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CONTENTS F E AT U R E

82

19

86

SUPER SUMMER GUIDE

For instant summer fun, just add family to this overview of Silicon Valley events and destinations.

INTERVIEW 82

DAVID HASSELHOFF

The man behind Baywatch says he’ll be ready for a new season of America’s Got Talent.

34

16

52

DEPARTMENTS UPFRONT 06

LETTERS { you talk }

12

SPOTLIGHT { local news }

16

HIT LIST { editors’ picks }

82

MOVIES Previews and Reviews: Sex and the City: The Movie, Kung Fu Panda, The Happening, and more.

86

ARTS Feature: The California Theatre Center presents a quartet of much-loved works this summer, including Thornton Wilder’s The Matchmaker.

90

FAMILY & COMMUNITY Feature: Eco-friendly education allows young students to develop a green attitude, and a green thumb.

LIFESTYLE 34

SPORTS & ADVENTURE Feature: Get ready for soccer as you’ve never seen it before.

38

HEALTH & BEAUTY Feature: Honey is more than just something you add to your tea – it has a bunch of sweet health benefits.

52

STYLE & SHOPPING Feature: A day at the beach requires more than just a towel and a tube of sunscreen.

54

HOME & DESIGN Feature: The outdoor kitchen is becoming a necessary summer luxury, with many now rivaling their indoor counterparts.

COLUMNS 08

DREGULATOR { media watchdog }

58

HOME WORK { from house to home }

89

HOT TICKET { arts alert }

98

THE FINAL LAST WORD { local opinion } SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTIONS

14 DAYS 62

76

DINING Feature: Jim Denevan, a fan of farm fresh fare, talks about the upcoming season of his popular Outstanding in the Field dinners. NIGHTLIFE & MUSIC Feature: The upcoming concert calendar sees a gaggle of talented musicians heading to town for an endless summer of great gigs.

38

SV GUIDES: 36

90

54

EXERCISE & LIFESTYLE

53

BOUTIQUES

68

CATERING

78

WINERIES

80

SPORTS BARS

93

WEDDING PLANNING

SV MARKETPLACE: 96

HOME IMPROVEMENT

62 THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

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MASTHEAD

OUR PEOPLE W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

The Wave Magazine Silicon Valley's Finest Entertainment & Lifestyle Magazine Volume 08, Issue 12 | June 2-15, 2008

THE WAVE MEDIA President/Publisher: B. Peter Brafford Associate Publisher: Chris Rhoads

Vice President, Corporate Relations: Dan Ferguson Vice President, Sales: Bill Hargreaves

EDITORIAL Events Editor: Johnny Brafford Senior Editor: Jo Abbie Assistant Editor: Mitchell Alan Parker Copy Editor: Ed Robertson

Contributing Writers: Seanbaby, Fred Topel, Cintra Wilson, Michael J. Vaughn, Tom Lanham, Damon Orion, Joanna Currier, Irene Kew,Kathy Chin Leong, Steve Goldstein, Jennifer & Kitty O’Neil

ART / PRODUCTION Design Director & Photographer: Chris Schmauch Graphic Designer: Jon Sontag

Contributors: Lisa Ferdinandsen

[ DESIGN ]

SALES / ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Bill Hargreaves Online Sales / Marketing: Chris Rhoads Traffic Manager: Yvonne Gonzalez

Marketing / Traffic Coordinator: Rebekah Hollister District Sales Managers: Ken Sorensen, Ray Klopp, Janette Deuerling, Grayson Lumpkin

CLIENT SERVICES Account Managers: Yvonne Gonzalez, Rebekah Hollister

ONLINE IT Support: Jenny Phan Design / Code: Chris Schmauch

Online Publishing: Jon Sontag

CIRCULATION Director of Circulation: Matt Smith

Circulation Representatives: Javier Segura, Guillermo Merino, Heather Deveraux, Luis Barreto, Alberto Velarde, Rogelio Galvez, Bertha Fernandez

EMAILS Display Ads: advertising@thewavemag.com Marketplace Ads: marketplace@thewavemag.com Editorial: writeus@thewavemag.com Events: events@thewavemag.com

Design: design@thewavemag.com Employment: jobs@thewavemag.com Distribution: distribution@thewavemag.com

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Bill Hargreaves (408) 467-3260 advertising@thewavemag.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send to writeus@thewavemag.com or use the mailing address below.

P UBLICAT ION INFORMAT ION

SUBSCRIPTIONS to The Wave Magazine run

The Wave Media publishes The Wave Magazine.

$9.95 for 20 issues (one year). For more informa-

All content of this issue is copyright ©2008 by The

tion, call (408) 467-3200 or visit

Wave Media, Inc., and may not be reprinted in

http://subscribe.thewavemag.com

whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. The Wave is available throughout

ED IT O RIA L C O N T RIBU T IO N S

the Silicon Valley; one copy of each edition of

Unsolicited manuscripts and story ideas must be

The Wave is available for free. Anyone removing

accompanied by a stamped return envelope.

magazines in bulk will be prosecuted.

The publisher assumes no responsibility for lost artwork, photographs or manuscripts. Submit all

SUBSCRIP T ION INFORMAT ION BACK ISSUES of The Wave Magazine are available for $5. Please submit your request for a back issue to: 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110.

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manuscripts, artwork and photographs to: The Wave Magazine, 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110

Phone: (408) 467-3200 Fax: (408) 467-3401


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Tickets available at the Box Office, by calling 1-800-786-8208 or online at SouthShoreRoom.com Get $5 off tickets* with your FREE Total Rewards® card. Not a member? Sign up today!

*Total Rewards® ticket discount does not apply to VEX nightclub or Cabaret shows at Harveys. Offer not available on all shows. $5 off does not apply to Nutcracker. See box office for details. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2008, Harrah’s License Company, LLC. All Rights Reserved. T1600-08-223


LET TERS

WRITE US@TheWaveMag.com

Give the gift of everything.

LETTERS FROM YOU

When sending letters, please include your full name, city, state, and daytime telephone number. Letters may be edited for clarity or length and may be used in any medium owned by The Wave Media. Send snail mail to 1735 Technology Dr., Ste. 575, San Jose, CA 95110 and email to writeus@thewavemag.com.

Make Father’s Day or Graduation Day extra special with the new BlackBerry® Curve 8330™ and Simply Everything Plan. It’s the perfect gift that does it all and the perfect way to stay in touch. Make Father’s Day or Graduation Day extra special

The Zero1 Festival is exactly what San Jose needs [“Art on the Edge,” Vol. 8, Iss. 11]. I’ve long felt that San Jose has been lacking in the arts and especially in anything raw and edgy. People wonder why SF has so much appeal: it’s not only the food and the ambience, it’s the arts – and modern art, to boot! Sure, San Jose has family appeal, and a lot to offer historically, but when it comes to anything independent or defiant (especially when related to movies, art, or music), you can forget about it here. No wonder the kids think art is boring; they’re only exposed to what they see hanging in restaurants.

with the new BlackBerry® Curve 8330™ and Simply Everything Plan. It’s the perfect gift that does it all and the perfect way to stay in touch.

Thanks for previewing the festival. Even though it seems like a big thing, I wouldn’t have known about it if it weren’t for your article. Greg San Jose

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6

7/28/08

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Inside California Check Cashing 4110 Monterey Hwy. San Jose, CA 95111 (408) 578-2777 7/14/08

THANK YOU for the rules on men’s jewelry [“Male Flair,” Vol. 8, Iss. 11]. Aside from saying it’s okay for men to wear necklaces (personally, I hate that), I agree with all your “terms.” Even in today’s metro world, many things just do not belong, and bold accessories on men are one of them. I prefer a simple man with simple tastes. Jeans and a T-shirt are often the only necessities. Marcy San Jose Although I don’t think your Sex and The City cover [Vol. 8, Iss. 11] is the best or most original I do think it’s the most popular. I’ve seen the magazine all over the place lately! I can’t decide if it’s because you’ve got an interview with Mr. Big and everyone loves the show, or because the word SEX is so huge on the cover. It’s no secret that sex sells, and I have to admit that I secretly want to read all the sex tips

in magazines while in line at the grocery store. So what’s your take? Do you think you’ll start writing more about sex? June Campbell I tried your free dial-a-horoscope in your past issue because I wanted lotto numbers… winning lotto numbers, which is my point. I didn’t win! Basically, I figure you owe me around $20 million! So, contact your accounting department and tell them to cut me a check – cash will work, too, but whatever works easiest for you guys. This isn’t a joke, so don’t try just laughing me off. I’m prepared to break thumbs. Thanks. Jerry Los Gatos Regarding “The Science of Insomnia” [Vol. 8, Iss. 11], I’m surprised you didn’t mention anything about sleep apnea. Although you mention somewhere that you’re writing about insomnia not attributable to a medical cause, I bet most people have no idea what the cause of their insomnia is. It’s worth it to get checked out. I was diagnosed with sleep apnea, which is a disorder characterized by pausing in breathing. If you have sleep apnea, you’ll wake up a lot during the night, because your body is telling you to wake up to breathe – but you won’t necessarily know what the problem was once you wake up. I have a machine now that helps me breathe and it helps me sleep. Some people have weird nose/throat setups that’ll cause this. Others who are obese have pressure on them from the fat buildup that’ll cause this, so getting a good night’s sleep can be as easy as losing weight. Bill Mountain View


LET TERS

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

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COLUMN: THE DREGUL ATOR

THE DREGULATOR B Y C I N T R A W I L S O N - W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

What Happens in Iraq Stays in Iraq

O

il has hit $132 a barrel, which could be why Dick Cheney felt comfortable addressing graduating cadets at the US Coast Guard academy in Connecticut on May 21 while wearing a 10-gallon hat. Why he thought a Texas pope hat was an appropriate look is a mystery, unless Arby’s unveiled a line of menswear with its new Bacon Beef sandwich. Cognitive dissonance is nothing new for our veep, who surreally told the new Coast Guard officers that the troop surge in Iraq “has succeeded brilliantly.” “The only way to lose this fight is to quit. That would be irresponsible,” Cheney said. “More than that, quitting would be an act of betrayal and dishonor.” Betrayal and dishonor in the eyes of Dick Cheney, presumably. Quitting the fight he invented may be an act of dishonor, but allegations of mismanagement, corruption and fraud among contractors directly related to Halliburton apparently don’t bother him. KBR (a division of Halliburton), DynCorp and a third firm just landed a 10-year contract worth up to $150 billion… and there’s still nobody watching the cash register. KBR has been accused – again – by ex-employees of engaging in brazen racketeering, according to Bruce Falconer of Mother Jones. “Three whistleblowers before the Senate’s Democratic Policy Committee (DPC) accused US private contractors of looting Iraqi palaces and ministries, stealing military equipment, fencing supplies destined for US troops, and even operating a prostitution ring.” Former KBR employee Frank Cassaday told the committee: “The ice foreman was cheating the troops out of ice at the same time that he was trading the ice for DVDs, CDs, food, and other items at the Iraqi shops across the street.” Cassaday later said that he observed co-workers bringing stolen US military equipment to the KBR camp. Thefts of US military equipment and supplies, wrote Falconer, are so pervasive they are nicknamed “drug deals” by KBR employees. But nobody likes a snitch. When Cassaday told his KBR superiors what he’d seen, KBR security officers held him in his tent for two days, transferred him into “protective custody” for another four days, then transferred him to work in a laundry. Linda Warren, another former KBR employee, told the DPC that KBR construction employees were not only “… looting, but they had a system in place to get contraband out of the country so it could be sold on eBay. They stole artwork, rugs, crystal, and even melted down gold to make spurs for cowboy

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

boots.” Ms. Warren, too, was suckerpunched by KBR brass: her vehicle was taken, her access to phones and the internet was cut off, and she was eventually transferred out of Baghdad. Barry Halley, a former project manager for a DynCorp subcontractor, told the committee, “A co-worker… was killed when he was traveling in an unsecure car and shot performing a high-risk mission… I believe that my co-worker could have survived if he had been riding in an armored car. At the time, the armored car… was being used by a manager to transport prostitutes from Kuwait to Baghdad.” This is not a new allegation for DynCorp. Ex-employees have accused DynCorp of being directly involved in human trafficking and child prostitution rings as early as 1999. Ex-DynCorp employee Ben Johnston blew the whistle on DynCorp’s practice of buying underage girls in Bosnia for use as sex slaves, according to a 2002 article in Insight Magazine by Kelly Patricia O’Meara. “(The girls) were from Russia, Romania and other places, and they were imported in by DynCorp and the Serbian mafia. These guys would say, ‘I gotta go to Serbia this weekend to pick up three girls.’ They talk about it and brag about how much they pay for them – usually between $600 and $800.” Johnston, too, was sacked for these revelations; a RICO statute (Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organization Act) lawsuit was filed on his behalf in Texas. Christine Dolan, founder of the International Humanitarian Campaign Against the Exploitation of Children, told O’Meara: “(W)hat makes this more egregious for the US is that our purpose in those regions is to restore some sense of civility. Now you’ve got employees of US contractors in bed with the local mafia and buying kids for sex!” Sadly, the DPC has no power to pass legislation, but it did wring its hands – and will “refer allegations to the Department of Justice and the Pentagon’s Inspector General for further investigation,” the DPC’s communications director told Falconer. Still a whole lot of cowboy hats in DC, fiends. Yipeee. TW


COLUMN: THE DREGUL ATOR

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

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SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

Wine Press Clueless about wine? Palo Alto’s Nirvino is here to help.

C SPOT L IGH T

hoosing the right wine is no small matter. Among other things, it can play a crucial role in deciding how well your date goes, how much you enjoy your meal, or the impression you make at that important dinner party. Faced with such pressures, many of us find ourselves wishing we had a wine-savvy angel on our shoulder, one who could steer us clear of the bad stuff and guide us to that magic bottle. The next-best thing to that angel is Nirvino (www.nirvino.com), a Palo Alto-based website that offers more than a million wine reviews, free of charge. Much in the spirit of sites like RottenTomatoes.com and Metacritic. com, Nirvino gives each wine a score of one to five stars, based on the comments of experts as well as other site users. The site also offers prices, flavor profiles and suggested food pairings, all in the name of sending you home with the perfect wine.

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“If you look at what’s been happening with a lot of consumer research in wine, most people are confused by it,” notes Christian Schroeder, the Palo Alto software developer who founded Nirvino last year. “They like wine, but it’s kind of an intimidating thing to get into. What we’re trying to do is take the guesswork out of that, and make it so that you’re not making a purchasing decision based on ‘Oh, that has a cool label’ or ‘This waiter is kind of selling me on this one,’ [so that] you’ve got some really valid information to make a decision.” Of special help to the layman is Nirvino Mobile, which makes Nirvino’s vast cellar of information available on almost any mobile device. Just punch in www.nirvino. com/mobile when you’re cruising the shopping aisles or sitting at the restaurant table, and all the world’s wine knowledge is at your fingertips – literally.


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

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SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

University Ave., Palo Alto

Small Town Marketing Palo Alto puts out the welcome mat for out-of-towners.

B

y the close of the financial year ending Jun. 30, tourism will have brought San Francisco almost $13 million in surplus revenue. If all goes according to plan, some of that fiscal love will soon spill over to the city of Palo Alto, which will be spending $240,000 per year for the next two years in an effort to attract more tourists. “When people go to San Francisco, they’re going up to Napa, and they’re going down to San Jose, or they’re going over to Santa Cruz,” says Susan Barnes, Palo Alto’s manager of economic development. “We just want to be one of those opportunities that people look at when they’re taking a look at the area.” To this end, marketing project Destination Palo Alto plans to work closely with local hotels, retail areas

and other establishments to promote the city in an effective, comprehensive way. For example, Barnes says Destination Palo Alto plans to contract with the Convention and Visitors Bureau to make it easier for out-of-towners to use Palo Alto hotels. “When you come to Palo Alto and you book a hotel, you have to go hotel by hotel by hotel,” she explains. “Whereas if you go through a visitors bureau, they can give you a block of hotels and connect you with the proper hotel with one phone call.” Further efforts will be made to

make it easier for visitors to access Palo Alto businesses, as well as popular shopping areas such as Stanford Shopping Center and California Avenue. “Even though we’re a little town of only 61,000 people, we’re in a very large region,” Barnes offers. “We’ve got great hotels here, great shopping and a great university, and we’d like to maximize this opportunity.” For more information, visit www.destinationpaloalto.com.

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SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOT L IGH T

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SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

Coyote Creek Trail

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A Path to Enlightenment San Jose’s cycling trails are expanding, one pedal at a time.

R

ecently, Bicycling Magazine named San Jose among the country’s “Most Improved Cities, Runner-Up” for cycling. Why the runner-up status? Well, as the magazine reports, not only is San Jose often overshadowed by San Francisco, its trails and bike network “has some gaps,” as San Jose city bike coordinator John Brazil recently pointed out. But that may change, and quickly. As program coordinator, Brazil hopes to expand San Jose’s bike paths, bike lanes and trails such as the Los Gatos Creek, Coyote Creek and Guadalupe Creek trails. Currently, the city has about 150 miles of street paths and 30 miles of completed trails for recreation and transportation purposes. The goal, says Brazil, is to create a network of 400 miles of connected bikeways throughout the area. “It’s an incremental work in progress,” he explains, adding that the plan is a “living document” that is constantly being upgraded and adapted in response to land use changes. San Jose’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee (BPAC) meets monthly to discuss suggestions to current and future projects. The program, which is funded by grant and sales tax money from the city, successfully completes about five projects a year, adding many miles to the paths and trails.

Although San Francisco is often considered a mecca for cycling enthusiasts, Brazil stresses that this is less a competition than a collaboration. In fact, he not only has a good relationship with the progressive biking city to the north, but often looks to its committee for ideas and advice in order to make San Jose more bike friendly. In the meantime, San Jose has some laurels of its own to be proud of, including the bronze Bicycle Friendly Community Award it won in 2006 from the League of American Bicyclists. Fewer than 100 American cities have won such an award, which is based on the number of trails and how friendly a city is to its bicyclists. “Many places in the country, you can’t bring bicycles on public transit,” says Brazil, noting that nearly all public transportation vehicles in San Jose are bicycle friendly, including CalTrain, light rail and buses. About six to seven sections of bike lanes and paths, including additions to Tully Road, Yerba Buena Road and Seventh Street, are slated to be completed by Jun. 30 – a project that will not only add about five miles to the current network of biking circuitry, but further close the gap with you know who. TW


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOT L IGH T

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» FEATURE

HitList

» FEATURE

37

C O M P I L E D B Y M I T C H E L L A L A N PA R K E R

Sun Visor DVD and Game Player Beginning in July, it will be illegal to drive in California while talking on a cell phone without a hands free device. But the law doesn’t say anything about watching a movie or playing a videogame while driving. OK. That may not be entirely true. And we certainly don’t condone doing either of the aforementioned, unless, of course, you’re riding shotgun. Our childhood road trips were bogged down with inane diversions like “I spy…” and various license plate games. Now, however, a journey across the country won’t be described in terms of miles, distance, time, or even the number of meaningful conversations we have with family members. Thanks to the Sun Visor, trips will be described in dialogue like “It took five movies, four seasons of Lost, 850 songs, 11 games of Asteroids and 17 games of Donkey Kong just to drive around the United States.” Oh, America, you look so majestic on a 7-inch color LCD screen. $100 www.chinavision.com

HIT L IST

Jesse James Men’s Dopp Kit If you are reading this and still haven’t bought a gift for Father’s Day, don’t panic. There’s still time. And if you’ve got a West Coast Chopper motorcycle, you’ll have plenty of time to get to Kiehl’s. Somehow WCC owner and ruffian Jesse James has found time away from building 10 custom bikes a year to design a men’s Dopp kit for Kiehl’s. Ironically, the always-greasy, smelling-of-motor-oil Mr. Sandra Bullock loves Kiehl’s grooming products so much that he decided to design the limited edition kit, which includes his favorites — the Ultimate Man Scrub Bar and the White Eagle Shave Cream. The kit also includes face wash, lotion and, of course, ultimate strength moisturizer. Jesse James is a lot of things. But a man with dirty dry skin, he is not. We particularly like how cool and manly we smell after using this stuff. $66

can be adjusted for reading, watching TV, conversing with the mother ship or examining moon rocks. The name is apparently derived and inspired from Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams, who is responsible for sending human forms and images to you during slumber. $5,580 www.unicahome.com

who prefer the Miami Vice soundtrack to any other form of music.” Nonetheless, the instrument is pretty fascinating. By running a hand or finger through one of the six horizontal laser beams, the hand jockey, uh, musician activates an instrument found in one of 30 preprogrammed songs from 19 different musical genres, which are displayed on a computer screen via a USB attachment. Basically, one laser acts as a piano, another a guitar, another a saxophone, etc. and when each one is meddled with, the instrument is heard. The result: anything with lasers is cool. $599 Sharper Image Valley Fair Mall, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd. Ste. 1009, Santa Clara (408) 241-9290; Sharper Image Stanford Shopping Center, 16 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto (650) 322-5488 www.sharperimage.com

Kiehl’s Valley Fair Mall, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 1045, Santa Clara (408) 554-7080; Kiehl’s Stanford Shopping Center, 365 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto (650) 617-4599 www.kiehls.com

Beamz Music Performance System The video we saw of a guy playing the Beamz laser harp is a little ridiculous. Touted as “the next Guitar Hero,” we would only add “but for mid-life crisis men 16

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

Morfeo Sofa Sleeper What looks like the decapitated head of a giant alien is actually a sleeper sofa perfect for anyone who leans toward sci-fi inquisitiveness. The two antenna lamps

Sinners Inc. CaliCustom Jewelry Last issue [Vol. 8, Iss. 11] we ran a feature on men’s accessories, asserting that only certain kinds of jewelry were acceptable for men to wear. We failed to mention one specific and highly important category: anything fashioned in the spirit of hot rods or choppers. That includes rings. Why the change of heart? Well, a phone call from Carlos Lovato of San Josebased Sinners Inc. sure helped. Along with friend and fellow “disenchanted hardware designer” Victor Martino, the custom jewelry maker is a badass force to be reckoned with. By making a custom-cast sterling silver line of jewelry — rings fashioned to look like pistons and cross necklaces as valve covers — these ornaments probably wouldn’t melt even if you plunged them directly into a raging river of hellfire. And don’t worry, take Lavato’s word for it that “No hot rods or choppers were harmed in making our jewelry. They only provide inspiration.” $120-$2,000 Available at Bettina’s, 320 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 335-1383; Sinners Inc. (408) 410-7391 www.sinners-inc.com TW


HIT LIST: EDITORS’ PICKS

HIT L IST

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Present this coupon at any open ticket window at California’s Great America and save $10.00 off each general admission ticket (ages 3 & up, 48" or taller) up to six (6) people. Valid for general admission only which includes use of all rides, shows, and attractions in operation on day of use except pay events/concerts and pay-per-play attractions. Coupon is valid 3/16/08 –11/2/08 during 2008 public operating days only. Not valid on Park company rentals or special events, including but not limited to Halloween Haunt. Not valid with any other offer, discount, coupon or promotion. Call (408) 988-1776 or visit www.cagreatamerica.com to confirm public operating dates and hours as they are subject to change. TM, ® and © 2008 Cedar Fair Entertainment Company All Rights Reserved. PLU 380664


With our comprehensive guide on hand, all you’ll need to kick-start the summer are your loved ones, some cool refreshments, and a tube of sunscreen. Whether it’s a day at the beach, the roar of engines at a high octane sporting event, a hike in the hinterland or a cultural excursion, Silicon Valley truly is the ultimate summer destination – and you’re already here. THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

Accredited by WASC


2008 SUPER SUMMER GUIDE

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus

2008 Vintners’ Festival

Billy Jones Wildcat Railroad

Gilroy Garlic Festival

Summer Events More than 70 ways to have fun and then some.

W

hether you’d prefer to sip local wines, support the arts, hang with Elmo, get into the festival spirit or enjoy a good ol’ chili cook-off, there’s no excuse to have an empty social calendar this summer.

ZERO1 FESTIVAL

Throughout Silicon Valley www.01sj.org June 4 – 8: Be prepared for four days of dazzling digital art from around the globe, with symposiums and exhibitions at various locations throughout San Jose.

ST. CHRISTOPHER’S PARISH FESTIVAL AND BARBECUE

St. Christopher’s School, 2278 Booksin Ave., San Jose www.stchristopher.net June 6 – 8: Enjoy great family fun and entertainment with rides, live music, games, a silent auction, rummage sale, music, food, and did we mention FUN?

30TH ANNUAL HARMONY FESTIVAL

Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1355 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa (707) 861-2035 www.harmonyfestival.com June 6 – 8: A day to pursue personal harmony, with five stages of music, green living expo, beer & wine garden, healing sanctuary, goddess temple, international food court and activities for the kids.

STORY ROAD TAMALE FESTIVAL

Emma Prusch Farm, 647 S. King Rd., San Jose www. storyroadtamalefestival.org June 7: Attention, tamale lovers – have we got an event for you! Spend the day listening to live music as you fill yourself full of delicious tamales. Also on hand: dance performances, tamaleeating contests, cooking demonstrations and entertainment for the kids: 10am – 6pm

MEL COTTON’S 15TH ANNUAL SUMMER EXPO

Mel Cotton’s Sporting Goods, 1266 W. San Carlos St., San Jose (408) 287-5994 www. melcottons.com June 7 – 8: Everything you need to get ready for summer will be at this year’s expo, with fun kayak demos, a kids catchand-release pond, great sales and much more!

42ND ANNUAL SAND CASTLE & SAND SCULPTURE CONTEST

Robert Crown Memorial State Beach, Otis & Westline Dr., Alameda www.ci.alameda. ca.us/arpd/events.html June 7: Enjoy a day of building and sculpting at this year’s annu-

al contest that includes divisions for 12 and under (individual and group), 13 and older (individual and group), and teams just for the family: 9 – 11am

ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ TRIATHLON

Marina Green, 99 Yacht Rd., San Francisco escapefromalcatraztriathlon.com June 7 – 8: Come and compete, or just gawk, as tri-athletes swim 1.5 miles from Alcatraz Island, bike ride 18-miles, and run eight-miles through Golden Gate Park.

VINTNERS’ FESTIVAL

Wineries and Restaurants in Santa Clara and Santa Cruz Counties (831) 685-8463 www.scmwa.com June 7 – 8: This festival offers participants a self-guided tour to take part in barrel tasting, meet winemakers, and enjoy music, art and good food.

34TH SUNNYVALE ART & WINE FESTIVAL

Sunnyvale & Washington Aves., Sunnyvale www.svcoc.org June 7 – 8: Not one to be left out, Sunnyvale hops on the

street fair bandwagon with this event, featuring over 500 of the country’s finest artists and craftspeople, a variety of wines from Bay Area winemakers, local microbreweries and live entertainment: 10am – 6pm

38TH ANNUAL BURLINGAME ART IN THE PARK

Washington Park, Carolan & Burlingame Aves., Burlingame www.burlingamechamber.org June 7 – 8: Fine art, arts & crafts, live entertainment, community exhibits and a plethora of excellent foods – you heard right, a plethora!: 10am – 5pm

SIXTH VASONA VIBRATIONS FREE CONCERT SERIES

Vasona Lake County Park, 333 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 354-2608 www.southbayfolks.org June 7 – July 26: What could be better than lounging by a lovely lakeside and listening to free music? NOTHING!

SAN FRANCISCO ETHNIC DANCE FESTIVAL

Palace of Fine Arts, 3101 Lyon St., San Francisco www.worldartswest.org June 7 – 28: More than 25 Bay Area dance companies show off their international styles over three weekends of electrifying performances.

SILICON VALLEY TOUR DE CURE

Start/Finish Hewlett Packard, 3000 Hanover St., Palo Alto (888) DIABETES June 8: Help raise funds for the American Diabetes Association and all you have to do is ride your bike!

MUDDY BUDDY

Joseph D. Grant Regional Park, 18405 Mt. Hamilton Rd., San Jose www.muddybuddy.com June 8: Okay, if you love getting muddy, sweaty, and beat up, then you’re invited to this year’s Muddy Buddy, which features a six-mile course that sees participants bike, run and crawl through mud!

SESAME STREET LIVE: WHEN ELMO GROWS UP

San Jose Civic Auditorium, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose (408) 999-5719 www.sesamestreetlive.com June 13 – 15: Join Elmo and his Sesame Street friends – The Count, Cookie Monster, Big Bird, and Bert & Ernie – for an evening of super family fun and music!

SAN JOSE JUNETEENTH IN THE PARK

Cesar Chavez Park, Market & San Carlos Sts., San Jose (408) 292-3157 www.sjaacsa.org June 14 – 15: This celebration of the end of slavery in America recognizes accomplishments of African-Americans through music, arts, crafts and food.

ART AT THE BEACH

Esplanade Park, Capitola Beach (831) 419-7485 June 15 – August 17: If your name is Art, this event could reach intergalactic heights of surreal double meaning. If not, you can always enjoy the fine painting and sculpture display on the first and third Sunday of each month, through September, at the picturesque Capitola Beach: 11am – 6pm

AVIATION DAY CAMP

Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyward Rd., San Carlos (650) 654-0200 www.hiller.org/daycamp. shtml June 16 – August 22: Kids ages six to 10 will enjoy an exciting week of exploring the science behind how airplane and helicopter wings work, design and test paper airplanes, along with meeting pilots and other people who work in aviation.

DIA DE PORTUGAL FESTIVAL

History Park at Kelley Park, 1650 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 808-1471 www.diadeportugal.com June 14: Bring the whole family to History Park for a day of fun and activities with live music, dance, and spectacular food from Portugal, Brazil and Macau: 10am – 7:30pm

2008 SAN JOSE GAY PRIDE CELEBRATION

Discovery Meadow, W. San Carlos St. at Woz Way, San Jose www.sanjosepride.com June 14 – 15: A two-day celebration with live music from Ari Gold, Frenchie Davis, Finding Stella and many more, plus a parade, food, drinks and fun for the whole family.

DANCING ON THE AVENUE

Downtown Willow Glen, Lincoln Ave. between Minnesota Ave. and Willow, San Jose downtownwillowglen.org June 14: It’s party time on Lincoln Avenue with food, drinks, live music, dancing and fun!

CONTINUED ON PAGE 25: SUMMER EVENTS

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

21


2008 SUPER SUMMER GUIDE

Winchester Mystery House

Family Attractions

These local spots aren’t just for tourists.

70 feet of Fun! Taste of Santa Cruz Sail Winemaker Sails Brewmaster Sails Wednesday Night Races Ecology Brunch Cruises Sunset Cruises Sushi Sunday Sails Whale Watching Team Building Private Parties Weddings

(831) 423-1213 www.chardonnay.com

$49.50

plus tax per person

All Public Sails include light refreshments

F

rom waterslides and carnival rides to getting into the arts or back to nature, these venues offer a constant stream of activities for parents and kids.

MONTALVO ARTS CENTER

Graham Hill Rd., Felton (831) 335-4484 www.roaringcamp.com Roaring Camp’s trips to the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk and Bear Mountain offer scenic views of the area’s redwood forests, as well as authentic trains dating back to the late 1800s. Also check out the camp’s new eco adventure and guided nature walk programs.

GILROY GARDENS FAMILY THEME PARK

SANTA CRUZ BEACH BOARDWALK

3050 Hecker Pass Hwy., Gilroy (408) 840-7100 www.gilroygardens.org Filled with unique gardens and kid-friendly rides, Gilroy Gardens is a relaxing place for parents with younger children to hang out for the day.

CANTOR CENTER FOR VISUAL ARTS

WINCHESTER MYSTERY HOUSE

328 Lomita Dr., Palo Alto (650) 723-4177 www.museum.stanford.edu A stunning collection of art spanning 4,000 years of world history, the Cantor Center includes the Stanford family art collection, touring exhibitions and the gorgeous Rodin sculpture garden and galleries.

HIDDEN VILLA

HAPPY HOLLOW PARK & ZOO

CALIFORNIA’S GREAT AMERICA THEME PARK

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

26870 Moody Rd., Los Altos Hills (650) 949-8650 www.hiddenvilla.org The organic farm and wildlife preserve offers tons of hands-on education for kids about the environment through summer camps, workshops and tours.

RAGING WATERS

4701 Great America Pkwy., Santa Clara www.pgathrills.com Be sure to check out Great America’s new Great Barrier Reef Wave pool, and don’t miss out on its 50-odd rides, roller coasters and family-friendly shows.

22

400 Beach St., Santa Cruz (831) 423-5590 www.beachboardwalk.com With an arcade, classic rides and carnival games, the Boardwalk is a great addition to a day at the beach in Santa Cruz.

525 S. Winchester Blvd., San Jose (408) 2472000 www.winchestermysteryhouse.com Originally built in 1884, the Mystery House has a staircase that goes nowhere, a window built into the floor and countless other architectural oddities reportedly intended to protect the heiress to the Winchester Rifle fortune from angry spirits.

1300 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 277-3000 www.happyhollowparkandzoo.org Kids learn about endangered species through hands-on experience at the petting zoo, plus enjoy the park’s rides, play areas and puppet shows.

Chardonnay II is licensed, insured and Coast Guard inspected

ROARING CAMP RAILROADS

15400 Montalvo Rd., Saratoga (408) 961-5800 www.montalvoarts.org While away the warm days on the sprawling front lawn of this historic landmark, or enjoy a peaceful stroll through the 137-acre plot of hiking trails and manicured gardens. Be sure to catch Montalvo’s summer concert series.

2333 S. White Rd., San Jose (408) 238-9900 www.rwsplash.com Thrilling water slides, a wave pool and playgrounds in the Lake Cunningham Regional Park make this an exhilarating cure for the summer heat.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 32: FAMILY AT TRACTIONS


2008 SUPER SUMMER GUIDE

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2008 SUPER SUMMER GUIDE 24

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008


FROM PAGE 21: SUMMER EVENTS

LICK OBSERVATORY CONCERTS

Berkeley Kite Festival

HATS OFF TO DAD

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com June 15: Dads like trains. Dads like barbecues. Why not give Dad a dream Father’s Day at Roaring Camp, where a steam engine will haul him to a big barbecue feast. Free engineer’s hat included.

MUSIC FOR FAMILIES

Flint Center for the Performing Arts, 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino (415) 864-6000 www.sfsymphony.org June 15: Designed for families, this event includes an afternoon of music, informative talks, and show-and-tell demonstrations. These concerts offer the entire family the opportunity to share the joy and discovery of music making. Recommended for children ages seven and older: 2pm

LIPIZZANER STALLIONS

HP Pavilion, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose www.hppsj.com June 15: Bring the whole family to witness the amazing feats and graceful movements of these highly trained dancing horses. You read right: dancing horses.

FREE FRIDAY NIGHT BEACH CONCERTS

Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz (831) 423-5590 www.beachboardwalk.com June 20 – August 29: Summer again brings exciting free Friday night concerts to the Boardwalk’s Beach Bandstand. Look for classic bands from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. The Romantics, Rare Earth, John Waite, Blue Oyster Cult, Gin Blossoms, and many more.

30 ANNUAL CAMPBELL HIGHLAND GAMES TH

Campbell Community Center, One W. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 219-9264 www.campbellgames.com June 21: You’ve seen highland games on ESPN2, now see them in person: The caber toss, the stone putt and the dreaded Scottish hammer throw. Bagpipe bands and Celtic food and crafts make this a full-fledged Celtic festival: 9am – 5pm

JAMMIN’ AT THE JAMBOREE

Off San Carlos St., San Jose (408) 947-8711 www.sancarlosstreet.com June 21: We at The Wave love jamborees, and you’ll love this one, too, featuring an evening of live music with The Groove Kings, two movies (Some Like It Hot and Happy Feet)and let’s not forget the barbecue from Armadillo Willys, childrens area and community booths: 5 – 10pm

ICE CREAM ZOOFARI

Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, 1300 Senter Rd., San Jose www.brownpapertickets.com June 21: Enjoy all-you-can-eat wild ice cream treats, live entertainment, animals, rides, puppet shows, and other fun activities.

VERTICAL CHALLENGE HELICOPTER AIR SHOW

Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyway Rd., San Carlos (650) 654-0200 www.hiller.org June 21: Hiller Aviation Museum’s annual helicopter show isn’t just about helicopter watching – you’ll even be able take a ride in one: 9am – 5pm

PRO-AM SAND SOCCER CHAMPIONSHIPS

Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz www.ussandsoccer.com June 21 – 22: South Africa has the World Cup, but Santa Cruz has the Sand Soccer Championships, where you can check out the accelerated action of soccer played on the beach. [See Sports feature, page 34.]

37TH ANNUAL STANFORD JAZZ FESTIVAL

Stanford Campus – Stanford University www.stanfordjazz.org June 27 – August 9: The Stanford Jazz Festival showcases more than 100 artists, including Terence Blanchard, Josh Redman, Kenny Burrell, Mulgrew Miller, John Scofield, Gary Bartz and many more.

GREAT TRAIN ROBBERIES

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com June 28 – 29, August 30 – 31: Witness shootouts of famed lawmen and notorious outlaws from the 1880s at Bear Mountain. Blazing re-enactments demonstrate why the West was wild.

STARLIGHT EVENINGS

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com June 28, July 5 & 12, August 9 & 23: Wonder at the beauty of a redwood forest lit up at night during a two-hour roundtrip railway excursion from the Boardwalk in Santa Cruz.

Summit of Mt. Hamilton in the Diablo Range, east of San Jose (408) 274-5061 www.ucolick.org June 28 – September 6: On Saturday evenings, enjoy live music followed by an astronomy lecture and viewing of stars: 7:30pm

WOODIES ON THE WHARF

Santa Cruz Wharf, Beach St., Santa Cruz, www.santacruzwharf.com June 28: Check out the original surfmobile. Over 100 pre-1950s “woodies” will line the wharf, with live music and a chance to win big prizes: 10am – 4pm

CELEBRATE AMERICA 2008

Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.bethel.org/ celebrateamerica2008.htm June 29: A full day of family entertainment with live music, a laser light show and fun!: 5pm

27TH ANNUAL SUMMER FESTIVAL & CHILI COOK-OFF Mitchell Park, 600 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto www.cityofpaloalto.org July 4: Teams of amateur and professional chili makers will bring their “A” game in this battle for cash and prizes, along with live music, activities for the kids, and more: Noon – 5pm

RADIO DISNEY’S EVENING OF MAGIC & MUSIC: A FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS SPECTACULAR

Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.shorelineamp.com July 4: When we say this is a full-day event, we mean it’s literally FULL of events, with a three-hour preconcert Radio Disney Family Festival Zone with interactive games, prizes, giveaways, live music, followed by a performance from the San Francisco Symphony and ending with an enormous fireworks display!: 5 – 10pm

FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com July 4 – 6: Pack up the family and head to Roaring Camp for a day of family fun, with sack races, balloon tosses, hula hoop contests, music and more.

AMERICAN IDOLS LIVE

HP Pavilion, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose www.hppsj.com July 9: Join the country’s greatest manufactured stars as they bring their live show – minus Simon Cowell – to the HP! 7pm

29TH ANNUAL LOS ALTOS ARTS & WINE FESTIVAL

Downtown Los Altos, Main & State Sts. www.losaltos-downtown.org July 12 – 13: Live music, children’s activities, fine wine, gourmet food and don’t forget the wonderful art!: 10am – 6pm

FIRST ANNUAL BIG BAND & BBQ FESTIVAL

Downtown Campbell www.downtowncampbell.com July 12: Enjoy big dance bands, dancing, top BBQ grillers, and artisan booths: 2 - 9pm

OBON FESTIVAL

Mountain View Buddhist Temple, Mountain View (650) 964-9426 July 12 – 13: Tour the temple and take part in games and activities, a cultural bazaar, exhibits, dancing, music, raffles and, of course, great food.

NINTH ANNUAL STRANGERS BBQ & CAR SHOW

Kelly Park, 1650 Senter Rd., San Jose www.strangerscarclub.com July 13: Check out some of the baddest pre-1965 hot rods and customs around, enjoy great music, browse art vendors, and if you bring any meat, they’ll even barbecue it for you: 10am – 4pm

2008 RED BULL US GRAND PRIX

Laguna-Seca, 1021 Monterey – Salinas Hwy., Salinas www.laguna-seca.com July 18 – 20: Three days of the most intense motorcycle racing you’ll ever see, as world class MotoGP riders will tear around the Laguna road course at “ludicrous speeds,” you heard right: LUDICROUS!

MUSIC@MENLO

Various locations www.musicatmenlo.org July 18 – August 8: Spend the WHOLE summer pampering yourself with classical performances of some of your favorite classical composers, such as Bach, Schubert, Bartok, and many more! See website for additional dates and times.

MOONLIGHT DINNER TRAIN

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com July 19, August 16, September 13, October 11: Moonlight dinner, dancing, and train ride through a redwood forest lit by flashlight. Cowboy singalong and marshmallow roasting at Bear Mountain.

2007 CONNOISSEURS’ MARKETPLACE

Santa Cruz Ave. at El Camino Real www.pacificfinearts.com July 19 – 20: A vibrant extravaganza of art, music, food, wine and all-around family fun: 10am – 6pm

CINEMA SAN PEDRO SQUARE

San Pedro Square, S. San Pedro & W. Santa Clara Sts., San Jose www.sjdowntown.com July 19 – August 27: Bring your blanket and beanbag and enjoy great movies in the great outdoors! Screenings begin at dusk.

TOUR DE FAT

San Francisco www.newbelgium.com July 19: A full day of music, bicycles and beer from the New Belgium Brewery.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 29: SUMMER EVENTS

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

25

2008 SUPER SUMMER GUIDE

30th Annual Campbell Highland Games


2008 SUPER SUMMER GUIDE

Picnic Spots

Because food just tastes better outdoors.

T

he beach isn’t the only place where you can spread out a blanket. The Bay Area is home to so many perfect picnic locales and such stunning weather, you’d be a basket case not to head outside to eat as often as possible. So, pack up a tasty lunch and head to one of these beautiful parks. Better yet, make picnicking a weekly event, and see how many of these spots you can check off your list over the summer.

EMMA PRUSCH PARK

674 S. King Rd., San Jose (408) 962-5555 www.pruschfarmpark.org Experience a slice of San Jose’s agricultural past with fruit orchards, a barnyard and lush lawn for kite flying and picnics. One Saturday of each month, kids can help park staff feed the farm animals for $3. Call for dates and times.

ALUM ROCK PARK

15350 Penitencia Creek Rd., San Jose (408) 259-5477 www.sjparks.org With miles of beautiful trails, lots of wildlife (including some deer), and playgrounds, San Jose’s first and largest park is picnic paradise. There are many picnic tables (some with barbecues) and also a Youth Science Institute that houses a small zoo.

HAKONE GARDENS

21000 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 741-4994 www.hakone.com Call it a family picnic with culture at Hakone, which showcases four one-of-a-kind Japanese gardens featuring meandering gravel paths, waterfalls, a koi and turtle pond, and a bamboo forest, along with classes, cultural programs and tea ceremonies. Pack some sushi and sake for an authenic Tokyo-style picnic.

MUNICIPAL ROSE GARDEN

3070 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View www.mountainview.gov An outdoor recreation mecca, Shoreline boasts a golf course, a man-made lagoon for boating, kayaking and windsurfing, restaurants, a kite flying field and miles of trails. Though the park is largely developed, there’s a wildlife sanctuary at the edge that’s great for bird watching.

Naglee and Dana Aves., San Jose (408) 277-2757 www.sjparks.org Take time to smell the roses – more than 150 varieties – at this petite park that also has fountains, a reflecting pool and beautiful lawns on which to nosh on your lunch.

VASONA LAKE COUNTY PARK

333 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 354-2608 www.parkhere.org What’s not to love about this prime picnic spot that offers hiking and cycling trails, family picnic tables, a gorgeous lake for fishing and boating, and 45 acres of rolling green lawn for softball, soccer or a game THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

CUESTA PARK

615 Cuesta Dr., Mountain View (650) 903-6326 www.mountainview.gov Summer fun beckons at this 32-acre park with playgrounds, well-lit tennis courts, a horseshoe area, outdoor volleyball courts, bocce ball courts, barbecue areas, picnic grounds and restrooms. Paved pathways that wind through the scenic park make it ideal for the young and old alike to bike or skate.

JAPANESE FRIENDSHIP GARDEN IN KELLEY PARK

1300 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 277-5254 www.sjparks.org Designed after the famed Japanese Korakuen Park, this tranquil garden covers six acres of lush landscaping, bonsai, bridges, fountains and ponds filled with koi that you can feed with food from dispensers in the garden. There are no picnic tables, so bring a blanket.

26

of Frisbee. Kids can also catch a ride on a 100-yearold steam-powered train on the Billy Jones Wildcat Railroad. From June to July, free summer concerts (www.southbayfolks.org/vasona) are held every Saturday, featuring everything from jazz acts to traditional and contemporary folk music.

SHORELINE PARK

YOUR OWN BACKYARD

While stunning scenery might make meals more enticing, few places are more comfortable than your own backyard. You don’t have to worry about running out of lemonade, and if the sun starts beating down, sheltered comfort is just a door away. TW


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27


2008 SUPER SUMMER GUIDE

Life at Your Pace... This summer with Milpitas Parks & Recreation Services

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SAN RAFAEL 415-456-2765 863 E. FRANCISCO

DANVILLE 925-866-6164 1901 CAMINO RAMON (behind Marshall’s)

Additional Locations in Roseville, Folsom, Laguna Niguel, Yorba Linda, Foothill Ranch, Newport Beach, CA. Austin,TX. Las Vegas, NV. 28

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008


FROM PAGE 25: SUMMER EVENTS

Sand Castle Sculpture Contest

33rd Annual Tapestry Arts Festival

US AIR GUITAR CHAMPIONSHIPS

Grand Ballroom, San Francisco www.usairguitar.com August 8: Oh, yes, friends, you read correctly. We’ve all done it, but now it’s time to get serious about our air guitar playing. For there can only be one CHAMPION OF THE AIR GUITAR!

CALIFORNIA EXTREME

Parkside Hall, San Jose Convention Center, 180 Park Ave., San Jose www.caextreme.org July 19 - 20: Spend two days dedicated to classic arcade games, along with tournaments, speakers and vendors, with the best part being ALL the games are set on FREE PLAY!!

ART ON THE WHARF

Santa Cruz Wharf, Beach St., Santa Cruz www.santacruzwharf.com July 20: Dozens of artists display their original photography, paintings, ceramics, and jewelry, along with live music and activities for the kids.

LOS GATOS SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

Oak Meadow Park, 200 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos www. festivaltheatreensemble.org July 20 – August 9: The Festival Theatre Ensemble performs Shakespeare’s As You Like It, The Tempest, and Beauty and the Beast by De Les Dernier at their outdoor theatre.

FESTIVAL OF SAIL

From AT&T Park to Aquatic Park, San Francisco www.festivalofsail.org July 23 – 27: Enjoy the spectacular sight of 15 – 20 tail ships as they sail under the Golden Gate Bridge. You can listen to multicultural music, take guided tours, witness battle re-enactments and even take a ride on one of the ships!

DAY OUT WITH THOMAS

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill & Mt. Herman Rds., Felton

www.roaringcamp.com July 25 – 27, August 1 - 3: Take a 25-minute ride on Thomas the Tank Engine as he chugs along the San Lorenzo River, along with face painting, puppet shows, and a chance to get your photo taken with Sir Topham Hatt.

Scotts Valley santacruzcycling.org/scmc July 26: Ride some of the most scenic and challenging roads in the Western United States, while gaining over 11,000 feet in elevation!: 6:30am

FRAM AUTOLITE NATIONALS

344 Tully Ave., San Jose www.thefair.org August 1 – 3: Carnival rides, live entertainment, and corn dogs... Mmm, corn dogs.

Infineon Raceway, Hwy. 37 at Hwy. 101, Sonoma www.infineonraceway.com July 25 – 27: Ever see a car go over 321mph (covering a quarter-mile in just under five seconds)? Didn’t think so. See you in Sonoma!

GILROY GARLIC FESTIVAL

Christmas Hill Park, 7050 Miller Ave., Gilroy www.gilroygarlicfestival.com July 25 – 27: Some people show up for the garlic pasta, others the garlic ice cream. Some show up for the multiple stages of live music. We show up to watch the crowning of the new Miss Gilroy Garlic.

BERKELEY KITE FESTIVAL

Cesar E. Chavez Park – Berkeley Marina (510) 235-KITE www.highlinekites.com July 26 – 27: The whole family will love this event, with two days of eye-popping kites flying through the sky, plus hands-on activities that include kitemaking, flying lessons, and flying demonstrations from local kite teams: 11am – 5pm

TENTH ANNUAL SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS CHALLENGE

Scotts Valley High School, 555 Glenwood Dr.,

SANTA CLARA FAIR

FREMONT FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS

Paseo Padre Pkwy. & Walnut Ave., Fremont www.fremontfestival.net August 2 – 3: Join more than 700 top notch artisans to view and purchase original paintings, clothing, jewelry, sculptures, wood objects, stoneware, wind chimes and more – plus wine, beer, food, and a fun zone for the kids!

STARRY, STARRY NIGHT: ART & ASTRONOMY SLUMBER PARTY

Montalvo Arts Center, Saratoga www.montalvoarts.org August 8 - 9: Sleep under the stars on Montalvo’s front lawn and view the Perseid meteor showers. Go on evening hikes, watch films and view the night sky through powerful telescopes: 8pm

19TH COMCAST SAN JOSE JAZZ FESTIVAL

Throughout Downtown San Jose www.sanjosejazz.org August 8 – 10: Swing down to Downtown San Jose and listen to great jazz on 10 stages, from some of the greatest jazz musicians from around the world.

SUMMER GATHERING OF MOUNTAIN MEN

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill & Mt. Herman Rds., Felton www.roaringcamp.com August 9 – 10: You’ll be transported to the 1800s as you wander through wilderness encampments of early trappers, watch frontiersmen perfect their skills during tomahawk and knife throwing contests, and then chow down on some chuckwagon barbecue.

MUSICAL SAW FESTIVAL

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill & Mt. Herman Rds., Felton www.roaringcamp.com August 10: Show up with your Stanley and partake in workshops, open mics, and performances of musical saws and folk instruments from around the world.

35TH ROLEX MONTEREY HISTORIC AUTOMOBILE

Laguna-Seca, 1021 Monterey – Salinas Hwy., Salinas www.laguna-seca.com August 15 – 17: Visit beautiful Salinas and watch vintage racecars (including Ferraris, Jaguars, Porsches, Bugattis, Shelbys, Lotuses, Aston Martins, Maseratis and Mustangs) scream around the track at ridiculously dangerous speeds.

FIESTA DE ARTES 2008

Los Gatos Town Center Grounds, Main St., Los Gatos www.lg fiesta.org August 16 – 17: Enjoy fine wine and microbeer, live entertainment and wonderful art: 10am – 6pm

ALOHA CELEBRITY RACES & POLYNESIAN FESTIVAL

Santa Cruz Wharf, Beach St., Santa Cruz www.santacruzwharf.com August 17: Enter the outrigger race (no experience necessary), then attend the Polynesian Festival with face painting, ice sculptures, dance performances, print making, and Hawaiian shaved ice.

THIRD ANNUAL CELEBRATE MILPITAS

S. Milpitas Blvd., between Turquoise St. to Calveras Blvd. www.milpitaschamber.com August 16 – 17: Art from over 100 artists? Check. Wine from local and international wineries? Check. Food booths, live music and community tents? Check, check and… test over, this is indeed an art and wine festival.

RINGLING BROS. AND BARNUM & BAILEY CIRCUS

HP Pavilion, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose www.hppsj.com August 20 – 24: Witness one of the greatest spectacles on earth, with high-flying wire acts, clowns, elephants, tigers and those little guns that shoot sparks!

PALO ALTO FESTIVAL FOR THE ARTS

University Ave., Palo Alto www.mlaproductions.com August 23 – 24: Amazing art will line University Avenue, along with gourmet food, microbrews, fine wine, live entertainment, Italian street painting, and tons of fun activities for the kids!: 10am

33RD ANNUAL TAPESTRY ARTS FESTIVAL

Downtown San Jose www.tapestryarts.org August 30 – September 1: This FREE event features 250 artists, four entertainment stages, the Design for Living Home Show and the Creativity Zone, a hands-on art activity area for kids of all ages.

EIGHTH ANNUAL ART & SOUL

Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, 14th & Broadway, Oakland www.artandsouloakland.com August 30 – September 1: Three big days of live rock, blues, jazz, gospel, and more on four concert stages along with exotic foods, art, poetry, and a Family Fun Zone.

SAND CASTLE SCULPTURE CONTEST

Capitola Beach, Capitola Village www.begoniafestival.com August 30: A part of Capitola’s Begonia Festival, the sand sculpture contest is a family favorite… so bring the family: 8:30am - Noon

THE BUTTERFLY ZONE

San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers, Conservatory Dr., San Francisco Thru November 2: This is one of the COOLEST family events ever. Don’t miss this wonderful event featuring beautiful floral displays and about a zillion live butterflies flying around inside the Conservatory of Flowers!

THE BILLY JONES WILDCAT RAILROAD

Oak Meadow Park and Vasona Park in Los Gatos www.bjwrr.org Thru October: Enjoy a ride on the Billy Jones Wildcat Railroad, which travels through Vasona to the adjoining Oak Meadow Park. The 102-year-old one-thirdscale steam engine runs most weekends through October. At Oak Meadow Park, kids can also enjoy a ride on the carousel or a stint at the playground.

SAIL THE CHARDONNAY II

704 Soquel Ave., Ste. A, Santa Cruz (831) 423-1213 www.chardonnay.com Ongoing: Cruise the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary on a 70-foot luxury sailing yacht. Choose your cruise theme: whale watching, wine tasting, ecology, fireworks, sunset or just an afternoon sail. TW

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

29

2008 SUPER SUMMER GUIDE

Summer Gathering of Mountain Men


2008 SUPER SUMMER GUIDE

Santa Cruz Beach

Soak up the Sun Head for the surf, and don’t forget the SPF.

T

he water here may not be as warm as the waves of Hawaii or Mexico, but the Bay Area does boast some beautiful stretches of beach that provide an idyllic backdrop for family fun. Now, who’s got the Frisbee?

ALMADEN LAKE PARK, SAN JOSE

Almaden Expwy. and Coleman Ave., San Jose www.sjparks.org (408) 277-5130. You won’t find the fresh scent of the ocean here but Almaden Lake Park makes up for it with a cozy sand beach and swim area (with lifeguards), pleasant hiking and biking trails, picnic facilities, bocce ball courts, and a 32-acre lake for fishing, boating, swimming and wind surfing.

FRANCIS BEACH, HALF MOON BAY

95 Kelly Ave., Half Moon Bay (650) 726-8820 The most developed of the three beaches that form Half Moon Bay State Beach (a four-mile arc of inviting white sand), Francis Beach is ideal for sun tanning, picnicking, kite flying, surfing, kayaking and coastside hiking. Those looking to stay overnight can book one of the 52 campsites with beachwide Wi-Fi access and, yes, hot showers. (800) 444-7275 www.reserveamerica.com

SANTA CRUZ BEACH AND BOARDWALK, SANTA CRUZ

400 Beach St., Santa Cruz (831) 423-5590 www.beachboardwalk.com There’s something for everyone at this popular mile-long beach, just steps away from California’s famed seaside amusement park that celebrates its centennial this year. The idyllic sliver of white sand and cool water is perfect for daylong sunbathing and swimming, but don’t miss out on the park’s 35 rides and other activities such as volleyball, fishing and sailing.

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

TWIN LAKES STATE BEACH, SANTA CRUZ

E. Cliff Drive at Seventh, Santa Cruz (831) 429-2850 www.santacruzstateparks.org A less crowded option and one of the area’s warmest beaches, Twin Lakes boasts a mile of sandy shoreline, popular for swimming and picnicking. The neighboring Schwann Lake Park is a birdlife magnet with mature trees and paved trails that lead up to the picturesque Schwann Lake Lagoon, a perfect spot for kayaking, hiking and fishing.

FORT FUNSTON BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO

500 Skyline Blvd. at John Muir Dr. www.parksconservancy.org This old military lookout isn’t just canine heaven – it’s also a superb hangout for families who enjoy sandy strolls and kid-friendly trails with breathtaking views. Add to that bird watching and exciting hand glider action over the Pacific on the weekends, and this San Francisco beach has all the makings of a prime summer playground.

MONTEREY STATE BEACH, MONTEREY

Del Monte Ave. at Park Ave., Monterey (831) 649-2836 This flat beach is popular for strolls or wading around the tide pools, as well as family-focused activities such as surfing, beachcombing, fishing, kayaking, kite flying, volleyball and sharing a picnic on the sand. Nearby Fisherman’s Wharf has food, restrooms and shops to complete your perfect beach getaway. TW


With more than 23,000 spaces in public and private facilities, it’s easy to find parking. G E T VA L I D AT E D Downtown offers up to two hours of validated parking at lots and garages displaying this sign:

For the most up-to-date parking information


2008 SUPER SUMMER GUIDE

FROM PAGE 22: FAMILY AT TRACTIONS

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855 E. El Camino Real, Sunnyvale (408) 245-8434 sunnyvale.golfland.com Families can embrace their competitive sides at Golfland’s two themed courses and arcade.

CHILDREN’S DISCOVERY MUSEUM

180 Woz Way, San Jose (408) 298-5437 www.cdm.org Kids can learn about science, math and art by tinkering on the museum’s two floors of interactive exhibits.

SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF ART

110 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 271-6840 www.sjmusart.org In addition to its permanent collections and modern art exhibitions, the museum has family workshops and is developing interactive games for children.

ROSICRUCIAN EGYPTIAN MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM

FREE HOROSCOPES! Dial the Toll-Free Dial-Send-Read # from your cell for an auto response text message.

1342 Naglee Ave., San Jose (408) 947-3636 www.egyptianmuseum.org A museum built to look like an ancient temple, the Rosicrucian museum has the largest collection of Egyptian artifacts on display in the Western United States, including four human mummies.

THE TECH MUSEUM OF INNOVATION

201 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 294-8324 www.thetech.org A classic field-trip destination for children, the Tech Museum has science-themed interactive exhibits and an IMAX theater that screens both documentaries and Hollywood films.

EMMA PRUSCH FARM PARK

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647 S. King Rd., San Jose (408) 926-5555 www.pruschfarmpark.org Once a working dairy farm, the park now has orchards and gardens open to the public, and kids can help feed farm animals one Saturday each month.

PALO ALTO ARTS CENTER

313 Newell Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-2366 www.paacf.org It’s all about creativity and art appreciation at the Palo Alto Arts Center, which boasts family days, private tours for adults and teens, and art exhibitions.

HAKONE GARDENS

Sports • Lotto • Trafc • & More at DSRdirectory.com No subscriptions. No accounts. What you want, when you want it. *Text messages subject to cell phone providers standard rates & limitations.Terms of use available at www.DSRdirectory.com. DSR content not necessarily provided by the businesses listed and is subject to change. Bay Com, LLC. does not guarantee accuracy of content. Most national carriers supported.

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

21000 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 741-4994 www.hakone.com Families can relax in the peaceful Japanese-style gardens, take classes in traditional Japanese art forms or go on a guided tour of the grounds.

NASA EXPLORATION CENTER

Hwy. 101, Moffett Field, Mountain View (650) 604-6497 www.nasa.gov/centers/ames Kids can explore space without leaving the ground at NASA’s interactive space center, with exhibits that let them control a Mars rover or see what scientists are studying.

SOUTH BAY HISTORICAL RAILROAD SOCIETY

1005 Railroad Ave., Santa Clara (408) 243-3969 www.sbhrs.org Dedicated to preserving the area’s railroad history, the South Bay History Railroad Society renovated the original Santa Clara Depot, which now contains a museum, library and two scale models.

SANTA CRUZ SURFING MUSEUM

701 West Cliff Dr., Santa Cruz (831) 420-6289 www.santacruzsurfingmuseum.org Explore the origins and evolution of surfing at the world’s first surfing museum.

PALO ALTO JUNIOR MUSEUM AND ZOO

1451 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-2111 www.cityofpaloalto.org Small in size but big on fun, kids can discover nature at this local zoo, which offers science classes, summer camps and more than 50 different animals.

MONTEREY BAY AQUARIUM

886 Cannery Row, Monterey (831) 648-4800 www.montereybayaquarium.org Captivating exhibits include a kelp forest, penguins, a touch pool with more than 500 different animals to help kids understand marine life and ecology, and a new otter display with 10 freshwater otters from Africa and Asia.

SHARKS ICE AT SAN JOSE

1500 S. Tenth St., San Jose (408) 279-6000 www.sharksiceatsanjose.com The official Sharks practice facility opens its four rinks to the public for skating and lessons.

ALMADEN LAKE REGIONAL PARK

Almaden Exwy. and Coleman, San Jose (408) 277-2757 www.sjparks.org Almaden Lake is the only city park in San Jose with a beach. Visitors can rent boats, fish or swim without heading to the coast.

GUADALUPE RIVER PARK & GARDENS

715 Spring St., San Jose (408) 298-7657 www.grpg.org With over two miles of trails and 150 acres of public park area, this oasis in the middle of Downtown San Jose is a great place to picnic and explore the outdoors. TW


Stop By Today ... Ride Tommorrow! OPEN Tuesday thru Saturday

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» FEATURE

Sports&Adventure

» FEATURE » EXERCISE & LIFEST YLE

34 36

2007 Third Annual Santa Cruz Championship

“The X Games of Soccer” Why beach soccer is one of today’s most exciting sports. SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

BY STEVE GOLDSTEIN

P

icture your typical day at the beach. You’ve got the sun, a paperback, maybe some sandwiches and libations. If the kids are along, you brought a Frisbee or a football. Plus, somebody’s probably going to get covered in sand. That description has absolutely nothing in common with the average soccer game, which is usually played on an extremely large grass field. Sand is often nowhere in sight – though Tighe O’Sullivan is trying hard to change that perception. He’s the co-founder of the Pro-Am Beach Soccer Championship, which will be held in Santa Cruz on Jun. 21-22. Beach soccer shares a name with the famous game from which it sprung. Both sports play with the same ball and have goalkeepers to prevent opponents from scoring, but that’s pretty much where the similarities end. O’Sullivan calls the beach battle an “X Games version of soccer,” advising novice fans to prepare for acrobat-

34

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

ics rarely seen on grass soccer fields. “You need to be watching who’s relaxed on the field and, at the same time, who performs the wildest tricks,” O’Sullivan says. “It’s an aerial game. Dribbling in the sand is not a good thing. The most versatile and athletic players and teams are the ones who are striking the ball above their waists and keeping their feet off the ground.” The pace of beach soccer is part of what separates it from its grass brethren. Instead of 11 players on each team, there are only five, all running on a sand field that’s about the size of a basketball court (which is a lot smaller than a usual soccer field). Those differences also lead to more goal scoring. Americans tend to steer clear of games that finish with scores of 1-0 or 2-1, which is why O’Sullivan believes beach soccer’s popularity is going to take off in the US. “This sport is right up the alley of the everyday American sports fanatic,” he explains. “In a regular soccer game, a 3-2 game is exciting. That’s a boring game in beach soc-

cer. We’re looking at 7-5 games. Two years ago, Brazil beat Mexico, 23-1.” If you’ve ever played a sport in the sand, you might wonder how any game played in the grainy stuff can be performed at a higher speed. Wouldn’t that slow it down? According to O’Sullivan, no, provided you train yourself to move properly. “You need to understand how to run in sand. It’s not a heel to toe thing – you need to curl and point your toes straight down, like an extended foot the whole time. Your heel never really gets in it. If you run like a normal person on the sand, you’re going to be very slow.” All signs show that the sport’s popularity is starting to spike. O’Sullivan recalls that when the Pro-Am Beach Soccer Championship started, 69 teams were entered. There were 89 the next year. That jumped to 179 in 2007. A Beach Soccer Federation is also forming – a huge step toward giving the game a stronger foundation of credibility. And though the Santa Cruz tournament will feature a great majority of amateur teams, some of the best pros are also set to participate. The city of Santa Cruz itself has been the breeding ground for eight of the members of the United States 36


SPORTS&ADVENTURE: FEATURE

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SPORTS&ADVENTURE: GOLF GUIDE

SPORTS&ADVENTURE F E AT U R E

[ C O N T. ]

34

National Beach Soccer team. Just because the sport’s name has “beach” in it, that doesn’t mean it won’t eventually be an indoor sport. O’Sullivan says his brother was on hand for a beach soccer tournament in Amsterdam. Last year, his team played in an ATP tennis stadium in Mexico where the courts were covered in sand. O’Sullivan hopes it doesn’t stop there. “We hope one day our final will be played in Las Vegas or something like that,” he says. “There’s talk about doing a beach soccer tournament in Central Park in New York.” So check your schedule and try to catch the beach soccer in Santa Cruz. You’ll see some of the world’s top competitors, and be able to tell your friends that you caught the sport before everybody else knew about it. You’ll probably even conclude that the beach isn’t just for sand castles

2007 Third Annual Santa Cruz Championship

and snow cones any longer. But you may want to leave running in the sand to the pros. TW Pro-Am Beach Soccer Championship, Jun. 21-22, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz. All matches will be played on the main beach below the Boardwalk. For more information, visit www.proambeachsoccerusa.com.

SV

EXERCISE & LIFESTYLE

» EXERCISE & LIFEST YLE

DANCE STUDIOS

Western Ballet SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

914 Rengstorff Ave., Unit A, Mountain View (650) 968-4455 www.westernballet.org Western Ballet provides an atmosphere of care and dedication for all levels, from absolute beginner to professional dancers. Students range in age from four to 95. FITNESS CENTERS

American Kickboxing Academy 1830 Hillsdale Ave. #2, San Jose (408) 371-4235, 168 E. Fremont Ave., Sunnyvale www.akakickbox. com The American Kickboxing Academy offers top-level public instruction for men, women, and children. In addition, AKA provides private professional training.

Ernie Reyes West Coast Martial Arts 668 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 993-8122, 7050 Santa Teresa, San Jose (408) 629-2441 www.erniereyes.com For children and adults, martial arts teaches focus, confidence, self-discipline, fitness, flexibility, coordination and weight, as well as respect for themselves and others.

Silver Creek Sportsplex

Fairtex Muay Thai Fitness

SOUTH BAY 2044 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View (650) RUNNING 938-8588 www.fairtex.com FairtexCLUBS Muay Thai is an internationally recognized sports fitness facility specializing in authentic Muay Thai training since 1971. AIDS Marathon: Marathon training www.aidsmarathon.com/home/sf.html Bay Trail Runners: Trail Running 800 www.baytrailrunners.com Embedded Way, San Jose (408) 225-1843 www.silvercreeksportsplex.com The 240,000-sq.ft. Galloway San Jose: marathon trainfacility is the largest underHalf oneand roofwhole in North America www.urbansports.info — aing truly unique, state of-the-art complex catering to Palo Altofamilies Run Club: today’s active andwww.parunclub.com individuals. Quicksilver Running Club: Fun run, marathon, and ultra marathon training www.quicksilver-running.com SpartansDr., Club: Interval(408) training www.gospartans.org 271 Houret Milpitas 946-0600 www.southbayathleticclub.net South Bay Athletic Stevens Creek Striders: Trail running Club www.stevenscreekstriders.org has always been a leader with innovative fitness programs, yet we always keep the old favorites Team and in Training: Half and whole marathon trainaround like racquetball and swimming! ing–www.teamintraining.org/sj

Silver Creek Sportsplex

South Bay Athletic Club

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008


SPORTS&ADVENTURE: GOLF GUIDE

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37


» FEATURE

Health&Beauty

» FEATURE » SPA PROFILES

38 42

ambrosia. These days, however, a growing interest in honey’s health benefits has put it back on the shelves, not just in the grocery store but in medicine cabinets. Honey is being marketed as a remedy for allergies, dry skin, even wounds. It’s “a pretty special product,” says Anthony Tomasso, owner of Aptos Apiaries, who can be almost as poetic as Aristotle when it comes to describing his product’s flower power. “It’s the nectar from 10,000 flowers in one teaspoon,” he says, “so you get the essence of 10,000 flowers in a teaspoon of honey.” Tomasso, who mans a booth with his products at the Los Gatos Farmers Market every Sunday, makes tinctures from his honey that he says can alleviate allergies caused by local pollens, as well as soothe sore throats. The latter claim has medical backing: A Penn State College of Medicine study released in December 2007 found that a small dose of honey (the study used buckwheat honey) was more effective at reducing children’s nighttime coughs than overthe-counter remedies containing Dextromethorphan (DM), the most common ingredient in supermarket cough syrups. This is great news for parents, considering that doctors don’t recommend giving cough syrup to children under two. (Raw honey, however, should not be given to children under one year of age, as it may contain botulinum spores.)

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

The jury is still out, though, when it comes to honey as an effective cure for allergies. Proponents such as Tomasso say that because raw local honey contains minute bits of pollen, ingesting it can “desensitize” allergy sufferers in the same way that allergy shots do. While such use of honey is a homeopathic approach espoused by Tom Ogren, author of Allergy-Free Gardening, controlled medical studies have yet to support the claim – though the herbs with which Tomasso combines his local honey might address allergy sufferers’ other symptoms. 40

HOW CAN HONEY HELP YOU?

Sweet Solution The buzz is that honey is good for what ails you. BY TRACI VOGEL

A 38

ristotle called it “dew distilled from the stars and the rainbow,” but honey may have slipped a little in the public’s estimation since those

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

poetic times. We tend to think of it more as the stuff to slather on bread, drip into tea or combine with peanut butter in sandwiches for kids and less than as heaven-sent

y Honey has been touted as a remedy for insomnia because it helps regulate blood sugar levels, while some studies say it contributes to the release of melatonin, the hormone that controls the body's sleep cycle.

lower rise in blood sugar than dextrose or refined sugars.

y Honey mixed with tea, hot water, or lemon juice can soothe a sore throat.

y Studies have shown that eating honey helps maintain bifidobacteria in the gastrointestinal tract, the "good" bacteria that assists in digestion.

y Honey may be a better option than sugar or artificial sweeteners for people with Type 2 diabetes. One study showed it caused a significantly

y Darker honey, such as buckwheat, may contain as many antioxidants as a similar serving size of some fruits.

y If you have a persistent wound, ask your doctor about trying out Medihoney.


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One of the more exciting applications of honey borne out by medical studies is its use in healing wounds. Used topically, medical grade honey can limit the spread of bacteria. How so? The relatively high acidity of medical grade honey not only prevents microorganisms from growing, but naturally releases a low concentration of hydrogen peroxide. The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved a wound dressing that combines seaweed and medical grade honey from the nectar of the Manuka, or Tea Tree. Called Medihoney, the dressings have shown to be effective even against the socalled superbug, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA. It’s important to note that regular honey is not medical grade, so tending your cut with the stuff you spread on your toast is not a good idea. Manuka honey, however, is easy to find: It’s being marketed under a variety of brands, in products that claim to cure stomach ulcers, acid reflux, ulcerative colitis, minor burns, pressure sores and sore throats. The sweet stuff has also found its way into cosmetic products. As a skincare ingredient, honey has a long history, dating back to Cleopatra’s reputed milk-and-honey baths. More recently, a study published in Complementary Therapies in Medicine a few years ago found that honey 40

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applied topically can ease itching caused by atopic dermatitis, a form of eczema. As an anti-inflammatory and a humectant (meaning it attracts and retains moisture), honey tends to show up in products aimed toward moisturizing. Kiss My Face (www. kissmyface.com) makes a honey and calendula hand and body moisturizer, while both Parrs Skincare (www. parrsskincare.com) and Koru Naturals (www.korunaturals.com) offer lines of Manuka-based products. Antipodes Nature’s Aura Manuka Honey Treatment Mask (www.antipodesnature.com) combines honey with pohutukawa blooms, which are high in antioxidants. Whether you apply it to your face or stir it in your tea, honey is worth buzzing about. Not only is it sweet and natural, from all appearances its advantages are just beginning to blossom. TW Anthony and Anna Tomasso, Aptos Apiaries, 1050 Larsen Rd., Aptos (831) 688-8791 www.aptosapiaries.com

LOCAL HONEY ORGANIZATIONS Beekeepers Guild of San Mateo County, www.sanmateobee.org Mount Diablo Beekeepers, www.diablobees.org San Francisco Beekeepers Association, www.sfbee.org Santa Clara Valley Beekeepers Guild, www.beeguild.org


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HEALTH&BEAUTY » SPA PROFILES

SPA CAMPBELL DESIGNER’S LTD. SALON & SPA $$ 2523 Winchester Blvd. (408) 378-7300

Services: Massage, hair styling, highlighting, waxing, facials, microderm, glycolic peels, reflexology, make-up, manicure, pedicures. Special Features: With over 28 years of experience, Designer’s will provide you with all your beauty needs, from your basic manicure to a cutting edge hair style. Book any service over $50 and receive a $25 gift card towards a facial or massage on your next visit. STAR SALON & SPA $ 2260 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 377-2151 www.starsalonspa.com

Services: Facials (refresher, classic European, ultimate European), massages (back and neck, full body, deep tissue, foot reflexology), tanning, hair removal, nail care and full salon services. Special Features: If a regular facial just doesn’t cut it for you, go for the Ultimate at Star Salon & Spa. It’s 80 minutes of pure facial bliss, with an AHA chemical peel that smoothes fine lines, lightens hyper pigmentation and promotes cell growth, followed by hydrating, toning, a facial, and a neck and shoulder massage, and ending with a nourishing masque. Also, check out the massage packages, which are a great bargain at $240 for six half-hour sessions.

FREMONT CLARITY SPA $$

40000 Fremont Blvd., Ste. D (510) 656-2100 www.clarityspa.com

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Services: Facials (purifying, skin resurfacing, dendrology, tri-enzyme, hydrating, vitamin C, gentlemen’s, skin balancing, lymphatic cleansing, superlifting, aromatherapy, refresher), microdermabrasion, peel (sensi, ultra peel I/II, PCA), body treatments (back, lymphatic drainage cellulite treatment, mind and body rejuvenation, French soft and silk salt glow, perfect legs), waxing, and tinting. Special Features: Extra means better at Clarity Spa with $20-andbelow add-ons that will enhance your spa experience. Get an instant super lift for $20 or the special ampoule containing vitamins A, E, C, collagen, DNA and oxygen for $12. EUROPEAN DAY SPA $

40643 Grimmer Blvd. (510) 770-1237 www.europeandayspa.com

Services: Massages (hot stone, Swedish, deep tissue, reflexology, integrated, aromatherapy, prenatal, spa hand and foot), facials (European deep pore cleansing, Dermalift nonsurgical facial lift, glycolic acid, acne, back, men’s), body treatments (salt glow body polishing with hydrotherapy bath, cellulite, seaweed body wrap, mud body wrap, slimming/detoxification, buff and bronze w/hypnotherapy), makeup, eye treatment, manicures, and pedicures. Special Features: Spa packages are the way to go if you can’t decide 42

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PROFILES

how best to pamper yourself. From career women and moms-to-be to teenagers and couples, European Day Spa has you covered. LAVENDER BEAUTY SPA $$$

47854 Warm Springs Blvd. (510) 353-1311 www.lavenderbeautyspa.com

Services: Facials (classic, Repechage four layer, Hungarian organic, hyper hydrating, teen, acne, silkpeel, anti-wrinkle firming and lifting defense, lightening, puffy-eye treatment, oxygen treatment, LumiLift, Lumifacial), body treatments (mud wrap, body contour wrap, lemon sugar body polish, spa paraffin, cellulite treatment), waxing, and eyelash perming. Special Features: Rehydrate with oxygen and choose one of Lavender’s facial treatments like the ECHO2Plus Oxygen Treatment System, which uses pure medical grade oxygen packed with 87 different vitamins, minerals, enzymes and amino acids. VISUAL IMAGE SALON $

5200 Mowry Ave., Ste. C (510) 792-5922 www.visualimagesalon.com

Services: Facials (signature, traditional European, acne, glycolic acid peel, microdermabrasion, back), eye, lip and neck treatments, eyebrow and lash tinting, waxing, hair salon, and makeup. Special Features: Become a model and get your haircut or colored for free. Models are used for training future hair stylists, and qualified educators are on hand to supervise.

GILROY BEAUTY LOUNGE $$$

1275 First St. (408) 846-5172

Services: Massages (reflexology, shiatsu, prenatal, sports, Swedish, aromatherapy, warm stone), tanning, facials (anti-aging, deep pore, acne, glycolic, enzyme peel, microdermabrasion), permanent makeup, hair treatments, and waxing. Special Features: Take a dip in their hydrotherapy tub and take home something special from their boutique, which sells designer jewelry, lingerie and health products.

HALF MOON BAY PRIMROSE COUNTRY DAY SPA $

630 Purissima St. (650) 726-1244 www.primrosespa.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, deep tissue, four hands, aromatherapy, warm stone, couples, prenatal), facials (pumpkin, resurfacing, rosacea, Jan Marini C-ESTA, teen, enzyme peel, hyper pigment treatment, acne), body wraps (herbal, mud, seaweed), scrubs, waxing, tinting, hand and feet care, and electrolysis. Special Features: Facials are Primrose’s specialty, with options like Epicurean enzyme and oxygen treatment, salicylic acid, microcurrent eye treatment and frozen live cell therapy.

RITZ-CARLTON, HALF MOON BAY SPA $$$$

One Miramontes Point Rd. (650) 712-7040 www. ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/ HalfMoonBay/Spa/Default.htm

Services: Massages and touch therapies (Half Moon Bay signature, couples, sports, reflexology, prenatal, Thai, invigorating scalp, shiatsu, healing stone, deep tissue), facials (calming lavender, the Half Moon Bay, men’s protection, renovateur, deep cleansing, Carita intense hydrating renovateur, Carita extreme softness renovateur, Carita purifying balance renovateur, Carita lift firming renovateur, Prada radiance visage), body treatments (pumpkin body peel, Prada replenishing body facial, fresh lavender wrap, aromatherapy body polish), nailcare, hair salon, hair removal, makeup, fitness center, and wellness services. Special Features: This ritzy spa’s fitness center, steam room, sauna, whirlpool, and coed Roman mineral bath are complimentary for guests purchasing a treatment.

LOS ALTOS CIANA DAY SPA AND SALON $$

111 Main St. (Salon); 107 Main St. (Spa), (650) 941-1285 www.cianasalonspa.com

Services: Facials (essential, ultimate, elemental nature, outer peace acne relief, men’s, LaStone, purifying facial for acneprone skin, 55-minute express, microdermabrasion), waxing, hand and feet therapy, hair salon, and makeup. Special Features: If you want the pampering to continue at home, throw a microdermabrasion party, where a certified esthetician from Ciana visits you. YELKA DAY SPA $$$

2049 Grant Rd. (650) 9691117 www.yelkadayspa.com

Services: Facial therapies (Treatment 21TM, pumpkin pie refining peel, hydraplenishing oxygen, MoistureLock collagen, ultimate decadence, mini decadence, regenerating caviar pearl, frosty mint spirulina, intense glycol-firming, microdermabrasion, Lumi, acne), massages (deep tissue, aromatherapy, aqua-thermal trio, personalized plus, mom-to-be, Treatment 21TM deep relaxation), body treatments (Adriatic lavender salt polish, chocolate raspberry buff, cellulite reduction, slimming detox, hand brightening and retexturizing, reflexology, aromatic scalp treatment), waxing, tinting, and spa packages. Special Features: Caviar used to be something you ate, but now it’s something you put on your face – well, almost. The Regenerating Caviar Pearl Facial takes the finest of caviar extracts, which compel skin cells to metabolize, leaving your face radiant.

LOS GATOS CLOUD 9 SKIN & BODY CARE $$

501 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Ste. 2 (408) 354-0710 www.cloud9x.com 44


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

HERBOLOGY • DIETETICS • ACUPUNCTURE • ENERGETICS • MASSAGE

F How Acupuncture Heals

For a quarter century Five Branches University Medical Centers have provided safe, effective medical care for over 80% of your healthcare needs.

Looking for a natural, lasting solution for your healthcare needs? ■

It restores balance to your body—establishing strength and well-being ■

It treats your entire condition, as well as correcting individual symptoms ■

It empowers you with herbs and diet and lifestyle guidance

Since 1984, Five Branches University Medical Centers have offered quality healthcare you can trust

Five BraNches university medical centers Quarter Century of Excellence in Healthcare & Education Santana Row Medical Clinic 3031 Tisch Way, San Jose ■ (408) 260-8868

Beach Harbor Medical Clinic 200 7th Avenue, Santa Cruz ■ (831) 476-8211

Health Insurance • Medi-Cal • Personal Injur y • Visa/MC

Infertility

Facial Rejuvenation

Allergies

Fibromyalgia

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Menopause

Addiction/Cravings

Fatigue

Hormone Imbalance

Indigestion ■

ADHD

FREE T R E AT M E N T For New Patients Some restrictions apply. Expires August 25, 2008.

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Services: Massages (deep tissue, trigger-point, acupressure, Thai, reflexology, Swedish gentle, hot stone, Reiki, lymphatic drainage, prenatal), facials (Cloud 9), body treatments (herbal cellulite wrap with foot reflexology, fabulous bodacial with salt scrub, herbal mask, aroma steam, moisture treatment), hair removal, nail care, naturopathic medicine, chemical and metabolic rebalancing, and chiropractic services. Special Features: Feel weightless in a flotation tank filled with 800 pounds of Epsom Salt – proven to relieve stress and muscle tension. GABRIELLE SALON $$

540 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Ste. D (408) 395-7260

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, Swedish, deep tissue, hot stone, prenatal, sports, chair, focus), facials (Aromessance, men’s, teen, sea, sensitive skin, deep pore cleansing, antioxidant, glycolic peel, back), body treatments (salt glow, moor mud, coffee scrub, airbrush tanning), waxing, nail care, hair salon, and makeup. Special Features: Coffee lovers should try the Café Latte manicure, in which the hands are soaked in coffee beans, and steamed milk before the rest of the treatment. LUSCIOUS SKIN $

401 Alberto Way, Ste. D (408) 370-9121 www.lusciousskin.com

Services: Massages (therapeutic Esalen, Reiki technique), facials (fountain of youth petite, tropical, deep cleansing European, firming, deep pore cleanse, soothing “C,” paprika with AHA, Lisa’s seasonal special), brow/lash tinting, and hair removal. Special Features: Try the Paprika Facial with AHA, the signature treatment which “regenerates, rejuvenates, and detoxifies” the skin. THE MOMMY SPA $$

413-A Monterey Ave., (408) 395-2009 www.themommyspa.com

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Services: Massages (specializing in pregnancy and postpartum massage, plus Swedish relaxation, deep tissue, and hot stone massage, trigger point therapy, and couples and infant massage classes). Also offers Reiki and guided meditation. Special Features: Founder Lindsay MacInnis has extensive training and experience, studying under such recognized experts as New York’s Elaine Stillerman, and San Diego’s Carol Osborne-Sheets. As a result, she has advanced certification in pregnancy massage, and over 70 hours of specific prenatal training. For new mommies, newborns to three-month-olds are welcome during postpartum therapy sessions, with time for infant care and feeding as needed. RENDEZVOUS SALON & DAY SPA $$

529 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-3085

Services: Massages (warm stone, Swedish body, therapeutic, aromatherapy), facials (Rendezvous ultimate, detoxifying, anti-aging rejuvenation, acne controlling), skin resurfacing (microdermabrasion, exfoliation power peels), hair salon, nail care, hair removal, brow design, and makeup. Special Features: Rendezvous offers 44

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special add-on services, including detoxifying arm treatment, décolleté microdermabrasion and rejuvenation treatment, balancing back facial, hydrating hand and paraffin treatment, and after facial makeup application. Makeup applications in styles such as film, photography and television are also provided. SHANGRI-LA LOTUS $$

412-A Monterey Ave. (408) 3951139 www.jennysbeauty.com

Services: Eyelash extensions, permanent makeup, hair styling, curling and straightening, facials (Heavenly Indulgence, classic, teen facial, Dermafile, back treatment), microdermabrasion, waxing, spa pedicures, manicures and nail care, makeup for weddings and special occasions. Special Features: Owner Jenny Dinh has been doing eyelash extensions for over 15 years. During the wedding season, she’s given as many as 10 brides a month the long, lush lashes of their dreams. STUDIO JOULE $$

130A N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-3773 www.studiojoule.com

Services: Massages (30-, 60-, 90minute; sole session foot reflexology treatment; Joule face and body duo, mother-to-be, eucalyptus escape), facials (classic Joule, petite studio, studio teen, microdermabrasion, lightening, Obagi skincare system, Joule facial packages, Jan Marini signature), hair removal, lash and brow tint, and makeup. Special Features: Find out which makeup looks best on you with a complimentary consultation with Jane Iredale Mineral Cosmetics. YVETTE’S INSTITUTE DE BEAUTE $$

248 W. Main St. (408) 395-1551

Services: Massages (aromatherapy massage, aromatic sauna wrap, tension relief neck and shoulder, renewing hand treatment), facials (deep pore cleansing, Guinot hydradermie oxygenating, hydradermie plus anti-aging, ultimate hydration, calming sensitive skin, purifying teen, regulating, aromaplasty mineral, luminizing, lift defense – collagen, oxyliance revitalizing, flash beaute vitamin C, evidence antiaging firming, refreshing mini, deep cleansing back, soothing eye contour treatment), body treatments (Swiss herbal wrap, anti-cellulite body mask, toning/ firming sculptural, mother-to-be, firming neck and décolleté mask), makeup, lash and brow tint, hair removal, and nail care. Special Features: For intensive care, go for the Glycolic Acid Peel or the Beta Hydroxy Acid Peel. The Glycolic is designed to make skin healthy and glowing, and with the Beta you can choose a booster to treat a particular problem area.

MENLO PARK INSPIRATION DAY SPA $$

325 Sharon Park Dr. (650) 854-5885 www.inspirationdayspa.com

Services: Massages (signature, deep tissue, heated desert stone,

neck, back and shoulders, prenatal, reflexology, shiatsu, Swedish), facials (inspiration, rose quartz, age perfecting, collagen veil mask, microdermabrasion), body treatments (Hamman, green clay mud wrap, champagne, caramel chocolate sundae, journey to serenity, bronzing), waxing, hair salon, makeup, and nail care. Special Features: The DNA CryoStemTM skin therapy system fuses the synergy of DermaNutraceutical technology with cryogenic bio-cell therapy to hydrate your skin. Integrate it into your day at the spa and take some home for later use. PERSONA DAY SPA $

1166 El Camino Real (650) 328-2836 www.personadayspa-mp.com

Services: Facials (European, vitamin C, collagen, teen, men’s, glycolic), body treatments (botanical body buff, parafango firming and anti-cellulite series, back cleansing), massages (Swedish, reflexology, deep tissue), makeup, lash tinting and perming, and waxing. Special Features: Marriage should not be taken lightly and neither should the wedding day. That’s why Persona Day Spa offers prewedding consultations on makeup application, and, if needed, onlocation assistance on your big day. THERMAE DAY SPA $$$

103 Gilbert Ave. (650) 8333131 www.thermaespa.com

Services: Massages (classic relaxing, deep tissue, hydrotherapy, lymphatic, maternity, warm soothing stone specialty, aromatherapy, neck, back and shoulder), facials (purifying/deep hydrating, oxygen, aromatherapy, anti-aging, vitamin C, teen, men’s, microdermabrasion), body treatments (exfoliating salt scrub, hydrating and healing mud wrap, detoxifying herbal wrap, hydrotherapy baths, nail care, waxing, and makeup. Special Features: It’s not enough just to look great on the outside. Therma’s wellness center takes care of your inner being with services such as counseling, a 25-minute meditation session and personalized Ayurveda nutrition sessions (to help you understand what foods are best for you, according to your mind and body type).

MOUNTAIN VIEW AMERICAN MALE SALON $$$

560 Showers Dr. (650) 9419994 www.americanmale.com

Services: Waxing, salon services, paraffin hand dips, foot and hand detailing, skin and back treatments, and massages (Swedish stress relief, deep tissue sports, reflexology). Special Features: American Male Salon offers a host of packages to help men look and feel great, such as the three-and-a-half-hour Ultimate American Male Combo that includes a Swedish massage, facial, hand and foot detailing plus a professional haircut.


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

Father's Day Specials and Gift CertiďŹ cates Oxygen Bar

Purify Your Body of daily toxins with our New Detox for Life

Great Personalized Hair Cuts Lupe Fiasco visits Foxy

Coming Soon: Therapeutic Massage Teeth Whitening

Free Shoe Shine (with any service) Total Men's Skin Care

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Hair Treatments


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PALO ALTO BEAUTY CLINICA $$$

200 S. California Ave. (650) 326-3442 www.beautyclinica.com

Services: Massages (deep tissue, couples, aromatherapy, hot stone, maternity, lymphatic drainage. Swedish, Esalen), facials (clean and clear, European, urban defense, back, acne, aromaplasty, alpha glycolic, sensitive skin, hydrating, herbal peel, gentlemen’s, anti-aging, regulating, oxygen), hair removal, nail therapy, body treatments (de-stress aromatherapy body wrap, Dead Sea full body masque, passionfruit body salt rub and massage, anti-cellulite, aloe vera oil body wrap, sculptured firming treatment, aroma), hair salon, makeup, and hair removal. Special Features: A trip to Beauty Clinica is like taking a mini vacation, without the hassle of traveling. Their wide range of full- and half-day packages, which comes with a healthy spa lunch, will leave you feeling on top of the world. Especially popular is the Half-Day Getaway, which includes a facial, massage, body treatment, manicure, pedicure, and a hot spa lunch. BODY KNEADS $

810 San Antonio Rd. (650) 852-0546 www.bodykneads-dayspa.com

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Services: Massages (Swedish,

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aromatherapy, pregnancy, cranial sacral, hot stone, lymphatic drainage, reflexology, hot stone, shiatsu, sports), facials (European, express mini, alpha hydroxy, mini, men’s, teen, crystal peel, back, vitamin C, eye treatment), body treatments (Body Xcell, cellulite, aromatic bath), hair removal, nail care, hand and foot therapy, permanent makeup, and tanning. Special Features: With Body Xcell, the use of gyratory vibration percussion stimulates and nourishes your skin and tissues to help dissolve fat and rid cellulite. DESTINO SPA $$$

4335 El Camino Real (650) 947-0203 www.destinospa.net

Services: Massages (Gardenia aroma Swedish, shiatsu, prenatal, healing warm stone), facials (revitalizing pumpkin, caviar, pomegranate, collagen silk, Mandarin C aromatic, purification, men’s, tropical taste, radiant caviar, deep cleansing back), resurfacing treatments (microdermabrasion, advanced exfoliation, sugar and beta peels, lactic acid and green tea), spa rituals (Bali bliss, Sanur seaweed wrap, minty earth and sea mud wrap, lava purification wrap), feet therapy, body polishes, baths and soaks, waxing, and makeup. Special Features: Feed your skin and senses with one of Destino’s appetizing treats. Try the Caramel Turtle Inspiration, which starts off with a dry brush exfoliation and delicious chocolate dip wrap. For

something sweeter, have a go at Chocolate Chip Devotion, which includes a yummy chocolate chip scrub and strawberries-and-cream custom massage. JUUT SALON SPA $$$

240 University Ave. (650) 328-4067 www.juut.com

Services: Salon services, waxing, makeup, facials (basic, replenishing, Juut Spa, eye zone treatment), body treatments (aroma body wrap, salt glow, herbal back treatment), and nail services. Special Features: Get a cut and color at reduced prices from licensed professionals in the process of obtaining advanced training at Juut’s Roseville training location. LA BELLE DAY SPA $$$

www.labelledayspas.com 95 Town & Country Village (650) 327-6964 36 Stanford Shopping Center (650) 326-8522

Services: Massages (therapeutic, hot stone, lymphatic draining, post- and prenatal, Swedish), facials (Back on Top, Bye Bye Spots, custom peels, epicuren enzyme, five carat glow, La Belle royal touch, quick clean, quick exfoliation, sea meets stone, slim and lift), body treatments (Endermologie®, aromatic mud, wine and roses scrub), waxing, laser hair removal, Botox, salon services, nails, regular, and permanent makeup. Special Features: Turn back 48


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the clock in just four hours with Timeless Radiance, the anti-aging spa package that combines a Forever Young Facial to minimize wrinkles and brighten and firm skin, and an invigorating full-body glycolic body exfoliation. Also, check out their extensive menu of services for men, which includes grooming and sports manicure and pedicure. SKINSPIRIT CLINIC AND SPA $$$

701 Emerson St. (650) 3249600 www.skinspirit.com

Services: Botox, chemical peels, dermal fillers (collagen, Hylaform, Radiesse, Restylane), intense pulsed light, laser hair removal, Thermage, vein laser therapy, acupuncture, sclerotherapy, massages (Swedish, deep tissue, lymphatic drainage, La Stone, pre- and postnatal, cellulite therapy), facials (signature, clarifying, teen, vitamin C, oxygen, paprika, microdermabrasion), waxing, lash and brow tinting. Special Features: Treatment21TM is an entirely new way to relax – combine a specially designed skincare treatment with one of five therapeutic guided visualization journeys on a CD and listened to with headphones. WATERCOURSE WAY $$

165 Channing Ave. (650) 462-2000 www.watercourseway.com

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, deep muscle, hot stone), facials (natural scrub, deep cleansing, moor therapy treatment, Hungarian paprika, organic, honey and yogurt, vitamin C, moisturizing, anti-stress, express, royal anti-aging, custom herbal peels), spa treatments (Red Flower Sento ritual, rain dance revitalizing skin treatment, moor therapy, salt glow, thermal seaweed wrap, Essensa’s 3D spa therapy), Ayurvedic rituals, and foot treatment. Special Features: This relaxing retreat boasts nine private hot tub rooms with a range of décor and amenities, including multijetted spas, wood tubs, saunas, and cold plunges with steam rooms.

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SAN JOSE SANDRA M. SKINCARE $$

6110 Camino Verde Dr., Ste. 5, San Jose (408) 224-1223 www.sandramskincare.com

Services: Facials (clarifying mask treatment, specialty and therapeutic), corrective skincare (microdermabrasion, dermaplaning, glycolic peels, acne treatment, Sensi peel, power peel, pumpkin peel, oxygenating trio, ultra peel, PCA peel, Esthetique peel, rapid exfoliation), waxing, permanent makeup, sunless body glow treatment. Product lines (Jan Marini Skin Research, Youngblood Mineral Cosmetics, Revitalash). Special Features: Owner Sandra M. had 14 years of experience as a medical assistant before undertaking four years of study in the skincare field. 1240 SALON & SPA $$$ 1240 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 295-3886

Services: Waxing, facials (back, pumpkin, red wine, glycolic, enzyme, lymphatic drainage), 48

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microdermabrasion, nail services, salon services, and hair extensions. Special Features: 1240’s vascular blemish removal treatment clears skin of broken blood vessels, spider veins and skin tags, leaving it smooth and blemish free. THE ALEXANDRIA SALON & SPA $$

1346 The Alameda, Ste. 8 (408) 971-2926 www.thealexandriasalon.com

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, deep tissue, hot stone, Swedish, sports and chair), facials (mini, full, European, thermo-plastic mask, algo mask, sea C spa treatment, botinol, hydro lifting and collagen 90 II), waxing, threading, manicure, pedicure, body treatments (parafango wrap, back parafango for men, body shaping and firming, Dead Sea salt glow and purifying back treatment), and makeup. Special Features: All skin treatments include a complimentary makeup retouch featuring Glominerals cosmetics, also sold at Alexandria’s. ANGEL FACE DAY SPA $$

833 S. Winchester Blvd. (408) 247-3223 www.angelfacedayspa.com

Services: Facials (hydrating, revitalizing, de-stressing, angel face, alpha hydroxy, back, gentlemen’s and teen), body treatments (European herbal wrap, European ocean glow, seaweed wrap, hair and scalp treatment), massages (Swedish, aromatherapy, deep tissue, acupressure), and makeup. Special Features: Angel Face offers specialty treatments like the Epicuren Enzyme Facial Treatment (natural enzymes, proteins and botanicals free of chemical preservatives, fragrances and colors) and the Micro Derma Facial, which uses a specially formulated microcrystal cream (that removes dry or damaged cells) to achieve results similar to that of a microdermabrasion machine. ATELIER AVEDA LIFESTYLE SALON AND SPA $$

378 Santana Row, Ste. 1120 (408) 244-4222 www.atelieraveda.com

Services: Facials (botanical skin resurfacing, men’s, self renewal), body treatments (Caribbean therapy, back), treatment enhancers, waxing, tinting, hair salon, and makeup. Special Features: All hair services begin with a consultation to determine what procedures are best for you, based on your lifestyle, face shape, hair texture and length. Hair color consultations are based on hair color wheels that are used as calculation tools to find the best shade for your natural color from Aveda’s exclusive products. AYOMA LIFESPA $$$

355 Santana Row, Fifth Floor (408) 423-5424 www.ayomalifespa.com

Services: Massages (traditional Kerala sports massage, four-handed Ayuverdic massage, aromatic herbal oil, traditional Indian), waxing, hand and feet therapy, facials (Soundarya deep cleansing, Mukhralepa Ayurvedic herbal), body treatments, and wellness plans. Special Features: This restful haven in Hotel Valencia is the only Ayurvedic (a 5,000-year-old healing system

from India) wellness spa in the Bay Area, and offers consultations and custom spa packages. BELLA BELLA SALON $$

2688 Union Ave. (408) 559-4247

Services: Massages (one hour full body, Swedish and deep tissue), nail treatments, permanent makeup, hair treatments, waxing, and facials (European, time saver, paraffin wax and dermalyse). Special Features: This familyowned business boasts its own Vidal Sassoon stylist and beautician who studied in New York and Europe. BURKE WILLIAMS SPA $$$ 355 Santana Row, Ste. 2010 (408) 241-0071 www.burkewilliamsspa.com

Services: Massages (pure relaxation, deep tissue/sports, pregnancy, traditional Japanese shiatsu, Swedish/shiatsu combo, reflexology, Thai, Reiki, lymphatic, cranial sacral), facials (spa-style, nourishing, oxygen, organic enzymes, microdermabrasion, back), signature treatments (Hunter’s retreat, Savannah’s surrender, salt glo, body wash, parafango), waxing, body wraps (thermal seaweed, detox/ calming, Calistoga getaway), handand-foot therapy, and hair salon. Special Features: If you’re looking to host a business meeting or office party with a twist, Burke Williams has conference room and party facilities. After that, wash away work stress in one of their luxurious spa baths (herbal, seaweed, milk, and mud). DOLCE VITA DAY SPA & SALON $$

630 N. First St. (408) 287-0200 www.dolcevitaspa.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, aromatherapy, pre- and postnatal, Shiatsu, deep tissue, reflexology, foot, hot stone), facials (express, deep cleansing, oxy-vital, hydrating, botanical Botox, glycolic acid peel), body treatments (micro-buff body polish, sea salt, aromatherapy, moor mud, detoxifying seaweed, cellulite body wrap), manicures, pedicures, hair salon, makeup, and waxing. Special Features: Detoxify and hydrate their skin with water therapies, like the purifying steam sauna and the balneotherapy aroma bath. FACE FORWARD SKINCARE $$

1610 Blossom Hill Rd., Ste. 3 (408) 206-2426 www.faceforwarskincare.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, structural/deep tissue, sidelying), body treatments (bust and décolleté, salt glow, seaweed body wrap, desert heat body wrap), chemical peels, post-surgical treatments (Silico-Lipid mask, CCH mask), facials (European, deep pore, express, luminous C and sea, plantomer, antifree radical, rosacea), waxing, and microdermabrasion. Special Features: Personalized service, value pricing, flexible hours, and results-oriented products and services, along with the revolutionary illumiMed® LED system that rejuvenates the skin and reduces the appearance of cellulite, make Face Forward a great find.

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HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

, in the heart of the California Avenue shopping district in Palo Alto, is a premier salon. Offering the latest in cuts and color is just the beginning. You’ll enjoy our boutique where you’ll find everything you need-hair care, skincare and makeup. We offer scalp and hand massages and makeup touch-ups free with each service. Call today and book an appointment.

For a Sizzling New and Vibrant Attitude

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

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HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

HEALTH&BEAUTY » SPA PROFILES

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LA CONCHA SPA $$$

JASKIRAN $

1042 Lincoln Ave. (408) 286-8612 www.laconchaspa.com

Services: Massages (hands and feet, feet only, traditional Indian head), facials (refreshing and hydrating, deep pore cleansing, acne, anti-aging peptide resurfacing peel, enzyme, back), body wraps (salt glow, enzymatic sea mud), spa packages (Renewal, Restoration, Promenade the Spa, Maternity Spa Day), hair removal, threading, lash and brow tint, and makeup. Special Features: If you’re looking for more pampering to go with a facial, ask for one of these add ons: foot remedy, hand and wrist massage, glycolic hand peel, or paraffin treatment for hands and feet. Jaskiran also offers henna tattoo applications.

Services: Massages (Swedish, shiatsu, deep tissue, carpal tunnel syndrome, foot reflexology, prenatal, sports, chair, Reiki, lymphatic drainage), facials (Fruitopia, hydrating, deep cleansing, regenerating, acne, glycolic, back), mineral and herbal oil baths, body scrubs and wraps, tanning, cellulite treatments, manicures, pedicures, hand and foot therapy, hair salon and makeup. Special Features: Heaven has a name and it’s the Grand Escape Spa Package. For $760, a couple gets seven hours of aromatherapy sauna, body scrub, choice of baths, full facial, one-hour massage, lunch, manicure, pedicure.

2833 Riedel Rd. (408) 309-1090

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PROFILES PERSIMMON SPA & TANNING $$$

1415 The Alameda (408) 298-2900 www.persimmonspa.com

Services: Massages (deep tissue, Swedish, sports, motherhood, local area emphasizing), facial treatments (DNA anti-aging treatment, signature Persimmon, deep pore cleansing, gentlemen’s relaxing facial, teen, back treatment), waxing and tanning. Special Features: Persimmon Spa & Tanning specializes in anti-aging facials that promise immediate results during the first treatment that will last up to three months. TW


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» FEATURE

Style&Shopping Sun of a Beach The right gear will make your coastal excursion even brighter.

65 Water Warriors Tarantula

BY MITCHELL ALAN PARKER

Forget pumping and repeatedly squeezing a trigger to soak your beach-day adversary. This water gun uses a battery-powered motor to produce a constant stream of water that can span up to 35 feet, letting the 57 ounces of water completely drench your opponents before they can even finish pumping their guns. $24.99

A

ccess to amazing beaches is one reason why California residents pay so much for housing. So many people want close proximity to the glorious sunshine and miles of sandy, pristine coastline. And there’s so much to do at a beach, from swimming, to running, to building sand castles, to playing beach soccer (see Sports feature, page 34), to just goofing off and spending time with family. But it’s always good to bring along an arsenal of things to do. Traditionally, beach gear is meant to be blasé; it’s supposed to be all about enjoying the weather and atmosphere and leaving all those work troubles at the office. The beach is a place for relaxation and outdoor activities, not DVD players and laptop computers. Don’t know what to bring? Here are a few ideas that would make even The Hoff proud of your beachside savvy.

ST Y L E & SHOPPING

01Aerobie

Rings and Discs

Apparently the Frisbee was created when college students began tossing around empty pie tins from the Frisbie Baking Company in Bridgeport, Conn. And you can bet that those tins were thrown on many New England beaches. Today, the disc has evolved, and Aerobie is at the helm of disc evolution. Off and on for 20 years, Aerobie’s Pro flying ring held the Guinness World Record for longest throw, until some crazy Aussie threw a metal rod from a string to break the record in 2005. What? How does that even count? Crikey! $7-$10 02 Cool Fusion 40 IcyTunes by Igloo

Ice cold drinks and plenty of rockin’ tunes are very important for a day at the beach. This cooler has both. In addition to a 58-can capacity cooler, there are drink holders, storage spaces and an amplifier and speakers that can be used with any MP3 player. $189.99 52

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03 UV

Canopy Chair by Kelsus

07 Oregon Scientific EB612 UV Monitor

After a while, sitting in the sand will cause impromptu vocal performances of the theme from Rawhide. A chair at the beach is a must. This one sits low to the ground for added comfort, and features a removable canopy for shade control. $30-$50

There’s really nothing more important than sunscreen when spending a day at the beach. But calculating one’s sun protection factor (SPF) can be tricky. This inexpensive device monitors the current UV index and determines what your recommended exposure time should be, based on UV, SPF and personal skin type. It automatically updates in response to changes in the intensity of UV rays and even monitors the current temperature. Vampires have never been happier. $29.95 TW

04 Morey Skimboard

For those of you who haven’t tried skimboarding, we’re sorry. You’re missing out. Apparently born in Laguna Beach in 1920, skimboarding begins on the shore. A boarder will wait for a wave to begin receding then run toward the wave, dropping the board in about an inch of water before jumping on and skimming into the wave, then doing tricks similar to surfing styles. Not only is it fun and relatively easy, but you can avoid the surf crowds… and most of all, sharks. $40.95 to $47.95 05 Sanyo

Xacti VPC-E1

Many fond memories are developed on the sandy shores of beaches, but what about all that crazy stuff going on underwater? The new Sanyo camcorder can be totally submerged up to five feet and still shoot high-quality pictures and video for up to one hour. $400

WHERE TO BUY 01 Aerobie rings, Palo Alto Sports and Toy, 526 Waverly St., Palo Alto (650) 328-8555; Sports Authority, 635 San Antonio Rd., Mountain View (650) 9418611; Wooden Horse, 796 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 356-8821 02 Cool Fusion 40 IcyTunes by Igloo, www.igloo-store.com 03 UV Canopy Chair by Kelsus, Reg. $50, on sale Jun. 7-8 for $29.99 at Mel Cotton’s Sporting Goods, 1266 W. San Carlos, San Jose (408) 287-5994 04 Morey Skimboard, available at www.waveblasters.com. Other skimboard retailers: Boarder Nation, 14448 Union Ave., San Jose (408) 377-3577; Cowell’s Beach Surf Shop, 30 Front St., Santa Cruz (831) 427-2355; Arrow Surf Shop, 2324 Mission St., Santa Cruz (831) 423-8286 05 Sanyo Xacti VPC-E1, Fry’s Electronics, 590 E. Brokaw Rd., San Jose; 600 E. Hamilton Ave., Campbell; 1077 E. Arques, Sunnyvale; 382 Portage Ave., Palo Alto; Also at The Sharper Image, Valley Fair Mall, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara; 572 Great Mall Drive, Milpitas; 105 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos; 16 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto, and at Wolf Camera, 1900 Camden Ave., San Jose; 1375 S. DeAnza Blvd., Cupertino 06 Water Warriors Tarantula, Toys “R” Us, 2179 Monterey Rd., San Jose (408) 259-2211; 751 S. Winchester Blvd., San Jose (408) 247-7323; 1082 Blossom Hill Rd., (408) 266-2600; 865 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 281-1710 07 Oregon Scientific EB612 UV Monitor, Oregon Scientific, Stanford Shopping Center, 152 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto (650) 325-1056


ST YLE&SHOPPING: FEATURE

SV

FASHION

» FASHION

Alta, Los Gatos

Bombshell Boutique 301 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 371-7423 www.bombshell-boutique.com Bombshell offers stylish and sexy clothing and lingerie for women. Also specializes in tattoo apparel for men and women, and offers unique accessories and gift items, all at affordable prices.

IBI Boutique 1231 Franklin Mall, Santa Clara (408) 261-2050 www.ibiboutique.com IBI Boutique is the modern woman’s dream closet! They have a large selection of women’s clothing, accessories, footwear, jewelry, and handbags. Located right in Franklin Square across from the Santa Clara Post Office.

Kitsch Couture

BOUTIQUES

Alta 1342 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 288-5940; 701 Laurel St., San Carlos (650) 596-9599; 779 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo Park (650) 326-7390; 130 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-0069 Alta has been carrying original contemporary clothing and accessories for the past 25 years. Visit any of their four locations and experience the excitement.

Amy B. Boutique Corner Stone Shopping Center, 15994 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-8600 Exceptional men’s and women’s contemporary clothing and accessories from Ted Baker, Diane Von Furstenberg, Oliver Peoples, James Perse, Vince and Paige Denim.

Bella James 1165 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 292-0000 350 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-9000 www.bellajames.com Located in the Garden Theatre in Willow Glen and now in downtown Campbell, Bella James features inspiring and affordable contemporary women’s clothing and accessories, including Michael Stars, Joe’s Jeans, Havaianas, Free People, Hudson Citizens and more.

20490 Saratoga-Los Gatos Rd., Saratoga (408) 8721104 www.kitschcouture.com At Kitsch Couture, they want fashion to capture your individuality. They have transformed a quaint historic church into a wonderfully distinct contemporary boutique, featuring an eclectic mix of fashion-forward pieces, unique accessories, and gifts. Customers often leave saying “There truly is something for everyone.” Brands include Free People, T-Bags, Trina Turk, Kensie and Michael Stars.

Signature Lifestyle 519 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 370-3433 www.myspace.com/signaturelifestyle Features casual clothing for young guys and gals, with a large selection of accessories at very affordable prices. Complimentary gift wrapping is also available.

Ursula’s Boutique 140 W. Main St., Ste. B, Los Gatos (408) 395-1400 The wide range of clothing and styles at Ursula’s Boutique will have you dressed for any event. With an array of jewelry, handbags, and accessories, Ursula’s Boutique is all you need to complete your outfit. LINGERIE

Dutchess Intimates Boutique 346 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-8006 www.dutchessboutique.com Dutchess specializes in fine lingerie, bras, panties and accessories at affordable prices. Visit their brand new boutique in downtown Campbell for something sweet or sexy. Private party hosting available.

TO HAVE YOUR BUSINESS LISTED IN SVGUIDE: FASHION, CALL

(408) 467-3200

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» FEATURE

Home&Design Grill Seekers Backyard barbecuing is hotter than ever.

I

t’s no secret that the indoors has moved out. Just as unassuming patches of green have blossomed into fully fledged outdoor living rooms complete with built-in plasma screens and cozy fireplaces, the once-modest barbecue has morphed into overthe-top outdoor kitchens that rival their indoor counterparts.

» FEATURE » COLUMN: HOME WORK

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No longer is it sufficient to have a trusty, stainless steel gas grill with five 50,000 BTU burners, a built-in rotisserie and infrared searing technology. Today’s al fresco kitchens are jam-packed with convenient luxuries such as icemakers, cocktail centers, under-counter refrigerators, warming drawers, pizza

HOME & DESIGN

BY IRENE KEW

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Cal Flame Ultimate Outdoor Theater by Cal Spa, $35,000 to $40,000 depending on options selected. Grilling won’t be boring with this five-burner grill that also comes with a self-rising high-definition 63-inch plasma TV with surround sound speakers, two subwoofers and a built-in iPod docking station. Two side burners, a cocktail center, icemaker, blender, beer tap, fire pits and plush weatherproof recliners round out this dream kitchen.

Open Air Culinary System (price varies according to options), by Alfresco. Hosts can cook and mingle with this custom outdoor kitchen, which consists of four zones: From right to left, a prep zone boasts a sink and built-in disposal; a cook zone features an infrared searing station, a storage pantry, a 42-inch grill and a refrigerator; a warming drawer, steam-heated food drawer and storage drawers make up the plating and garnish zone; and the bartending station in the entertaining zone makes serving drinks a breeze.

Boca Custom Outdoor Kitchen, by Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet, approximately $30,000 (excluding countertop, sink or delivery). The K900HB Hybrid Grill, which allows you to cook with any combination of wood, charcoal or gas, takes center stage in this custom kitchen that also features cabinets, an icemaker and refrigerator.

Edo Grill, by Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet, $7,495. The design of this sculptural grill is based on Japanese yakitori carts, where skewered meat is cooked on a hot grill. Two steel panels on the top open to reveal an 18-inch-by-24-inch grilling surface and ample counter space on the side.

Malibu Outdoor Kitchen, by Viking, approximately $17,000 for entire setup. Stylish yet functional, the complete Malibu Outdoor Kitchen with a 53-inch premium grill features conveniences such as a gas wok cooker, storage drawer, warming drawers, double side burners, refrigerated refreshments center and a portable drink dispenser.

Artisan Pizza Oven, by Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet, $3,990. This stainless steel oven will allow you to bake up to a 17-inch pizza in your backyard. A wood-chip drawer allows you to add the authentic smoked flavor that a classic wood-fired pizza oven is known for.

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HOME&DESIGN F E AT U R E

[ C O N T. ]

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ovens, wok burners, sinks, even built-in iPod docking stations. To satisfy the growing hunger for innovative, topof-the-line equipment, savvy manufacturers such as Viking, Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet and Cal Spas have developed attractive modular units that not only make design and installation a cinch, but also allow homeowners to keep their ultimate outdoor kitchens as simple or elaborate as they wish. Grill lovers can begin with the basic elements — a high-performance grill and storage cabinets — and gradually add as many bells and whistles as their heart, and budget, desires. With such a dizzying array of fancy features, it’s easy to go overboard, so caution, outdoor kitchen designers. Consider your budget and the square footage of your outdoor space, as well as how often you’ll actually use the kitchen. Those who entertain large groups should probably invest in a bigger grill and more counter space, while a family of four can most likely do without multiple burners or a keg tap.

PizzaGrill by VillaWare, $100 www.surlatable.com

Pakka Wood-Handled Grill Tool Set, $100 www.crateandbarrel.com

Whether your dream outdoor kitchen is one with all the culinary trappings or as straightforward as an island with a grill and sink, be warned: You may never want to cook inside again. TW

Motorized Grill Cleaning Brush, $30 www.brookstone.com

WHERE TO BUY

HOME & DESIGN

Stainless Steel Rib Rack, $40 www.williams-sonoma.com

Handcrafted Terra Cotta Oven, $1,900 www.surlatable.com 56

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Monogrammed Grill Tools, set of four, $100 www.williams-sonoma.com

Sur La Table www.surlatable.com 378 Santana Row, Ste. 1030, San Jose (408) 244-4749 23 University Ave., Los Gatos (408) 395-6946 Brookstone www.brookstone.com Valley Fair Mall, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 1143, Santa Clara (408) 247-6223 Oakridge Mall, 925 Blossom Hill Rd., San Jose (408) 363-8582 91 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto (650) 329-1206 Williams-Sonoma www.williams-sonoma.com Valley Fair Mall, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 985-1507 122 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-7302 Stanford Shopping Center, 180 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (650) 321-3486 Crate and Barrel www.crateandbarrel.com 301 Santana Row, San Jose (408) 247-0600 530 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto (650) 321-7800 Viking www.vikingrange.com Meyer Appliance 305 Meridian Ave., San Jose (408) 292-6655; 278 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 968-8318 Expo Design Center, 5095 Almaden Expwy., San Jose (408) 979-3500 Barbecues Galore, 2080 El Camino Blvd., Palo Alto (650) 843-0560 Al Fresco www.alfrescogrills.com Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet www.kalamazoogourmet.com Cal Spa www.calspa.com


City living made easy with up to $60,000 assistance on a new home!* With prices and interest rates so low in this terrific buyers market, now is YOUR time to buy! For a limited time, City Heights and The Works have special programs available to help you fulfill your dream of home ownership.*

The Works is the ultimate in city living. You'll feel at home the moment you walk through the door. From the tree-lined exterior to the modern sophistication within, the Works combines style and function to bring you Silicon Valley’s value-packed home ownership opportunity. Close to San Jose State University.

City Heights is attainable urban living at its finest. Relax in the comfort of your home with the dramatic views or take advantage of the conveniences of City life. With modern interiors and a location in the heart of Downtown San Jose, City Heights is designed to make urban living civilized.

125 Patterson St., San Jose, Open weekdays by appointment, Sat-Sun 12-5 408.288.8826 • TheWorksSanJose.com

175 W. St. James Place, San Jose, Open daily: 10am-5pm 408.286.2489 • CityHeightsSanJose.com

*Down payment supplied by the City of San Jose down payment assistance program. Income restrictions apply. Call sales agent for details. Different programs apply. Prices, term and availability subject to change without notice. Exclusively represented by Pacific Marketing Associates.


PROMOTION

Livorno Square by JSM Communities “To live like this, most people go on vacation.”

HOME&DESIGN » COLUMN: HOME WORK

HOME

WORK

V

irtually the only brand new luxury condominium development within a stone’s throw of Santana Row, Livorno Square boasts an array of high-end upgrades, providing luxury living at affordable, competitive prices starting at only $399,000. Once you walk through the elegant lobby and past the Fit Tech fitness center, the rear lobby door opens onto an expansive Tuscan-inspired European village-style square. Nowhere else will you see a more beautiful pool and terrace, with a 50,000-gallon lap pool in addition to a spa, outdoor fireplace and KitchenAid gas grills, while a cabana with his-and-hers showers and lush landscaping finish off the resortlike ambience. As magnificent as the pool and terrace areas are, the interiors are equally impressive. Innovative design combined with sophisticated touches unite elegant with urban. For example, the recessed lighting blends beautifully with 4-inch crown moldings. These features, standard at Livorno Square, would all cost extra at other communities. Similarly, both the kitchens and the baths combine polished, bull-nosed granite countertops with classic cabinetry. Stainless steel appliances, including refrigerators, are also standard, while the light fixtures, sinks, faucets, and other features have been upgraded at no additional charge. Even one of the “standard” carpet choices is a chic Berber. Plus with 12 unique floor plans of one-, two- and

three-bedroom layouts, there’s bound to be something for everyone. Being a builder of “boutique communities,” JSM Communities focuses on quality over quantity. Rather than mass-produce cookie-cutter homes, they carefully select prime locations and intricately design a superb, one-of-a-kind product. This approach is immediately apparent at Livorno Square. The 50 luxury condominiums are designed in an L shape around the pool to maximize access to the common area and eliminate looking directly into another unit. Gated, underground parking provides privacy and cleverly avoids infringing on the setting in any way. If all this weren’t enough, Livorno Square is surrounded by a myriad of vibrant, urban shopping and entertainment. Step away from your private, gated sanctuary to Starbuck’s – literally a few steps from the lobby. Cross Winchester to Century Cinemas or go just down the block to Santana Row. This lifestyle is nothing short of superb. Livorno Square sales office, 3101 Magliocco Ave., San Jose. Model homes open daily 9am-6pm. For more information, call (408) 243-4500 or (877) LIVE-JSM, or visit their websites, www.LivornoSquare.com or www.JSMCommunities.com.

Stepping Out HOME & DESIGN

Take your garden one step beyond with mosaic stepping stones the whole family can enjoy. BY JENNIFER AND KITTY O’NEIL

M

osaic stepping stones are a perfect summer craft, so why not round up the whole gang for an afternoon of creative fun? Quikrete from the hardware store makes the project a cinch, and found objects like keys and coins give each stone a little funky flair. Get enough materials for each member of your clan, and you’ll have a garden path as unique as your family.

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WHAT YOU’LL NEED

10-quart bucket 60-pound bag of Quikrete concrete mix (makes 4 to 5 stepping stones) Gloves Tarp 2-cup measure

Wooden paint stirrer Square stepping stone mold, 11 inches by 11 inches Old keys Foreign coins Rusty washers Sand 60


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HOME&DESIGN HOME

WORK

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Step Three

Step One Spread out the tarp and put on your gloves. Measure 12 cups of Quikrete into the bucket. Pour in two cups of water and mix with the paint stirrer. Add more water a little at a time until the mixture is the consistency of brownie mix.

Create an artsy composition with keys, coins, washers and other items. Press each item into the mixture, wiggling it down into the concrete about an 1/8 of an inch deep. Sprinkle the surface with sand for a decorative finish. Let cure for 48 hours before moving the stone, and wait at least a week or two before use. TW MOSAIC MADNESS

You can decorate your stepping stones with all kinds of found objects, provided they are flat and weatherproof. Try sea glass, flat marbles, broken china, river rocks, vintage buttons, and even old typewriter keys. TIPS

Step Two

HOME & DESIGN

Pour the mixture into the stepping stone mold and smooth it with the paint stirrer until the surface is level.

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On The Beaten Path: If your stepping stones will see a lot of foot traffic, you might want to reinforce them. Fill the mold half way, lay in a piece of wire mesh slightly smaller than the mold, and then cover with concrete. Glove Love: Remember to always wear gloves when working with concrete. Direct contact with the skin can cause irritation, and who needs that?


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» FEATURE

Dining

» FEATURE » HOT SPOTS » CATERING

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the planning and logistics, and Outstanding in the Field was born. Guest chefs from area restaurants, many of them local celebrities, began to contribute their talents. Cheesemakers, winemakers, fishermen, bakers… all would break bread together at communal tables, dining family-style under an open sky with around 80 to 100 lucky paying guests. In 2003, after purchasing a vintage bus for $7,000, Denevan and his small staff took to the open road, hosting meals on farms near Lake Michigan, Atlanta, Ga., and in the Rocky Mountains, all cooked by chefs from those areas. In 2004, they traveled to Alaska, where “they go through a period of 24-hour sunshine,” says Denevan. “Everything grows at a rapid pace. It’s like being in a greenhouse.” Cabbages, potatoes, moose, and fireweed (Alaska’s state flower, used in everything from salads to preserves) were some of the many local products featured on that menu. As national buzz and demand grew, Denevan began moving even farther afield, staging special events in such stunningly photogenic settings as sea caves, and even a tiny island off the coast of Washington state that was nearly swallowed by the tide over the course of the meal. At the dinner’s close, guests and tableware were fetched by boat. Earlier this year, Outstanding in the Field traveled to Florence, Italy, to host a private event, while as of press time, Denevan was considering logistics for dinner on an iceberg in Greenland as part of Absolut Vodka’s “In an Absolut World” campaign featuring progressive thinkers.

Outstanding in Every Field

Despite his widespread success, Denevan’s most popular dinners are still the simplest: meals hosted on farms, where diners can see, taste, smell and even pick the food at its source. As it happens, his favorite such location remains right here in Northern California. “The surf ’s good,” he says with a smile. “And there are more organic farms in Santa Cruz County than anywhere else. There’s not much reason to leave.” TW

Santa Cruz local Jim Denevan’s inspiring approach to food, art and life. DINING

BY JOANNA CURRIER

Outstanding in the Fields’ farm dinners cost between $180-$200 per person, all inclusive. (Each meal includes five courses with wine and a tour of the farm.) Check the website for Bay Area dates, or for dates and venues out of state. www.outstandinginthefield.com.

T

he simplest ideas usually create the biggest waves. Luckily, laid-back Santa Cruz native Jim Denevan is an experienced surfer. In the late ’90s, when the artist and chef headed up the kitchen at his hometown’s popular Gabriella Café, Denevan found himself reflecting, as chefs tend to do, on the sources of the restaurant’s fresh, local ingredients. Soon he realized that his curiosity and gratitude – for the people behind the produce, local food artisans and area farms – was not just professional, but universal: Who doesn’t love a farm? Who doesn’t love finding out where a strawberry or a squash comes from, and where and when to enjoy the freshest ones possible? In 1999, Denevan turned his earthy, philosophical musings into a very special dinner – open to the public, hosted al fresco on Watsonville’s renowned Mariquita Farm. The multiple-course meal included simple, sumptuous dishes created to highlight the farm’s freshest-picked produce. Diners sipped local

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OUTSTANDING READING

wines, mingled under trees, met the farmers, enjoyed a gentle tour of the property, and ate food straight from the soil at an elegant, outdoor, communal table set in a field. Predictably, the farm’s natural beauty created the ultimate rustic and romantic atmosphere, while fresh air served to heighten each sensation and flavor. The event was more than a success – it was a revelation. Word spread, and subsequent dining events on farms started selling out within minutes of being announced. Denevan collected a small staff to handle

Jun. 3 sees the release of Outstanding in the Field: A Farm to Table Cookbook (Clarkson Potter), featuring recipes, photos and Denevan’s musings on his experiences. For more information, visit www.outstandinginthefield. com/shop.html. Also an accomplished artist, Denevan’s vast, temporary drawings across large-scale natural surfaces (dried up lake beds, beaches) can be seen on his website, www.jimdenevan.com.


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DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING

» HOT SPOTS

HOT

PRICE GUIDE: $[5-15]

CAMPBELL CAPERS EAT & DRINK $$

[American] 1710 W. Campbell Ave. (408) 374-5777 www.caperseatanddrink.com

Capers – which could mean either the delicious Mediterranean condiment or a playful escapade – seems a particularly appropriate name for this popular spot. You’ll find more than just perfect pasta and juicy steaks here. Fire-roasted marinated artichokes, flash-fried calamari with jalapenos, a killer chicken marsala, and a meatloaf entrée with a wholesome reputation are just some of the enticing menu items. Main-course salads are also popular, particularly for lunching customers. Capers offers a selection of more than 30 wines by the glass from the full bar. HAWGS SEAFOOD BAR $$

[Seafood] 1700 W. Campbell Ave. (408) 379-9555 www.hawgsseafoodbar.com

Those who love seafood, but hate dealing with the sand, crowds, seagulls and hairstylesavaging salty winds of beachside establishments, will love Hawgs for its marinalike feel and selection of fresh fish. From the depths of the ocean there are oysters, mussels and clams, succulent fish and shellfish. Landlubbers can nosh on favorites such as New York steak and Australian lamb.

CUPERTINO ARYA $$

[Global] 19930 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 996 9606 www.aryarestaurant.com

Arya visitors can enjoy a distinctive dining experience in a restaurant that exudes relaxed elegance. The menu here is a unique mix of Persian, Italian and classic American cuisines, with dishes including shish kebab, cioppino, chicken marsala and flavorful Persian soups, stews and meats. Before your meal, allow time to enjoy a glass of wine from their extensive list in the cozy, fireside lounge.

DINING

THE BLUE PHEASANT RESTAURANT & BAR $$$

[American] 22100 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 255-3300 www.bluepheasant.com

Reeling in regulars for almost 40 years with appetizers like the Blue Pheasant Crabcakes – breaded, deep-fried crabcakes served with aioli – and entrées like Salmon Wellington: King salmon and crabmeat baked in French puff pastry and covered in Hollandaise sauce. Not to mention the pork tenderloin in Dijon peppercorn sauce, set aflame with brandy. South-facing windows offer greenside views of the Blackberry Farm Golf Course, and dancing starts in the lounge around 7pm (DJs play ’70s-’90s music to please an older crowd). Reservations are recommended. MERLION RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR $$

[Asian Fusion] 19628 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 777-8228 www.merlion.us

Though named for Singapore’s well64

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$$[15-25]

$$$[25-40]

known tourist icon, the Merlion (a lion head with the body of a fish), this cozy restaurant goes beyond Singaporean cuisine, blending Thai, Malaysian, Indian and Chinese influences into its pocket-friendly menu. Lunch entrées are priced anywhere from $6 to $15 and dinner entrées go for $10 - $30. A transparent wine cellar adds to the sophisticated interior ambience and offers an extensive selection to complement every meal.

HALF MOON BAY HALF MOON BAY BREWING COMPANY $

[American] 390 Capistrano Rd. (650) 728-2739 www.hmbbrewingco.com

A tasty array of eight different home-brewed beers takes center stage, but the HMB Brewing Company has definitely raised the bar for “bar food.” Steamed clams, seared ahi tuna, prawn cocktails, and the smoked fish appetizer are all top rate… and those are just the appetizers. Be sure to try the Mavericks Amber Ale – it has unseated Corona as the perfect oceanside sunset beer.

LOS GATOS LITTLE LOU’S BBQ $

[Barbecue] 15466 Los Gatos Blvd., Ste. 111 (408) 356-5768 www.littlelousbbq.com

A tiny little place with no more than a dozen tables inside and out, Little Lou’s nevertheless manages to fill the air with the smell of summer barbecue in all its basted glory. House specialties include the Louisiana burger, Texas-style brisket, and the pulled pork meal. Meatballs and buffalo wings, combo dinners, burgers, dogs, and sandwiches round out the menu, with traditional sides of coleslaw, corn bread, corn on the cob, potato salad, and BBQ beans. WILLOW STREET PIZZA $

[Italian, Pizza] 20 S. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-5566 www.willowstreet.com

This family-oriented restaurant rotates around a social dining experience, as tables of locals devour baskets of Willow Street’s bread, which is made piping hot inhouse daily. In addition to gourmet wood-fired pizzas like the Thin Crust Mediterranean (tomato sauce, mozzarella, roasted red peppers, kalamata olives, caramelized onions, fresh thyme, and goat cheese), the menu features sandwiches, grilled meats, and a number of savory pasta dishes. The fettuccini chicken tequila pasta is particularly popular. WINE CELLAR $$$

[Modern American] 50 University Ave. (408) 354-4808 www.winecellarlosgatos.com

Descend the curving stone staircase and be transported into an elegant restaurant removed from the street noise of Los Gatos. Try one of the unusual appetizers, such as the honey-apricot BBQ glazed ribs or sauteed abalone, to start. Entrées

$$$$[40+]

include duck confit and pan-seared chicken breast, grilled Australian lamb chops, soy-glazed wild Alaskan king salmon, and last, but never least, filet mignon.

MILPITAS DAVE & BUSTER’S $

[American] 940 Great Mall Dr. (408) 957-9215 www.daveandbusters.com

An upscale midway for the kid inside every adult. Tiffanyesque lights hang from the ceilings, casting a warm glow around tables packed with game lovers, because Dave & Buster’s is all about the games: billiards, shuffleboard, simulators, and videogames. Have steak, ribs, chicken, seafood or pasta. Many of the meats can be ordered with Jack Daniel’s BBQ sauce for a finger lickin’ buzz. Things here are done in pairs: two bars and two happy hours. A 30-year-old needs to accompany you if you’re under 21. Curfew for minors is 11pm. HAPPI HOUSE $

[Asian] 133 Ranch Dr., Milpitas (408) 263-3440

The first Happi House opened its doors in San Jose’s Japantown in 1976. Now there are six restaurants serving original teriyaki infusion cuisine made fresh and delicious by specially marinating “the most wholesome ingredients with top-secret seasonings and our exceptional teriyaki sauce” and using distinctive cooking techniques that “infuse our delicious California teriyaki flavors throughout our chicken, pork and beef.” Try their signature teriyaki, tempura, noodle or rice bowls, which are made fresh to order daily.

MORGAN HILL / GILROY EL AMIGO RESTAURANT $

[Mexican] 8800 San Ysidro Ave., Gilroy (408) 846-0040; 7090 Santa Teresa Blvd., San Jose (408) 365-9500 www.elamigorestaurant.com

Established in 1987 by Mexicanborn Huberto Acevedo and his wife Margarita, this authentic restaurant features all of the accoutrements the festive Mexican culture creates. Mariachi players, a fiestalike atmosphere and colorful and delectable food propel El Amigo to new strata far above small taquerias common throughout the valley. Take time to sample the fajitas de camaron, plato de carne asada, enchiladas in traditional Mexican mole sauce, or its signature dish, the Molcajete, a fajita-style sizzling combination of shrimp and special salsa. GIANCARLO’S $$

[Italian] 16180 Monterey Rd., Morgan Hill (408) 776-2995 www.bestofmorganhill.com

Under the wing of chef and owner Tony Garcia, this much-loved Italian restaurant continues its fine tradition of providing pocket66


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Parcel 104 at the Santa Clara Marriott 2700 Mission College Boulevard, Santa Clara For reservations call 408.970.6104 or visit parcel104.com

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friendly meals of sandwiches, salads, pastas, antipasti, as well as seafood, veal and beef entrées, in an inviting, casual environment. Garcia recommends the Escolar, tender white fish topped with a sweet and sour sauce, but don’t miss out on the standout sorbets, which are served creatively in shells of fruit such as oranges and coconuts. With a capacity of 50, the restaurant’s banquet room is perfect for an intimate party.

MOUNTAIN VIEW 3TA RESTAURANT AND BAR $$

[Asian Fusion] 156 Castro St. (650) 988-1382

This restaurant and bar combines the best of Asian cuisine. Serving everything from Pad Thai to Japanese sushi concoctions, 3ta truly lives up the phrase “Asian fusion.” Their menu features an already popular filet mignon in peppercorn sauce, with lobster, ahi tuna, and other savory specialties. 3ta is a semiformal restaurant with a relaxed atmosphere, full bar serving up old favorites, and some new dessert-inspired cocktails. CASCAL $$

[Pan-Latin] 400 Castro St. (650) 940-9500 www.cascalrestaurant.com

Vibrant interior colors create a lively setting for Cascal’s huge, Latin-influenced tapas menu. If you don’t feel like sharing, feel free to fall back on the full menu, which has a trio of ceviche dishes, plus several varieties of seafood paella. Weekdays from 3:30-6:30pm, you can enjoy your tapas with half-price mojitos, sangria or caipirinhas. SPICE ISLANDS CAFÉ $

[Malaysian] 210 Hope St. (650) 961-0628 www.spiceislandscafe.com

DINING

Dishes like mango chicken and prawns, black pepper crab, and spicy spareribs (plus a host of vegetarian options) may sound familiar, but they defy traditional preparations. All go perfectly with the pan-fried roti bread, a hardto-find side dish at even the most authentic Singaporean restaurants. The bar at Spice Islands knows how

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to make a perfect Singapore Sling, using the recipe taken from the famous Raffles Hotel in, where else, Singapore. TAQUERIA LA BAMBA $

[Mexican] 2058 Old Middlefield Way (650) 965-2755

Tucked away in this tiny taqueria are some of the biggest burritos this side of Texas. La Bamba’s super burrito comes with all the traditional fixings, such as meat, beans, rice, cheese, sour cream and guacamole, and is big enough to feed two hungry people. La Bamba’s menu also offers a taste of El Salvador with its pupusas, wonderfully crispy tortillas filled with pork, beans, and cheese. These delicacies are not designed to go – gobble them up in-house as they emerge piping hot from the kitchen. TIED HOUSE BREWERY $

[American] 954 Villa St. (650) 965-2739 www.tiedhouse.com

Tied House bustles with patrons as familiar with the microbrewery’s selection of homemade ale and ambers as they are with the menu of oversized burgers, deep-fried appetizers, and hearty salads. Pasta and seafood entrées offer up more refined options than the typical brew pub fare, but at the end of the day, any food you order is really just a side dish to the real main course: beer.

PALO ALTO BLUE CHALK CAFÉ $

630 Ramona St. (650) 3261020 www.bluechalk.com

Part restaurant, part game room, part music venue, part nightclub, this unique downtown establishment has something for everyone. Private dining areas, billiards, shuffleboards, fireplaces and live music on Thursdays are just some of the amenities. Featuring recipes from the famed Left at Albuquerque restaurant, Blue Chalk’s welcoming atmosphere is supported with Mexican grillinspired dishes and signature margaritas. Indulge in Baby Back ribs, chipotle meatloaf, veggie burritos or the popular Navajo Chicken Stack: cornmeal-dusted chicken breast baked with roasted poblano chilies, pepper jack and cheddar cheeses.

FISH MARKET RESTAURANT $$

[Seafood] 3150 El Camino Real (650) 493-9188 www.thefishmarket.com

Every Fish Market location (the first opened in 1976) houses a retail market, oyster bar, and restaurant. The menu changes daily, but no matter what day it is, there’s a dish for nearly every hankering: seafood cocktails, raw oysters and clams, baked shellfish, steamed shellfish, smoked fish, sashimi and sushi, oyster bar specialties, and a deep list of mesquite charbroiled entrées. Ask for the cheesy bread with crabmeat, and always choose the au gratin as one of your sides. Trust us. MANTRA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE $$ [Contemporary Indian, California] 632 Emerson St, (650) 322-3500 www.mantrapaloalto.com

The gold wallpaper, cherry wood veneers, and occasional live jazz hint that this isn’t your typical Indian restaurant. Executive chef Sachin Chopra has created a winning menu that juxtaposes the Indian and California tastes, ranging from appetizers like golden cumin cauliflower soup to entrées like mustard and roasted Kashmiri cayenne pepper-marinated sea bass filet on a bed of leeks and fresh vegetables. Equally pleasing are the elegant 78-seat dining room and Dual Happy Hour ($3 beer, $5 cocktails and half off bar food) at the sleek Daru Lounge.

SAN JOSE AIRPORT

GINGER CAFE $

[Chinese, Asian] 398 W. El Camino Real #114 (408) 7362828; 8657 San Ysidro Ave., Gilroy (408) 847-2625 www.gingercafe.net

Named after an ingredient that’s dominant in Asian cuisine, the menu at Ginger Café draws inspiration from the region, blending Thai, Malaysian, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Japanese flavors to perfection. Small plates are a great way to go if you can’t decide what to have, but popular picks include the Tamarine Jumbo Prawns, Filet Mignon Luc La (tender cubes of beef 68


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and vegetables in a special house sauce), and Signature Seabass (fried with a spicy mandarin sauce or steamed with ginger scallion). To wash down that perfect meal, Ginger Café offers a wide variety of beers, sake, wine, and cocktails. HOUSE OF GENJI $$$

[Japanese, Steakhouse] 1335 N. First St. (408) 453-8120 www.houseofgenji.com

If you’re craving teppanyaki, or even if you just have a knife fetish, House of Genji is the place in the South Bay to watch some tableside juggling and chopping. Start with some salad and soup, sipped Japanese-style, and then watch as your chef plays with your food, threshing your choice of meats and vegetables into bite-sized pieces with circus-worthy flair on his teppan (Japanese for “iron”). ISLAND GRILL $$

[Steakhouse, Seafood, Modern American] 1355 N. Fourth St. (408) 392-2468 www.theislandgrill.com

The Island Grill in the resort-style Clarion Hotel cooks up the food equivalents of sun, sand, and long walks on the beach: blackened chicken salad with mango citrus vinaigrette; plenty of pasta and seafood dishes, like pineapple and chipotle and fried plantains with chili pepper jelly; and jerk sauce, jerk sauce everywhere. Dig the dish appellations: Jerk Caesar, Volcano Salad, and Da Plane, Da Plane Burger. MENARA MOROCCAN RESTAURANT $$

[Moroccan] 41 E. Gish Rd. (408) 453-1983 www.menara41.com

Recline on a pillowed couch with a Moroccan Magic cocktail in hand. Six different five-course prix fixe dinners include Casablancan

SPOTS

delectables like lamb with honey, hare with paprika, and orange roughy with shermoula sauce. Meals are finished with mint tea. Moroccan arches, gilt accents, low-to-the-ground dining tables, and belly dancers might catch you hoping Master won’t rub the lamp just yet. SPENCER’S FOR STEAKS AND CHOPS $$$

[American, Steakhouse] 2050 Gateway Pl. (408) 437-2170 www.spencersforsteaksandchops.com

This is a steakhouse-away-fromhome for grilling fanatics, located in the San Jose DoubleTree Hotel. George Foreman wannabes will appreciate the variety of premium grade cuts on the menu and envy the state-of-the-art infrared broiler that sears each one to an unholy 1,700 degrees. Any of the full-bodied reds on the menu will help wash down those eight-to-12 ounces of grilled-to-order meat, and the 16-to-18-ounce prime rib calls for a shot of serious single malt Scotch.

SAN JOSE ALMADEN VALLEY

BURGER PIT $

[American] 1349 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 269-8062

Having called Silicon Valley home since 1956, this burger joint has withstood the test of time. Their classic Steerburger remains a strong seller, but they also have chicken, seafood, ribs, and steak plates, including their eight-ounce Rancher’s Choice sirloin that comes with a hearty helping of side dishes. For the weight-conscious, they also have several low calorie plates. Be sure to print out their online coupon, which gets you a half-pound Steerburger and fries for just $4.99.

FISH MARKET RESTAURANT $$

[Seafood, American] 1007 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 2693474 www.thefishmarket.com

Fresh seafood at a fair price – a goal Fish Market is able to meet because they operate their own fishing vessels, fishery, and oyster farm. The dazzling menu includes line-caught Pacific swordfish, Hawaiian hebi, Pacific Miyagi oysters, and live Maine lobster tail, plus, a choice of having your fish cooked over a mesquite wood fire, baked, steamed, smoked or fried. Make sure to check out the weekly specialty fish and the sushi bar.

SAN JOSE DOWNTOWN

BELLA MIA $$

[Italian, Modern American] 58 S. First St. (408) 280-1993 www.bellamia.com

Come for the old-world charm; stay for amazing pasta dishes. Bella Mia’s dark mahogany wood and beautiful chandeliers make the place dreamily cozy, and the house-made pastas are always pleasing. For the carb-conscious, the restaurant carries a variety of starter and main-course salads; other splurgers might prefer the seafood saffron risotto or the grilled pork chops. FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE & RESTAURANT $

[Modern American, Asian Fusion] 99 E. San Fernando St. (408) 998-9998 www.fahrenheitultralounge.com

Fahrenheit’s exotic small plates have gotten so much attention, they’ve expanded their menu to include equally exceptional entrées. For starters, try the Mandalay beef with roti bread, or gingerpoached chicken salad, and cruise 70

SV

CATERING

» CATERING

INDIAN/CHINESE

19 Market

Temptations DINING

288 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 625-1234 www.temptationsca.com Contact: Neela Shukla MALAYSIAN

Spice Islands Cafe 210 Hope St., Mountain View (650) 961-3500 Contact: Elizabeth Chen MEDITERRANEAN

Cafe Baklava 341 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 969-3835 Contact: Illiano Yuksel CALIFORNIA

Crimson 15466 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-0175 www.crimsonrestaurant.com Contact: Chef Diane Rose CUBAN

Habana Cuba 238 Race St., San Jose (408) 998-2822 www.998cuba.com Contact: Jennifer Cannella

MEXICAN

Taqueria La Bamba 2058 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View (650) 965-2755 Contact: Leo Munoz VIETNAMESE

19 Market 19 N. Market St., San Jose (408) 280-6111 www.19market.com Contact: Hanna Pham

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to gratifying large plates such as the grilled cabernet skirt steak or pan seared wild Alaskan salmon. Cocktails get as every bit as much attention here; it’s the only South Bay joint where bottle-flipping bartenders add a shot of energetic flair to their service. HAPPI HOUSE $

[Asian] 5353 Almaden Expwy. (408) 265-8282; 695 N. Fifth St. (408) 295-5554; 397 Saratoga Ave., San Jose (408) 984-4806; 3015 McKee Rd., San Jose (408) 923-2120

Oceanfront Dining On-Site Brewery Fresh Seafood Fire Pits Cocktails & Wine Live Music & Dancing

The first Happi House opened its doors in San Jose’s Japantown in 1976. Now there are six restaurants serving original teriyaki infusion cuisine made fresh and delicious by specially marinating “the most wholesome ingredients with top-secret seasonings and our exceptional teriyaki sauce” and using distinctive cooking techniques that “infuse our delicious California teriyaki flavors throughout our chicken, pork and beef.” Try their signature teriyaki, tempura, noodle or rice bowls, which are made fresh to order daily. KOJI SAKE LOUNGE $$

[Japanese] 48 S. First St. (408) 287-7199 www.kojisakelounge.com

Touted as the South Bay’s only sake lounge, Koji serves simple, traditional Japanese cuisine in a contemporary atmosphere, and fueled by an ever-changing selection of premium sakes. Small, tantalizing dishes include Panko Crusted Calamari, a Teriyaki chicken sandwich on grilled pita bread, and Ahi Tuna Tartar with mango salsa. More than 20 premium sake brands don the shelves of Koji, with new sake featured every Wednesday. Mellifluous music, a Zen garden and ample lounge space equipped with suede booths and candle-lit tables make this a great hangout for any night of the week. LOFT BAR & BISTRO $$

[Modern American] 90 S. Second St. (408) 291-0677 www.loftbarandbistro.com

Capers Eat and Drink impresario Kam Razavi has a Downtown hit with Loft. A historic stone-andmarble exterior belies the airy urban-chic warehouse interior, complete with upstairs loft and a second-story patio. The menu

DINING

HALF MOON BAY BREWING COMPANY

4 Miles North of Half Moon Bay

390 Capistrano Road Princeton-by-the-Sea 650.728.BREW www.hmbbrewingco.com 70

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features gourmet turns on classic comfort foods, as exemplified by Razavi’s meatloaf, made with smoked ham and smothered in a wild mushroom sauce that migrates to the garlic mashed potatoes. The full bar on the second floor is a popular gathering spot on weekend nights.

blended with Peruvian flavors. Nazca embodies that tradition, serving modern Peruvian and fusion cuisine rich in seafood and meat. Main dishes include Peruvian ceviche, black ink risotto and Peruvian-style lamb shanks.

THE MELTING POT $$$

[Spanish, Tapas] 62 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 298-4400 www.picassosrestaurant.com

[Modern American] 72 S. First St. (408) 293-6020 www.meltingpot.com

This popular franchise takes the Swiss-born craze of dipping stuff in hot pots way beyond standardissue “cheese with bread,” and San Jose’s handsome location in a historic building is sophisticated, warm, and simple. The four-course menu features varied entrées cooked in one of four styles, with an assortment of savory breads, vegetables, and choice of salad. The regular menu includes dishes like lobster, chicken, pork tenderloin, shrimp, and Florentine ravioli – and, of course, chocolate fondue dessert. MUSTARD CAFE $$

[American] 975 The Alameda (408) 295-9000 www.mustardcafe.com

Bringing the famous New York deli taste to the West Coast, Mustard Café has an almost endless array of sandwiches on offer, thanks to its create-your-own sandwich menu. Choose from six artisan breads, six gourmet mustards, and pile your creation high with a selection of fine Boar’s Head meats, nine different cheeses and more. If the options are overwhelming, try one of their signature creations, such as the popular Cranturberry sandwich, which boasts turkey, mesclun greens, red onion, mayonnaise and a house-made cranberry sauce, served on whole grain bread. NAZCA PERUVIAN CUISINE $$

[Peruvian, Latin American, Fusion] 167 W. San Fernando St. (408) 295-2828

According to Nazca owner Jose Bohorquez, Peruvian gastronomy is at its highest level in the nation’s history, with a boom of culinary schools in Lima sending Peruvian chefs to all corners of the world. And it’s no secret why. Traditional Peruvian food, Bohorquez says, is a mixture of several cuisines brought to Peru from Spain, China, Japan, Italy and Africa, which were then

PICASSO’S TAPAS RESTAURANT $$

Picasso’s offers a tapas menu so multifaceted, even a Cubist painter would be impressed. Start off with the tangy, garlic-spiked specialties, like clams in white wine garlic sauce, then switch it up with the stewed chicken and tortilla Española (a potato and onion frittata). The paella is served for two or more, so bring friends over a pitcher of sangria. On weekends, there’s often a guitarist to keep guests entertained during the inevitable wait. TIED HOUSE CAFE & BREWERY $$

[American upscale pub food] 65 N. San Pedro St. (408) 2952739 www.tiedhouse.com

Ravenous Sharks fans devour platters of smoked trout, smoked salmon, ribs, and sausages with a pint of Ironwood Dark, an Englishstyle brown ale, while mall-weary shoppers gratefully chow down the blackened Louisiana catfish with Tied’s Cascade Amber. For bar snacks, it’s hard to beat the pesto-parmesan calamari or the Harvest Quesadilla, roasted butternut squash, and red peppers with pepper jack cheese in a flour tortilla drizzled with lime-chipotle sour cream.

SAN JOSE SANTANA ROW & WEST

BLOWFISH SUSHI $$

[Japanese, Sushi, Asian Fusion] 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1010 (408) 345-3848 www.blowfishsushi.com

If you like your sushi trendysophisticated, with a little DJ music and anime thrown in, you’ll be hooked. A menu of Sakizuke (Japanese fusion appetizers) mixes up sea bass and miso, salmon roe, 72


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and quail egg. Try special sushi rolls like the Special Dragon or the Super Dynamite Roll, and fill up on their extensive list of imported, hard-to-find sakes. Try the Peach Nympho, the Mango Mojito or the Kiwi Appletini. ROSIE MCCANN’S IRISH PUB AND RESTAURANT $$

[Irish, American] 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1060 San Jose (408) 247-1706 www.rosiemccanns.com

Rosie McCann’s reinvents traditional pub fare. Quaff a pint or two at the elegant curved bar, and you, too, will be singing praises to Rosie’s Irish Nachos, a mountain of guacamole, salsa, and all the fixings atop (of course) potatoes. The Irish sausage bangers with garlic mashed potatoes and Guinness gravy, and Alaskan cod fish ‘n’ chips are delectable. Try the filet mignon medallion appetizer and order a couple of items from the kid’s menu. It’s cheaper, and you still get tons of food. SINO RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE $$$

[Chinese] 377 Santana Row (408) 247-8880 www.sinorestaurant.com

Ultra-modern Asian chic ambience sets the stage for this upscale Chinese/dim sum hot spot. Owner Chris Yeo (of Straits fame) packs the menu with everything from General Yeo free-range chicken to char siu smoked sea bass, and packs SINO’s five large rooms full of Santana Row’s genetically privileged diners. Try the Peking barbecued baby back ribs. Delicious. STRAITS RESTAURANT $$

[Asian Fusion] 333 Santana Row, Ste. 1100 (408) 246-6320 www.straitsrestaurants.com

DINING

Pan-oceanic Singaporean small plates and noodle dishes are like romance on the high seas: unexpected, spicy, and utterly seductive once you begin to roll with it. A meal at Straits will take your taste buds on a whirlwind tour

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of Asia, starting with the buttery Indian-style roti prata flatbread and the Fuji apple and prawn salad in a mint vinaigrette, all the way to the Origami sea bass with ginger, shiitake mushrooms, and rice wine baked in parchment.

SAN JOSE WILLOW GLEN

CREEKSIDE INN $$

[Classic American] 544 W. Alma Ave. (408) 289-9781

The kind of place where quality comfort food and karaoke cohabitate, the Creekside recalls the big-shouldered days at the height of classic American cuisine. A meatand-potatoes menu pleases with favorites like lobster, sole, meatloaf, and rack of lamb, and while the décor can’t be called cutting-edge, it wins points for coziness. Nick, the owner, promises the best steak in town. Karaoke (Wednesdays) comes with a free buffet – get there early. MIO VICINO ARISTO $$

[Italian, Pizza] 1140 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 286-6027

Mio Vicino proves to be a little more upscale than your typical homespun Italian joint. Entrées like chicken marsala and filet mignon and pasta dishes like fettucini Alfredo hew closer to tradition, as does the vigorous house red wine. It can get a little noisy inside, but what do you expect from a friendly eatery whose name means “My neighborhood”? WILLOW STREET PIZZA $

[Italian, Pizza] 1554 Saratoga Ave. (408) 871-0400; 1072 Willow St. (408) 971-7080 www.willowstreet.com

Friendly service, a convivial, neighborhood atmosphere, and fresh ingredients have made Willow Street Pizza a longtime local favorite. Their wonderful, wood-fired pizzas have a crispier edge than regular oven-baked pies, and their scrumptious pasta combinations (fettuccini with chicken, red bell peppers, red

onions, and cilantro in a tequilalime cream sauce) are creative palate-pleasers.

SANTA CLARA BIRK’S RESTAURANT $$$

[Modern American, Steak] 3955 Freedom Cir. (408) 9806400 www.birksrestaurant.com

Almond wood and mesquite charcoal fuel the tender flavors emanating from this upscale American grill designed by Pat Kuleto. The open kitchen features superb steaks cut from tender, dry-aged, free-range beef, and organic, local produce, including the popular creamed spinach side. A business-casual hot spot for local white collars who like the kitchen energy at the grill and the succulent seafood at the oyster bar. Couples should request the lighter, Ushaped “Snoopy room” (shaped like Snoopy’s nose) for more intimacy. CHATANOGA $$

[Persian] 2725 El Camino Real (408) 241-1200 www.chatanogaonline.com

Chatanoga (named after a river in Iran, not Chattanooga, Tenn.). features traditional dishes that combine the delectable sauces, meats, kebabs and rice dishes for which the region is renowned with a fine dining atmosphere and live entertainment. Popular appetizers include the eggplant-based dishes, such as Haleem Bademjan – a blend of eggplant, seasonings, crispy fried onions and sautéed mint, served with optional ground beef. The sizeable dining room’s dance floor plays host to belly dancing Thursday thru Saturday, while live music is on offer Thursday thru Saturday. FISH MARKET RESTAURANT $$

[Seafood, American] 3775 El Camino Real (408) 246-3474 74


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DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING HOT 72 www.thefishmarket.com

Rarely does a seafood restaurant operate its own certified processing, distribution, and wholesale company, but that’s Fish Market’s commitment to freshness. With 25 fresh fish dishes and a variety of shellfish on a daily changing menu, Fish Market satisfies any oceanic urge. If you can’t eat in, pick up some fish at their adjoining retail market. Catch the action at the old-school oyster bar – and know that chefs here will cater readily to your special dietary needs or not-onthe-menu cravings. LA PALOMA RESTAURANT $

[Mexican] 2280 El Camino Real (408) 247-0990

There’s nothing fancy about the interior of this adobe-style building, but, then, you’ve come to get plenty of food for a reasonable price. La Paloma serves up mostly traditional Mexican fare (good burritos and enchiladas) with a few Nuevo dishes like mango chicken quesadilla. Their chile verde – a hearty sauce of green chiles, tomatoes, and onions over tender pork – lures meat eaters back again and again. PARCEL 104 $$$$

[Modern American] 2700 Mission College Blvd. (408) 970-6104 www.parcel104.com

Celebrity chef Bradley Ogden and executive chef Robert Sapirman transform farm-fresh, local ingredients into works of seasonal art at this crown jewel of Santa Clara fine dining. The result: An ever-evolving, palate-provoking and inventive menu that pairs well with the extensive list of wines from Parcel 104’s award-winning cellar. The restaurant does not serve weekend lunches or Sunday dinners, but offers a full breakfast menu for an inspiring weekday jump-start. YE OLDE ROYAL OAK PUB $$

DINING

[Pub] 1240 Coleman Ave., Santa Clara (408) 588-1111 www.meetmeattheoak.com

74

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

SPOTS

A traditional British pub with all the entertainment ye’d expect: live Celtic music, karaoke, ladies night, live bands and, of course, British breakfast served on Sundays. Feast on Fish & Chips with Mushy Peas, Bangers with Mash served with vegetables du jour, or splurge on the Beef Wellington, a hearty 15-ounce filet mignon doused in a Madeira mushroom sauce and wrapped in puff pastry before being baked. It’s enough food for two people, but it takes 45 minutes to cook, so start off with some fried calamari and a pint of draught beer while ye wait. Varieties include Boddingtons, Guinness, New Castle and Strongbow Dry Cider.

SARATOGA BAI TONG THAI BISTRO $

[Thai] 14515 Big Basin Way (408) 872-1319

Bai Tong is creating quite a buzz with a menu that offers a medley of different colored curries – Kang Dang (red), Kang Keow Warn (green) and Kang Karee (yellow). For the more daring, there is the Evil Jungle Curry, a choice of meat or tofu mixed with a bunch of veggies. Pink walls and funky-looking statues may have you wondering if you’ve stumbled onto Disneyland’s Indiana Jones ride. But, hey, what could be better than eating at “The Happiest Place on Earth?” Bai Tong boasts hard-to-find wines from some of the smallest local vineyards around. THE BASIN $$

[American] 14572 Big Basin Way (408) 867-1906 www.thebasin.com

Regulars call The Basin the place “where everybody knows your name” – just with much better grub. The fare is American by way of Spain and Italy, including the wild mushroom rigatoni. With cozy wood tables and red drapes, The Basin caters to large groups and has a private room that can hold 30. Ask the bartender to shake you up a Caipirinha, the unofficial national

drink of Brazil distilled from sugar cane rum and is oh-so-good. BELLA SARATOGA $$

[Italian] 14503 Big Basin Way (408) 741-5115 www.bellasaratoga.com

Comfortable family dining is served up daily at this elegant Victorian home turned restaurant in the heart of Saratoga. Bella Saratoga’s extensive Italian menu features award-winning pasta, flat bread pizzas, and a comprehensive wine list to complement any meal. Portions are generous, but if your stomach still has room postdinner, delicious desserts such as tiramisu and pecan turtle pie await.

SUNNYVALE NICOLINO’S ITALIAN $$$

[Italian] 1228 Reamwood Ave. (408) 734-5323 www. nicolinosgardencafe.com

Arched doorways and old-world light fixtures set the mood at this family-oriented Sunnyvale favorite, where the waiters wear tuxes and the food speaks Italian. Try veal scaloppini, fettuccine carbonara, or the famous “New York Style” sausage burger (the sausage is homemade). Try the extravagant flambé menu (lit up tableside) for a memorable dining experience. OCEAN BLUE RESTAURANT $$

[Japanese, Asian Fusion] 1010 E. El Camino Real (408) 720-8840

The classic elegance of the décor means that Ocean Blue exudes the atmosphere a sushi restaurant is meant to have. The restaurant features fresh, top quality sushi and sashimi, a full bar stocked with premium sake and stylish music, ranging from classic Japanese to current hip-hop. Try their signature Kabuki Roll: salmon, yellowtail tuna and radish sprouts wrapped in cucumber; or the more classic Firecracker Roll, topped with sliced jalapeños and hot sauce. TW


DINING: HOT SPOTS

Our specialties are Tapas, Paella and Sangria Try Our Selection Of Best Spanish Wines 62 W Santa Clara St. San Jose, Ca 95113 Tel/ Fax: 408.298.4400

-VODIÂ&#x2026;%JOOFSÂ&#x2026;'VMM#BS

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» FEATURE

Nightlife&Music

» » » » » »

FEATURE WINE TASTING & MORE CD RELEASES ALBUM REVIEWS CONCERT PREVIEWS SPORTS BARS

BILLY IDOL

June 26 – 27, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

OURS

June 27, Slim’s, San Francisco www.slims-sf.com

ROBERT PLANT AND ALISON KRAUSS

June 27, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

DIA DE SAN JUAN FESTIVAL

June 28, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

MARK KNOPFLER June 28, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

BIG SANDY & HIS FLY-RITE BOYS

June 28, The Blank Club, San Francisco www.theblankclub.com

CAMPER VAN BEETHOVEN

June 28, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

2008 Summer Music Guide Three months of live performances blitzkrieg the Bay Area.

A NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

nyone who says Silicon Valley’s music scene is lacking anything can henceforth suck eggs. This summer’s lineup is chock full of chest pounding, fist pumping, rhythm crunching music that will undoubtedly complement the rich scenes of San Francisco and Santa Cruz. From Live 105’s perennially awesome BFD concert in Mountain View, to the lord of hip-hop, Kanye West, at the HP Pavilion, from cat scratching madman Ted Nugent in Santa Cruz, to living legends Radiohead and Tom Petty at Golden Gate Park, this summer will be the zenith of great music. With this guide, there’s no reason not to catch at least one of these amazing live performances. CHEVELLE

June 2, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

PETER MURPHY

June 2, The Grand Ballroom at the Regency Center, San Francisco www.ticketmaster.com

KANYE WEST

Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

LOCAL H

June 8, The Independent, San Francisco www.theindependentsf.com

ERYKAH BADU

June 6, HP Pavilion, San Jose www.hppsj.com

June 8 – 9, Paramount Theatre, Oakland www.paramounttheatre.com

SHOOTER JENNINGS

FISH

June 6, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

June 9, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

CHICAGO / THE DOOBIE BROTHERS

June 10, The Independent, San Francisco www.theindependentsf.com

June 7, Sleep Train Pavilion, Concord www.livenation.com

LIVE 105’S BFD W/CYPRESS HILL, FLOGGING MOLLY, THE KOOKS, MOBY AND MANY MORE June 7, Shoreline

76

CRYSTAL CASTLES

BILLY BRAGG

June 11, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

SNOOP DOGG’S WEST FEST

June 15, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

OLD 97’S

June 17, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

SEA WOLF

June 17, The Independent, San Francisco www.theindependentsf.com

TED NUGENT

June 18, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com June 19, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

GEORGE MICHAEL June 19, HP Pavilion, San Jose www.hppsj.com

THE ROMANTICS

June 20, Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk www.beachboardwalk.com

THIEVERY CORPORATION

June 20, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

BRAD PAISLEY WITH JEWEL June 20, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

O.A.R.

June 21 - 22, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE

June 21, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

PEPPER

June 22, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

LIZ PHAIR

June 23, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

INDIGO GIRLS

June 25, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

CYNDI LAUPER / THE B-52S

June 29, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

MIKE NESS & HIS BAND

July 2, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com July 6, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

STYX

July 2, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

REVEREND HORTON HEAT / SUPERSUCKER / NASHVILLE PUSSY

AMERICAN IDOLS LIVE

July 8, HP Pavilion, San Jose www.hppsj.com

STEVIE WONDER

July 8, Sleep Train Pavilion, Concord www.livenation.com

THE NEW MASTERSOUNDS

July 11 – 12, The Independent, San Francisco www.theindependentsf.com

EDDIE MONEY

July 11, Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk www.beachboardwalk.com

SLIPKNOT / DISTURBED

July 12, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

THE POLICE / ELVIS COSTELLO & THE IMPOSTERS

July 14, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com July 16, Sleep Train Pavilion, Concord www.livenation.com

AIMEE MANN / MARC COHN

July 14, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

ALAN JACKSON

July 14, HP Pavilion, San Jose www.hppsj.com

PETER FRAMPTON

July 15, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

LYNYRD SKYNYRD

July 16, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

JONAS BROTHERS

July 17, Sleep Train Pavilion, Concord www.livenation.com

July 3, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

JIMMY EAT WORLD

RADIO DISNEY PRESENTS FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS SHOW WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY

AGENT ORANGE

July 4, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

STEVIE WONDER

July 5, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

YAZ

July 7, Paramount Theatre, Oakland wwwparamounttheatre.com

BOSTON

July 7 – 8, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

76 78 78 79 80 80

July 18, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com July 18, The Blank Club, San Francisco www.theblankclub.com

CHRIS ISAAK

July 18 – 20, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

DOWNLOAD FESTIVAL

July 19, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

FEIST

July 19, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

KENNY LOGGINS

July 20, Frost Amphitheater – Stanford University www.summersymphony.org

78


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: INTERVIEW

$2 PABST

$2 PABST

$2 PABST

WII VIDEO

LADIES COURGAR NIGHT

SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE FEVER

LIVE MUSIC

DJ / LIVE MUSIC

DJ / LIVE MUSIC

THE ESCAPE BAR & GRILL, 2942 S.

$2 PABST

MULLETT MADNESS

$2 PABST WII VIDEO

$2 PABST TRIVIA

$2 PABST

OPEN POOL TOURNAMENT

Bascom Ave., San Jose (408) 377-5436

R&B, FUNK, JAZZ

BAMBOO LOUNGE, 1355 N. Fourth St., San Jose (408) 392-2468 www.TheIslandGrill.com

LIVE MUSIC R&B, FUNK, JAZZ

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR THE BANK, 14421 Big Basin Way,

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$2 PBR ON TAP

$3.50 KAMIKAZES

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR $1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$2 PBR ON TAP

$2 PBR ON TAP

HAPPY HOUR $1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

Saratoga (408) 867-5155

BERT’S ALIBI, 1313 W. El Camino Real Mountain View (408) 561-4339

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

$3.50 KAMIKAZES

BUDDHA LOUNGE, 251 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 965-7665 www.myspace.com/buddhalounge

SOUTH BAY’S LONGEST HAPPY HOUR!

KARAOKE & DJ

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

$1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 $1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM

Santa Clara (408) 241-1200 www.chatanogaonline.com

DIVE BAR, 78 E. Santa Clara, San Jose (408) 288-5252 www.sjdivebar.com

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 8PM-MIDNIGHT

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 9PM-MIDNIGHT

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 9PM-MIDNIGHT

BOMBS AWAY THURSDAYS

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE, 99 E. San Fernando St., San Jose (408) 998-9998 www.fultralounge.com

MARTINI FRIDAYS

RHYTHM

9:30PM - 1:30AM

MAD MIX JAM

ROSIE MCCANN’S, 355 Santana Row

Ave., Santa Clara (408) 588-1111 www.meetmeattheoak.com

TEMPLE BAR & LOUNGE, 52 S. First St.,

LIVE MUSIC

TOP 40’s-80’s

CLUB NIGHT

LIVE CELTIC MUSIC

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

$2 WELL DRINKS, $5 TOKYO, AMF, LONG ISLANDS

2 FOR 1 ANY SHOTS 9 - 10PM

WEDNESDAYS

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

HUMPDAY DRINK SPECIALS

MARAGARITA MONDAYS

4 - 7PM

TOP SECRET TUESDAYS

HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM

KARAOKE WEDNESDAYS

$3 HOUSE MARGARITAS & PALOMAS, $4 TOP SHELF

$2 JACK $2 JAGER $2 BLUE MOON B4 11PM

9PM-1AM: $3 CORONA $3 PACIFICO $3 LANDSHARK $4 JAGER

HAPPY HOUR

DRINK

DRINK

JAM NIGHT

KARAOKE NIGHT

JAM NIGHT

LIVE ART SHOW & HOUSE MUSIC

KARAOKE NIGHT

HOUSE MUSIC

KARAOKE

TRIVIA

DJ NIGHT

5-7PM, 3 BEERS & SPECIALS SPECIALS $3 WELLS & ½ PRICE SPECIALTY COCKTAILS $3 BEERS, $3 WELLS, $5 SPECIALTY DRINKS, $3 JAGER, BEER PONG 30% OFF BOTTLE OF WINE ALL NIGHT

9:30PM - 1:30AM

CLUB NIGHT

7 - 10PM, 9:30PM - 12:30AM, $1 APPETIZERS & DRINKS $1 APPETIZERS & DRINKS

$2 TUESDAYS

KARAOKE NIGHT

INDUSTRY NIGHT

#1060, San Jose (408) 247-1706 www.rosiemccanns.com

YE OLDE ROYAL OAK PUB, 1240 Coleman

CHILL SUNDAYS

HAPPY HOUR

LIVE MUSIC

HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

JAM NIGHT 8PM

R&B, HOUSE

9:30PM - 12:30AM

8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS

1ST MON. OF THE MONTH

OPEN MIC

7PM - 1AM, SPONSORED BY GUITAR SHOWCASE

9PM - 1AM, 7:30 - 10PM, $1 APPETIZERS & DRINKS $1 APPETIZERS & DRINKS $1 APPETIZERS & DRINKS

$3 WELL DRINKS & BEER

San Jose (408) 288-8518

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

77

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

GOOSETOWN, 1072 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 292-4835 www.goosetownlounge.com

QUARTER NOTE, 1214 Apollo Way, Sunnyvale (408) 732-2110 www.quarternote.com

4 - 7PM

$4 DRAFT BEERS, 1/2 5-7PM: 3 BEERS & $3 5-7PM: 3 BEERS & $3 PRICED ROTATING SPECIALS, WELLS & ½ PRICE SPE- WELLS & ½ PRICE SPECOMPLIMENTARY CHAMCIALTY COCKTAILS CIALTY COCKTAILS PAGNE - 9:30-10:30PM

KARAOKE NIGHT

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR

FREE POOL SATURDAYS $5 JAGER BOMBS & $5 $5 GREY GOOSE & KETEL ONE DJ OTREBOR & CREW $2 DOMESTIC BOTTLES IRISH CAR BOMBS B4 11PM MARTINIS & COSMOS B4 9PM ROTATING LOCAL DJS DJ OTREBOR & CREW

DRINK SPECIALS HAPPY HOUR

$2 PBR ON TAP

$1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 $1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR CHATANOGA, 2725 El Camino Real

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

HAPPY HOUR LADIES NIGHT SUNDAYS KARAOKE & DJ

COLLEGE NIGHT

BRANHAM LOUNGE, 1116 Branham Ln., San Jose (408) 265-5525

$3.50 KAMIKAZES


» HEADLINERS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC F E AT U R E

76

THE BLASTERS

July 23, The Blank Club, San Francisco www.theblankclub.com

THE DOOBIE BROTHERS

July 24 – 25, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

BLUE OYSTER CULT July 25, Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk www.beachboardwalk.com

TOBY KEITH

July 25, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

STONE TEMPLE PILOTS

July 25, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley, www.ticketmaster.com

FLIPPER

BONE BASH

EMMYLOU HARRIS

LYLE LOVETT

JOHN MAYER / COLBIE CAILLAT

MÖTLEY CRÜE / BUCKCHERRY / PAPA ROACH / TRAPT

July 26, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

August 2 – 3, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

July 26, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

August 6, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

STEELY DAN

July 26, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

PAT BENATAR

July 27, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

ENGLISH BEAT / THE FIXX / THE ALARM

July 31, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

UB40

August 6, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

PROJEKT REVOLUTION WITH LINKIN PARK / CHRIS CORNELL / THE BRAVERY AND MANY MORE

WINE TASTING & MORE

» WINE TASTING & MORE

Vino Locale

Hahn Estates, Smith & Hook Winery 37700 Foothill Rd., Soledad (831) 678-2132 www.hahnestates.com Wine Tasting: Mon-Fri 11am4pm, Sat-Sun 11am-5pm.

Pedrizzetti Winery 1645 San Pedro Ave., Morgan Hill (408) 779-7389 www.pedrizzettiwinery.com Open Tue-Sun 10am-5pm (closed most holidays). WINERIES

Rabbit’s Foot Meadery

Burrell School Vineyards & Winery

1246 Birchwood Dr.,Sunnyvale (408) 261-1603 www.rabbitsfootmeadery.com Their famous cider is available at Whole Foods Markets and Oliver’s Markets.

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

24060 Summit Rd., Los Gatos (408) 353-6290 www.burrellschool.com Burrell School Vineyards & Winery produces “Wines at the Head of Their Class”: wines of unmistakable mountain character. Estate grown Cabernet Franc, chardonnay, merlot, pinot noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Syrah. Open Thu-Sun 11am5pm, Fri-Sat 11am-6pm.

Cinnabar Winery Tasting Room 14612 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-1010 www.cinnabarwine.com We invite you to visit our beautiful tasting room. Located in the quaint, historical village of Saratoga, flanked by the magnificent Santa Cruz Mountains. Open daily 11am - 5pm and Friday and Saturday evenings until 8pm for the summer months.

Cooper-Garrod Estate Vineyards 22645 Garrod Rd., Saratoga (408) 867-7116 www.cgv.com Wine Tasting: Mon-Fri Noon-5pm, SatSun 11am-5pm.

Fortino Winery 4525 Hecker Pass Hwy., Gilroy (408) 842-3305 www.fortinowinery.com Wine Tasting: Tue-Sat 10am5pm, Sun 11am-5pm.

Fleming Jenkins Vineyards & Winery 45 W. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 358-4949 www. flemingjenkins.com Wine Tasting: Tue-Sun Noon-6pm.

Roudon-Smith Winery 2364 Bean Creek Rd., Scotts Valley (831) 438-1244 www.roudonsmith.com Wine Tasting: Sat Noon-4:30pm.

Thomas Fogarty Vineyards 19501 Skyline Blvd., Woodside (650) 851-6777 www.fogartywinery.com Wine Tasting: Thu-Sun 11am-5pm. WINE SHOPS

Savvy Cellar Wines 2048 Broadway St., Redwood City (650) 363-8737 www.savvycellar.com Experience top quality wines without having to spend an arm and a leg. Savvy Cellar Wine Bar & Wine Shop features wines from all the great wine producing regions of the world – all wines rated 90 points or higher and retail for $39/bottle or less. Check website for details on: wine classes, wine clubs, private events, tasting specials, live jazz and online sales (including gift certificates).

Vino Locale 431 Kipling St., Palo Alto (650) 328-0450 www.vinolocale.com Vino Locale is the perfect place to host a business or social event in an elegant and private setting. Open Tue-Sat 11am-9pm, Sun Noon-5pm.

Vintage Wine Merchants 377 Santana Row #1135, San Jose (408) 260-1115 www.vintagewinemerchants.com Open Mon-Wed 10am-9pm, Thu-Sat 10am-10pm, Sun Noon-8pm.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM 78

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

Lucinda Williams

August 2, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

July 27, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

SV

[ C O N T. ]

August 9, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

August 18, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

REGENERATION TOUR WITH THE HUMAN LEAGUE / BELINDA CARLISLE / ABC / DEAD OR ALIVE

YES

August 11, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

DONNA SUMMER

August 13, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

WARPED TOUR WITH 3OH!3 / AGAINST ME / DANGER RADIO AND MANY MORE August 15, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

STEVE MILLER BAND / JOE COCKER August 15, Sleep Train Pavilion, Concord www.livenation.com

JONNY LANG / BIG HEAD TODD & THE MONSTERS August 15, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

JVC JAZZ FESTIVAL WITH GEORGE BENSON, BONEY JAMES, RAMSEY LEWIS AND MANY MORE August 16, Sleep Train Pavilion, Concord www.livenation.com

ROCK THE BELLS WITH A TRIBE CALLED QUEST / NAS / MOS DEF / RAKIM AND MANY MORE August 16, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

DARYL HALL & JOHN OATES

August 19, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

GIPSY KINGS

August 20, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

GIN BLOSSOMS

August 22, Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk www.beachboardwalk.com

TONY HAWK’S BOOM BOOM HUCKJAM August 22, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

OUTSIDE LANDS MUSIC & ARTS FESTIVAL WITH RADIOHEAD, BECK, TOM PETTY & THE HEARTBREAKERS, BEN HARPER, JACK JOHNSON, NELLIE MCKAY, THE BLACK KEYS AND MANY MORE

August 22 – 24, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco www.sfoutsidelands.com

Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

LAVAY SMITH & HER RED HOT SKILLET LICKERS

August 23, The Blank Club, San Francisco www.theblankclub.com

LUCINDA WILLIAMS August 27, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

JAMES BLUNT

August 28, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

THE TUBES

August 29, Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk www.beachboardwalk.com

CHICAGO

August 29 – 30, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www. mountainwinery.com

METAL MASTERS WITH JUDAS PRIEST / HEAVEN AND HELL / MOTORHEAD August 31, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

KT TUNSTALL

August 31, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

TW

CREEDANCE CLEARWATER REVISITED

August 22, Mountain » CD RELEASES

CD

RELEASES

JUNE 3 Aimee Mann, @#%&*! Smilers Ashanti, The Declaration Bret Michaels, Rock My World Disturbed, Indestructible Jewel, Perfectly Clear Radiohead, The Best of Weezer, Weezer Red Album

JUNE 10 Alanis Morissette, Flavors of Entanglement Emmylou Harris, All I Intended to Be Jakob Dylan, Seeing Things Martha Wainwright, I Know You’re Married But I’ve Got Feelings Too My Morning Jacket, Evil Urges Supergrass, Diamond Hoo Ha


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: ALBUM REVIEWS » ALBUM REVIEWS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC ALBUM REVIEWS

ALANIS MORISSETTE

BY TOM LANHAM

Flavors of Entanglement 

( M AV E R I C K / WA R N E R S )

Memo to Ryan Reynolds: For God’s sake, watch your back. Your famous former flame, Alanis, is, um, er, how to put this gently... not taking the recent breakup very well. She’s composed a vengeful, almost Fatal Attractionesque album that seems to detail every last twist and turn of said relationship’s death throes – a set so painfully personal, it feels every bit as uncomfortable as eavesdropping. We oughta know, of course, that this Grammy winner trades in such diary-honest reflection. She starts with good intentions on the album opener, “Citizens of the Planet,” but things turn creepy on “Underneath,” as she runs down a “Look at us” laundry list, including “Look at us waging war in our bedroom.” Even the memorable keyboard hook can’t save the song from TMI overload. And the dirt keeps getting dished: She swears a “Moratorium” on love, believes her lover would happily confine her to a “Straitjacket,” and finally skips town in the new wave-y “Giggling Again for No Reason.” Even the gorgeous piano centerpiece “Not as We” gets torpedoed by Gone with the Wind schmaltz when Morissette solemnly promises to start over, “This time I as I, and not as We.” At least Scarlett O’Hara always spoke plainly (and, unlike this singing canary, wisely kept her heartbreak to herself).

MARTHA WAINWRIGHT

I’ve Got Feelings Too 

I Know You’re Married But

(ZOE/ROUNDER)

It’s a deft trick, but there are artists who actually manage to make the personal sound palatable, no matter how deep they happen to be delving. In the space of two albums, this lovable eccentric has matured into a stylist, slyly melding murky poetic metaphors with playfully surface-y folk-pop schematics to create a wonderland every bit as curious as that of her brother, Rufus. And she holds nothing back. “My heart was made for bleeding all over you,” she informs a married suitor in the opening number (“Bleeding All Over You”), but shrugs and eventually walks away to chirrupy backing vocals and a sunny ‘60s melody, which tumbles headlong into another unfaithful ditty, “You Cheated Me.” She sticks to her new Spector-session path for several tracks, closing out with campy covers of Pink Floyd’s “See Emily Play” and the Eurythmics’ “Love Is A Stranger,” but breaks form long enough (with the operatic “Tower Song”) to remind you that she is, first and foremost, a quirky, cabaret-schooled Wainwright.

CURT SMITH Halfway, Pleased  (KOOK MEDIA)

RAINE MAIDA

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

Rarely has an album title so perfectly suited its content. On the one hand, you have to champion this brave Brit for moving to Hollywood and revving up his post-Tears For Fears solo career with this, his first album in a decade. And the ethereal, classy arrangements Smith conceives on this self-issued set are truly stunning. But then a sad thing happens – he starts to sing, in a forced castrato falsetto that immediately steals every last ounce of thunder from the music, and you realize just how crucial a role vocalist Roland Orzabal played in the TFF sound. Then you start hoping those two will hook up one more time to add to that halcyon canon – only to sigh at the end of the album, realizing that you are, indeed, only halfway pleased.

The Hunters Lullaby 

(KING NOISE/NETTWERK)

Maida is one composer who seems to have grown since he decided to fly solo. With his singer/songwriter wife, Chantal Kreviazuk, this Canuck left Toronto (and his old outfit, Our Lady Peace) behind in a dicerolling move to Los Angeles. It paid off handsomely, as the couple was soon penning hits for the likes of Avril Lavigne. Now the guy steps out with this brainy effort, equal parts Leonard Cohen and Woody Guthrie, with a dark sinister pall hanging over every last note. Maida always relied on oblique hooks and grave chords in OLP, but he really pushes himself here, from the hip-hop-fueled stomp of “Yellow Brick Road” to a Stephen Foster-prim “Confessional.” And in “Careful What You Wish For,” he melds Brecht/Weill piano with forlorn violin, a stop-start rhythm, and lyrics that soundly damn his shallow new hometown. Will he finally receive some long overdue acclaim this time around? That’s a tough one – America might have grown too stupid to appreciate his brilliance. TW THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

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NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: FEATURE / SPORTS BARS » CONCERT PREVIEWS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC CONCERT PREVIEWS

Hip-hop’s Jesus figure, a summer music mecca and a hard-core Republican from the ’70s are only fractions of what’s coming to the Bay Area this summer. BY MITCHELL ALAN PARKER

KANYE WEST J U N E 6 , H P PAV I L I O N , S A N J O S E W W W. H P P S J . C O M

San Jose cares about Kanye West, and Kanye West cares about San Jose. The multiple Grammy Award-winning hip-hop megastar native returns to play the HP Pavilion after, get this, only 48 days! That’s right. The most solipsistic rapper to date is gracing the capital of Silicon Valley with a second performance, and he’s bringing his friends with him – Pharell’s N.E.R.D., fellow Chi-town rapper Lupe Fiasco, and Rihanna, the singer responsible for the ridiculously popular “Umbrella,” will open for West once again. Kanye’s last HP performance left some confused about why he incorporated puppets and holograms into his act. Maybe he’s returning to set the record straight.

LIVE 105’S BFD JUNE 7, THE SHORELINE A M P H I T H E AT R E , M O U N TA I N V I E W W W W. L I V E N AT I O N . C O M

Where do we begin? This massive festival is like a tidal wave of talent that pours into the Valley and pools together in Mountain View, resulting in an 11-hour oasis of musical bliss. Headliners include bong-rippers Cypress Hill, Celtic punkers Flogging Molly and New York psychedelic synthpoppers MGMT. A subsonic tent will include the bald-headed Moby and up-and-coming new waver Santogold. Supporting the local scene will

be a stage featuring Bay Area bands like galactic wonders The Phenomenauts and progressive pop rockers Apside, one of the most requested local bands on Live 105’s Soundcheck with Aaron Axelson. If you only have time and money for one concert a year, this should be it.

TED NUGENT JUNE 18, THE CATALYST CLUB, SANTA CRUZ WWW.CATALYSTCLUB.COM

We’re getting a little case of Cat Scratch Fever in anticipation of the gun-toting and wildlifeslaughtering hard rocker’s Santa Cruz performance. A self-proclaimed “pr*ck,” Nugent has been shredding guitars with face-melting riffs on tour since the late ’70s, so he knows how to put on a live show. He also knows how to piss off ultraliberals. His super conservative ways have gotten him quite a bit of heat from animal rights activists, not to mention nearly the entire Democratic Party. The online news site The Raw Story reported last August that Nugent addressed his fans, brandished two assault rifles, and told Barack Obama to “suck on my machine gun” and Hillary Clinton to “ride one of these into the sunset” before calling her an unprintable vulgarity. Oh, the Nuge, always getting our blood pumping. TW

SV

SPORTS BARS

» SPORTS BARS

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

Strike

TVs: 18 HDTV flat screens Food/Drink Specials: Yes Team Affiliations: 49ers Hours: Mon-Thu: 4:30pm-12:30am, Fri: 4:30pm-1am, Sat: 11:30am-1am, Sun: 11:30am-Midnight SUNNYVALE

Firehouse Brewery 111 S. Murphy Ave. (408) 773-9500 www.firehousegrill.com CUPERTINO

Strike Cupertino Square, Wolfe Rd., right after Hwy. 280 (408) 252-2695 www.bowlstrike.com TVs: 29 Team Affiliations: All Bay Area teams Hours: Sun: 11am-Midnight, Mon: 11am-1am, Tue - Wed: 11am-Midnight, Thu - Sat: 11am-2am SANTA CLARA

Characters Sports Bar & Grill

TVs: 13 HDTVs, NFL Package Food/Drink Specials: Bloody Mary discount Team Affiliations: Raiders, 49ers Hours: Mon - Fri: 11:30am-10pm, Sat: Noon-10pm, Sun: 9am-9pm SUNNYVALE

Quarter Note 1214 Apollo Way (408) 732-2110 www.quarternote.com TVs: 6 Food/Drink Specials: Daily, Happy Hour MonFri: 4 - 7pm, Sun: breakfast & lunch specials Team Affiliations: Vote, majority wins Hours: 10am-2am

2700 Mission College Blvd. (408) 988-1500 FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM 80

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» INTERVIEW

Movies&TV

» » » »

INTERVIEW MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS DVD RELEASES CINEMA DIRECTORY

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TW: It’s gotta be just between you and The Hoff, not for the public. DH: That’s okay, too. I don’t care. I was a self-effacing wanker teenager as well. It’s life. It’s great, because I can do things that nobody else can do. I can change a person’s life, but the most important person I can change is myself. If I stay on my game, I can affect my children because they can say, “Look at Dad.” And I can affect a person, bring a kid out of a coma, which I did years ago just by saying “Hey, it’s Michael Knight, it’s Michael Knight.” The kid comes out of the coma. A father called me on the air to tell me that on The Big Breakfast Show in London. Or else I can go to the White House and the next thing, I’m jogging with President Clinton. He asked me, “Did you think Baywatch would be as big as it is?” I never thought the president of the United States would ever utter the two syllables, “Bay-watch.” TW: What wisdom does The Hoff have for the America’s Got Talent contestants? DH: It’s the same thing with your career – the only person you can control is yourself. Control yourself, and just sit back and enjoy it.

Hasslin’ The Hoff David Hasselhoff, no stranger to judgment, looks forward to another season of dishing it out on America’s Got Talent. BY FRED TOPEL

MOVIES & T V

SHOW: America’s Got Talent EXECUTIVE PRODUCER: Simon Cowell STARRING: Jerry Springer (host), David Hasselhoff, Piers Morgan, Sharon Osborne (judges) NETWORK: NBC

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ith hits like the original Knight Rider and the Speedo-rific Baywatch, David Hasselhoff has always been a somewhat campy icon. Now he’s completely embraced his status, referring to himself in the third person as “The Hoff.” This summer, he returns as a judge on America’s Got Talent, where he will share his wisdom with future Hoffs-in-training. The Wave: How does it feel to be The Hoff right now? David Hasselhoff: Oh, you know, it’s just great. I went to Coachella and sometimes you sit back and you 82

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think, “What am I doing now? I’m a judge and Knight Rider’s on.” I was walking around Coachella and it’s unbelievable. People were just chanting, “Hoff, Hoff, Hoff ” and it was all positive. Everybody from little kids dressed as hippies to people my age, 55, saying hi and it was positive. You just realize wow, what a wonderful career. TW: Since you came out with your autobiography, Don’t Hassle The Hoff, have people stopped hassling The Hoff? DH: They hassle The Hoff all the time, but you can kind of pick those people out. If you give a person an autograph, they say, “I’m your biggest fan.” I say, “If you’re my biggest fan, I’m going to give you this autograph, and don’t show it to anybody. Can you agree to that?” They can’t. If they can, if they say, “No, I won’t” and they really mean it – there’s sincerity in their eyes, you know that they really admire you. They’re not trying to utilize you, like, “Oh, let’s get a piece of The Hoff ” and play that game.

TW: What’s next for The Hoff? DH: I’m going off to do a huge project, and it takes a lot of training. It’s back to Broadway. It’s going to be a big pop opera album. Then I can do the Vegas show. It’s already a go. I could do that tomorrow. I just called my agent and said, “You wanna do the Baywatch Beach Blast at Mandalay Bay? I can do the kids’ pool, I can do the topless pool, I can do Viva Hoff Vegas. Just book me. You book me, you tell me where to go and I’ll do it.” I’ve already got the show planned and it’s just a question of the timing, because they’ve added so many shows this year. I’m just kinda going with the flow and letting go and letting God just see what happens. TW: But the album comes first? DH: The album I’m doing in June is with Frank Wildhorn. It’s kind of a pop opera. The fun title is Knight at the Hoffra, and it’s called The Romantics. We’re going to shoot it in a castle in Ireland. The music is beautiful and it makes me happy. It organically makes me really happy. That’s what I need. TW: Do you think they’ll bring back Baywatch in another 10 years? DH: Baywatch is already in development at DreamWorks. [But] unless I can be a part of it and put my hand in it, it’s kind of like what happened with Knight Rider. I wish them well. But the best part for me right now is America’s Got Talent, because I’m able to connect with my fans and that’s the most important thing – to know when I walk through the door, they’re really cheering. They still call me the Knight Rider, so it’s cool. TW The new season of America’s Got Talent premieres Tues., Jun. 17, 9pm on NBC.


MOVIES & TV: INTERVIEW

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» MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS

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M. Night Shyamalan is getting vaguer and vaguer. At least The Sixth Sense, Signs and The Village were about a sixth sense, signs and a village. This is just about something that happens. Shyamalan’s answer to “event” catastrophe films is a phenomenon that mutes people, freezes them, and finally makes them jump off buildings. Is it terrorists or… something else? Shyamalan is great at playing with things we can’t see. It’s just getting harder and harder for him to come up with a payoff. Maybe they’ll just say, “Yeah, it was terrorists, but we got ‘em,” and that’ll be the biggest surprise of all.

S TA R R I N G : E D WA R D N O R T O N , LIV TYLER, TIM ROTH D I R E C T E D B Y: L O U I S L E T E R R I E R

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SEX AND THE CITY: THE MOVIE

MOVIES & T V

S TA R R I N G : S A R A H J E S S I C A PA R K E R , K I M C AT T R A L L , CHRIS NOTH DIRECTED BY: MICHAEL PATRICK KING

Around 95 percent of Bay Area women will have already donned Manolos and quaffed cosmos when Sex opened on Fri., May 30. But, for those who didn’t brave the crowds, here’s what we predict: Carrie (Parker) will have some thought-provoking revelation about her relationship with Big (Noth) that she’ll talk about with her girlfriends. Charlotte (Kristin Davis) will be optimistic and hopeful, Miranda (Cynthia Nixon) will be tough and cynical, while Samantha (Cattrall) will share her most recent wild sexscapade at an inoppor» DVD RELEASES

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KUNG FU PANDA S TA R R I N G : V O I C E S O F J A C K BLACK, DUSTIN HOFFMAN, LUCY LIU D I R E C T E D B Y: M A R K O S B O R N E AND JOHN STEVENSON

The latest star-studded DreamWorks cartoon features Black as a panda learning martial arts. While these exercises in celebrity likenesses lack the heart of Pixar movies, they’re usually decent fun. One can imagine Jack Black having a great time alone in a recording studio, while some talented computer nerds program amusing animation to go along with it. Expect Po the Panda (Black) to find a surrogate family in all the kooky animal outcasts in China – that’s usually how these things work. Then he’ll learn that hard

DVD RELEASES

MOVIES JUNE 3 Semi-Pro – Two-Disc Unrated “Let’s Get Sweaty” Edition There Will Be Blood – Blu-ray Flawless The Eye

MOVIES JUNE 10 The Bucket List The Other Boleyn Girl Jumper Witless Protection – Widescreen Edition

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TV JUNE 3 Weeds – Season Three Rescue Me – The Complete Fourth Season The Dead Zone – The Final Season Get Smart – The Complete Series (1995 remake with Andy Dick)

TV JUNE 10 John Adams – HBO Miniseries My Boys – The Complete First Season Da Vinci’s Inquest – Season Three Army Wives – The Complete First Season

Even if there were nothing wrong with the first Hulk movie, just the chance to recast him as Edward Norton would be worth it. As it is, people didn’t like Ang Lee’s artistic Hulk, so Leterrier promises more smashing. Norton bringing his edgy intensity to a comic book character suggests the awesomeness of Christian Bale. Hopefully it won’t turn out like Nicolas Cage or Halle Berry. There sure seems to be a lot of destruction going on in the trailer, so if nothing else, this promises to be one of the biggest, loudest pieces of eye candy this summer. » CINEMA DIRECTORY

CINEMA

CAMPBELL Camera 7 Cinema, 1875 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 559-6900 CineLux Plaza Theatre, 2501 S. Winchester Blvd. (408) 378-2425 L O S G AT O S Los Gatos Cinema, 41 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-0203 GILROY Platinum Theatres, 6851 Monterey St. (408) 84-MOVIE HOLLISTER Premiere Cinemas 5, 581A McCray St. (831) 638-1800 M E N L O PA R K Guild, 949 El Camino Real (650) 266-9260 M I L P I TA S Century 20 Great Mall, 1010 Great Mall Dr. (408) 942-5550 Cinema Saver 10, 577 E. Calaveras Blvd. (408) 942-SAVE MORGAN HILL Cinema 6, 750 Tennant Station Way (408) 779-5151

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What a weird little movie. All these funny people, only they’re acting so normal that it’s not so much hilarious as just plain odd. Scott plays a supermarket assistant manager whose sure thing promotion is foiled by do-gooder rival Reilly. Fischer is Scott’s supportive wife. The cast has fun with crazy things that can happen at a supermarket, but nobody reacts in any big way. Instead, they all seem kind of frustrated, as if they’re holding back. Because there’s always the potential for something funny to happen, The Promotion is never boring. Problem is, there is no payoff, so maybe it’s just boring in retrospect.

YOU DON’T MESS WITH THE ZOHAN  S TA R R I N G : A D A M S A N D L E R , EMMANUELLE CHRIQUI, JOHN TURTURRO D I R E C T E D B Y: D E N N I S D U G A N

THE INCREDIBLE HULK

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S TA R R I N G : M A R K WA H L B E R G , ZOOEY DESCHANEL, JOHN LEGUIZAMO D I R E C T E D B Y: M . N I G H T S H YA M A L A N

tune moment. It’ll be good to see the girls again, even if it is just this one time.

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work pays off when he can finally use his own resources to save the village from the bad guys.

Adam Sandler can still be funny, even when he’s not playing that soft talking shy guy who sometimes yells loudly – and when he plays a completely ridiculous character and totally commits to it, as he does here, it’s awesome. The Zohan is an Israeli secret agent with outrageous super powers, many of which involve his butt cheeks. Tired of the violence, he moves to New York to style hair. As a fish out of water, the Zohan makes friends quickly by beating up bullies and pleasing the ladies in bed. The film never lets up with the crazy antics, while its not-so-subtle political message also works. TW

DIRECTORY

CineLux Tennant Station 750 Tennant Ave. (408) 778-6500 M O U N TA I N V I E W Century Cinema 16 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd. (650) 960-0970 PA L O A LT O Aquarius, 430 Emerson St. (650) 266-9260 Stanford Theatre, 221 University Ave. (650) 324-3700 Century CineArts at Palo Alto Square, 3000 El Camino Real, Bldg. #6 (650) 493-3456 REDWOOD CITY Century Park 12, 557 E. Bayshore Blvd. (650) 365-9000 S A N TA C L A R A AMC Mercado 20, 3111 Mission College Blvd. (408) 871-2AMC SAN JOSE AMC Saratoga 14 Theatre, 700 El Paseo de Saratoga (408) 871-2AMC Almaden Cinema Five 2306 Almaden Rd. (408) 265-7373 Camera 12, 201 S. Second St.

(408) 978-2787 Century 20, Oakridge, 925 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 225-2200 Century 21, 3161 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 22, 3162 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 23, 3164 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 24, 741 Winchester Blvd. (408) 984-5610 Century 25, 1694 Saratoga Ave. (408) 984-5610 Century Berryessa 10 1171 N. Capitol Ave. (408) 926-7091 Century Capitol 16 San Jose 3690 Hillcap Ave. (408) 972-9276 Century Capitol Drive-In Capitol Expwy. and Snell Ave. (408) 226-2251 CineArts@Santana Row 3088 Olsen Dr. www.cinearts.com Hackworth IMAX Dome 201 S. Market St. (408) 294-TECH India Movie Center 6 1433 The Alameda (408) 830-9999


MOVIES & TV: REVIEWS & PREVIEWS

STYLING THE WORLD, ONE CUT AT A TIME!

SARAH

JESSICA

PARKER

Invite you and a guest to join us at a special screening on Thursday, June 5th in San Jose! For your chance to receive a pass (good for two) to this screening, head down to

HOMESTEAD BARBER SHOP Since 1948 (3545 Homestead Road, Santa Clara)

beginning June 4th at 11am. While you are there, make sure to enter-to-win a free haircut courtesy of Homestead Barber Shop! COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH RELATIVITY MEDIA A HAPPY MADISON PRODUCTION A FILM BY DENNIS DUGAN "YOU DON'T MESS WITH THE ZOHAN" JOHN TURTURRO LAINIE KAZAN AND ROB SCHNEIDER MUSIC SUPERVISIONBY MICHAELPRODUCED EMMANUELLE CHRIQUI NICK SWARDSON WRITTEN DILBECK BROOKS ARTHUR MUSICBY RUPERT GREGSON-WILLIAMS EXECUTIVE DIRECTED PRODUCERS BARRY BERNARDI ROBERT SMIGEL BY ADAM SANDLER & ROBERT SMIGEL & JUDD APATOW BY ADAM SANDLER JACK GIARRAPUTO BY DENNIS DUGAN

No purchase necessary. While supplies last. Passes are limited and will be given away by random drawing of all entries received. Winners will be notified by mail.

THIS FILM IS RATED PG-13. Please note: Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee you a seat at the theatre. Seating is on a first-come, first-serve basis, except for members of the reviewing press. TICKETS RECEIVED THROUGH THIS PROMOTION ARE NOT FOR RESALE. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. Columbia Pictures, Homestead Barber Shop, Terry Hines & Associates, The Wave Magazine and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost; delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors their employees and family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

IN THEATRES FRIDAY, JUNE 6!

Put on your Manolos, finish up that Cosmo and head over to:

URSULA’S BOUTIQUE (140 W. Main Street in Los Gatos)

on Friday, June 6th between the hours of 1:00PM–4:00PM for your chance to win a pass to see

LL TR A CAT VIS KIM TIN DA IXON KRIS THIA N CYN STIN DAVIS TTRALL KRI IGMAN RKER KIM CA MUSICBY AARON Z AN FILLEY JESSIEXECACUTPAIVEER SALAAM REMI THRYN BUSBY JONATHPATRICK KING H RA SA G KA N AND CHAEL IC PRODUC CK KIN HAEL PATRI RD TELSEY, C.S.A. MUS CH RICHARD BRENERSTARWRDIREITTECTED BY MI M BY MIC TION A FIL CASTINGBY BERNA IVE EMMERI BASED ON THEBY DARREN STAR PRODUC RIS NOTH EXEPROCUTDUCERS TOBY TV SERIES CREATED CE A DARRAENNDICE BERGEN ANDDIRECTOGHCTORAPR OFHY JOHNCHATHRACOMTERSBYASCANDACE BUSHieNE.cLL om FI OF X BO ON C PHO K HOME HUDSON ANDTION Y CONWAY BASEDFROM THE BOO yMov ATION WITH ATE TS IN ASSOCI H JENNIFER PRODUC IGNER JEREM HN MELFI eCit INEMA PRESEN E CITY” WIT M, A.C.E. DES STAR AND JO ndth E D RES NEW LINECA NIXON “SEX AND THOR MICHAEL BERENBAUTRICK KING DARRENw w.Sex a TH HEAT w CYCOSNTTUMHIE PATRICIA FIELD EDIT RKER MICHAEL PA E R DESIGNE ED SAV IN T 30 JESSICA PA PRODUC BY SARAH Y TM

SOUNDTRACK BLE ON AVAILA

T, TEN GE CON GUA UAL LAN SEX AND ONG ITY STR C NUD PHI GRA

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in theatres anytime Monday–Thursday; while supplies last. No purchase necessary. Limit one “admit two” pass per person/household. Passes are limited. Sign up for your chance to win. Winners will be notified by phone. Passes only valid Monday–Thursday excluding holidays.

This film is rated R. Run-of-engagement passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission to the theatre. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. Theatre is open to paying customers. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. New Line Cinema, Terry Hines & Associates, The Wave Magazine and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost, delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors their employees & family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

N O W P L AY I N G

YOUR KARMA MUST BE HUGE! Join us at a special screening on Tuesday, June 17th in Santa Clara! For a chance to receive a pass (good for two), head on down to

Why are businesswomen joining eWomenNetwork? MOVIES & T V

• To acquire more customers. • To market and promote what they offer. (2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Valley Fair Mall)

on Tuesday, June 10th starting at 12pm. While supplies last. Passes will be distributed on a first come, first served basis. One pass per person/household.

While there, enter for your chance to win a

LOVE GURU CINNABON PRIZE PACK This film is rated PG-13 for crude and sexual content throughout, language, some comic violence and drug references. THEATRE IS OVERBOOKED TO ENSURE A FULL HOUSE. Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission and must be surrendered upon demand. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. The Wave, Paramount Pictures, Cinnabon, Terry Hines & Associates and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost; delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors their employees and family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS! TICKETS RECEIVED THROUGH THIS PROMOTION ARE NOT FOR RESALE.

OPENS IN THEATRES ON FRIDAY, JUNE 20TH!

• To join our community of women helping women.

Let’s get connected. I’d love to learn more about you. Kristy Rogers Managing Director kristyrogers@eWomenNetwork.com 408-288-8484

Connecting and promoting women and their businesses

www.eWomenNetwork.com THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

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Arts

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who sets her sights on Horace Vandergelder, a local merchant who has hired her to find him a wife. The Matchmaker played in Scotland and London before opening on Broadway on Dec. 5, 1955, running for 486 performances and earning Guthrie a Tony, while Ruth Gordon got a nomination for her turn as Dolly. A 1958 film version featured Anthony Perkins, Shirley MacLaine and Robert Morse. And now – dramatic pause – the rest of the story. In 1964, David Merrick mounted a musical adaptation of Wilder’s play with a score by Jerry Herman, starring Carol Channing and titled Hello, Dolly!, which was followed by the 1969 film with Barbra Streisand, Walter Matthau and the great Satchmo himself, Louis Armstrong. “Most people are surprised that Our Town and Hello, Dolly! have this authorial connection,” says Cornelison. “The 1958 film was terrible, and the play was pretty much forgotten.” But don’t underestimate Wilder’s version, which Cornelison calls “one of the best farces written in the 20th century.” “What is truly wonderful about this work is the language,” she continues. “Early in the play, the leading character says, ‘Ninety-nine percent of the people in the world are fools and the rest of us are in great danger of contagion.’ For the remainder of the play, we see how truly silly and foolish human beings can be about love and money.”

CTC actors Will Huddleston and Charlie Shoemaker in The Dock Brief

ARTS

A Match Made for Audiences

The original Hello, Dolly! highlights the summer rep season at Sunnyvale’s CTC. BY MICHAEL J. VAUGHN

I

n the spirit of the summer movie season, programming the schedule for a theatre center is not unlike being an archaeologist: you’re always digging around for past treasures that the audience might enjoy seeing. Gayle Cornelison has been quite the Indiana Jones of late, coming up with a fourplay summer rep for the California Theatre Center (CTC) that is sure to intrigue. First up is Thornton Wilder’s The Matchmaker. When the Our Town playwright reintroduced his comedy to Broadway in 1955, it not only possessed a colorful past, but had the potential for a future more brilliant than anyone could dream. Certainly not John Oxenford, the Englishman who in 1835 wrote a humble one-act farce called A Day Well Spent. The

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play must have gone over well, because several years later it caught the eye of Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy, who expanded it into a full-length play titled Einen Jux Will er Sich Machen, which he introduced in 1842. Jump ahead nearly a century to 1938, when Wilder, in the same year that he won a Pulitzer for Our Town, decided to adapt Nestroy’s play into a version set in Yonkers, New York (any guesses yet as to where this is headed?). German director Max Reinhardt mounted a Broadway production, but it failed miserably, closing after 39 performances. Fifteen years later, with director Tyrone Guthrie on the case, Wilder did an extensive rewrite, putting the focus on a previously minor character named Dolly Gallagher Levi – a turn-of-the-century widow

Another of CTC’s summer offerings, Stephen Massicotte’s Mary’s Wedding, explores the timely theme of love and war. “I found this play to be a powerful, deeply thoughtful and timely work which manages masterfully to contrast the joy and beauty of young love with the harsh reality of war,” says Cornelison. “It was also interesting to me that it was written by a playwright who was both a Royal Canadian Air Cadet with a background of military service in his family, but who also has an antipathy for war.” Playing on a double bill with John Mortimer’s The Dock Brief, the play follows two lovers, Mary and Charlie, who meet, but are quickly separated by World War I. Also on tap this summer is Liberty Inn, Dakin Matthews’ adaptation of Carlo Goldoni’s 1753 work The Innkeeper Woman. Reset during the American Revolution, the play centers on a vivacious innkeeper who must decide between a haughty but poor French aristocrat and a rich, aloof American captain. “I like the classic Italian comedies,” says Cornelison. “They are fast-moving, colorful and entertaining. What makes this play different than most others of the period is that the dominant character is a female. Setting the play during the Revolutionary War makes it more relevant to our audience, and this translation makes its characters seem more like real people than most commedia dell’arte stereotypes.” TW CTC Summer Rep, $18-$25, Jun. 6-Jul. 27, Sunnyvale Community Center, 550 E. Remington Dr., Sunnyvale (408) 720-0873 www.ctcinc.org.


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May 8 - June 8 Elton John and Tim Riceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

AIDA Box Ofce: (650) 349-6411 hillbarntheatre.org 1285 E. E. Hillsdale Hillsdale Blvd., Blvd., Foster Foster City City 1285

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LISTINGS (408) 367-7255 www.sjrep.com

Contained: The Box Show at The Main Gallery

The dark and eerie two-faced world of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic novel comes to life on stage. At night, murder engulfs the foggy streets of London. The once likable Dr. Jekyll is beginning to act strange. What is his relation to the horrible Mr. Hyde?: Thru 6/8. TWELFTH NIGHT

Theatre on San Pedro Square, 29 N. San Pedro St., Ste. 200, San Jose (408) 460-1696

As part of the first annual Shakespeare on the Square, the Arclight Repertory Theatre is putting on a festival featuring the romantic comedy Twelfth Night, and a free performance of Indian classical music titled The Green Show, performed by the Abhinaya Dance Company of San Jose: 6/6 – 6/28. 12 ANGRY MEN

4000-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org

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THEATRE ALTAR BOYZ

San Jose Stage Theater, 490 S. First St., San Jose (408) 2837146 www.sjstage.com

Five small-town boys make up a religious pop band that has fans screaming. With songs such as “Girl, You Make Me Wanna Wait” and “Jesus Called Me on My Cell Phone,” this play will to have you singing along: Thru 6/22. THE CONSTANT WIFE

Triton Museum Hall Pavilion, 1505 Warburton Ave., Santa Clara (408) 248-7993 www.scplayers.org

A sophisticated comedy about what it means to be in a faithful marriage, and what happens when that trust is broken: Thru 6/7.

ARTS

ELTON JOHN AND TIM RICE’S AIDA

Hillbarn Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City (650) 349-6411 www.hillbarntheatre.org

A story of passion set in ancient Egypt, chronicling the capture of a Nubian princess and the love triangle that ensues. Features music created by the artists and composers of The Lion King: Thru 6/8. DISNEY’S HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL San Jose Center for the Performing Arts, 255 Almaden Blvd., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE

Featuring all the songs from the original soundtrack plus two new songs, this new touring stage adaptation is sure to have you dancing in the aisles: 6/10 – 6/15. A FEW GOOD MEN

City Lights Theater, 529 S. Second St., San Jose (408) 2954200 www.cltc.org

From the creator of The West Wing comes this award-winning play about the death of a marine at Guantanamo Bay and the ensuing military trial of the two Marines accused. Can you handle the truth?: Thru 6/15.

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GROSS INDECENCY

Dragon Theatre, 535 Alma St., Palo Alto (650) 493-2006

Moisés Kaufman penned this play about the trials of the flamboyant and famous playwright Oscar Wilde: Thru 6/22. HAIR

Louis B. Mayer Theatre, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara (408) 5544015 www.scu.edu/cpa/hair.cfm

Featuring such classic songs as “Aquarius,” “Good Morning, Starshine” and, of course, “Hair,” this musical set in the Vietnam War-era counterculture movement explores the draft, racism, psychedelic drugs, free love and more: Thru 6/7. THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST

Bus Barn Theatre, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos (650) 941-0551 www.busbar.org

This unforgettable comedy by Oscar Wilde “lampoons the Victorian obsession with wealth, breeding and propriety”: Thru 6/21. LIBERTY INN

Sunnyvale Community Center Theatre, 550 E. Remington Dr., Sunnyvale (408) 720-0873

Part of the California Theatre Center’s Summer Rep series, this witty comedy by the Bay Area’s Dakin Matthews follows Mirandolina as she shrewdly runs the Liberty Inn during the American Revolution and encounters numerous eligible suitors, forcing her to make a decision: 6/12 – 7/6. MARY’S WEDDING AND THE DOCK BRIEF

Sunnyvale Community Center Theatre, 550 E. Remington Dr., Sunnyvale (408) 720-0873

Kicking off the California Theatre Center’s Summer Rep series is this exquisite double bill of two short plays. Mary’s Wedding is Stephen Massicotte’s love story that “examines the enduring, painful cost of war,” while The Dock Brief is John Mortimer’s dark comedy about an

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

“aging barrister asked to represent an alleged wife murderer”: 6/5 – 7/20 [See Arts feature, page 90]. NORTHANGER ABBEY

The Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1148 www.thepear.org

A new dramatization by the Pear’s artistic director makes this a unique experience of Jane Austen’s first novel: Thru 6/8. NUNSENSE

Morgan Hill Community Playhouse, 17090 Monterey St., Morgan Hill (408) 782-0008

An unholy comedy about the holy sisterhood, Nunsense follows the Little Sisters of Hoboken as they try to raise funds for the burial of 52 nuns who were accidentally poisoned by the cook. Featuring such quirky characters as Sister Mary Amnesia, who loses her memory after a crucifix falls on her head: Thru 6/14. PERFECT WEDDING

Lucie Stern Community Center, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 463-4949

The title is deceiving, as the lead character wakes up hung over and in bed next to a woman who is not his bride-to-be just hours before his wedding. Perfect, indeed!: 6/14 – 6/29. SESAME STREET LIVE PRESENTS WHEN ELMO GROWS UP

San Jose Civic Auditorium, 135 W. San Carlos St., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE

A pageant is about to take place on Sesame Street and Elmo, Zoe, Rosita and friends welcome newcomer Abby Cadabby in answering the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” If any part of your answer includes singing cowboy songs, then this performance is a good place to start: 6/13 – 6/15. THE STRANGE CASE OF DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE

San Jose Repertory Theatre, 101 Paseo de San Antonio, San Jose

A juror tries to knock some factual sense into the other 11, as a 19-yearold awaits his fate after standing trial for stabbing his father. What will the verdict be?: Thru 6/14.

CLASSICAL MUSIC & OPERA PACO SINFONIA CONCERT

Dinkelspiel Auditorium, 471 Lagunita Dr., Stanford (650) 725-2787

Ten-year-old Katherine Tseung performs Haydn’s Divertimento in D for cello and string orchestra and 14-year-old Albert Tseung performs Mozart’s Violin Concerto #5. Both performers are winners of the Palo Alto Chamber Orchestra concerto competition: 6/8. THE RITE OF SPRING

California Theatre, 345 S. First St., San Jose (408) 295-9600

Experience Stravinsky’s masterpiece like never before. Beyond the Score is an exciting multimedia concert format that begins the concert with visual images and an actor and narrator to explore and explain the “creative context” of the music and artist: 6/7 – 6/8.

DANCE 20TH ANNIVERSARY SPRING PERFORMANCE 2008 San Mateo Performing Arts Center, 600 N. Delaware Ave., San Mateo (650) 762-0258

The Professional Ballet School Young Artists Ballet Theatre returns with performances featuring guest artists Eric Bourman, David Fonnergra and Jekyns Pelaez: 6/6 – 6/7. DON QUIXOTE

San Mateo Performing Arts Center, 600 N. Delaware St., San Mateo (650) 631-3767 www.pyb.org

Join the Peninsula Youth Ballet and special guest performers for their one-night-only production of Don Quixote: 6/13. THE GREEN SHOW

Theatre on San Pedro Square, 29 N. San Pedro St., Ste. 200, San Jose (408) 460-1696

A performance of “Indian classical music, dance and love poetry” by

the Abhinaya Dance Company of San Jose precedes the Shakespeare on the Square Festival: 6/7 – 6/28.

MUSEUMS CANTOR ARTS CENTER Palm Dr. at Museum Way, Stanford University (650) 723-4177 www.museum. stanford.edu

Makishi: Mask Characters of Zambia: An exhibition of 24 masks selected from the Fowler Museum at UCLA is making its way up north. Featured masks originate from the Three Corners region of Zambia, Angola, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo and date from the late 19th to the 20th century, providing a glance into the traditional and sociopolitical events important to the people of central Africa: Thru 6/29. A New 19th Century: The reinstalled Mondavi Family Gallery features newly acquisitioned works by Monet, Renoir, Sargent, and more: Ongoing. Auguste Rodin Collection: The largest collection of Rodin bronzes outside of Paris: Ongoing. African Art in Context: Photography, dress, and other artifacts: Ongoing. Papua New Guinea Sculpture Garden: Wood and stone carvings of people, animals, and mythical beings: Ongoing. Living Traditions: Arts of the Americas: A collection of work from diverse Native American peoples and times: Ongoing. Explore Outdoor Sculpture: Enjoy beautiful weather and the works of Auguste Rodin, Maya Lin, Beverly Pepper, Richard Serra and Andy Goldsworthy: Third Sunday of each month. Andy Warhol Prints: Featuring multiples from the Mao and Flowers series and from the Electric Chair series in addition to images of Elizabeth Taylor and Mick Jagger: Thru 11/30. Experiments in Navigation: The Art of Charles Hobson: An exhibit of Hobson’s artists books, a medium he has worked with for two decades: Thru 7/6. CHILDREN’S DISCOVERY MUSEUM

180 Woz Way, San Jose (408) 298-5437 www.cdm.org

Exciting interactive displays, galleries and activities for the whole family to enjoy: Ongoing. DE SAISSET MUSEUM

500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara (408) 554-4528 www.scu.edu/desaisset

Eye on the Sixties: Vision, Body & Soul: Focusing on one of the most vibrant and dynamic decades in modern history, this exhibit includes painting, sculpture, drawings, and prints by artists ranging from Frank Stella to Claes Oldenberg: Ongoing. HAKONE GARDENS

21000 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 741-4994 www.hakone.com

Hina Doll and Kimono Exhibition: The Upper House of Hakone Gardens, one of the oldest Japanese estates in the Western Hemisphere, is now showcasing a display of ornamental dolls representing the Emperor and other historical figures in the traditional dress of the Heian period: Ongoing. HISTORY SAN JOSE

1650 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 287-2290 www.historysanjose.org

A Breath of Plein Air: A show featuring 54 pieces by 25 local artists, showcasing the beauty of the Santa Clara Valley: San Jose, Santa Clara and Silicon Valley: Thru 9/21.

JAPANESE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF SAN JOSE

535 N. Fifth St., San Jose (408) 294-3138 www.jamsj.org

Jack Matsuoka’s Cartoons: Making the Best of Poston: Documenting the incarceration of Japanese Americans during the 1940s: Ongoing. MEXICAN HERITAGE PLAZA

1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose (408) 928-5524 www.mhcviva.org

Mi Coche / My Culture – Livin’ the Lowrider Lifestyle: A unique, visual art experience that delves into the art and Chicano subculture of automobiles. Exploring the history of the Lowrider lifestyle, this exhibit pays homage to this cross-cultural movement through a variety of artistic genres: Thru 6/30. ROSICRUCIAN EGYPTIAN MUSEUM

1660 Park Ave., San Jose (408) 947-3636 www.egyptianmuseum.org

History of the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum Exhibit: This exhibit shows the museum’s transformation from one artifact in an office to a museum with more than 4,000 artifacts: Ongoing. SAN JOSE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART

560 S. First St., San Jose (408) 283-8155 www.sjica.org

Lift Off: The Fourth Annual San Jose State Master of Fine Arts exhibition: Thru 6/14. Night Moves: Unique window installation series that can only be viewed at night. The first installation of the series is The Word on the Street, by Ray Beldner: Thru 6/14. Crater Bay Area: A participatory exhibition that is a lunar drawing competition to win deeds of land on the moon: Thru 8/2. Brendon Lott: Memories I’ll Never Have: Photographs from internet sharing networks are sent to China and reproduced as oil paintings: Thru 8/2. SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF ART

110 S. Market St. San Jose (408) 271-6840 www.sjmusart.org

Robots: Evolution of a Cultural Icon: An optimistic, pessimistic and at times humorous exhibition, examining the development of robot iconography in fine art over the last half century: Thru 10/19. Fred Pratt: Color and Space: Often categorized as ‘60sborne minimalism, vibrant colors and never-ending spaces encapsulate this exhibit: Thru 7/6. SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF QUILTS AND TEXTILES

520 S. First St., San Jose (408) 971-0323 www.sjquiltmuseum.org

Awareables: Conscious Clothing: Fusing technology and fiber art, these artists present works that were featured in the SIGGRAPH fashion show Unravel: Thru 6/8. TECH MUSEUM OF INNOVATION

201 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 294-TECH www.thetech.org

IDEA House: An interactive program space encourages you to formulate and synthesize like never before: Ongoing. Green by Design: Designs with a green approach, aiming to prevent environmental problems and improve lives: Ongoing. View from Space: Science made visible in


» COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

ARTS

EVENT

LISTINGS

GALLERIES

Four reasons why you’ll want to read Andrew Sean Greer’s latest work.

AICON GALLERY

535 Bryant St., Palo Alto (650) 321-4900\

A solo exhibit of intricate heads and totemic sculptures by India-native Mayyur Kailash Gupta, this will be his first exhibit in the United States: 6/13 – 7/12.

BY MICHAEL J. VAUGHN

T

ANNO DOMINI

366 S. First St., San Jose (408) 271-5155 www.galleryAD.com

Fim do Mundo: The debut US solo exhibit by Brazilian artist Stephan Doitschinoff (aka CALMA) presents his evocative work, which combines Brazilian folklore, baroque religious imagery, pagan symbols with the artist’s urban art and pop culture roots: Thru 6/21.

Mayyur Kailash Gupta sculpture at Aicon Gallery

GREGORY KATE GALLERY

Therese May and Donna Orme exhibit their work together for the first time: 6/4 – 6/29. KALEID GALLERY

88 S. Fourth St., San Jose (408) 271-5151 www.KALEIDgallery.com

Featured exhibitions by clayprint monograph artist Martha Castillo and mixed media artist Eric Taggart are part of the South First Fridays artwalk: 6/6 – 6/12. LOJART ART GALLERY

35 E. First St., Morgan Hill www.lojart.com

Robo Revival Exhibition: Assemblage artist Paul Loughridge showcases his work of rockets, ray guns and robots: Thru 6/12. LOS ALTOS LIBRARY

13 S. San Antonio Rd., Los Altos (650) 948-7683 www. santaclaracountylib.org/losaltos

Interpretations: The Santa Clara

TICKET

A Story That Draws You In

an exhibit that displays weather, aircraft, and daily patterns from space: Ongoing.

925 The Alameda, Ste. 101 San Jose (408) 271-2661 www.gregorykategallery.com

HOT

Valley Watercolor Society presents an exhibit by its members, who were given the task of interpreting a favorite quote, phrase or excerpt through one of their paintings: Thru 6/30. THE MAIN GALLERY

1018 Main St., Redwood City (650) 701- 1018 www.themaingallery.org/ calendar.html

Contained: The Box Show: An exhibit of various artists featuring dozens of different artistic boxes: big, small, hung from a wall, glazed, unglazed, ceramic, porcelain, you name it, they got it: Thru 6/29. MODERNBOOK GALLERY

494 University Ave. Palo Alto (650) 327-6325 www.modernbook.com

Evocations: Photography by Mary Daniel Hobson attempting to express different states of mind. Thru 6/3.

PEABODY GALLERY

11 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 395-3440

Visions of Los Gatos, the Endless Summer: Riki R. Nelson exhibits his Oil Paintings and Cityscapes featuring his unique realist talent. Paintings include images of downtown Los Gatos in the summertime. THOMAS WELTON STANFORD ART GALLERY

419 Lasuen Mall, Stanford (650) 723-3404

Transient: An exhibition by three graduating MFA artists as part of their final thesis. Matt Jones creates a sculpture that “responds to traffic flow,” Lordy Rodriguez builds a highly detailed immigration office for viewers to take a tour through, and Naomi Vanderkindren displays her large-scale photographs: Thru 6/15. TW

he Story of a Marriage, the new novel by San Francisco author Andrew Sean Greer, carries several qualities that a certain kind of reader (okay, me) just drools over. But I’m not alone: Literary folks the likes of Dave Eggers and John Updike have given the novel high praise. Let’s first tell you briefly what it’s all about, and then we’ll conduct a little inventory. Pearlie is a girl who grew up in Kentucky, where she met a boy named Holland, and they carried on an unusual courtship. After Holland received his World War II draft notice, his mother hid him in his bedroom, while Pearlie showed up each afternoon to read to him. Alas, the scheme didn’t work, and Holland was dragged off to fight in the Pacific, where his boat was blown to bits, leaving him as one of the few survivors. Meanwhile, Pearlie went to San Francisco to work at a factory, where one day, purely by accident, she ran into a worn-down young sailor who appeared to be the same young man she read books to in Kentucky.

Birthday Caboose A private coach for your party takes you to Bear Mountain

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Thomas the Tank Tank Engine™ A themed party for an aspiring engineer and up to 20 guests

Andrew Sean Greer, The Story of a Marriage, Jun. 12, 7pm, The Booksmith Bookstore, 1644 Haight St., San Francisco (415) 8638688; Jun. 19, 6pm, San Francisco Public Library, 300 Bartlett St., (415) 355-2800; Jun. 21, 7:30pm, The Makeout Room, 3225 22nd St., San Francisco (415) 647-2888

The Velvet Gunshot: The book carries major revelations, but Greer delivers them in a whisper, without preamble. It’s a beautiful, devastating trick, one that few authors have the restraint to perform. Negative Space: Greer’s use of language is lovingly spare and direct, speckled with diamonds in the grass. You may find yourself reading more slowly, just to catch everything.

Now, let’s get to that inventory.

The Importance of the Everyday: The story takes place in the everyday, the unspectacular, in a narrowly focused world of few characters. In other words, the real, the plausible – something we can all relate to.

Subtext: Greer, who has several appearances in San Francisco lined up this month, is a master of omission. He’s like a sculptor who chisels the marble down to perfection, and then goes 10 percent further, inviting the reader to fill in the gaps and become an active participant in the story.

In the end, The Story of a Marriage speaks gently enough to carry much more than the sum of its parts. It is a canvas of shifting identities that resonates long after the last page rustles to the binding. If you’re putting together your summer reading list, make sure this one’s at the top. TW

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

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ARTS

Come 1953, Pearlie and Holland live with their polio-stricken son, Sonny, in the Sunset District. Warned by Holland’s aunts of his “crooked heart,” Pearlie protects him from undue shocks by buying a dog that cannot bark, while also clipping bad news from the daily paper. But then one day, an old war buddy, Buzz, shows up at their door to change everything.

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while using specific walls to post artwork. Soothing classical music blends into the background. Meanwhile, NCC parents are thrilled. “My son would rather go outside and plant and harvest than be inside playing with his toys,” says San Jose mom Mary Lou Terrazas, whose four-year-old son, Roman Samuel, has been composting and recycling, even supporting a floating orphanage in Cambodia, along with his classmates. Charmaine Hayward, a parent at the preschool, is now an NCC teacher after first becoming a regular volunteer. “It’s a great thing to train the kids about gardening and recycling at such a young age,” she says. “Going outside to learn is like giving them an open book. Kids are learning about organic gardening and fresh produce. The parents love it.” Going green at the school also means working to reduce energy costs. NCC relies on 100 percent of its energy through wind and solar power. The staff uses organic cleansers and hand soaps for the classrooms and nontoxic paint covers the walls.

Baby Greens One Santa Clara preschool teaches youngsters about planting, recycling and more. FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

BY KATHY CHIN LEONG

T

his summer, preschoolers in Santa Clara will harvest beans, carrots, corn, watermelon and other organically grown fruits and vegetables as part of their daily curriculum. Instead of filling up on fish-shaped crackers, they’ll munch on school-grown fruits and vegetables (no dipping sauces whatsoever) while drinking milk or water, not juice. These pint-sized agrarians will then host their own farmers market, selling the bounty to parents, with the money going to replenish their garden with more seeds and plants. Welcome to Neighborhood Christian Center (NCC), Santa Clara’s forerunner in organic and environmentally sensitive preschools. With a curriculum based on outdoor activity, global education, and growing and planting, the one-acre school is a role model. These planetary stewards, ages two to six, understand the importance of cultivating soil and being kind to the

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

land. Together, they till the plots, sow seeds and create a compost pile, learning what does and does not go into it and why. The green philosophy is the brainchild of the school’s director and relentless visionary, Graciela MarquesHahn, who attributes the success of NCC to God, passion and miraculous donations that often materialized from the hands of strangers and friends. There is an expansive green hill, unstructured play areas, edible flower gardens, fruit trees, a wall of raspberry and blackberry canes, and a story circle made of tree stumps. Two giant 99-percent UV filtered sunscreen canopies from Australia provide shade for two play areas. Last year, the kids grew a 300-pound pumpkin; this year, they plan to exceed that with super pumpkin seeds donated to the school. Now permanently situated at 887 Pomeroy Ave., the site represents the third location for NCC, but the first with an ecological agenda. The pupils comprehend the origin of food. “Our kids will go to the market with their parents and explain what they have learned in class and tell them how certain fruits and vegetables are grown and eaten,” explains MarquesHahn. Adds five-year-old Shivansh, “I like eating pears and raw peas from the vine. Planting is good because it gives you fresh air.” Marques-Hahn balances the school’s healthy outdoor environment with healthy indoor classrooms, decorating the walls with soft colors instead of bright ones

Results in this organic setting are positive. Kids’ behavior, attitudes and understanding have all improved and broadened. Once-picky eaters are now trying new foods and are enjoying the range of cultural diversity among peers. While NCC is a Christianbased preschool and daycare, Marques-Hahn stresses 92

SILICON VALLEY SCHOOLS TURN GREEN

Many local campuses, from preschool through high school, are making the move to go green. Here’s what some of them are doing: Carlton Elementary School, San Jose: Recycling program underway for paper, glass and plastic. San Jose Unified, San Jose: Solar panel program at four high schools in the district. Georgina Blach Intermediate School, Los Altos: Water conservation, automatic day-lighting controls and limited demotion in modernizing buildings. Chartwell School, Seaside: Uses recycled siding from existing barrels. Gunn High School, Palo Alto: Has a student-run club called the Green Team, a recycling and green club. Mt. Madonna School, Watsonville: Hosts the Annual Festival for the Environment, an eco-fair open to the public every April. Sacred Heart, Atherton: Has school buildings registered for green certification under the US Green Building Council. The Harker School, San Jose: New expansion includes Green Science and Technology Center, an artificial field made of shredded tire rubber, and a solar-heated pool.


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$500

2 weeks

$950

3 weeks

$1,350

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» EVENT LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY EVENT

LISTINGS ST. CHRISTOPHER’S PARISH FESTIVAL & BBQ: 6/6 - 8

St. Christopher’s School, 2278 Booksin Ave., San Jose www.stchristopher.net

Enjoy great family fun and entertainment with rides, live music, games, silent auction, rummage sale, music, food, and did we mention FUN?! SECOND ANNUAL WORLD OCEAN DAY CELEBRATION: 6/7 -8

Monterey Bay Aquarium, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey www.montereybayaquarium.org

Two full days of celebrating the ocean with live music, crafts, face painting and more!: 10am – 6pm 38TH ANNUAL BURLINGAME ART IN THE PARK: 6/7 - 8

Washington Park, Carolan and Burlingame Aves., Burlingame www.burlingamechamber.org

Fine art, arts & crafts, live entertainment, community exhibits and a plethora of excellent foods – you heard right, a plethora!: 10am – 5pm

Sesame Street Live – When Elmo Grows Up: 6/13 - 15, San Jose Civic Auditorium IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR COMMUNIT Y EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

CLUB MEETINGS FUN TIME SINGERS: WEDNESDAYS

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 12770 Saratoga Ave., Saratoga www.funtimesingers.org

A lively and diverse community choir invites men and women to join their group: 7:15 – 9:30pm

BUSINESS

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

OPEN HOUSE AT SILVER CREEK SPORTSPLEX: 6/7

Silver Creek Sportsplex, 800 Embedded Way, San Jose www.silvercreeksportsplex.com

PARCEL 104’S SECOND ANNUAL 104-MILE DINNER: 6/7

Parcel 104, 2700 Mission College Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 9706104 www.parcel104.com

Enjoy a spectacular dinner from executive chef Robert Sapirman and his team, where all ingredients, including the wine, are sourced from within 104 miles of the restaurant: 6pm cocktails; 6:30pm dinner GRAND OPENING WEEKEND: 6/13 – 15

Fleming Jenkins Tasting Room, 45 W. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 3584949 www.flemingjenkins.com

Join the winery for the grand opening weekend at its new tasting room: Noon – 6pm

Come and experience the Bay Area’s most exciting destination for sports, fitness, and fun for the whole family! Open play, trial classes, food and more: 10am – 3pm » FARMERS MARKETS

FARMERS

Campbell: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Campbell Ave. at Central & First Sts. (510) 745-7100 Cupertino: Friday 9am – 1pm (year round) Vallco Fashion Park Parking Lot, 10123 Wolfe Rd. (800) 949-FARM Los Gatos: Sunday 8am – 12:30pm (year round) Montebello Way & Broadway Extension (408) 353-5355 Mountain View: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Hope & Evelyn (800) 806-FARM

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Wineries and Restaurants in Santa Clara and Santa Cruz Counties (831) 685-8463 www.scmwa.com

June 7 - 8: This festival offers participants a self-guided tour to take part in barrel tasting, meet winemakers, enjoy music, art and good food.

ZERO1 FESTIVAL: 6/4 - 8

Throughout Silicon Valley www.01sj.org

Be prepared for seven days of dazzling digital art from around the globe, with symposiums and exhibitions at various locations throughout San Jose. 34TH SUNNYVALE ART & WINE FESTIVAL: 6/7 - 8 Sunnyvale & Washington Aves., Sunnyvale www.svcoc.org

Not one to be left out, Sunnyvale hops on the street fair bandwagon with this event, featuring over 500 of the country’s finest artists and craftspeople, a variety of wines from Bay Area winemakers, local microbreweries and live entertainment: 10am – 6pm

MARKETS

Palo Alto: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) California Ave. & El Camino Real (800) 806-FARM San Jose: Sunday 10am – 3pm (year round) Stevens Creek & Winchester (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Friday 10am – 2pm (year round) Kaiser Santa Teresa Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Sunday 8:30am – Noon (year round) Japantown, Jackson between Sixth & Seventh Sts. (408) 298-4303 San Jose: Sunday 10am – 2pm (year round) Princeton Plaza, Kooser & Meridian (800) 806-FARM

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

FESTIVALS & EXPOS

VINTER’S FESTIVAL 2008

Santa Clara: Thursday 10am – 2pm (year round) Santa Clara Kaiser Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM Santa Clara: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Jackson St. between Homestead & Benton (510) 745-7100 Saratoga: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Saratoga West Valley College, Fruitvale & Allendale Aves. (800) 806-FARM Sunnyvale: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) S. Murphy Ave. at Washington and Evelyn (510) 745-7100

SUNSET MAGAZINE CELEBRATION WEEKEND: 6/7 – 8

Sunset Headquarters, 80 Willow Rd., Menlo Park www.sunset.com

This two-day festival features kitchen and garden tours, stage presentations, live entertainment, experts who will answer your home and garden questions, hands-on activities, and microbrew tastings: 10am – 5pm

F E AT U R E 90

that families of all faiths are absolutely welcome. Many children come with Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim, atheist and Zoroastrian backgrounds. In this Silicon Valley melting pot, the school embraces a global perspective. Last year, “we had a circle of bean poles that formed a tent, and we planted 50 varieties of beans from around the world and did a curriculum about the different beans,” says Marques-Hahn, who also uses recycling as a means of teaching NCC preschoolers about the children of different countries and cultures. Each of the four buildings recycles cans and plastic bottles, using the money to support various children’s causes, including a school in rural North India, 15 “green” orphanages in Zimbabwe, a floating school and orphanage in Cambodia, and a bus-on-wheels, after school program in New Mexico that reaches Native American children.

ART DECO AND MODERNISM SALE: 6/7 - 8

Concourse Exhibition Center, 635 Eighth St., San Francisco www.artdecosale.com

This is the largest art deco and modernism sale in the country, featuring more than 150 dealers selling art deco arts and crafts, streamlined modern furniture, vintage clothing, mid-century jewelry and more.

ROBOGAMES 2008:

[CONT’D]

NCC didn’t start with a lot of money, but it did start with a lot of prayer from friends, family, perfect strangers and a committed group of board members. As Marques-Hahn states, “I stand in awe at God’s faithfulness. He used ordinary people to accomplish extraordinary tasks: We call it miracles.” A partial list of heavenly donations include picnic tables, trees, benches, sand, concrete pathways, rubber playground mates, beach sand, a sprinkler system, compost and more. In less than four years, word of this exciting program has gotten out, creating a waiting list for prospective students. “All this has been a pioneering thing,” says Marques-Hahn. “But you and I can all make a difference. It takes one person with a heart and determination to motivate others and see it through.” TW Neighborhood Christian Center: 887 Pomeroy Ave., Santa Clara (408) 984-3418


EVENT 6/13 -15

Fort Mason Center, Buchanan St. & Marina Blvd., San Francisco www.robogames.net

Along with robots bashing each other to pieces, you’ll enjoy competitions that include largest robot, best walking robot and many more! 2008 SAN JOSE GAY PRIDE CELEBRATION: 6/14 - 15

Discovery Meadow, W. San Carlos St. at Woz Way, San Jose www.sanjosepride.com

A two-day celebration with live music from Ari Gold, Frenchie Davis, Finding Stella and many more, along with a parade, food, drinks and fun for the whole family. DIA DE PORTUGAL FESTIVAL: 6/14

History Park at Kelley Park, 1650 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 8081471 www.diadeportugal.com

Bring the whole family to History Park for a day of fun and activities with live music, dance, and spectacular food from Portugal, Brazil and Macau: 10am – 7:30pm ART AT THE BEACH: 6/15 - 8/17

Esplanade Park – Capitola Beach, Capitola (831) 419-7485

Head to picturesque Capitola for a full day of nothing but perusing and purchasing wonderful art!: 11am – 6pm

FAMILY ACTIVITIES THE BUTTERFLY ZONE: THRU 11/2

San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers, Conservatory Dr., San Francisco

Don’t miss this wonderful event featuring beautiful floral displays and about a zillion live butterflies flying around inside the Conservatory of Flowers! MOVIES ON THE SQUARE: 6/5 - 8/28

Courthouse Square, downtown Redwood City, 2200 Broadway www.redwoodcityevents.com

Grab your friends, a blanket and a

lawn chair and enjoy free outdoor movies every Thursday: Sundown MIDNIGHT MOVIE MADNESS: 6/6 - 8/30

Camera 7, The Pruneyard, 1875 S. Bascom Ave., Campbell www.cameracinemas.com

Not only are cult classics like The Thing, The Big Lebowski and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas shown at the stroke of midnight, but Camera Cinemas will be giving away concert tickets, T-shirts and other goodies to attendees. And it’s only $7.50!

San Jose (408) 287-5994 www.melcottons.com

Everything you need to get ready for summer will be at this year’s expo, with fun kayak demos, a kids’ catchand-release pond, great sales and much more. 42ND ANNUAL SAND CASTLE & SAND SCULPTURE CONTEST: 6/7 Robert Crown Memorial State Beach, Otis & Westline Dr., Alameda www.ci.alameda.ca.us/ arpd/events.html

SHAKESPEARE ON THE SQUARE FESTIVAL: 6/6 - 6/28

Enjoy a day of building and sculpting at this year’s annual contest that includes divisions for 12 and under (individual and group), 13 and older (individual and group), and teams just for the family: 9 – 11am

Join the Arclight Repertory Theatre as they present Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.

SIXTH VASONA VIBRATIONS FREE CONCERT SERIES: 6/7 - 7/26

Theatre on San Pedro Square, 29 N. San Pedro St., San Jose www.brownpapertickets.com

STORY ROAD TAMALE FESTIVAL: 6/7

Emma Prusch Farm, 647 S. King Rd., San Jose www.storyroadtamalefestival.org

Attention, tamale lovers – have we got an event for you! Spend the day listening to live music as you fill yourself full of delicious tamales. Also on hand: dance performances, tamale-eating contests, cooking demonstrations and entertainment for the kids: 10am – 6pm A TASTE OF JAZZ: 6/7

Plaza de Valencia Stage, Santana Row www.atasteofjazz.net

Enjoy free jazz at Santana Row: 1 – 4pm WORLD’S LARGEST CHALK ART DRAWING: 6/7

Naval Air Base at Alameda Point, 1951 Monarch St., Alameda (510) 395-3920 reenchantingtheworldthroughart.org

Come make history: Bring your family and friends to create the world’s largest chalk art drawing that, when completed, will be the size of two football fields!: 9am – 4pm MEL COTTON’S 15 ANNUAL SUMMER EXPO: 6/7 - 8 TH

Mel Cotton’s Sporting Goods, 1266 W. San Carlos St.,

LISTINGS STORIES FROM THE PAST: 6/13

This celebration of the end of slavery in America recognizes accomplishments of African-Americans through music, arts, crafts and food.

A preschool children’s story time featuring an African tale, Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears, that tries to explain the annoying buzz of mosquitoes: 11am & 2pm

DANCING ON THE AVENUE: 6/14

San Mateo History Museum, 2200 Broadway (650) 299-0104 www.historysmc.org

SAN JOSE JUNETEENTH IN THE PARK: 6/14 - 15

Cesar Chavez Park, Market & San Carlos Sts., San Jose (408) 292-3157 www.sjaacsa.org

Downtown Willow Glen, Lincoln Ave. between Minnesota Ave. & Willow, San Jose www.downtownwillowglen.org

It’s party time on Lincoln Avenue, with food, drinks, live music, dancing and fun!

A day that the family can’t miss. You’ll enjoy a day at History San Jose, Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, followed by an exciting San Jose Giants baseball game… all for ONE dollar! MUSIC ON THE SQUARE: 6/13 - 10/3 Courthouse Square, downtown Redwood City, 2200 Broadway www.redwoodcityevents.com

Enjoy free music on the square every Friday night: 6 – 8pm SESAME STREET LIVE – WHEN ELMO GROWS UP: 6/13 - 15

San Jose Civic Auditorium, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose (408) 999-5719 www.sesamestreetlive.com

Join Elmo and his Sesame Street friends – The Count, Cookie Monster, Big Bird, and Bert & Ernie – for an evening of super family fun and music!

WEDDING PLANNING

» WEDDING PL ANNING

Learn about the value of your insurance coverage through a friendly review of your current policies and benefit from our multiline discounts for home, auto, and life insurance. CA License 0F86939 MAKEUP ARTIST

Hear that whistle, sounds like fun… 1880’s fun and it happens Father’s Day!

Treat Dad to a day in the Redwoods. Ride the Steam train to Bear Mountain and take the NEW guided bike ride back to Roaring Camp for a Chuckwagon BBQ. (reservations required must be 10 and up for bike ride)

Steam Trains at 11am, 12:30pm & 2pm Beach Trains at 10:30am & 2:30pm Chuckwagon BBQ is open from noon to 3pm 831-335-4484 • www.roaringcamp.com Felton, Santa Cruz County, CA Six miles north of Santa Cruz on Graham Hill Road

Professional Makeup by Tiffany Chiang

Shangri-La Lotus Salon & Spa ACCOMMODATIONS

Hotel Los Gatos & Spa 210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com Mediterranean-styled villas providing luxurious guest rooms and suites. Nestled at the base of the Santa Cruz Mountains and within walking distance of the many shops, restaurants and galleries. Home to Preston Wynne Spa & Dio Deka Restaurant. BACHELORETTE PARTIES

Jewelsexpression 1445 Foxworthy Ave., San Jose www.jewelsexpression.com Jewelsexpression offers exotic dancing classes with a softer touch. Designed for women of all shapes, sizes and ages, you’ll learn the art of the “walk,” floor performing, and faux pole and chair dancing. Great for bridal showers and bachelorette parties. BEAUTY SALON

Shangri-La Lotus Salon & Spa 413A Monterey Ave., San Jose (408) 623-3963 www.jennybeauty.com Look your very best for your day. We provide the perfect makeup for your entire wedding party – bride, attendants and both mothers. Flawless makeup complements your dresses and location, allowing your photographer/videographer to provide you with the best memories. Whether you come to us or we come to you, everything will be done to your satisfaction. ENTERTAINMENT

Thoro-Bread Entertainment (650) 248-3803 We provide DJ services for all occasions, and offer a wide range of music, including today’s greatest hits, hip-hop, reggae, dancehall, soul, oldies, Spanish music and much more. So, next time you’re thinking about having a party, give us a call and leave the music to us! FLORIST

Abercrombie Flowers & Gifts 120 S. Sunnyvale Ave., Sunnyvale (408) 245-0130 Luscious wedding bouquets, distinctive reception and exotic centerpieces for your luxurious and lavish soiree. Corporate gifts, funerals, and events are other areas of our expertise! INSURANCE

Valerie Young Vedda

(408) 242-8154 www.beautyexperttiffany.com Camera-ready bridal and wedding makeup service specializing in customized color matching foundation and mineral powder just for you. I will make sure you have a flawless complexion and the perfect makeup for your special day. RECEPTIONS

Hotel Los Gatos & Spa 210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com Mediterranean ambience provides luxurious banquet facilities for events to accommodate up to 130 guests at various locations, including our Indoor Monte Sereno Ballroom, Outdoor Courtyard & Pool Terrace. SALON

The Alexandria Salon & Spa 1346 The Alameda, Ste. 8, San Jose (408) 971-2926 www.thealexandriasalon.com Hair, skincare, massage, makeup and waxing services provided by a friendly and skilled staff in our relaxed spa environment. Come see our newly added clothing boutique. TANNING

Parlour 308 Airbrush Tanning 308 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 354-9308 www.parlour308salon.com Professional, comfortable and discreet. Your tan is applied by hand, using an airbrush. The solution is customized for every client, to create a natural sun-kissed tan. TRAVEL

Cruise Planners 5669 Snell Ave., Ste. 372, San Jose (408) 715-7196 Our travel agency specializes in designing a vacation that exceeds your expectations. Our passion is to plan a seamless and exciting cruise and travel experience. Call us today to start planning your dream vacation memories. WEDDING GOWNS

Nicolette Couture Bridal Boutique 15 El Toro Ave., Morgan Hill (408) 779-6146 www.nicolettecouture.com Features four gorgeous wedding gown designers, one of which is exclusive to our boutique for all of Northern California. We offer a no pressure, memorable shopping experience for your dream wedding gown.

181 Metro Dr., Ste. 290, San Jose (408) 930-1290 FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

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FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Sunday, June 15

Local artists from Heart of Chaos and Heart of Kids will demonstrate a variety of chalk art and invite you to join them in creating your own masterpieces, along with live music provided by KSJS DJs: 10am – 2pm

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What could be better than lounging by a lovely lakeside and listening to free music? NOTHING!

History San Jose, Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, San Jose Giants (408) 277-4193 www.sjgiants.com

Gardner Community Center, 520 W. Virginia St., San Jose www.downtownwillowglen.org

SV

Vasona Lake County Park, 333 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 354-2608 www.southbayfolks.org

TRIPLE PLAY FAMILY DAYS: 6/10

SAN JOSE’S SECOND ANNUAL CHALK ART FESTIVAL: 6/14


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: EVENT LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY

Grand Opening

EVENT 93

FATHER’S DAY CONCERT: 6/15

Hidden Villa Ranch, 26870 Moody Rd., Los Altos Hills (650) 949-8650 www. hiddenvilla.org

Bring dad to enjoy a free concert with the Banana Slug String Band that blends music, theatre and puppetry!: 5:30 – 7:30pm HATS OFF TO DAD: 6/15

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

See Calendar of Events at

Dads like trains. Dads like barbecues. Why not give dad a dream Father’s Day at Roaring Camp, where a steam engine will haul him to a big barbecue feast. Free engineer’s hat included.

FUNDRAISERS DANNY’S ESTATE SALE: AUCTION OF HAPPY HOLLOW MEMORABILIA: 6/7

Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, 1300 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 277-4193 www.hhpz.org

A live auction of one of a kind Happy Hollow and Frontier Village items: Proceeds raised will help build the new Happy Hollow: 4:30 – 8pm RUMMAGE SALE AND CONCERT: 6/7

Trinity Presbyterian Church, 3151 Union Ave., San Jose (408) 377-8930 www.trinitypresbyteriansj.org

Rummage sale and concert to benefit Rev. Elijah’s orphanage and ministry in Uganda, Africa: 8am – 5pm, 7 – 9pm CHEFS WHO CARE BBQ AND PICNIC IN THE PARK: 6/9

Cuesta Park, 615 Cuesta Dr., Mountain View (650) 9680836 www.csacares.org

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Come and enjoy a great food catered by Armadillo Willy’s, with funds raised benefitting Community

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

LISTINGS

Services Agency’s Food & Nutrition Center: 5:30 – 7:30pm

VOLUNTEER

UPTOWN, DOWNTOWN & EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN: 6/10

BECOME A BIG BROTHER OR BIG SISTER

Vbar, 355 Santana Row, San Jose (408) 253-4002 www.ajsalon.com

A preview of fashionably new hairstyles, and take part in a silent auction, with all proceeds raised benefitting Childhelp: 6 – 8pm CHURCH RUMMAGE SALE: 6/14

Wesley United Methodist Church, 566 N. Fifth St., San Jose (408) 295-0367

Swing by and pick up some great stuff and help raise funds for the United Methodist Women Missions work: 9am – 2pm TAUPOU BINGO: THURSDAYS

San Jose Moose Lodge, Ste. 401, 1825 Mt. Pleasant Rd., San Jose

Come out and play bingo and help raise funds for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: 6:45pm

HEALTH & WELLNESS CHANGING DIABETE BUS AND VILLAGE WORLD TOUR: 6/6 - 8

Pier 39 East Park, San Francisco www.changingdiabetes-us.com

The three-day event features a mobile diabetes showroom and interactive diabetes village offering free diabetes education, activities and giveaways: 11am – 7pm FINDING YOUR SPIRITUAL PATH: 6/14 - 20

Ananda, 2171 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (650) 323-3363 www.anandapaloalto.org

Find out how to begin the journey to your own personal spiritual path: 10am – 1pm

(408) 876-4193 www.emp.org

Become a mentor and be a positive influence on a child’s life and it’ll only cost you two hours a week!

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES LEARN TO SQUARE DANCE: 6/6

United Church of Christ Hall, 400 W. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 377-3740

Come and take part in a free introductory class and don’t worry, you don’t need a partner. DIGITAL CAMERA BASICS: 6/9 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, 150 E. San Fernando St., San Jose (408) 808-2397 www.sjlibrary.org

You’ll learn everything you need to know about digital photography: 6 – 7:30pm INTERMEDIATE TAROT READING WORKSHOP: 6/14

Sacred Paths Bookstore, 134 S. B St., San Mateo (650) 347-7284 www.magicians-table.com

You’re invited to come and learn some pointers on tarot reading: 11am – 1pm WRITE NOW! SUMMER WRITING PROGRAM: 7/7 – 8/8

Emerson School, Palo Alto (650) 424-1267; Hacienda School, Pleasanton (925) 485-5750 www.headsup.org

A week-long day camp for Grades 2 - 8 that prepares students to master the disciplines of writing and public speaking. Three sessions include expository writing, creative writing, and presentation skills. TW


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: EVENT LISTINGS

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

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SVMARKETPLACE » COLUMN: HOME WORK

HOME

IMPROVEMENT PATIO FURNITURE

The Complete Backyard 1600 Duane Ave., Santa Clara (408) 748-8100 www.patio101.com Come by and visit our 33,000square-foot showroom featuring all the top names in the patio business. We have over 250 sets on display from various manufacturers. PLANTS (INTERIOR)

Creative Plant Design 1030 Commercial St., Ste. 109, San Jose (408) 4521444 www.creativeplant.com Creative Plant Design, Inc. has been providing and maintaining excellent interior landscape services throughout Northern California for over 20 years.

Staging by Karen Dayton www.staging-pros.com

TO ADVERTISE IN THE HOME IMPROVEMENT SVMARKETPLACE CALL: (408) 467-3201 EQUIPMENT RENTAL

A Tool Shed (Eight South Bay locations) (800)-ATOOLSHED www. atoolshed.com A Tool Shed Rentals should be your first stop for all your rental needs! We have the tools and equipment rentals to make your weekend or major project easier.

Black Sea Gallery 27 South First Street, San Jose (408) 998-8885 www.blackseagallery.com Welcome to Black Sea Gallery, where worldly furniture finds its home. Each piece is inspired by an exotic place, a past era, an antique lost but not forgotten.

FIREPLACE

PLUMBING

Smart Choice Plumbing 55 Newell Rd., Ste. 301, Palo Alto (650) 424-1616 Professional plumber 24 Hrs. / seven days a week video Inspection / Pipe locating / Fixture repair.

HOUSE CLEANING

At Home House Cleaning (408) 401-7755 Your home is our concern! We offer worry free insurance protection, bonded employees, window cleaning, and deep carpet cleaning. Call for a free estimate. KITCHEN AND BATH

Arch Design Center (ADC) 1264 S. Bascom Ave., San Jose (408) 278-9056 ADC is a new showroom with an old-fashioned approach. A family oriented business whose main focus is bringing customer service back to the showroom.

Willow Glen Kitchen and Bath

Peninsula Fireplace

46 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-9200 www.peninsulafireplace.com Specializing in original designs. Offering screens and accessories, hand forged iron, wood and stone mantels, wood gas and electric fireplaces, glass and mesh doors.

Jimyko 1919 Monterey Road, Suite #10, San Jose (408) 993-0918 www.jimyko.com Provides fresh and unique ideas that attune to today’s casual and contemporary lifestyles. We invite you to explore our retail studio and experience the elements that define your home.

FLOORING AND CARPETS

Grand Flooring

351 Willow Glen St., San Jose (408) 293-2284 Lighting, rugs and pottery are but a few of the items we feature in our “Complete Home Furnishing” selections; enabling you to experience a “One Stop Shopping” environment. HARDWARE

Palo Alto Hardware

11155 Lena Ave., Gilroy (408) 846-4555 www.garden-accents.net Our vision is a garden center to inspire the customers, not just to sell product. We provide a place where garden lovers become inspired and where gardening ideas can flourish.

Can-Do Construction (831) 539-1181 All phases of construction and excavation, residential remodel and additions, structural retaining walls, decks, and hardscapes. Licensed, bonded, and insured. HOME THEATRE

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950 S. McGliney Ln., Ste. 505, Campbell (408) 371-9495 Offering emergency leak repair, roof maintenance, annual maintenance, reroofing of all types, and roofing inspections.

Garden Accents

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

All World Furniture

ROOFING AND GUTTERS

Franklin’s Roofing Service

875 Alma St., Palo Alto (650) 327-7222 www.paloaltohardware.com At Palo Alto Hardware, “living green” is more than just a catchphrase. We work hard to put into place systems and programs that are environmentally friendly as we run our business.

Heavenly Greens

981 Stockton Ave, San Jose (408)292-6833 www. allworldfurniture.com All World Furniture Inc. was started over sic years ago and now has a one of the largest modern, contemporary furniture showrooms with attached warehouse in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Admiral Pool Tables www.mrpooltable.com Offering quality handcrafted 8-foot pool tables - custom made - factory direct to you. Also offering a wide variety of accessories from lamps to casino tables to spectator chairs.

LAWNS AND GARDENS

894 Commercial St., San Jose (408) 441-1021 www.grandflooring.com Beautiful homes deserve beautiful floors. At GrandFlooring.com we let nature customize your floor. Our solid hardwood flooring contains both clear and character planks that reflect all the best attributes of the natural wood.

FURNITURE

POOL TABLES

Modern TV 1228 S. Bascom Ave., Ste. B, San Jose (408) 2931330 www.moderntvonline.com We can provide the home theater system you dream about. Whether it’s a dedicated theater with plush seating and a big screen, or a family room with a slim plasma TV and speakers built into the walls, we have the solution for you.

STORAGE

A-1 Self Storage

(866) 724-8873 www.heavenlygreens.com A Heavenly Greens lawn is as close to natural grass as you can get without the need to water, mow or fertilize. Your lawn will look beautiful 365 days a year with little to no maintenance. AS SEEN ON TV!

(Four San Jose Locations) 1415 Old Oakland Rd.; 2900 Monterey Rd.; 131 Baroni Ave.; 3260 S. Bascom Ave. (800) 210-8979 www.a1storage.com Save money with A-1 Self Storage! Affordable pricing for personal and business needs.

LANDSCAPING AND GARDENS

WOODWORKING CENTER

Zaira’s Gardening and Landscaping (408) 569-3389 Contact Hector for FREE ESTIMATES... Maintenance, Clean-ups, Trimmings, Pressure Wash, New Lawn and more.

The Sawdust Shop 452 Oakmead Pkwy., Sunnyvale (408) 992-1004 www.sawdustshop.com The Sawdust Shop is a unique woodworking center located in the heart of Silicon Valley, combining a do-it-yourself woodshop, a woodworking store, and woodworking classes all under one roof.


PHOTO CREDITS D E S I G N @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

1, Cover / Courtesy of iStock, 3, 2007 Third Annual Santa Cruz Championship / Courtesy of Pro-Am Beach Soccer, Beamz Music Performance System / Courtesy of Sharper Image, Boy Splashing in pool / Courtesy of iStock, David Hasselhoff on America’s Got Talent / Courtesy of NBC, Honey Closeup / Courtesy of iStock, NCC 07 / By Chris Schmauch, Sanyo Xacti E1 / Courtesy of Sanyo, Terracotta Oven / Courtesy of SurLaTable, The Dock Brief / Courtesy of California Theatre Center, 8, Cintra Wilson / By Chad Rachman, 10, Nirvino phone / Courtesy of Nirvino, 12, Palo Alto - University Ave. / By Chris Schmauch, 14, Coyote Creek Trail / By Chris Schmauch, 16, Beamz Music Performance System / Courtesy of Sharper Image, Jesse James Dopp Kit / Courtesy of Kiehl’s, Morfeo Bed / Courtesy of Unica Home, Sinners-Inc. / Courtesy of Sinners Inc., Sun Visor / Courtesy of Chinavision, 21, End of Summer Ride / Courtesy of Billy Jones Wildcat Railroad, Gilroy Garlic Festival / Courtesy of Gilroy Garlic Festival, Ringling Bros. / Courtesy of Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey, Wine pour / Courtesy of iStock, 22, Winchester Mystery House / By Chris Schmauch, 25, Campbell Highland Games / Courtesy of Sara Bruce, Fireworks / Courtesy of iStock, 29, Mountain men gathering / Courtesy of Roaring Camp, Sand castle building / Courtesy of iStock, Tapestry art festival / Courtesy of Tapestry Arts Festival, 30, Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk / By Chris Schmauch, 32, Gilroy Gardens / Courtesy of Gilroy Gardens, 34, 2007 Third Annual Santa Cruz Championship / Courtesy of Pro-Am Beach Soccer, 38, Honey / Courtesy of iStock, 40, Heitkam honey / Courtesy of iStock, 52, Aerobie disc and ring / By Chris Schmauch, Cool Fusion 40 Icy Tunes / Courtesy of Igloo, Tarantula / Courtesy of Buzz Bee Toys, Morey Skimboard / Courtesy of Quality Trading Inc., Sanyo Xacti E1 / Courtesy of Sanyo, UV Canopy chair by Kelsyus / Courtesy of Mel Cotton’s, UV Sensor / Courtesy of Oregon Scientific, 53, Alta / By Chris Schmauch, 54, Alfresco outdoor kitchen / Courtesy of Alfresco Outdoor Kitchen, Boca Custom Outdoor Kitchen / Courtesy of Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet, Edo Grill / Courtesy of Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet, KOG Artisan pizza oven / Courtesy of Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet, Outdoor Theater / Courtesy of Cal Flame, Viking Malibu Outdoor Kitchen / Courtesy of Viking Range Corporation, 56, Black Pakka Grill Tool Set / Courtesy of Crate and Barrel, Monogrammed Grill Tools / Courtesy of Williams-Sonoma, Motorized Grill Brush / Courtesy of Brookstone, Pizza grill / Courtesy of SurLaTable, Stainless steal rib rack / Courtesy of Williams-Sonoma, Terracotta Oven / Courtesy of SurLaTable, 58, Livorno Square / Courtesy of Livorno Square, Stepping out stepping stone / Courtesy of the O’Neill Sisters, 60, Step 1 / Courtesy of the O’Neill Sisters, Step 2 / Courtesy of the O’Neill Sisters, Step 3 / Courtesy of the O’Neill Sisters, 62, OITF Cookbook / Courtesy of Clarkson Potter Publishing, California 178 / By of Colleen Sweeney, DSC 5789 / By of Wyatt Dexter, Foraging / By of Chelsey Chen, 63, Shooter Jennings / Courtesy of Shooter Jennings, Vintners Festival / Courtesy of iStock, 68, 19 Market / By Chris Schmauch, 76, Andrew Bird / Courtesy of Cameron Wittig, Beck / Courtesy of Nasty Little Man PR and Bill Graham Presents, Chris Isaak / Courtesy of Monterey Peninsula Artists, Death Cab For Cutie / Courtesy of Death Cab For Cutie, English Beat / Courtesy of Fox Theatre, Feist / Courtesy of Live Nation, Jon Mayer / Courtesy of Bill Graham Presents, Indigo Girls / Courtesy of Jeremy Cowart, Jimmy Eat World / Courtesy of Bill Graham Presents, KT Tunstall / Courtesy of Live Nation, Lavay Smith / Courtesy of Lavay Smith, Lyle Lovett / Courtesy of Lyle Lovett, 82, David Hasselhoff on America’s Got Talent / Courtesy of NBC, 84, Incredibly Scary Hulk / Courtesy of Universal, Kung Fu Panda / Courtesy of DreamWorks Animation, 86, The Dock Brief / Courtesy of California Theatre Center, 88, Flying Lox Box / By Nina Koepcke, 89, Sculpture by Mayyur Kailash Gupta / Courtesy of Aicon Gallery, Andrew Sean Greer / By Henry Dombey, 90, NCC 08 / By Chris Schmauch, 92, Sesame Street Live / Courtesy of Sesame Street, 98, Seanbaby / By Chris Schmauch

ADVERTISER INDEX S A L E S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

300 - San Jose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 3Ta Restaurant & Bar. . . . . . . . . .73 9 x 9 Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 A-1 Self Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 a.c.t. Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Aaron Sessions, State Farm . . . .14 All-American Builders. . . . . . . . .61 Alliance Development Group - Park Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Alliance Development Group - Stone Crest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 American Kickboxing Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Angel Face Day Spa . . . . . . . . . . .47 Art Beat, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Arya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Associated Students Child Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Attuned Dental Care . . . . . . . . . .42 AVA Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Baby Buzz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 Bai Tong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 BarbieAnn’s Hair Design. . . . . . .47 Basin, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Baycom LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Bay Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Beautiful by Design. . . . . . . . . . .49 Bella Mia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Bella Saratoga. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Bert’s Alibi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Birk’s Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Blowfish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Blue Chalk Cafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Blue Pheasant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Braces For Pretty Faces. . . . . . . .39 Branham Lounge . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Burger Pit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Cafe Hair Salon & Spa . . . . . . . . .44 California Wheels. . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Camera Cinemas. . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Campbell Highland Games . . . .87 Cantor Arts Center . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Caper’s Eat & Drink . . . . . . . . . . .73 Cascal Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Century Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Chardonnay II Santa Cruz. . . . . .22 Chatanoga Persian Cuisine . . . .70 Children’s Discovery Museum . .91 Chrysalis Aesthetic & Reconstructive Surgery . . . . . . .15 Cinelux Theatres. . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 City Heights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 City of Miplitas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 City Smog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Cookies by Design . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Creekside Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Cucina Bambini. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Dave & Buster’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 Dave & Buster’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 Day Out with Thomas . . . . . . . . .94 Designers Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Dippin’ Dots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Dive Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Dr. Hoang K. Do. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Dr. Robert Ferguson . . . . . . . . . .43 Dr. Tony Pham. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Dr. Youbert Karalian . . . . . . . . . .48 El Amigo Restaurant . . . . . . . . . .67 Elle Kiss. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Emerge Medispa . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Emerson School . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91

Escape Bar & Grill. . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Eternal Beauty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Everything and Hair. . . . . . . . . . .45 eWomen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Fahrenheit UltraLounge. . . . . . .73 Featured Business Livorno Square . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Fish Market, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Five Branches Institute. . . . . . . .43 Foxy Avenue Clips . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Giancarlo’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Ginger Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Go Mobile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Goosetown Lounge . . . . . . . . . . .80 Grand Century Dental . . . . . . . . . .9 Great America. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Gulliver USA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Half Moon Bay Brewing Company . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Happi House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Harrah’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Hawg’s Seafood . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Healthy Chocolates . . . . . . . . . . .40 Hillbarn Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Home Consignment Center . . . .28 House of Genji. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 iFlySFBay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 infobayarea.com . . . . . . . . . . . . .97 Island Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Jane Aesthetic Medicine & Surgery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Jelly Belly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 JFK University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Jigsaw Java . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Julie Acosta, Hairstylist. . . . . . . .46 Kawczynski & Associates . . . . . .14 Kidz Shoppe, The . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Kim’s Auto Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Koji Sake Lounge . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 La Paloma Restaurant. . . . . . . . .70 Laser Beauty Center . . . . . . . . . .51 Las Madres Neighborhood Playground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Legar Salon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Lisa’s Tea Treasures . . . . . . . . . . .73 Little Lou’s BBQ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Livorno Square . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Loft Bar & Bistro. . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Los Gatos Tire & Automotive. . .17 Love Guru. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Lupe’s House Cleaning Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Lyric Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Mantra Palo Alto . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Maple Tree Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Marbella Hair Salon. . . . . . . . . . .48 Marketplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 Massage Envy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 MaxPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Mazda Laguna Seca. . . . . . . . . . .27 Melting Pot, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Menara Moroccan . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Merlion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Milpitas Optometric Group . . . .50 Milpitas Spine Center . . . . . . . . .47 Mio Vicino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Mix 106.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Mommy Spa, The / Shangri-La Lotus . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Mustard Cafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Nazca Peruvian Cuisine. . . . . . . .65

Nichols Research, Inc. . . . . . . . . .28 Nicolino’s Italian Restaurant . . .74 Ocean Blue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Off Ramp, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Off the Hook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Paizley’s Salon & Spa. . . . . . . . . .42 Parcel 104 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Petroglyph. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Picasso’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Pinn Bros.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Pleasures from the Heart . . . . . .17 ProXprint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Quarter Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Radiance Health Solutions. . . . .50 Rejuve Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Roaring Camp - Birthday . . . . . .89 Roaring Camp - Camping. . . . . .14 Roaring Camp Railroads. . . . . . .35 Roaring Camp Railroads. . . . . . .93 Roem Corporation Montecito Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Rosie McCann’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Rozenhart Family Chiropractic .40 Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Sanctuary Salon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 San Jose BMW Motorcycles . . . .33 San Jose Downtown Association - Dining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 San Jose Downtown Association - Parking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Scandalous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 ScrapLovers @ WorkofHeart . . .91 Sex and the City . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Silvercreek Sportsplex . . . . . . . .23 Silvercreek Sportsplex . . . . . . . .35 SINO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Sky High Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Sole di Paradiso . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 South Bay Athletic Club . . . . . . .24 Spencer’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Sports Basement . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Starburst Construction . . . . . . . .60 Straits Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Sue Durfee, Realtor . . . . . . . . . . .58 Sunny Buffet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Sunnyvale Chamber of Commerce. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 SuperSlow Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Team 72 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Temple Bar & Lounge, The. . . . .81 TheFaceShop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Thoi’s Arts & Crafts . . . . . . . . . . .53 Tied House. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Trailsloggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Ultra Outlet & Spa . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Umbrella Salon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Up and Running . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Valley Transportation Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Vision Innovations Optometry .45 West Coast Bartending School .80 Westpark Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 West Valley College. . . . . . . . . . .12 Westwood Chiropractic . . . . . . .46 Willow Glen Ace Hardware . . . .60 Willow Street Pizza . . . . . . . . . . .75 Wine Cellar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Ye Olde Royal Oak Pub . . . . . . . .71 Zohan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85

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COLUMN: THE FINAL L AST WORD

THE FINAL LAST WORD B Y S E A N B A B Y - S E A N B A B Y @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

The Gay Marriage Repercussions

B

oth California and New York state have ended their war against true love and legally recognized same sex unions. And as predicted, the American family has been destroyed. Not since Y2K has such a long-anticipated disaster lived up to our darkest expectations. Besides every gay couple’s newfound ability to emit bolts of fire when they touch, many other aspects of the traditional wedding have been altered. Since this law will affect everyone in many different ways (or often as few as none), I can only comment on five aspects of the institution of marriage that it will destroy. I personally am not gay, but since every woman who wouldn’t sleep with me is, I have some insight into the lifestyle. I know that their feelings, like ours, are real. Only here’s the complicated part: if you recognize them legally, that destroys the sanctity of regular nongay feelings – and without that, it makes gay love false again. A classic catch-22. Which leaves us with the following traditions in shambles:

Family Value 1: Bachelor Parties Constructing a cake large enough to fit a partially nude man is in possible, just not practical. According to emission studies, it requires seven times more energy to build it than to burst out of it shirtless and glistening (though to be honest, I’ve only seen strippers hide in cakes during films like Under Siege starring Steven Seagal). Do naked people still do that? It’s possible I’ve confused bachelor parties with deadly ambushes. Regardless, I think we all watch the same stupid movies, so no one is surprised by huge cakes anymore. It’d be more of a surprise if you wheeled in a giant cake, and inside was just a regular cake – or better yet, if you wheeled in a nude guy and then a cake burst out of HIM! I think I’ve proven why people feared gay marriages for so long: in their tireless efforts to trick one another, the gays are about to hire strippers to puke cake all over their guests.

Family Value 2: Bridal Showers I know nothing about bridal showers except that women use them as an excuse to scrapbook and giggle about dildo gifts. Even more shocking, according to my master’s degree in women’s studies, now that bridal show98

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 2-15, 2008

ers are gay, everyone plays rugby. You can look it up.

Family Value 3: Receptions Traditionally, a wedding reception is a wild party for dangerously untrained partiers. Sort of like Las Vegas, but with fewer magicians. Throughout a reception, drunken relatives circle around each other and take turns clumsily unerasing certain dances from history. Certain dances are erased from history for a reason. With gay marriages, this will no longer cut it. The caliber of dancing at a gay reception will be so much higher, the first part of the wedding ceremony will now become a two-week dance seminar. It’s fun, but intense – so intense, many will die, and even more will lose a lover to the graceful arms of a ballroom instructor and vow to never dance again. Do we really want this for our children? Check a box: [ ] Yes [ ] No. Well, surprise: you’re not in control of that destiny anymore. In fact, those boxes do nothing more than tell me if you think I’m cute or not. And what’s more, both of them are actually yes.

Family Value 4: Pit Fighting Here’s what we know: When they’re not marrying, men love the new Philips Norelco Beard and Mustache Trimmer and competing in mixed martial arts events. How are they going to do all these things when they have to work together to find a Southwestern-style caterer and work out a seating arrangement that makes everyone happy?

Family Value 5: Wedding Night There is literally almost an entire line in the Bible devoted to men not lying down with each other. So if you’re a hotel manager, this means that bridal suites will have to replace all king-sized mattresses with twin beds to avoid such dangers as God transforming you into a goat and doth declaring thee Beast. TW


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