am-2pm


The

Press PUBLISHER Dan Mathers Dan@thewcpress.com ADVERTISING MANAGER Nick Vecchio Nick@thewcpress.com COPY EDITOR Kehan DeSousa kdesousa@thewcpress.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Nazarena Luzzi Castro nazluzzidesign.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Jesse Piersol jpiersol@thewcpress.com Kate Chadwick kchadwick@thewcpress.com CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Luke O’Brien snappedstudio.com PHOTOGRAPHY INTERN Annie Tennyson

The dog is a gentleman. I hope to go to his heaven, not man’s. –Mark Twain COLUMNISTS Chelsea Durning cdurning@thewcpress.com DJ Romeo romeo@thewcpress.com Jennifer Ozgur jozgur@thewcpress.com Published By... Mathers Productions Limited 13 South Church Street West Chester, PA 19382 mathersproductions.com 610-344-3463

Sunset Hill Jewelers 23 North High Street, West Chester, PA 610-692-0374, sunsethilljewelers.com

Best of Show for Cat & Dog Charms!

ALL CURRENT

The WC Press is a monthly magazine distributed free of charge to more than 250 businesses. For a free digital subscription, visit thewcpress.com. For more information about specific distribution locations visit thewcpress.com/distribution.

Worth

Noting

AKC Breeds

D

ALL CURR ICE " EN N T " AKC bBy reedGIES s AVAILABLE! DOG

AVAILABLE!

Our no-nonsense table of contents

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INFOGRAPHIC Just how much do we love our pets? We’ve got the figures.

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THE LOOK Nich Boutique offers up two of the best looks for this month

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PETS IN RESIDENCE We profile the West Chester businesses with a pet on staff

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BRIGHT-EYED & BUSHY TAILED The tips and tricks you need to raise a happy, health pet

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PAWS TO REMEMBER Inside the trend of memorializing pets

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BARTENDER OF THE MONTH Talking drinks with Jordan Kennedy of Kooma

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ADOPTABLE ANIMALS Do you have room in your heart and home?

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OWNER OF THE MONTH Jen Galfano of PetCare Group Inc is passionate about pets

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LOCAL TALENT Nick Hallady knows arrangements are an artform

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EVENT PHOTOS Our favorite images from around West Chester this month

cuff d n a ants ! d n e p ell for w s a links Combining golds, rhodium, and techniques known only to a few, Meche has created a collection of the most detailed Canine charms in existence. all current aKc breeds available February 2014 D thewcpress.com

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the wc press | voice of the borough


Fromthe

Editor

I wouldn’t say, “fur child,” because that’s just really creepy, but he’s definitely part of the family.

I’m at the point in my life where people have begun openly inquiring as to when I’ll have kids. They don’t tiptoe around the subject, they just straight up ask. True, my mother-in-law started asking as soon as I was married, but at least everyone else has given us a few years to adjust. As of lately though, even my mother—who’s been understanding of the commitments found a company requires—has begun to drop hints that it may be time to start a new enterprise, one that shares my DNA. I’ve recently cut back on my use of Facebook. A significant part of that decision was based around the fact that my newsfeed was full of posts I couldn’t relate to. My friends have started having kids, and it seems the people most likely to share on Facebook in their late twenties are new and expectant mothers. These posts don’t intrigue me; i can’t relate. In my opinion, kids don’t really become cute until they start saying words they shouldn’t even know. But you know what’s cute? Puppies and Kittens. When animals have babies, they are ADORABLE. That’s why I have a dog. You see, just as there is a bond between parents of young children (as evidenced by the absurd number of likes that baby bump photos generate), there is also a bond between us pet owners. That’s why Instagram has so successfully acted as the methadone for my Facebook withdrawal. I can waste entire Sunday afternoons searching #PuppiesOfInstagram. And I’m only contributing to the craze—check my feed. You’ll see my spotted mutt cropping up even more often than photos of food. I’m shameless about it, and I think with good reason. When we rescued Odin from the Chester County SPCA three years ago, he was a mad man. Adorable, but entirely out of control. He literally ran up the walls of our house when we first brought him home, and—despite the fact we were told he was full grown—he added 50% to his body weight within the first six months. The battle to assert control over a muscular, mostly feral animal was long and hard, but in the end I won, and so did he. He’s well-behaved, absolutely spoiled, and I’m damn proud. I’m not alone. We’ve packed this magazine with stories showcasing just how much West Chester loves its animals. From memorial services for pets to furry friends who work the counter at local stores, West Chester is a pet-friendly community. I know there are plenty of other people out there who—like me—think there’s no need for children when you’ve got pets. Still, the fact that my mother is now suggesting we consider having kids lets me know the situation is growing dire. I’m afraid the day is near where she’ll no longer be content stealing kisses from her “grandpuppy,” and my wife’s biological tock will begint icking uncontrollably. A few years from now my phone might be full of photos showcasing a tiny, red, scrunched-up face that I brag about, and you might find yourself holding a magazine all about babies. But, until then, enjoy “The Pet Issue.”

Meet Our Stylists... Tiffany Taraschi has been with our salon for eight years. She started as a receptionist, then completed the apprentice program and is now a stylist. She has continued studying cosmetology and loves going to classes and learning new styles and skills. She is dedicated to perfecting her skills on hair cutting and foil highlighting and loves challenges along the way. She is passionate about formal hair styling and Ombré coloring. Debbie Amoroso has been with Peter’s Salon for three years now and is currently a designer. Her specialties at Peter’s include cutting, coloring, and formal styling. At Peter’s, she considers everyone she works with family and is happy to be a part of the team. She really enjoys meeting new people and loves how her profession allows her to share what she knows and also to learn from others at the same time.

If you have never been to our salon, Tiffany and Debbie would like to extend an invitation to experience our world-class hair and spa services along with our excellent customer service.

Present this ad to receive 50% off any hair service with Tiffany or Debbie

1009 West Chester Pike West Chester, PA 19382 610.436.6464 peterssalonandspa.com February 2014 D thewcpress.com

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Giuseppe has some great Valentine’s Day ideas for you..

Visit Our New West Chester Location ! 148 West Gay Street

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the wc press | voice of the borough


OBVI Boutique keeps you ahead of the fashion curve with two of this month's best looks

The

Look Outfit One

Outfit Two

Striped Elbow Patch Open Cardigan

Chambray Shirt Dress

by Always Me, $38

Denim

by Miss Me, $98

Long Fringe Necklace by Girly, $24

by B. Envied, $42

Beaded Necklace by Girly, $24

"

styles you can mix, match and wear over and over again

PHOTO Luke O'Brien

STORY Anotinette Poluch

This season it’s all about adding versatile pieces to your wardrobe that you can wear today, and wear again in the spring with an entirely different look. These are two must-have outfits that will help you do just that—they transition effortlessly from season to season. When choosing these pieces, remember to keep it classic with a bit of a trendy twist, that way you know it will work any time of year while staying true to your personal style. The chambray wash will be everywhere this spring; here it is in the dress version with a removable, thin leather braided belt. Wear it during the cooler months with tights and boots, keep it around for spring with your favorite flats, and bring it into summer to cover up your bikini for lunch! Another essential for your spring wardrobe: stripes! Think classicnautical meets preppy-chic. This open, navy striped cardigan adds a twist with chocolate suede elbow patches. It’s another look you can wear today with jeans and boots, then bring it into the warmer months with white denim or cut-off shorts.

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This feature is the whole reason we decided to put this issue together.

Walking through West Chester and popping into stores, you can’t help but notice how many proud proprietors bring their furry friends to work—we’re an incredibly pet-friendly town. So, we took a stroll through the borough and visited some of our favorite locations to meet West Chester’s favorite furry employees. 

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Nick & Kate Halladay Florist 29 S Church St, West Chester, PA halladayflorist.com, 610.696.5200

From touring shelters looking for a resuce, I knew I wanted a pit bull.

They’re an amazing breed with a great history, and we couldn’t be happier with Kate—the staff love her.

Kyle & Czar Kyle’s Auto Tags 529 E Gay St, West Chester, PA kylesautotags.com, 610.429.1447

He is the greatest thing that’s ever happened to me. Unlike my

wives, he’s never left me—he’s been with me for 14 years, and people come to the shop looking for him.

Manfred, Donna & max Mitch’s Market Street Gym 322 W Market St, West Chester, PA mitchsgym.com, 610.918.2900

I am fortunate to be able to bring both of my dogs to work with me... and it’s fortunate for them, too! They live a dog’s life—as it should be!

GIuseppe & antoinette OBVI Boutique 30 S High St, West Chester, PA obvionline.com, 610.696.2477

Giuseppe helped me open the store eight years ago as a puppy, and I have customers that will pop just to see him. Plus, he gives great fashion advice.

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Best Steak House In West Chester Live Music on Weekends, Patio Dining Fabulous Martinis, Seasonal Menu

125 W Market Street West Chester, PA 484.760.6100 ď ´ PietrosPrime.com pietrosprime.com/facebook 20

the wc press | voice of the borough


Maggie & Cyndi Penwick Design 132 N High St, West Chester, PA penwickdesign.com, 610.431.2739

Maggie is my cute corgie. Her job is to bring customers into the store, and she does it really well. But, she’s also great company to have around.

Sandy & Louie Sunset Hill Jewelers and Fine Arts Gallery 23 N High St, West Chester, PA sunsethilljewelers.com, 610.692.0374

Sunset Hill has always had an in-house Yorkie and Louie is cur-

rently reigning. He’s also my best salesman—he actually once sold a pair of diamond-stud earrings.

Hugo & Mary Visual Expansion Gallery 126 N High St, West Chester, PA visualexpansiongallery.com, 610.436.8697

We think he’s a German Shepherd-Basset Hound mix. The hound explains why he is so mellow—he just likes to sit on the steps and stare out the door looking for friends.

Dan & Odin, Nick & Buddy The WC Press 13 S Church St, West Chester, PA thewcpress.com, 610.344.3463

Being that Nick and I are so different, it really only makes

sense that our dogs be polar opposites. We’d have them here every day if they didn’t shed so damn much.

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fo r

in an sp d irin de g si st gn yl s es

@ sa Fo lo ll nc ow he m ist ry

Salon

A top-notch salon with a very real feel.

610-585-0102 salonchemistry.net You can find Salon Chemistry on Middle Alley between Walnut and Matlack Streets. Just head down Market Street and Salon Chemistry is in the lot to your left, behind the Salvation Army.

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H

ey, we’re a month into 2014 - how those New Year’s resolutions holding up? You know—the ones where you were going to take better care of yourself, get more exercise, eat right, have more fun and less stress? And what about your dog, or your cat—how are their resolutions going? They didn’t make any, did they? Bless their hearts. They’re blissfully unaware of the entire concept. And that’s okay, because not only is your own health and happiness your responsibility, theirs is on you, too. No pressure, though. For those of us who have pets, we really couldn’t imagine life any other way; taking care of them is not a chore, but a labor of love. And there are quite a few of us who feel this way. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, roughly one in three American households included at least one cat or dog as of 2012. So, we spoke with some West Chester-area experts in the care, feeding, and general well-being of the four-legged friends who enrich our lives. Here’s what they had to say.

socialization DOGS: There’s a great line from the charming ’90s film The Truth About Cats and Dogs, wherein a caller complains to a radio show veterinarian that her dog pees in her shoes whenever she goes out. The vet replies: “Dogs don’t like to be left alone. It’s not like, when you leave, he goes, ‘Great, time to finish writing my novel!’ No, when their humans leave, dogs get depressed, and they show it.” That’s where Jen Galfano and her company, Pet Care Group, step in (see our Owner of the Month feature on page 45 for more on Jen). “It’s important that pets have relationships not only with their owners, but also with other people,” Jen says. “Our staff members form relationships with our clients’ pets by seeing them every day, talking to them, and paying attention to them. It breaks up boredom and decreases anxiety, and gives the pet special time to look forward to that’s all about them.” As much as our dogs seem to live and die for us, socialization with other beasts is important—critical, even, according to John McManus at Toby’s K-9 Kamp (www.tobysk9kamp.com). (No cats there, sadly, but that’s probably just as well.) “Socializing with other dogs at the daycare makes it less stressful on a dog (and by extension, the owner) when he interacts with other dogs outside the daycare,” John told

us. “They’re calmer, more self-assured, and they have confidence. “ What about dog parks? “Dog parks can be fun, but you tend to have owners standing around chatting while the dogs are left to their own devices,” John says. “At Toby’s, they have good, healthy, and more importantly, supervised fun.” CATS: We don’t tend to think of cats as the most social of creatures, but interaction with humans is important to them, too. “People think of cats as independent, and they are,” Jen Galfano

Did you know? Sure, interacting with us is good for our pet—but it’s good for us, too. Petting your dog or cat not only feels good to both of you on a tactile level, studies have shown that it can lower your blood pressure. of Pet Care Group says. “But don’t leave your cat alone when you go on vacation! It’s my ‘pet peeve,’ so to speak, when people ask us to stop by once during the course of a week. Cats need attention, exercise, clean litter, and fresh food and water daily.” So if you can’t be there to keep your feline friend purring, make sure to hire a pet-sitter. 

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nutrition The more we researched pet nutrition, the more we realized that this topic alone could fill the entire issue, so here are a few condensed thoughts on the subject. Americans spent $19,000,000,000 on pet foods in 2012—yes, that’s billion, with a ‘b.’ Anyone who has visited the pet food aisle in a grocery or pet supply store knows that the options can be dizzying. These are the basic no-brainers: don’t overfeed your pet, minimize or eliminate ‘people food,’ don’t go overboard with treats—the pet equivalent of junk food, and most importantly, check with your veterinarian, as each dog and cat’s nutritional needs are unique. We checked with Dr. Rachel Stadler of the

Chester County Cat Hospital (www. cccathospital.com) for her thoughts. “The downside to purchasing foods in pet stores is that there are too many options,” she told us. “Some cats need to be on a specific diet for medical reasons, a prescription diet, which really helps improve their quality of life via nutrition. These are more expensive, but it is also using food as medicine, and good nutrition goes a long way.” Dr. Sadler also suggests keeping tabs on quality control, and keeping an eye out for food recalls. “It is great to check FDA.org for these,” she says. “And from there, an individual should ask their veterinarian for what is best for their unique pet.”

Did you know? While feeding your pets “people food” is generally a no-no, check with your vet on some fruits and vegetables that are permissible. It’s safe and healthy to add a small amount of canned pumpkin to your dog or cat’s food, for instance. It adds moisture and fiber, they love the flavor, and it’s good for their digestive system.

OBEDIENCE DOGS: Sometimes it’s not a matter of whether our pets WANT to please us; it’s simply that they don’t know how. We checked in with Debbie DeSantis, owner of Going to the Dogs Obedience Training (www.topdogtraining.org) about keeping our canine companions in line. The benefits of a well-trained dog are obvious, but is there a benefit to the dog? “I often tell my clients that it’s as if dogs are dropped from another planet, in that they don’t know our language or rules,” Debbie told us. “A dog who receives even the most basic training is a more well-adjusted family member than those who don’t. Trained dogs know that the humans in the family are the leaders.” Another key element is expectations. “Trained dogs know what to expect from their owners, because they’ll understand what’s required of them,” Debbie says.

Did you know? Dogs can learn many spoken commands, says Debbie DeSantis, but they also rely on our body language and our tone of voice when training. “Because they know what to expect and have boundaries placed on them, they’re generally less stressed than dogs who don’t know what’s expected of them and what’s going to occur next in their world.” In a nutshell, Debbie says, a dog who is less stressed will generally have fewer health and behavioral problems.

CATS: “Cats” and “training” aren’t necessarily compatible concepts in most peoples’ minds, but it can be done, according to Dr. Rachel Stadler of Chester County Cat Hospital. “Cats are very intelligent creatures, and are very trainable. However, you have to be diligent and specific in your efforts, and this is where humans usually fail,” says Dr. Stadler. And yes, they can even be trained to use a toilet, but “I’ve never had the patience to try this.” 

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One bite and you’re hooked

ramsheadbarandgrill.com 40 East Market Street 484-631-0241

It’s hard to beat our California BLT with tots and an IPA 28

the wc press | voice of the borough


exercise DOGS: Just like with you and me, exercise and health—both physical and emotional—go hand-in-hand for our pets, too. “It’s important to know the exercise needs of our dogs,” says Debbie DeSantis of Going to the Dogs Training. “An under-exercised dog can be a poorly-behaved dog.” Whether it’s throwing a ball in a fenced-in yard for your dog to retrieve over and over (and over again), or scheduled walks on a leash several times a day—whether by you or your Pet

Care Group pet-sitter—an exercised dog is a happier, healthier dog. CATS: It’s rare to see a cat strolling down the street on a leash, but they need exercise to maintain good overall health, too. Things like laser pointers, a stringed feather on a pole for him to chase, even a lowly brown paper bag will get the average cat moving. And don’t forget the catnip. A little sprinkle on occasion will usually get even the laziest cat up and about.

Did you know? According to Dr. Stadler, the active ingredient in catnip is a chemical called Nepetalactone, and whether or not your cat will react to it depends on their genetic history.

GROOMING DOGS: If there’s one area where the difference between cats and dogs is glaringly obvious, it might be grooming. Dogs tend to have the unselfconscious attitude of a toddler bounding in from the yard, blissfully unaware of sticks and leaves in its fur, or the pudgy belly on display as they sprawl on their backs on the couch. Toby’s K9 Kamp (www. tobysk9kamp.com) will not only give your dog a place to hang out with his pals (see ‘SOCIALIZATION,’), they have a menu of grooming services which will return him to you looking (and smelling) better than when you dropped him off. Check their website for specifics.

Did you know? If you believe in the concept of beauty sleep, cats also have an edge here, sleeping an average of 10-14 hours per day.

CATS: Cats are nothing if not fastidious—they’ve got the grooming game down to a science. If you happen to notice that your feline friend is not paying attention to meticulous grooming, that might be a hint that something is amiss.

According to Dr. Stadler, most cats groom themselves for approximately 3-4 hours per day. That’s something to think about the next time you’re tapping your foot waiting for your lady love to get dressed for that party.

don’t try this at home A list of obvious—and not so obvious—habits to avoid, as suggested by our experts. “Don’t let your dog off leash in open areas—another of my ‘pet peeves.’ –Jen Galfano “Don’t call your dog to you for anything negative. Coming on command should always be positively rewarded.” –Debbie DeSantis “Don’t let your cats near lilies—especially the big Easter lilies—they’re very toxic!” –Dr. Rachel Stadler Don’t think you can just drop your dog off at a daycare and be done with it. “All of our kampers must pass a temperament test, and not all dogs do.” –John McManus Don’t forget dental care! While most of us don’t brush our pets’ teeth, we should keep an eye on their oral health. Ask your vet or groomer about doing it if you don’t feel comfortable; Toby’s K9 kamp also offers tooth-brushing service for example. As for cats, Dr. Stadler suggests tuna juice on a cotton swab. “It sounds silly, but the abrasion on the tooth is what’s important, just like with humans.” We didn’t ask about the resultant tuna breath, but you can always just buy pet mouthwash (yes, that’s a real thing).

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story by

Margaret Houtman faced death more closely than usual this week. As co-owner of Pet Memorial Services, she's used to attending to departed pets and helping their owners through the grieving process. But Wednesday, she lost her own dog: a 13-year-old Shiba Inu named Misha. Misha's death wasn't entirely unexpected given her age, but it still hit Margaret hard. ''“I thought it would be easier; I'd pick out my favorite urn in our display room and that would be that. But I still haven't decided what to do for her. It just proves that you're never truly prepared.''

Jesse Piersol

One of Pet Memorial Services’ offerings is the “attended service,” where a family can visit with their departed pet in the facility’s main room. When they feel ready, their pet is moved into the crematory in an adjacent room. The cremation process takes about two hours, and family members can view the process, if they wish, from a small ancillary room. This option may seem unnerving at first, but Margaret believes that information about the process ultimately provides comfort to families. “Coming here is a learning experience for a lot of people. When they imagine cremation, they imagine their pet in a fiery pit, which isn’t accurate. Cremation is more like being baked in an oven. It’s a peaceful process.” Margaret leads me around the corner into the next room and opens the door to the crematory, which looks like a big brick oven inside. She sticks her hand in, and invites me to do the same. It is still warm from a service earlier in the afternoon. “That’s really the hottest it gets,” she tells me. 

Prepared or not, pet owners today have a host of options for what to do with their departed pets, including specialty funeral services. Pet Memorial Services has been offering an assortment of funeral services just for pets since 1996. In their facility on Turner Lane, they offer custom funerals, as well as basic services, all tailored to the needs and wishes of their customers. The vibe of the place is serene and casual. A cascading waterfall fountain hangs on a wall. Pet portraits from local artists grace the corridors. Margaret greets me with an effervescent smile, wearing a soft gray sweater and boots. “We don’t do suit and tie here,” she explains. “We like it to feel comfortable, a place you can relax and be with your pet.”

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All Baking Done on Premises 15 N Church St ď‚Ą 610-344-9674

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Once the process is complete, families have all kinds of options for what to do with the remains. One of the newer products available is a gold locket, decorated with paw prints, with a discreet vessel inside for storing a tiny amount of the pet’s remains. “It’s a way to keep a little bit of your pet with you all the time.” A Philadelphia glassblower works with the company to create hand-blown glass objects, such as pendants and paperweights, using a portion of the pet’s remains for color. “It looks like bubbles in the glass,” Margaret says. The company also does in-house laser etching of pet names and photos onto urns, glass ornaments, and even black granite outdoor memorials. In an adjoining room, Jon Milanese is working in front of a shelf filled with baked clay paw prints inscribed with names and phrases. “Sometimes people will want a print of a paw that has an extra toe or something. It’s what you remember about your pet.” In her seven years with the company, Margaret has seen attended services increase from one per month to about four per week, and expects that number to continue to rise. “Today, it’s more accepted to grieve your pets. And I tell people ‘do it, because you might feel better.’ I think it can help with closure.” Still, not everyone chooses to have a funeral service for a pet, or even wants a permanent memento. Nancy Perruzzi works at the front desk of the West Chester Veterinary Medical Center across town, and sees cost as a major factor in the choices people make. “Private cremation is expensive, and a lot of people can’t really afford it,” she says. For an average-sized dog of 31-50 pounds, a private cremation arranged through the Vet Center costs $225. A cheaper alternative is group cremation, which runs $85 for an average-sized dog. Families also have the old-school option of taking their pet back home to bury it, but you’ll have to check with your township first. “Pet owners must abide by township regulations. Usually it’s the people with farms and big properties who want to take their pet home,” says Nancy. “We wrap their pet in a nice blanket and put them in a coffin box.” Even with all of today’s options, many owners don’t feel the need to be involved in a pet’s aftercare as part of their grieving process. Longtime West Chester resident Susan Whitehead lost Bungee, her 15-year-old blond Pomeranian in March of 2012. Bungee died at home, and Susan took him to her vet, wrapped in a towel, and that was the last time she saw him. “I keep photos of him around the house.” But Susan didn’t feel the need to keep any physical reminders of Bungee around. “His memory is enough. I miss him. Sometimes I’ll still say goodnight to him.” Back at Pet Memorial Services, Margaret reflects on her time with Misha, and on her time with the company. “Seven years ago, I never would have imagined that I’d want my hands to be the last hands that touched Misha. I think that dealing with death all the time makes you value life that much more. And that’s what bonds everyone who has lost a pet:

“”

In her seven years with the company, Margaret has seen attended services increase from one per month to about four per week and expects that number to continue to rise.

Nobody is immune to grief. And there is no right or wrong way to grieve your pet.'' February 2014 D thewcpress.com

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The

takehome

Chef

Chelsea Durning is a cook by trade and she’s not shy about sharing her recipes with our readers

Our pets have a special place in our hearts. They are a part of our families and in some cases, many of consider them to be our children. So, this month I wanted to take a break from feeding the fur-less members of your family, and instead focus of the fourlegged variety. Here are some recipes to show your critter how much you love them.

We’ve

moved!

Homemade Cat Biscuits 1 1/4 cup whole wheat flour 1 cup powdered nonfat milk 1/2 cup cornmeal 1/2 cup wheat germ 1 tbsp instant rolled oats 1 cup chicken broth 1 egg 2 cans fish in oil (tuna, sardines, etc) Combine 1 cup whole wheat flour with the powdered nonfat milk, cornmeal, wheat germ and instant rolled oats in a large mixing bowl. Mix the ingredients continuously with a clean hand as you slowly pour in the chicken stock. Mix in the beaten egg and oily fish. Dust the remaining 1/4 cup of whole wheat flour onto a clean surface. Turn the dough out onto the floured surface. Knead the dough and incorporate the wheat flour until a smooth ball forms. Roll the dough out into a 1/4 inch-thick sheet with a heavy rolling pin. Cut small cat biscuit shapes with a cookie cutter. Line a baking sheet with a thin coating of cooking spray. Place the cat biscuits half an inch apart. You may need to bake in two batches depending on the size of your baking sheets. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes or until the tops have turned golden brown. Move baked biscuits to a rack and cool for at least 10 minutes before feeding them to a cat. Homemade “Pup”cakes 1/2 cup whole wheat flour 1 tsp baking powder 1/3 cup canola oil 1/2 cup apple sauce 1 egg 2 tbsp peanut butter, smooth (can’t risk choking!) 1/2 container Greek yogurt with honey 1 tbsp honey Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl. Scoop batter evenly into cupcake pan. Bake for about 35-40 minutes. Let cool before frosting. “Pup”cake Frosting 2 oz cream cheese 4 tbsp pumpkin puree 2 tbsp honey 2 tbsp Greek yogurt with honey 1 tbsp flour (just to thicken it) Mix all of the ingredients together until smooth and spread evenly onto each pupcake. cdurning@thewcpress.com

Same quality, New Facility! Plus dog training And coming soon... pet grooming!

15 S Bolmar St TobysK9Kamp.com 610-430-1330 February 2014 D thewcpress.com

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the wc press | voice of the borough


Bartender of the

Month

PHOTO

Luke O'Brien

INTERVIEW

Dan Mathers

Kooma’s Jordan Kennedy knows that good bartending is all about good conversation... and drinks. You from the area? I’m from San Diego. I love West Chester, but—seriously— why’d you move here from San Diego? My mom is from this area, and as she grew older, she wanted to be closer to her parents. So, she dragged me, my dad, my brother and my dog back here with her. How old were you? I was three. Oh, so then what would you consider your hometown? I guess Doylestown would be my hometown. I thought you were gonna say West Chester. When did you move here? I moved here in… I graduated high school in 2005 and went to West Chester University, so I’ve been here since 2005.

After coming to West Chester, how long was it before you started working in bars? Oh, it was right off the bat. I started off as a busboy working at Doc Magrogan’s. And I guess you worked your way up. I’ve worked every position in the industry—from busing, to serving, cooking to managing and now bartending, and everything in between. I’ve liked it all. But can you choose a favorite? Bartending. Hands down. I guess it’s the alcohol that makes the job, huh? It’s not that, though I do love a good IPA, and while Kooma doesn’t have a reputation for being a beer bar, now that we’ve moved to our new location we’ve expanded our craft beer selection, so now we have IPAs from Troegs, Yards and Dogfish Head—all great beers, all pretty local. Well then, what is it about this position that makes it so much better than any of the others? You’re part of the nightlife, part of the party. There is so much energy when you’re behind the bar. I mean, instead of paying money to hang out, people are paying you to be there. What’s the best party you’ve ever worked? This New Year’s Eve was epic. People were dancing, spraying Champagne, having an awesome time. It got out of control.

In a good way? In a very good way. It was still a classy party, but people were just having a really good time. Do you sometimes regret having to work certain times of the year, like New Year’s? People think it’s strange that I want to work on a holiday like that, but I haven’t taken off for New Year’s Eve since I started bartending, and I’ve never regretted it. Just work here one New Year’s; you’ll understand. I think it takes a certain type of personality to understand it. It definitely does. What would you consider to be the defining characteristic of that personality type? You have to be outgoing, and I think most people in the hospitality industry really are. Most all of my best friends are people I’ve met while working in bars and restaurants. Don’t you ever get tired of being happy and putting on a smile for everyone? No. In this job, you have to be able to enjoy a conversation with anybody. No matter who sits at the bar, I can have a conversation with them like we’ve known each other ten years. And, you just need to learn how to do it while serving drinks. Well that quality’s also made it pretty easy to interview you. Thanks. Can I get you a drink?

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1

1

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Brody

3

ROland

Breed: English Spot | Age: 1

Breed: American Bulldog Mix

Poor Brody was only in his last home for one week (he’d been adopted without parental permission), so he’s really hoping to find a good owner. He’s a sweet guy who needs a family that will give him the love and attention he deserves.

Roland came in as stray and is a young adult, approximately one to three years old. He’s a very energetic young guy who will be good with an active family who can provide him the exercise (and love) he needs.

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faze

Breed: Am Staff Mix Faze came in as stray and is an energetic young girl looking for an active family. She loves lots of attention and has a very sweet personality.

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Nacho

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capone

Breed: Orange Tabby

Breed: Am Staff Mix

This orange tabby domestic short haired cat is a sweet boy. We think he’s between two to four years old, and he is a very loving cat who would do great with children as young as ten.

Capone is only maybe one to two years old, and he’s a very sociable guy with lots of energy. He’d do well with a young, active family and is also good with other dogs. Capone is very playful and loves attention!

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Monday to Friday: 9am-5:30pm | Saturday: 8am-2pm Monday 12/23: 9am-5:30pm | Tuesday 12/24: 8am-2pm Closed 12/25 and 12/26 610.696.9683 | 1009 West Chester Pike

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georgina

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Ralph

Breed: Bulldog Mix

Breed: Hamster

We’d guess Georgina is only about a year old, and she would be a perfect fit for a young family. She’s young, she’s very energetic, and she loves big dogs almost as much as she loves belly rubs and lots of attention!

It’s not just big furry creatures here at the shelter, so before you rush off to PetCo for a first-time pet for your children, consider stopping by the shelter to give one of our pint-sized pets a try.

BY

Pete crain

D The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, mostly referred to as the ASPCA, acts as a voice and protective arm for our furry (and scaly) friends that suffer from abuse or neglect. There are local organizations that serve a greater role for the communities in which they are located. Based in West Goshen Township on Phoenixville Pike, the Chester County SPCA is a non-profit organization that provides animal protection and welfare services for the West Chester area, as well as the rest

of Chester County and parts of Delaware County. They have been working to better the lives of animals and provide pets to loving homes since 1929. Funded by donations from the community and charity events, the CCSPCA does not take any money from the government or tax payers. It’s best known in its capacity as a shelter for stray and and rescue animals. The shelter cares for all animals that come to their facilities until they are adopted or given to eligible foster keepers. CCSPCA boasts some of the cleanest and best-run shelters in the United States, and they have won awards for the quality of care the shelter provides for thousands of animals who pass through their doors each year. The sheer scale of the operation requires the shelter to maintain a large staff, including volunteers, to handle basic needs such as feeding, walking, and healthcare. Efforts range from working in the shelter, to going to events that help raise money and awareness for the CCSPCA. Volunteers enjoy the challenge and reward that has come from helping with animals at the CCSPCA despite the fact it’s not easy work, as many of the animals have come from places where they were abused and neglected. Coming from a bad home can mean that animals are aggressive, nervous, and constantly frightened. With the goal of finding every rescued animal a home, easing pets back into a loving environment can take time. Volunteers who work with cats, dogs, and other animals provide the nurturing support and socialization that readies the pet for adoption by a loving family.

D Adopting a pet from the Chester County SPCA is a wonderful way to give an animal a second chance at a loving family. There are many factors that go into adopting. The shelter looks into the home, affordability, pet history, and instance of other animals in a prospective adopter’s household to ensure that the pet and owner are a perfect match. Potential adopters are able to interact with their pets in the shelter away from other animals in order to see how they act. Successful adoptions have a fee which covers the costs of spaying and neutering, vaccinations given while at the shelter, an identification microchip, and a visit to one of many veterinarians in the West Chester area for a free exam. In addition to rescuing and sheltering animals, the Chester County SPCA also provides humane investigations. These are conducted when there is suspicion of animals being mistreated. If you find an instance in which an investigation by SPCA authorities is needed, the organization has tips and instructions on their website to follow in reporting neglect or abuse. D If you'd like to volunteer, foster or to find out how your can become involved with the SPCA in the West Chester area, visit their website at www.ccspca.org. Financial support can be made through donations as well as from one of a few events held annually for the shelter. Food, beds, and other pet needs are also appreciated as donations to make the stay at the shelter that much better for needy pets. Your furry and feathered friends are grateful for the support!

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PETCARE GROUPINC

SAFE AT HOME, WHILE YOU’RE AWAY!

610-738-2273

Spread the Love

| petcaregroup.com

Show your pets you care with a visit from PetCare Group

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the wc press | voice of the borough


Owner of the

Month

PHOTO

Luke O'Brien

INTERVIEW

Dan Mathers

Few people are as passionate about their jobs as the owner of PetCare Group, Jen Galfano How long have you been in West Chester? Since 2002. Wow. That’s a long time. What brought you here? Heart surgery of all things. I was born with a heart problem, and I wanted the cardiologist I knew to fix it, so I came from Seattle to have it fixed. Did you have a job when you moved here? I needed health insurance for that surgery, so I picked up this terrible job at place called... you know what? I don’t want to put that on record. I ended up paying for the surgery out of pocket and it didn’t even work, but I guess I was just meant to be here. Where did life take you after that unnamable job? I went back to school to get my teaching certificate. I thought, “I’m good at Italian, I’ll teach that.” I started PetCare Group

at the same time to make a little extra money. I only ended up teaching for a little over two years because PetCare took off, and I needed to work full-time. People thought I was crazy, quitting a job where I got summers off to go work for myself walking dogs, but I stopped teaching in 2005. To the people who said you were crazy, how did you respond? I said, “It’s worth the risk.” You’re only ever going to get so far working for somebody else. Why not take the chance, and do something on your own? And I guess it worked out. Yeah. It worked out really well. More than I ever thought. It’s better every time I turn around. To what do you attribute that success? Well, personally, I never stop working, and my staff do their jobs really well. They make our clients happy, and happy people tell other people. Oh, and we never close. Never? We never close. We’re available every day of the year, even holidays. We do overnight services, we do extended stays for people who just want to make sure their pets have company, and we even do emergencies. If you need us there in two hours, we can do that. It will cost you, but we can do that. What did the business start out as, and how did it evolve? It started out as mostly pet-sitting and dog-walking, but even some of the more comprehensive services have

been available since day one. I did three to four overnight stays a week in the early days, and I felt like a vagabond, sleeping in other people’s houses more often than my own. Now how often are you out on the job interacting with animals? Every day. I do consults, visits in my neighborhood, and pick up the shifts nobody else can. Still, I try not to do the visits as much these days because administration is more than a full-time job. So, while the services are the same, your job has changed a lot. I started out doing it because it was what I loved—I liked dealing with animals more than people. Now I deal with people all the time, but it’s rewarding because we’re taking care of animals that many people consider their children. To be able to talk to these people when they need help is rewarding. My job isn’t what I planned, but I wouldn’t trade it for the world. I think the success of your company is indicative of just how much this community values their pets, but do you ever have people who don’t get it? There are plenty of people out there who don’t get it. They say, “Just put out extra food for the cat over the weekend.” But I think, “No! They’re going to be lonely.” With my cats, I genuinely feel like they’re going to miss me… although they probably don’t. They probably just sleep in the cat tower in my office.

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the wc press | voice of the borough


Children in

Tow

Jennifer Ozgur is a mother, wife and teacher who still finds time to get out and about with her family

It is with a heavy heart that I begin this month’s column. It is February—the month of love—and as I start to write, I feel a little dejected. If you are a regular reader, you know that my husband is from Turkey. We had a child together 18 months ago. Except for Skype, my in-laws hadn’t seen their grandson... ever. So when we decided to go to Turkey for winter break, and I had to return to school on January 2nd, my husband and little guy stayed. I had suggested it, thinking that if he felt pressured to return too early, he’d feel compromised. I didn’t want that for him, so I encouraged him to take advantage of this opportunity. Leaving my family behind was very difficult, but at least I knew the situation was a happy one, and they were in good hands. I also had the excitement of knowing that I’d get to share some special “girl ime” with my daughter back in West Chester. Still, she wouldn’t always be with me, so I’d be in my house alone some periods. At times, the silence was deafening, so I found myself heading into town to distract myself from my loneliness. It’s moments like these, when emotions are heightened, that you tend to see things in a different light. Nothing like some separation anxiety to open your eyes a bit. Being in town for some distraction was the best strategy I could have taken. Instead of walking around pouting, I looked around with amazement and gratitude for living in such an amazing place. I love West Chester’s perfect combination of quaint and cosmopolitan: brick sidewalks lead up to trend-setting boutiques; historical buildings are also popular eateries; longstanding local businesses abut Starbucks. It may sound like a far-fetched comparison, but West Chester is actually very similar to my husband’s town near Istanbul. Both harken back to their cultural ancestry while simultaneously embracing modernity. Although, unlike Turkey, which is mostly (you guessed it) Turkish, West Chester’s multiculturalism is sublime. Sushi, samosas, and Szechuan. Arabic smoking lounges and Unitarian churches. Health stores and head shops. I feel like I’ve written similar content in my column before, but this time, it’s different—I’m writing more from a position of appreciation in a time of necessity. A wife and mother without her husband and child needs something to lift her up. Fortunately, West Chester delivers. I think back to my mother in the ’70s and her times being a stay-at-home mom in the middle of Fogelsville, PA. That blip on the map was as rural and backward as the name sounds. Our elementary school’s mascot was a corn stalk. The drive to a grocery store took half an hour. I wonder if her life might have been happier if she’d had the opportunities this borough offers. It’s true about absence making the heart grow fonder. For me, the love affair rekindled was that of a woman and her zip code. May February rejuvenate your love of something dear to your heart, as it did mine. jozgur@thewcpress.com

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We are Insurance. We are Farmers. Excite all of your senses

Brandt van Naerssen agency owner Business 610-386-7326 Fax 610-441-7583 Cell 610-745-3276 bvannaerssen@famersagent.com

at West Chester’s most alternative & unique boutique! A vast array of “one-of-a-kind” products, including...

Hip Clothing • Bags & Accessories • Jewelry Galore • Incense/Oils/Candles • Tapestries/Blankets • Eclectic home/Dorm décor • Hemp products • Grateful Dead, Bob Marley & ‘60s Memorabilia • Tie Dyes & Cool T-shirts • Hand-blown glass & local artwork • Tobacco accessories • Groovy Gifts Gift Certificates Available

130 W. Gay Street 610-431-6607 www.moonflowershop.com A portion of our proceeds go to environmental and pro-peace charities!

1000 Continental Drive, Suite 500 King of Prussia, PA 19406-2820 www.farmersagent.com/bvannaerssen

All major credit cards accepted. Open 7 Days A Week

10% off purchase with student ID! SINCE 1992

Classes at... Peter’s Salon & European Spa 1009 West Chester Pike Bring this ad to your first class and it’s FREE carolt.zumba@gmail.com 610-436-6464

CarolThiel.Zumba.Com Contact Carol for Current Hours 48

the wc press | voice of the borough


Playlist for

Pets

DJ Romeo curates a playlist that shows that not every muse is a woman— musicians love their pets just as much as the rest of us.

Most pet owners consider their animals to be family, and more than half (don’t quote me on that statistic) refer to their furry family members in the same way they do their genetic children. So, it should come as no surprise that musicians who own pets have paid homage to their animal children in song. Some of these songs are in remembrance of pets lost, some are ballads about a best friend... and then there’s one about a goldfish. I’ve labelled each song accordingly, so pull up YouTube and listen along. djromeo@thewcpress.com

Norah Jones - “Man of the Hour” (Dog) Elvis Presley - “Old Shep” (Dog) Paul McCartney - “Jet” (Dog) Michael Jackson - “Ben” (Rat) Freddie Mercury - “Delilah” (Cat) Harry Nilsson - “Me and My Arrow” (Dog) The Presidents of the United States of America - Kitty (Cat) Lobo - “Me and You and a Dog Named Boo” (Dog) Peter, Paul & Mary - “Blue” (Dog) Barry Manilow - “Mandy” (Dog) Michael Martin Murphey - “Wildfire” (Pony) Patti Page - “How Much is that Doggie in the Window?” (Dog) The Beatles - “Martha My Dear” (Dog) Queen - “All Dead, All Dead” (Cat) Pinback - “Penelope” (Goldfish) Cat Stevens - “I Love My Dog” (Dog) Henry Gross - “Shannon” (Dog) Pink Floyd - “Lucifer Sam” (Cat) Arcade Fire - “Neighborhood #2 (Laika)” (Dog) Suicide Machines - “Sometimes I Don’t Mind” (Dog) The Weakerthans - “Plea from a Cat Named Virtue” (Cat) The Dillards - “Old Blue” (Dog)

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29 S. Church Street 610-696-5200 www.halladayflorist.com

Our Family, your town, your florist since 1957

We Put You on the MaP!

 Limoncello Ristorante  The WC Press  Subway  Yori’s Bakery  The Note  Kooma Viet  The Social Lounge  Culinary Deliveries  Ram’s Head Bar & Grill  Saladworks  Pietro’s Prime  Pisano & Sons Shoe Repair  Senator Dinniman  Salon Chemistry  Nonna’s  Doc Magrogan’s  Optimal Massage  Cozy Hookah Café  William Shehwen Law Offices  Big Mike’s Barber Shop

 Franklin Mint Federal Credit Union  High Roller Tattoo  Giuseppe Cabinets  Mainline Men’s  I Pasta  Chester County Intermediate Unit  D’Ascenzo Gelato  X-treme Ink Tattoo  The Pita Pit  The Olive Branch  Blaze Salon  Balance Hair Spa  Vitesse Sports  Mercado’s  Moonflower  Zazen Nail Spa  The Lunch Box  Jazmine Thai  Elwyn School

WeSt CheSteR’S LandLoRd 121 e GaY St  610.696.0953  ZukinRealtyInc.com

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the wc press | voice of the borough


Local

Talent

PHOTO

Luke O'Brien

INTERVIEW

Dan Mathers

Nick Halladay loves his job almost as much as he loves his rescued pit bull, Kate This is a family business, right? Family owned ever since 1957. So, did you always know this is what you were going to do? No. I went to Wesley College and got a degree in political science. When I graduated I was a runner in the Delaware state legislature, a substitute teacher, working at WT Smithers Restaurant and delivering flowers for a company in Delaware. Well, how did you end up here then? My mom came down to see me and said they’d gotten an offer from someone who wanted to buy the business. We figured that, because I wasn’t really settled, because I wasn’t wholly invested in any one thing, I could take a year off, try the floral business, and if it didn’t work out I could come back and pick up where I left

off. So, I took an apprenticeship with one of my dad’s friends at a huge place called Flower World. Is it typical in this industry to have an apprenticeship? Not really, but I knew I’d be coming into a small, family-run business, and I want my skills to speak for me, not my name. I think many people who inherit the family business take the opposite tack. They kind of take it for granted. I went the complete opposite direction. I took classes at the Delaware Museum of Art, I studied Ikebana like crazy, which is a simplistic, high-style, Japanese art of arrangements. Has that informed your design sense? In a way. I’m a minimalist designer—less is more. I find that working with only two elements, and two colors can be elegant and high-impact. Minimalism is very popular in America right now. I think so, and I think that sense of style has really helped with my window displays—simple but high impact. And, your window displays often feature fundraisers for animal rights groups. How did that happen? As a companion for the store and a way to teach my kids about patience and understanding, I thought we’d adopt a dog. We found Kate at the Delco SPCA, and she’s been a perfect match.

And since then you’ve become a bit of an advocate. So, since getting Kate we’ve been running fundraisers and charity drives for the organizations that benefit these dogs. And you have one going now, right? Yes. We’re encouraging people to pick items off the SPCA’s wish list and bring them to the store to be donated. The list is in our window. It seems you bring a lot of passion to everything you do. This business isn’t just my job—it’s our family name. We have deep roots in this community, and we take deep pride in what we do. You have to love your job. You have to like what you do or life will be a long, tedious and unhappy experience. What made you realize this was a career you could excel at? When I was cooking at WT Smithers. With the multitasking, timing and presentation that goes into serving a great meal, these were the same skills I apply here every day. There’s an art to both. Did you notice you had an artistic bent from an early age? I liked to draw—that’s about it. My parents never pushed this on me. I shoveled the walk at the store when it snowed, but I was never coerced into this business. And do you think your kids will follow in your footsteps? I’m not expecting it—there’s no pressure. But if they did, if they wanted to, it would be a really rewarding gift.

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Our Favorite Photos of the Month

January 2014

We dropped by to visit those who braved the elements at the winter farmers market, and enjoyed delicious food provided by Cakes & Candies by Maryellen and Limoncello Ristorante at Faunbrook Bed & Breakfast. Check out all of this month’s photos on our website at thewcpress.com/events photos by Annie Tennyson

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