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AUGUST 2015

Old is NEW Consignment shopping IN

WEST CHESTER

West Chester

SHOWCASE Previewing Our Upcoming FASHION SHOW

LOOK BOOK WEST CHESTER’S MOST stylish BOUTIQUES


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The

“Fashion is made to become unfashionable.” —Coco Chanel

Press PUBLISHER Dan Mathers dan@thewcpress.com ADVERTISING MANAGER Nick Vecchio nick@thewcpress.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Julie Ryan jryan@mathersproductions.com Nazarena Luzzi Castro nazluzzidesign.com COPY EDITOR Jon Roth jroth@thewcpress.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Jesse Piersol jpiersol@thewcpress.com Kate Chadwick kchadwick@thewcpress.com CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Andrew Hutchins hutch@mathersproductions.com

COLUMNISTS Becca Boyd bboyd@thewcpress.com Diane LeBold dlebold@thewcpress.com Brad Liermann bliermann@thewcpress.com Jennifer Ozgur jozgur@thewcpress.com DJ Romeo romeo@thewcpress.com Published By... Mathers Productions 13 South Church Street West Chester, PA 19382 mathersproductions.com 610-344-3463 The WC Press is a monthly magazine distributed free of charge to more than 250 businesses. For a free digital subscription, visit thewcpress.com. For more information about specific distribution locations, visit thewcpress.com/distribution.

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Our no-nonsense table of contents

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Dan Mathers’ monthly ramblings BARTENDER OF THE MONTH Chatting with Saloon 151’s Michael Zawada LOCAL TALENT Talking with Cashmere Salon owner Juanita James THE MAKEOVER Avante Salon & Spa styles a lucky lady EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW AGAIN Making the most of consignment shopping OWNER OF THE MONTH The life story of Main Line Custom Clothier’s Larry Albert LOOK BOOK The Best of Fall Fashion in West Chester PHOTO HUNT Your favorite bar game, only free

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From the

Editor

“Fashion should be a form of escapism, and not a form of imprisonment.” –Alexander McQueen

I used to be a trendsetter, but lately I’ve been losing my sense of style. I first noticed when I was out one night having a drink at Sprout and jokingly told the stranger standing next to me, “Hey, that’s a great haircut.” It was exactly the same style as mine, so I thought I was quite funny. He turned his head toward me, squinted over his shoulder and said, “Yeah. Seems like everybody has it these days.” Part of me wanted to say, “Hey, buddy, I was just being friendly.” Another part wanted to snap, “Listen, pal, I’ve had this haircut for years.” But the small, adult part of me won out. I just smiled, took another sip of my Peloton cocktail (a nice long sip), and simmered in thoughts of all the things I wanted to say. “Hey, the jerk store called; they’re running out of you!” I was pulled out of my reverie by my girlfriend Morgan Quinn who was talking to Gabrielle Liberi, our cover model and, not coincidentally, girlfriend of Adam Jones, the man behind the stunning images in this year’s Look Book. They were talking about a time I was being particularly petulant and told Morgan I didn’t like her jacket. Gabrielle thought I was flat wrong. “What would you know?” she said, “You look like you stepped out of a J. Crew catalogue.” I protested. In response, Morgan whipped out her phone, looked up a J. Crew ad and showed me a photo of a man wearing almost exactly my jacket, shirt and shoe combo. And my haircut. Apparently everybody has that haircut these days. Looking like a J.crew model isn’t a particularly scathing insult, but after years ahead of the curve, it’s tough to be in lockstep with a $2 billion retail giant. I’d cultivated that haircut for years, but I had Morgan cut it off with a pair of kitchen scissors. My fashion failures grew more frequent, and I became increasingly despondent; I wondered why my taste was becoming so pedestrian. At Market Street Grill one recent morning, I looked up from my egg white breakfast burrito to find a man standing next to me wearing a navy-colored shirt patterned with sky-blue sailboats, and I thought, “Huh, I like that.” My next thought was, “This guy may have served in the Korean War.” That’s when the epiphany hit: the reason I’m becoming less trendy is that I’m getting old. Well, old-er, at least. It seems my days of being at the forefront of fashion are behind me. You can’t run a business and rock a mohawk. While I know animal patterns are making their way into menswear this season, I can’t imagine anyone taking me seriously in leopard. And—although I know prints are really in right now—I only wore my favorite Hawaiian shirt a handful of times this summer. It’s a little disheartening to realize that it’s likely I’ll never again be one of the “cool kids,” but I’m taking solace in learning to compare myself to a new crowd. At dinner the other night, my uncle complimented my denim Vans. My aunt followed the compliment up by saying, “You’ve always had a very cool sense of style.” I just smiled, said, “Thank you,” and took another sip of my drink.

AUGUST 2015 THANK YOU MUMBAI FOR ALL THE GREAT LUNCHES

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Bartender of the

Month

PHOTO Andrew Hutchins

INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Michael Zawada chats with us about food and whiskey at the brand new Saloon 151. How long have you been bartending? It’s been… hmm… 19 years. Wow, that’s impressive. Where’d you get your start? My first real bartending gig was at a little place in Reading called Slammers, but I was even bartending before that at Stokesay Castle doing weddings. From that I moved on to working at Slammers. Then I worked at a couple other places before I ended up at Pietro’s Prime. What brought you to West Chester? I knew Marissa and Sean Powell from Pietro’s. I was in town one night, and they asked me what I was doing. I told them I’d taken some time off from my previous job, and they asked if I wanted to come work for them.

And I guess it just made sense to move here. Actually, I commuted from the time I got the job in September through to November—that was five years ago. I found I really liked the town, so I moved here. And you’re still working at Pietro’s, right? Oh yeah. I’d never leave there, but there I mostly serve. I really enjoy bartending, and I missed it, so I had my eyes open for another job doing that if I could find the right place. What got you interested in working at Saloon 151? I knew there was a new spot coming into town, and I wanted to check it out, plus I really liked the whole idea of a whiskey bar. When I came to check the place out, I loved the rustic look that they cultivated inside, and I thought it’d be the right place for me to get back into bartending. You guys have been open for a little over a month now. How would you say the response has been? The response has been awesome. People really like it here, and we’re getting a lot of repeat business already. I find we get a lot of compliments, but we also get a lot of suggestions, and we listen to them. What do you mean by that? If there is something you’re looking for and you don’t see it, ask. The ownership is open

to ideas and working with customers. Theres a lot of whiskey out there, so while we might not have all of it, we’re happy to try to find it for you. What seem to be the best-selling drinks so far? Blanton’s is a top seller, and Whistle Pig is fantastic. We’re also moving a lot of Angel’s Envy. How about beyond the whiskey? Well, all draft beer is $3 during happy hour— Monday-Friday, 5-7pm—and people really like our selection of craft beer. How about the food? The steak medallions are good, the brisket sandwich is excellent. The wings are really good and I’ve noticed a lot of people coming in for the tacos. I’ve tried just about everything on the menu at this point, and nothing has disappointed me. It’s all really good. What’s your favorite thing about the new job? I love the building and atmosphere—I really like how comfortable and fun the place is. Everyone—from the staff to the customers—seem to be enjoying themselves all the time. We’ve got a great crowd—from young to old— and everything is mixing really well together. It’s a great place to hang out, and everyone should really come in, check it out and enjoy themselves.

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Home

Becca Boyd has a passion for good food

Beccanomics

How about a big plate of boiled beef and potatoes for dinner, followed by tapioca pudding? If it were 1955 you’d consider that the epitome of haute cuisine. Food, like fashion, is driven by trends. Disagree? Had you even heard of kale 10 years ago? Right now elimination diets are trending in a big, inconvenient way, but the recipe below for gluten-free treats is so good that I prefer it to the original. Then we’ve got a throwback recipe that will make you rethink a ‘90s favorite. Gluten-Free Peanut Butter Cookies makes 18 1 c. peanut butter (NOT natural style); 1 egg 1/2 c. brown sugar; 1 tsp. vanilla; kosher salt 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. In a medium mixing bowl, beat peanut butter, sugar, vanilla and egg with electric mixer until blended. 3. Roll batter into 1 inch balls and place, evenly spaced, on parchment or non-stick baking sheet. 4. Using the tines of a fork, press down lightly and then turn the fork to criss-cross the pattern. 5. Sprinkle lightly with kosher salt, and place in preheated oven. 6. Bake for 12 minutes on the center rack of the oven. Let cool on baking sheet at least five minutes before gently moving to wire rack to cool completely. Mini Prosciutto Wrapped Turkey Meatloaves makes 12 1 tbsp. olive oil; 2 onions, finely diced; 1 1/2 dried thyme 4 garlic cloves, minced or pressed through garlic press 2 eggs; 1 tsp. salt; 1/2 -3/4 honey mustard, divided 1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce; 2 2/3 lb. ground turkey 1 c. lowfat plain Greek yogurt; 12 slices prosciutto (6 oz) 1 c. crushed Saltine crackers (about 22 crackers) 1. Heat oven to 450 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and place a cooling wrap on top. Spray cooking rack with nonstick spray. 2. Heat oil in skillet and add onion. Saute over medium heat until softened and translucent, about 8 minutes. Add garlic and saute, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Remove from heat. 3. In a smaller mixing bowl, whisk eggs, thyme, salt, and 2 tbsp. of the honey mustard to combine. 4. In a larger mixing bowl, combine turkey, yogurt, onion/garlic, and cracker crumbs. 5. Add egg mixture to meat mixture and stir to combine. 6. With dampened hands, shape mixture into 12 loaves and place on prepared rack. 7. Rub about 1 tbsp. of honey mustard on each loaf. Wrap with prosciutto. 8. Bake in heated oven for 25 minutes. 9. Let cool slightly and serve. bboyd@thewcpress.com


for Lunch ,D & Sunday inner Brunch

Boxcar Brewpub is the ideal spot for happy hour, a big night out or a relaxing weekend meal with the fam. Award-winning beers and a new homemade menu makes Boxcar the tastiest new place to be: • West Chester-crafted Boxcar brews • Seasonal beer cocktail menu • Local PA wines & ciders • Delicious cuisine sourced local from scratch • 6-packs and growlers to-go Check out our ever-expanding event schedule online including an extensive line-up of live music. Consider us for your next private event in our upstairs lounge.

142 East Market Street, West Chester | www.boxcarbrewingcompany.com | 484.947.2503 BC15-WCPress-Half-Page-Ad-Food-v2.indd 1

7/15/15 10:46 AM


Local

Talent

PHOTO Andrew Hutchins

INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Chatting with regionally recognized stylist and Cashmere Salon owner Juanita James. What is it that sets you apart from other stylists? I think the thing that really separates me is that I’m a very diverse stylist. I don’t just do one type of hair. Is that atypical? It’s rare. I think some people don’t explore other hair textures; they just work within one hair texture. When I studied as a cosmetologist, I was always interested in all types of hair and products, too—I was the first person in the tri-state area to introduce Great Lengths, a brand of hair extensions that was littleknown then but is widely respected now. And yet, when The Daily News wrote about it, they referred to me as, “The First African-American Salon…”

Is that a label you try to avoid? Yes. I think it’s limiting. Because you’re not an African-American stylist, you’re just a stylist. Yes. And this isn’t an “African-American salon,” it’s just a salon. I think that a lot of people are afraid of that label. And, I think being labeled that way leads to a lot of questions about my talent or my expertise. And that can be extremely hurtful. So, it’s not just a branding issue—you don’t just avoid being labeled an AfricanAmerican salon because it limits the business. You want to avoid people judging you as a stylist based on the color of your skin. It’s more than just the color of my skin—your tan has made your skin darker than mine—but because of my outward appearance I go through the, “Do you know how to work my hair?” People assume I’m not educated about my profession, which is just incredibly wrong— I’ve been in this industry for more than 20 years. I’ve sought out education on so many levels. I am the best at what I do. I have been known for my expertise across the board since my days in Philly because I pursued my education. I have a very serious passion for this industry.

If anything, I’d guess that your breadth of knowledge would make you a better stylist than someone who has never stepped outside of a single hair type. I’ve always looked at hair as just simply being hair. No matter the person, I want to be able to help them. I make sure that I have a wide range of products and tools available so that I can help anyone who walks through the doors of my salon. Has that been successful? It has. In Philadelphia I had a large, diverse staff, and my customers were equally diverse. What made you come to West Chester? My husband and I always wanted to get out of the city, move to the suburbs. At the time, I had customers coming to me in the city who were from Chester County, and they told me great things about West Chester and suggested I open up out here. Have you been happy with the way things have gone? Well, I’m still here. I opened Cashmere Salon in Philadelphia in 1997. Since then I’ve been featured in The Daily News, Philadelphia magazine and even Elle. But for me—considering the economy that we’ve experienced since I opened here in 2009—the fact that we’re still here is the greatest testament to our work.

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Children in

Tow

Jennifer Ozgur is a mother, wife and teacher who still finds time to get out and about with her family

I’ve been writing for The WC Press for three-and-a-half years now. I love the challenge of tackling a topic in 550 words. I also like the fact that I teach writing, and I get to model for my students every month. Rarely, though, do my teaching and writing worlds collide; I usually write about my life as a mother and how I try to get my children out into the borough for family fun. But this month, all the elements of my life are combining into one massive promotion for a controversial topic: summer reading! If you start asking parents' opinions on the issue, you’ll find out that feelings run deep. It’s a partisan debate. One camp passionately believes that schools and parents should work together to keep kids reading. Others? Not so much. They feel that those nine weeks of summer break should be just that: a break. I conducted a survey with all my students before the end of school, and the overwhelming feedback I got was that they want a connection between the summer reading assignment and the school setting. They also wanted an element of completion or rewards. In trying to stay objective and honor all sides of the debate, I combined the various points of view into a program that gets students reading in a fun and meaningful way. I reached out to five local restaurants on Gay Street and all graciously agreed to sponsor my idea. Peace A Pizza, Buddy’s BBF, The Couch Tomato, The Pita Pit and La Bamba all have the same poster and incentive cards. If students go in and ask for a “Tables of Content” card, they are part of the club. Essentially, I divided the summer reading selection, I Will Always Write Back, into four bite-sized pieces for the month of August. If students follow the reading schedule and go into the sponsoring eateries, they can ask for a question about the content of that portion of the book. Each business sponsors one week (except La Bamba; they are doing the entire month in Spanish). If students answer the question correctly, they will get a stamp on their card. When the card is filled, they can redeem the card for prizes. But that’s not all… I’ve also arranged two Book Talks on Tuesday 8/11 at Buddy’s and on 8/25 at The Couch Tomato, both at 7pm. I Will Always Write Back tells of a Pennfield Middle School student from Hatfield, PA who has a pen pal from Zimbabwe. The 392-page book is a lightning-quick read that chronicles the vastly different circumstances under which these two teenagers live. Themes of poverty, charity and the value of education are explored, and this true story will motivate anyone to appreciate what they have an instill a desire to help others. It's my hope that Tables of Content gains a following, resulting in students returning to school excited, but I need your help. Please follow the @TabOfCon on Twitter and promote it through your networks; consider reading this book along with your student, whether or not they go to the participating school, and join in on the activities I have planned—it will make summer reading into a memory your child will retain long past the end of August. jozgur@thewcpress.com

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The

Makeover Avante Salon & Spa offers up a bright new summer look

First, stylist Shawn used a balayage technique through the ends of model Shannon's hair with a bond-strengthening color additive called Olaplex. Shawn then used a foiling technique on the sides and the front of Shannon's hair with Redken's ammonia-free conditioning Blonde Icing. After 30 minutes, Shannon’s hair was rinsed and towel dried. Shawn then applied Redken's ShadesEQ conditioning gloss all over for 10 minutes, rinsed, and towel dried again. Next, she applied the second phase of Olaplex and combed it through the hair for five minutes. She shampooed Shannon’s hair with Redken's Extreme Shampoo and conditioned with Redken's Extreme Length Primer for five minutes. Shawn then cut Shannon's hair, adding layers and styling with Redken's Frizz Dismiss products for a smooth and sleek finish.

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E

Y TH I N R E V G

OLD NEW IS

Aga in

Making the most of consignment shopping in West Chester By Kate Chadwick

A

nyone who knows me well can attest to the fact that I’m not what you’d call a fashionista, nor could I be called “trendy” without irony. This is not to say that I don’t like fashion; I do pay attention to it, I love the creativity of it, I’m just not much on… follow-through. My “style” usually consists of t-shirt dresses, flipflops, and a baseball cap (or an occasional “real” hat) in spring and summer, and jeans/sweater/boots in fall and winter. Generally, I lean towards bohemian; I have a proclivity for strappy heels when dressing up, and I think Audrey Hepburn is the most perfect style icon who ever existed. Along with Katharine Hepburn. Oh, and Grace Kelly, although I’m not completely convinced she was human. And the older I get, the more I realize that there’s only so much you can do about the changes in your face and body, but you can control how you dress yourself.

Long before rapper Macklemore thrust the concept of consignment shopping back into the zeitgeist in 2012 with his smash “Thrift Shop,” I was a thrift shopper. Raised in a lowermiddle income, working-class family, my wardrobe for most of my life consisted of second-hand and hand-me-down clothing (and later, home furnishings, but that’s another story). Years ago, that meant the warehouse-like spaces of nonprofit organizations like Goodwill or Salvation Army stores, whose proceeds go towards job training and helping people with addiction issues, respectively. People donated things they no longer wore, or had cleaned out of an attic belonging to dear departed Aunt Betty. They’re good stores serving great purposes and I continue to frequent them, but you took your chances with the quality and condition of merchandise back then.

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Now, as a single mom, consignment shopping is practically a must. The very thought of spending $200 on a pair of jeans horrifies me, given what I could do with that amount of money at the grocery store and gas pump. And, consignment shopping offers the added bonus of not only saving you money, it can make you money if you dig into your closet and weed out those pieces that are still serviceable but perhaps don’t speak to you quite as loudly as they once did. Consignment stores today have evolved into a destination shopping category in their own right, likely brought on by the twin issues of the economic downturn in the past decade or so, and the “green” trend of recycling and repurposing instead of throwing away. The stores are pleasant, dare I say chic places to shop, where you can enlist the help of a staff member or two if, by chance, you have no idea what the heck you’re doing. Which is where I come in. Armed with a list of three local consignment shops to visit, and a budget of $50 for each, in less than three hours, I returned to The WC Press office with three bags of clothes that I can’t WAIT to wear.

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FIRST, A COUPLE OF TIPS: “Consignment shop” doesn't mean “yard sale.” Please, don’t try to negotiate a price unless there’s a reason (a stain or a tear), and even then, only with a manager or an owner. Just like in a regular retail store, if there’s a tag on something, that’s the price. I’ve had great luck walking into consignment shops with a specific item in mind, but keep your eyes open for something that might not even be on your radar. I went into a shop several months ago looking for a cocktail dress for a work event, which I got. But I spotted a fabulous long, corduroy coat on the clearance rack for $14, and I can hardly wait to wear it this fall. Keep consignment shops in mind for big events, like weddings or proms. Why spend hundreds of dollars on something that you know you’ll only wear once? Don’t spill any wine on it, have it cleaned, and consign it back. (And yes, I bought my wedding dress at a consignment shop for $200.) Don’t forget accessories! All the places I visited here have scarves, belts, purses, jewelry and sunglasses.

GREENE STREET 106 West Gay St, 484-947-5562, greenestreet.com My first stop was at Greene Street, and I’ll admit two things right here: it was the only one of the three I’d visited before, and I’ve visited it approximately a kajillion times. It was my first time at their new Gay Street location; the size of the store is good, it’s brightly lit, and they always have great music playing, always. Jaycene greeted me as soon as I was in the door, and was a huge help to me in both familiarizing myself with the new place and helping me find a top to go with a particular skirt I was stuck on. Alas, it was not meant to be, and the skirt and I eventually parted ways. (It was a Banana Republic skirt, white background with pink, peach and black flowers for $22.95, if you think you can give it a good home.) The staff was friendly and helpful, swooping in when I was carrying too many items and starting a dressing room for me. They nudged me gently out of my comfort zone by encouraging me to try things on I never have would have picked up on my own, always an eye-

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opening experience. For instance, Jaycene suggested a pale, pinkish-purple silky blouse, and although I didn’t buy it, I did learn that I can rock that color. After much trial and error, I ended up with some great finds, and even stayed a bit under budget: a great Express dress in a fun print, which can be dressed up with pumps for work, or dressed down with black boots; I snagged a super-funky pair of dangly silver earring for $12; and the big bargain of that stop was a brown Live A Little trench coat spotted on the clearance rack for $8. That’s eight dollars, with an “8.” I couldn’t NOT buy it, really. Fun fact: I follow Greene Street on Instagram, once buying three of five pairs of boots posted in one photo, right over the phone. I also bought a dress over the phone, and a friend who lives near their Red Bank location (they have ten in PA, NJ and NY) picked it up for me to save on shipping. And they’ve also begun selling menswear in some of their locations.

CHRISTINE'S CONSIGNMENT BOUTIQUE 150 Westtown Rd, 610-692-9375, christinesconsignment.com Christine’s is called a “boutique” because it really feels like one. It is at once brimming with high-end merchandise, but somehow does not feel crowded; there is plenty of floor space to navigate between racks, and all of the items are art-

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$15 fully displayed. Christine and her staff also take the time to separate out specific brands toward which their clientele tend to gravitate—Chico’s being one example—and those brands have their own racks, making this stop more efficient for the woman who knows exactly what she wants. Because I was supposed to be making the most of the budget I was so graciously alloted for this article, I resisted the urge to blow my entire purse on a stunning, satin Alexander Wang vest top (because I’m always wearing that sort of thing, clearly). Instead, under the watchful guidance of Christine and her accommodating staff, I was able to stay on my game. It almost felt like I was shopping with friends or family—I had no hesitation about popping out of the dressing room and calling “Yes or no?” and I know I’d get an honest, experienced answer. The payoff? Before I knew it, I’d purchased another dress— also gray, but shorter and infinitely more casual, a great pair of Guess dark-wash skinny jeans, a gorgeous peasant blouse perfect for fall, AND a pair of summer wedges (not pictured here because I put them right on and drove home in them). Fun fact: Christine’s has a brand-new section of the store, which sells brand-new special occasion wear—dresses AND accessories—something to keep in mind for mother-of-thebride, or perhaps looking ahead to your next black-tie wedding or other formal affair.

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CLOTHES MENTOR 1369 Wilmington Pk, 610-455-1500, clothesmentor.com Okay, another admission: the size of this place overwhelmed me just a little bit—there’s a lot going on in here. The great news is that it’s all beautifully and precisely organized, so I got my bearings in no time. And I must have had that fish-out-of-water look going, because staff member Amy glided right up to me and offered her name and assistance if needed. By then, I’d already gathered a couple of things, including outrageous BCBG suede booties for $24. And no, I have no idea whether I’ll be able to walk in them, but I spotted them as soon as I arrived, they were miraculously my size, and I look forward to standing still in them all fall and winter. I spotted a gray swing dress, perfect for the office, and which happened to match my fabulous booties. (Well, Amy told me I could wear them together; it didn’t actually occur to me.) And she should know—she's one of Clothes Mentor’s personal shoppers. They’ll work with you in person or online to coordinate your next favorite outfit. She pointed out that my dress needed a necklace— something that wouldn’t have occurred to me either, given that I’m an earring girl—and in minutes I had a pendant necklace for daytime, and a string of faux dark-gray pearls for night. Fun fact: Most shops consign on a percentage basis—typically 40% to the consigner, 60% for the shop. Here at Clothes Mentor, they make you an offer and then pay you in cash on the spot when you bring your merchandise in. Also, while they have a two-year moratorium on what they’ll accept, they take all seasons of clothing, all year.

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Owner of the

Month

PHOTO Andrew Hutchins

INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Larry Albert of Mainline Custom Clothiers has a passion for quality menswear. How did you get started in the business? I got out of the service in 1966, and I was looking for something to do. I always had a passion for men’s clothing. During that time, if you wanted to work for someone, you had to go into an apprentice-like program, which paid $1.50 an hour. So where did you start? I started at Krass Brothers. He did a ton of advertising, and he called the place “Store of the Stars.” I worked my way up and when I reached the limit of how high I could climb there, I went to work at a better store, William H Wannamaker. After about 6 months, I think, I became a department manager in sportswear and haberdashery. I stayed that way for about 2 years, then I got promoted to the suit department. Why change departments? In those days, you had to get promoted to suits, because that’s where the real money was. So, I worked in that position for a while until I became an assistant manager of the whole store. I sort of reached the limit there… Time to move onto a better store? Yeah. And from there I left and I went to work for an upscale store called Al Berman’s on 54th and City Line. I started out selling there, then I started to do buying for them also. I worked there for about six years, and then I went into my own business. I just took a chance. When was this? 1974. It was Called Albert Limited, located at the Hilton Hotel in South Philadelphia. Great sports complexes, it was booming there. It was just a chance to get in, but what happened was, when I opened up my business, 2 weeks into business I was driving down 95 and I almost died in a nearly fatal accident. I was in the hospital for five weeks. What’d you do about the store? Two weeks before that, I got a hell of an accident policy which paid me $200 per week. At that time, that was okay. I had to

do something to keep the store going, so I hired someone to run the store. Even with him, I could draw a $100 salary. So, while I’m home, laying in the bed with a cast, I’m looking at the business opportunities section and it says, “Famous Men’s Wear Store Must Sell Due to Health Conditions." I told my wife, “I want to go see this store.” And she said? “Alright, whatever.” The store was Witlin & Gallagher, a very famous store started in 1917. They had a 35-year lease, good until 1995 and for $35,000 I got everything. JFK Boulevard was a little off the beaten path, but it was perfect for me. I closed the store at the Hilton, hired the other man to work with me at the new store, and that’s how we started. And it grew from there? I expanded it to four stores: Jenkintown, Gateway Shopping Center, Margate… I even had a store in Atlantic City for a short period of time.

What brought you to West Chester? I retired for a time—I closed the last store in 2000 because dress down just killed the whole suit business. But there was still money in custom, and the people buying custom were from Malvern, West Chester, Media. That's what led me to open up on Gay Street about five years ago. What brought you back into business? Oh, you know, I missed it really. I always had a passion for it. And you followed that passion into this bigger location on Market Street. Right, and it just kept growing, so this past year we expanded, brought in a bigger selection of retail and a section of formal wear and tuxedos, for rent or purchase. It’s a little bit of a risk to expand, but if you’re in business for a long time like I’ve been, it’s sort of like riding a bike: you know how to do it; you’re not afraid.

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Tell Me something

Good

Kate Chadwick takes a moment to spotlight local citizens for doing something swell.

Who he is: Anton Patriarca What he does: The 18-year-old will be entering West Chester University this fall to study technical theater. Anton lives with his parents and older brother in West Goshen, is an avid photographer and was involved with the school stage crew while attending West Chester East High School; he graduated this past spring. Why he’s on this page: For nearly three years Anton has volunteered four hours every Sunday (and sometimes Saturdays) at the Chester County Hospital with their VolunTeen Program. According to CCH’s Volunteer Services Coordinaor, Carol Dunigan, who told us that Anton has logged 333 hours with the program. Among the numerous tasks that Anton and his fellow teen volunteers perform are making beds, folding gowns, filling water pitchers, delivering flowers, escorting patients, running errands to the lab and radiology, helping in the storeroom and mailroom, and assisting nurses with various tasks. “My favorite aspect of what we do is that we’re doing the jobs that many people tend to overlook,” Anton told us. “Not only is it helpful to the patients, it’s also helpful to the doctors and nurses who we work alongside.” What he likes about West Chester: “I just love that it’s such a quaint little town,” he told us. “There are so many places to eat, and just hang out with your friends.” His favorite hangout? “Outside the old courthouse—it’s so calm and peaceful." As for places to eat, Anton likes Iron Hill Brewery, Kiwi Frozen Yogurt, and, like so many of us, Wawa. What we like about him: His willing spirit to get out of his comfort zone a bit. “I first learned about the VolunTeen program from my mom, because she signed my brother up for it,” he said. “At first I was unsure if I wanted to volunteer in the hospital, so I looked around for some other alternatives for volunteering, but I didn’t find anything that I really liked. So I agreed to do the program. I found that I really started to enjoy it.” Anton said that even though he doesn’t plan to enter the medical field, he enjoys volunteering at the hospital for a completely different reason. “I don’t do it because of the medical aspect,” he said. “I do it because it’s a way of giving back to the community.” Moral of the story: Doing for others is wonderful, and it’s something we all should consider, but in the end, it doesn’t just help them. In Anton's words, “I love doing this, because the work that I do comes straight from the heart.” For more information on volunteering at Chester County Hospital, please visit chestercountyhospital.org, or call 610-431-5000. Correction: Last month we incorrectly identified The Arc as “The ARC,” and the organization utilizes the term “children with disabilities" instead of “disabled children.” Do you know a WC resident who’s doing good things and deserves a little recognition in Tell Me Something Good? Let us know! Email details to kchadwick@thewcpress.com.

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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models MAURA SCHLUPP LAUREN BALDWIN GABRIELLE LIBERI

photography ADAM JONES

hair & makeup AVANTE SALON & SPA: MADI MILLER, LAUREN TASSONI, MARGERY FEENEY & LINDSEY HAMMAKER

LOOK BOOK ion in West Chester

The Best of Fall Fash

location courtesy of TFS CAPITAL & SWOPE LEES

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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K N I BL ess Flower Fit and Flare Dr by KEEPSAKE $187

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM 35 136 W Gay St\610.431.2212\shopblink.com


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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


S ' E N I T S I CHR

Jeans HUDSON $39, Cotton Navy Blouse COTTON ON TOP $22, Watch BURBERRY $449, Necklace ANN TAYLOR $22, Boots MARNI $180, Purse ELLE TAHARI $89, Sunglasses RAY-BAN $69

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM 37 105 Westtown Rd\610.692.9375\christinesconsignment.com


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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


GREENE STREET

Cream Shirt EQUIPMENT $69, Leather Skirt SILENCE AND NOISE $16, Gray Booties MARC JACOBS $337, Black Vest WALTER BAKER $59, Fringe Clutch SHIRALEAH $29, Sunglasses AJ MORGAN $15

106 W Gay St\484.947.5562\greenestreet.com

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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JANE CHALFANT RRO $168 Micro Jersey Dress EVA VA LTAN $35 Cuff Bracelet KARINE SU N $72 Necklace KARINE SULTA E SULTAN $38 RIN Rhinestone Earrings KA

123 N High St\610.696.0290\janechalfant.com

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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KALY MOONEY $255 Silver Necklace VANESSA Handbag BED-STU $161 T $74 Sweater Top EFFIE'S HEAR READ $106 TH D Maxi Skirt PLUME AN

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM 43 37 W Gay St\610.436.8272\kalyclothing.com


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MAINLINE CUSTOM Jacket ENZO $295 Shirt MAINLINE CUSTOM $145 Jeans JACK OF SPADES $165

131 W Market St\484.905.7098\mainlinecustomclothiers.com

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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S ' A N E L A M VINTAGE 1950s Floral Dress $120, 1920s Flapper Purse $175 1960s Crystal Necklace $5 5

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM 47 101 W Gay St\610.738.9952\malenasboutique.com


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0523052 3052305 2305230 @may23online 5230523 0523

e n li n O r o e r o t S Shop in www.May23Online.com 117 W Gay Street * West Chester, PA 19382

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MAY 23

Unicorn Necklace MAY23 $8, Plaid Top LUMIERE $34 Tan Tank ALTERNATIVE EARTH $22, Watch GENEVA $32 Clutch URBAN EXPRESSIONS $50, Jeans CHIQLE $48

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM 49 117 W Gay St\484.356.1008\may23online.com


Excite all of your senses

at West Chester’s most alternative & unique boutique! A vast array of “one-of-a-kind” products, including...

Hip Clothing • Bags & Accessories • Jewelry Galore • Incense/Oils/Candles • Tapestries/Blankets • Eclectic home/Dorm décor • Hemp products • Grateful Dead, Bob Marley & ‘60s Memorabilia • Tie Dyes & Cool T-shirts • Hand-blown glass & local artwork • Tobacco accessories • Groovy Gifts Gift Certificates Available

130 W. Gay Street 610-431-6607 www.moonflowershop.com A portion of our proceeds go to environmental and pro-peace charities! All major credit cards accepted. Open 7 Days A Week

10% off purchase with student ID! SINCE 1992

Best Steak House In West Chester Live Music on Weekends, Patio Dining Fabulous Martinis, Seasonal Menu

125 W Market Street 484.760.6100  PietrosPrime.com pietrosprime.com/facebook 50

THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


R E W O L MOONF

Halter Dress CULTURE SHOP $46, Crocheted Dress CULTURE SHOP $48 Turquoise Pendant MOONFLOWER $72, Vegan Leather Jacket VELVET $120

AUGUST THEWCPRESS.COM 51 1302015 W Gay St\610.431.6607


We are Insurance. We are Farmers. Brandt van Naerssen agency owner Business 610-386-7326 Fax 610-441-7583 Cell 610-745-3276 bvannaerssen@farmersagent.com www.farmersagentpa.com

1000 Continental Drive, Suite 500 King of Prussia, PA 19406-2820 www.farmersagentpa.com

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NICH

Kimono FLYING TOMATO $46 Half Top JACK $40, Jeans BLANKNYC $98 Necklace WITH GOOD INTENTIONS $52

29 S High St/610.436.8181/shopnich.com

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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TISH Knit Sweater Top MAX AZRIA $268 Knit Sweater Skirt MAX AZRIA $198 Gold Cuff BRACELET $28

138 E Gay St\610.692.7500\tishstyle.com AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM 55


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Home

Diane LeBold and the West Chester Food Co-Op examine local food production and bring eaters closer to the source of their food.

Grown

Why the “USDA Certified Organic” label matters.

Decades ago, when consumers first became aware of the health and environmental issues related to their food, marketing moguls began labeling foods “organic” or “natural” to make them seem healthy. But there were no real regulations governing those labels. Then in 1990, with passage of the Organic Foods Production Act, the US Department of Agriculture created a rigorous certification process that finally defined what “organic” means. You may be surprised to learn that it’s a lot more than simply prohibiting the use of synthetic fertilizers and toxic pesticides. Food producers are prohibited from using the term “organic” in any way (for example, claiming that a product has some organic ingredients) unless they meet specific USDA requirements. And they can use the circular “USDA Organic” logo only if a product is certified as meeting all USDA requirements. Here in Chester County, Two Gander Farm is among a handful of farms that have achieved USDA certification. On a hot evening in July, Deirdre Flemming who, with her husband Trey, operates the farm, talked to representatives of the West Chester Food Co-op about the challenges facing small organic farmers and why USDA certification is so important. “USDA certification isn’t just about food,” she explained. “It’s about a strict process designed to protect natural resources and ensure the health of plants and animals. We don’t just focus on raising crops but on enhancing the quality of soil and water—and conserving wetlands, woodlands and wild life. The result of this process is healthy food.” “To maintain our certification, we have to follow the approved plan and keep good records,” Deirdre continued. “Those records get reviewed annually. It can be expensive, and, for most farms, it takes three years to get the certification. But I would encourage other local growers to do it. There’s a large population of highly educated consumers in this area who know the importance of the label. And they’re a committed customer base.” A cost-share program is available that provides partial reimbursement for certification fees, so it’s now more affordable for producers to become certified. Deirdre said that small farmers in Chester County face challenges, but those challenges aren’t insurmountable. “We lease ten acres, the house and the barn from the Brandywine Conservancy,” she said. “The rest of the 260 acres is kept in forest and meadows to protect the Brandywine River watershed. The cost of owning a farm here is beyond what most small farmers can afford, so land trusts like this can be a good choice for young farmers, now.” –dlebold@TheWCPress.com

we’ll manage all your social media for $200 a month find out how: info@mathersproductions.com

Two Gander Farm is located at 110 Buck Rd, north of Downingtown, 610-659-0138. Register for their winter CSA at twoganderfarm.com

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND: It's everyone’s favorite bar game, in print (and you won’t have to pay 50 cents). You can actually WIN money. Compare the two photos at right. They may look the same, but there are five subtle differences between the two. Find those five differences and identify the items that have been changed. Then send an email to contests@thewcpress.com listing those items. You’ll be entered to win a $25 gift card to a local business. Winners will be chosen at random, and their name will be posted to Facebook along with the solution at the end of the month. So make sure to like us and follow along if you want to play. Enjoy!

Can you spot the five differences in this photo from Paris Fashion Week?

Facebook.com/thewcpress 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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August

Hit List

DJ Romeo curates a list featuring the top tracks you'll hear played on the radio this month.

The following is a list of songs that will take over the radio stations in the next few months—you'll soon know them by heart and play them 'til they're tired. But, good news: you can download them first and look like the cool musical genius to all of your lame friends. djromeo@thewcpress.com

soundcloud.com/d-j-romeo

Cro – “Dream” R. City ft. Adam Levine – “Locked Away” Demi Lovato – “Cool for the Summer” Thomas Jack – “Rivers” CHVRCHES – “Leave a Trace” Afrojack ft. Mike Taylor – “SummerThing!” Avicii – “Waiting for Love” Jason Derulo – “Cheyenne” Jr. Jr. – “Gone” Selena Gomez ft. A$AP Rocky – “Good for You” Meghan Trainor ft. John Legend – “Like I’m Gonna Lose You” Kevin Rudolf – “That Other Ship” Kygo ft. Conrad Sewell – “Firestone” Fetty Wap ft. Drake – “Come My Way” Walk the Moon – “Different Colors” Lawrence Taylor – “Bang Bang” Calvin Harris – “How Deep is Your Love” Chainsmokers – “Waterbed” Nico & Vinz ft. Kid Ink & Bebe Rexha – “That’s How You Know” 5 Seconds of Summer – “She’s Kinda Hot” Meek Mill – “Monster” Chris Brown – Liquor” Adam Lambert – “Ghost Town” Jidenna ft. Roman GianArthur – “Classic Man” Nathan Sykes – “Kiss Me Quick” Travie McCoy ft. Sia – “Golden” Daya – “Hide Away” Timeflies ft. Natalie La Rose – “Worse Things Than Love” Icona Pop – “Clap Snap” Cee Lo Green – “Robin Williams”

AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Computer Support (clothing optional)

Introducing RemoteWC!

Remote technology support services you can trust. (Anytime, anywhere, in any attire)

Schedule your remote session today at RemoteWC.com Brought to you by West Chester Computer Doctors, located in the middle of the block at 28 South High Street www.computerwc.com  610.431.0400  support@computerwc.com AUGUST 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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The WC Press Fashion Issue - August 2015  

Voice of the Borough

The WC Press Fashion Issue - August 2015  

Voice of the Borough