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SUMMER 2015 THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM

METAMORPHOSIS Get a Grip +++ I WANT TO RIDE MY BICYCLE WE GO AROUND THE WORLD +++

THE FUTUR E O F M A K EUP


BEHIND THE SCENES


LAURA PETRO Editor-in-Chief

ASHLEY LEUNG Creative Director

MAX WANG

Editor-at-Large

ISABELLA CUAN, AMY CHEN

MARILYN YANG

MADHAVI MURALIDHARAN

NATALIE PEELISH

Photography Directors

Operations Coordinator

Art Director

Marketing Director

ALICIA CHON

Editorial Director

AYO FAGBEMI

Director of Sponsorship

FASHION Women’s Style Director ANDREINA VAN MANEEN Men’s Style Director ALEXANDER MINTZ Beauty Director LAURA SACHSE Stylists EXIA BURNS, JOSEFINA BRAUNING, PAOLA GAMARRA, MASOMA IMASOGIE, EMILY CHENG, JESSIE CHOI, NOLAN HILL, EMILY HSU, ERIC KIM, LINDA LIN, LISA LIU, VASILIKI PAPANIKOLOPOULOS, MARIANA PAVIA, BENJAMIN ZOU, JESSICA SUNG Beauty Stylists CHRISTINA ATTERBURY, ANASTASIYA KRAVCHUK-KIRILYUK, ELIE SOKOLOFF, MOLLY WANG On-Set Coordinator MARA VEITCH

FEATURES Fashion Editor AUGUSTA GREENBAUM Features Editor ANDIE DAVIDSON Copy Editors ANNA ROSE BEDROSIAN, ALISON FREUDMAN Research Editors CATHERINE DING, COURTNEY GU Contributing Writers EMILY CHENG, ANDIE DAVIDSON, STEPHANIE FAGBEMI, AUGUSTA GREENBAUM, TINA HSU, KATHERINE LITTEL, PAIGE PARSONS, JULIE SHANUS, JULIA VITALE

PHOTOGRAPHY Photographers ELIZABETH HWANG, MASOMA IMASOGIE, MIRU OSUGA, ANNAIS PAETSCH, SARA-PAIGE SILVESTRO, DYANA SO

ART AND DESIGN Assistant Art Director KATIE WU Layout Team ALEXANDRA BENYA, STEPHANIE BUSINELLI, AMY CHEN, TALIA DELIJANI, CAROLINA ENGLISH, ANUSHREE GUPTA, ERICA HARRITON, LISA HOONG, ZAHRA HUSAIN, CHAEWON LEE, ISABELLA RAHM, GLORIA YUEN

MARKETING Social Media Representatives GENA BASHA, ALLISON RUBEN, ALICE SHEN, GLORIA YUEN, GABRIELLA ZACARIAS Events Coordinators CAROLINE BATOFF, EMILIE BISHOP, LINDSEY GAON, SAFIA SEXTON, MARIA ALONSO TORRAS, ZOE SHAN Market Research Coordinator ALEXANDRA BENYA Design Chair SUBI QIAN Alumni Relations Chair BRIANNE POLITO Alumni Relations Coordinator CAROLINE CALLE

MANAGEMENT Assistant Operations Coordinator CATHERINE DING Internal Affairs Coordinator STEVIE KLEIN Local Sponsorship Coordinators ALLIE DRABINSKY, AYO FAGBMEI Professional Apparel Coordinators REGGIE JAMES, MADELINE MCLINTIC Bookings and Model Coordinator EUGENIE GRUMAN Penn Fashion Collective Executive Board Members AYO FAGBEMI, NICOLAS GOMEZ, GRACE GUAN, MEGAN LUPPINO, NICOLE MALICK, ALEXIS RICHARDS, MAHA SUBRAMANIAM

THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM Editor-in-Chief LAURA PETRO Editorial Director MINJI KWAK Managing Editor ERICA POLLE Website Director NEERA THAVORNVANIT Operations Coordinator MADHAVI MURALIDHARAN Senior Fashion Editors ROLANDA EVELYN, EMILY ULRICH Senior Culture Editor MARILENA ZEPRUN Senior Health & Beauty Editors TINA HSU, ERICA POLLE Junior Fashion Editors SOPHIE FRITZ, AUGUSTA GREENBAUM, MARLENA HANNA, KATHERINE LITTEL, MADELINE MCCALLUM, CATHERINE MILANOSKI, MERIAH O’NIEL, EGE OZYEGIN, ALLISON RUBEN, JULIE SHANUS, KARIS STEPHAN, PHOEBE UM Junior Men’s Fashion Editor ALLISON RUBEN Junior Culture Editors SAIDZHAN ABDULLAEV CHARLOTTE DEVAULX, NANETTE ELUFA, REMY HABER, EMILY HU, DANIELLE MOORE, PAIGE PARSONS , LAURA ZHANG Junior Health & Beauty Editors HELEN DUGAN, CAROLINE LEVY, KIRARA SATO, MOLLY STEIN Guest Bloggers HALEY BRAHMBHATT, TALIA STERMAN, MAYA RIVERA Blog Director ALEXANDRA TRITSCH Blog Photographers TAYLOR BROWN, SOPHIE FRITZ, SARAH KU, KATHERINE LITTEL, MICHELLE LIU, ALISON MILLER, MEGHAN MILLER, ANDREINA VAN MAANEN, ALLISON RUBEN, RYANN SHAFFER UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA’S PREMIER FASHION MAGAZINE • VOLUME IX • ISSUE I • APRIL 2015 The WALK was founded in 2006 as a student initiative and continues to be a student fueled organization. TheWALKmagazine.com was launched in 2010 as a sister to the print edition. The WALK aims to satisfy our community’s widely-demanded fashion fix year-round. Stories edited by the editorial staff will carry bylines of the original author. Please report corrections to info@thewalkmagazine.com. We will post corrections on our website. This publication was typeset using GeosansLight and Bebas for headlines, Justus Italic for subtitles and captions and Adobe Garamond Pro for body text. Page layout was created using Adobe InDesign. Original images were taken with DSLR cameras and adjusted using Adobe Photoshop. The WALK was printed in Sappi Flo 70-pound gloss text paper (FSC and 10% recycled) using sheet-fed offset presses. The binding is saddle-stitched. Printed by Garrison Printing Company, Inc., Pennsauken, NJ. To get involved or learn about advertising and partnership opportunities, please contact us at info@thewalkmagazine.com.


SUMMER 2015 LIFESTYLE

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STREET STYLE: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE Step outside the Penn Bubble to explore the street style of the world’s leading fashion cities.

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GET A HANDLE ON BIKE CULTURE From PennCycle on campus to Philly’s new bike share program, it’s easy to get a grip and grab a bike.

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From THE GROUND UP The Penn Environmental Group shares how it tackles environmental issues and gets students involved.

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AS SIMPLE AS WXYZ Penn alumna Laura Wass points to the future in jewelry design with traditional techniques and bold looks.

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tHE METAMORPHOSIS OF The High Heel An investigation of the history of high heels will make you think twice the next time you slip on your pumps.

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PRINTING THE FUTURE One woman’s invention will change your makeup approach and society’s beauty culture forever.

FASHION

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ENTER, ENDEAVOR Crisp and clean summer looks lend themselves to endless exploration.

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TAKING ROOT: Garden Culture Blooms in Philly Spring forward with the gardens – beer and urban – that are reinvigorating Philly’s urban scene.

From Gardens to Glamour Take a bite out of food-inspired fashion in designs by innovators Hanayuishi Takaya and Fulvio Bonavia.

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ACCESSORIES Leave your statement necklaces and costume jewelry at home-- this summer opt for a fresher look. All you need is a chic scarf to look easy, breezy, beautiful.

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TREND WATCh Take a cue from the most fashion-savvy Instagrammers to see how you can rock the runway’s freshest looks.

WALK ON

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A Guide to Globalize Your Beauty Routine It’s time to “spring clean” your beauty cabinet with products from around the globe.

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Made in America Find out what it really means to be made in America-- you’ll be checking your shirt tags twice.

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Senior Spotlight We bid adieu to our fabulous and talented seniors and wish them luck as they WALK into the real world!

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The WALK is in your Closet Ever wonder what your trendiest classmates are hiding behind their closet doors? We got the inside look.

LAYOUT CREDITS Cover — Amy Chen ‘18 • Behind the Scenes — Marilyn Yang ’17 • Masthead — Laura Petro ’16 • Cover Story — Laura Petro ’16 • Letter from the Editor — Laura Petro ’16 • Street Style — Anushree Gupta ’17 • Bike Culture — Laura Petro ’16 • From the Ground Up — Isabella Cuan ’18, Ashley Leung ’16 • As Simple as WXYZ— Marilyn Yang ’17 • Metamorphosis of the High Heel — Talia Delijani ’18 • Printing the Future — Marilyn Yang ’17 • Enter, Endeavor — Isabella Cuan ’18, Ashley Leung ’16 • Taking Root — Laura Petro ’16 • From Gardens to Glamour — Anushree Gupta ’17 • Accessories — Isabella Cuan ’18, Ashley Leung ’16 • Trend Watch — Lisa Hoong ’17 • Globalize Your Beauty Routine — Marlena Hanna ’17 • Made in America — Marilyn Yang ’17 • Senior Spotlight — Ashley Leung ’16 • Walk is in Your Closet — Marilyn Yang ’17 • Edited by Laura Petro ’16, Marilyn Yang ’17


COVER LOOK: EMERGENCE DIRECTED BY ASHLEY LEUNG ’16, LAURA PETRO ’16 PHOTOGRAPHED BY ISABELLA CUAN ’18 ART BY AMY CHEN ’18 MODELED BY MARIELLE MILLER ’18

For this semester’s cover, we wanted to embrace the unconventional. Marielle’s raw beauty radiates behind a stroke of color, inviting you to envision image and paint becoming one. Abstraction through the mixture of mediums evokes a beautiful simplicity that requires no embellishment. We may not always want to show our most stripped selves, but sometimes beauty comes in the barest of packages.


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR We as individuals—and certainly as college students—are perpetually in a state of flux. The WALK believes fashion is no different. As commencement nears for many and icy winter turns into sunny summer, we want to challenge you all to embrace change— both in life and in style. This issue, we celebrate living in constant metamorphosis and finding certainty in the uncertain. In “Becoming Eco-Friendly,” the Penn Environmental Group schools us on how they work to transform Penn, and Philadelphia as a whole, into a greener place. In “Taking Root: Garden Culture Blooms in Philly,” we investigate how Philly converts urban spaces into fruitful summer gardens, ripe with the opportunity to explore, socialize and do good for the environment all summer long. If outdoor foliage isn’t exactly your thing, we’ll take you on a journey through a hidden greenhouse in “Enter, Endeavor” as three students venture beyond the notorious Penn Bubble to discover the unknown. And the discovery doesn’t stop there—in “Get a Handle on Bike Culture,” four students hop on their

bikes to take you on a trip back in time with retro styles and carefree looks. We’ll give you the down low on Philly bike culture and spill the inside scoop on cycling safely and in style. You don’t have to step outside to notice the change around us: In “Made in America” we survey the evolving landscape of fashion and find out how production is moving from global to local. In “A Guide to Globalize Your Beauty Routine,” and “Street Style: A Global Perspective,” we’ll take you on a trip around the world to see the globes’ best-kept beauty secrets and fashion trends. From food-filled fashion to the technologic future of makeup, this issue we want you to keep an open mind and explore the unexplored. This summer, instead of shying away from change, let’s embrace it—we think you’ll find that an evolving state of uncertainty can be a surprisingly cozy place to be.

Laura Petro, Editor-in-Chief


All photos by Masoma Imasoge C’17 and Miru Osuga ’17


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STREET STYLE: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

TOKYO Tokyo fashion is

an eclectic scene; a combination of the innocent schoolgirl look and crazy, chaotic, colorful pieces. Flowery prints, playfully bulky layering, wild makeup and platform shoes in every height and color rule the streets, making for an ever-stimulating street style experience. Japanese fashion is endlessly permeated by its expressive quality, evident both in major Tokyo-based fashion house Comme des Garçons— where Rei Kawakubo’s masterpieces reflect her use of fashion as a medium for strong statements— as well as in the street culture and fashion hub of Harajuku. Maya Rivera C ’17 highlights the role of detail in Japanese fashion: “Fashion in Toyko ranges from the eccentric to the minimalist. On either end of the spectrum, details are crucial to executing every outfit, whether it be a vision of saccharine Harajuku or haute goth.”

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New York

Los Angeles

Hitting closest to home for many Penn students, this major fashion city offers a bit of everything, from the craziest Brooklyn grunge outfits to the classic uptown look. However, the city as a whole boasts edgy choices meant to impress without necessarily taking the risk of some of fashion’s more outlandish statement pieces. After volunteering at New York Fashion Week, Emily Ulrich C’17 gives her take on fashion in the Big Apple, stressing its simple yet high-caliber direction. “I think in New York, you see a great strive for ease — in terms of the layering, the ambiguity of the silhouette and the color palette,” Ulrich notes. “That being said, the quality of clothing is still very important — the caliber of the fabric and the name of the designer. With that in mind, I think there’s a greater instilment of professionalism in the everyday wardrobe.”

In L.A., as in many cities, extreme weather is a player in fashion choices. Except here it’s the lack of extreme weather that shapes outfits. Heavy coats, boots, hats and scarves are out but are quickly compensated for with a crisp, fresh take on style that takes full advantage of the sunny weather. According to L. A. native Amy Chen C ’18, “L.A. fashion is unique because you are never limited by cold weather, so you never have to dress for practical purposes. With the year-round sunshine, fashion is fun and versatile, and that’s why you won’t find a single, uniform style on the street.” The breeding ground of fashion geniuses like Hedi Slimane and the Rodarte Sisters, Los Angeles fashion continues to flourish and make its mark.


LIFESTYLE\thewalk Take a trip around the globe and see what fashionstas are sporting worldwide.

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etropolitan areas are known for drawing people from all over the world. While we in the fashion world love to throw around terms like “Parisian chic” and “breezy L.A.,” with people from all walks of life in major cities, it’s hard to actually pinpoint what it means to “look” like you live in a certain city. The increasing globalization of fashion icons like models, stylists, fashion editors and celebrities makes

it increasingly difficult to distinguish the unique features of major fashion cities. Yet each city has its fashion trademarks, and certain ways of dressing can help us make an educated guess about a person’s fashion roots. With that in mind, we’ve taken the time to break down the fashion industry into its most prominent cities and investigated the sartorial personality of each.

BY JULIA VITALE

Shanghai

London

Milan

Increasingly favoring refinement and sophistication over ostentatiousness, Chinese fashion seems to be moving towards the making of a more modern style statement. Michael Xufu Huang C’17, echoes this sense of development and notes, “Chinese fashion is growing rapidly, with many designers graduating from well-known design schools worldwide.” Particularly, Huang says to look out for Chinese designers Xander Zhou, who is stocked worldwide and shows during London fashion week, and Haotian Wen, who is great with high-end womenswear and airs regularly on Chinese TV.

Travel accross the pond and you’ll quickly find the classic English accessories (cue the Asprey crocodile bag or Burberry trench) that might make it easy to classify a Brit. But beyond the quintessential British touch, it’s London’s diverse styles that distinguish the city’s fashion from that of any other. An arguably unrivaled melting pot of nationalities, the city has a multi-cultural influence that plays a large role in London fashion, adding variety and creativity in the form of eclectic global touches and making London style unique in its heterogeneity. UCL exchange student Gabriel Morales says: “London may have its rivals as a fashion capital, but it’s the innovator; there’s an experimental, creative side to the fashion here that’s just unmatched.”

Bold and bright trenches, playsuits bearing stiff, stylized cuts and subtle but consistent odes to classics such as the simple ballerina flat grace the streets of Milan. Mandy Chow W ’16 studied abroad in Milan, and noticed a heightened consciousness of what people choose to wear. She refers to a constant level of elegance, remarking that the Milanese steer away from casualness in dress, avoiding sweatpants and flip flops, and opting instead for sophistication in style.

Images courtesy of (from left to right) tokyofashion.com, hapersbazaar.com, refinery29.com, judy-ip.com, stylecaster.com, whowhatwear.com, touchoftexture.com. THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM

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GET A HAN

DLE ON BIK

From PennCycle on campus to Philly’s new bike share program, it’s easy to get a grip and grab a bike. BY AUGUSTA GREENBAUM

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ow that warmer weather has finally arrived, it’s time to come out of winter hibernation mode and say goodbye to Netflix. Sunny skies are calling outside, and biking is the perfect way to stay active while also having a good time. You can walk the walk, but can you bike? Get ready to dive headfirst into Penn’s bike culture (just remember to bring a helmet — safety comes first!). If you want to make your 9 a.m. commute to DRL easier and more enjoyable but don’t have wheels on campus, don’t worry. PennCycle, a convenient student-run bike-share organization, will help you get into gear. Since its foundation in 2011, PennCycle has been providing our campus with an easy-to-use bike borrowing program. Students can join simply by filling out a form at www.penncycle.org or signing up in person at Penn Student Agencies (PSA). PennCycle members will help you select the right bike for your needs and arrange a time to pick up your bike from PSA. First-time riders even get an introductory lesson on biking at Penn and around the city. With three different plan choices — month ($35), semester ($120) or year ($175) — there’s a membership option for everyone. By providing bike maintenance services, helmets, Kryptonite combination locks and even organized group rides, PennCycle helps make biking at Penn a fun and stress-free experience. This welcoming community spirit is what makes Giovanni Saldutti (E’15) love PennCycle. Saldutti has been working for PennCycle for over a year and has served as a fleet manager, summer manager and customer service representative. “Everyone I work with is great,” Saldutti says. “Beyond the working environment, though, PennCycle also facilitates a riding community through its group ride initiative.” Zoe Blickenderfer (C’16), Director of PennCycle, is proud that “we have an awesome team of intelligent and enthusiastic students dedicated to creating a stronger biking community at Penn.” Blickenderfer has been involved with PennCycle since the beginning of her freshman year. Needless to say, the PennCycle crew knows the ins and outs of biking at Penn. So what’s the scoop on the best place to bike around Penn? Saldutti votes for the Schuylkill River trail and Fairmount Park. He has fond memories of last spring’s PennCycle-led group ride and picnic on the trail, which he feels “was a really great experience to be able to share our love of biking with other Penn students.” Nayeli Riano (C’17), an avid cyclist and former PennCycle sales and publicity manager, recommends the lesserknown Wissahickon Gorge. Even though it’s a bit farther from campus, she loves that “it feels like you somehow transported to the middle of the woods.” While Blickenderfer doesn’t have a single favorite location to bike, her favorite bike event is the Philadelphia Naked Bike Ride, a 10-mile ride featuring thousands of daring people in various states of undress.

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CULTURE

On Elizabeth Vaziri: Top, $275, at Intermix. Scarf, shirt, shorts, sunglasses, stylists own. THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 11


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On Elizabeth: Top, $295, at Intermix; Jacket and pants, stylist’s own.On Jillian Karande: Dress, stylist’s own. On Josh Richardson: Jacket, shirt, shorts, stylist’s own. On Dimitri Antoniou: Jacket, shirt, shorts, stylist’s own.

For bikers who prefer to stay clothed, bike style goes far beyond the yellow Tour de France jersey. When it comes to bike style tips, Saldutti suggests, “Opt for shorter dresses or somewhat looser pants that won’t restrict your movement as much.” He also recommends wearing prints that can work to camouflage any bike grease or dirt that could get on your ensemble after your bike commute. Riano likes to contrast simple black tights with a cool, patterned top (or vice versa). For ladies who want to avoid having a Marilyn Monroe moment, Blickenderfer advises: “If you’re worried about flashing passersby, you can pick up some cheap spandex shorts to wear under skirts and dresses.” For longer and more intense rides, you can invest in padded bike shorts that would not only make Kim Kardashian West jealous but will also help provide you with a more comfortable ride. One accessory that you can’t forget when biking: a helmet. Saldutti strongly believes in the importance of bike safety, saying “everyone should wear a helmet while cycling, especially in a city.” Old motorcycle bike helmets best suit his look. Blickenderfer can always count on her trusty and affordable Schwinn helmet, but she covets a fancy Bern helmet. Riano likes the simple, clean designs used by Giro. If you’re looking to build up your bike gear and accessory wardrobe, there are many on-campus options, including Keswick Cycle (4040 Locust St.) and Eastern Mountain Sports (3401 Chestnut St.), as well as Breakaway Bikes in Rittenhouse (1923 Chestnut St.). Regarding bike safety in a city setting, it’s also important to be conscious of bike theft and to always remember to lock up your bike. Saldutti advises, “It’s best to have a sturdy U-lock go through the frame and front wheel and have something

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that wraps around back to keep the back wheel locked too.” A future solution to prevent bike theft could be the PubLock, a senior engineering design project that won the 2014 William K. Gemill Memorial Award. PubLock addresses many possible errors of using U-locks and other personal bike locks. According to its website, “The PubLock retrofits to existing bicycle racks and can be accessed by riders with RFID cards.” RFID (Radio-frequency identification) cards are wireless tags that serve the same function as a magnetic strip on the back of a credit card. Production of the lock is still in the works, but the design team is continuing to develop the product. More information is available at www.publock.com. Penn isn’t the only place to catch the biking bug. The market for secure and easy-to-use public bike share programs continues to increase. New York has Citi Bike, Paris has Vélib,’ London has Barclays Cycle Hire, and starting this spring, Philly has a new bike share initiative: Indego. Indego is sponsored by Independence Blue Cross and will feature more than 60 locations around the city and more than 600 bikes (for more information, visit http://www.rideindego.com). Independence Blue Cross President and Chief Executive Officer Daniel Hilferty is pleased with the program and said, “We’re focused on helping people get healthy and stay healthy. What better way to do that than getting out and riding bikes?” The future for Philly’s bike scene looks bright, so get ready to embark on a fun season!

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On Josh: Shirt, pants, sneakers, stylist’s own. On Dimitri: Shirt, shorts, shoes, stylist’s own.


On Jillian: Tank top, skirt, sunglasses, stylist’s own. On Elizabeth: Bathing suit top, model’s own; pants, sweater, sunglasses, stylist’s own.

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thewalk/LIFESTYLE On Jillian: Bathing suit top, $102, at South Moon Under; Pants, $265, at Intermix.

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DIRECTED BY ASHLEY LEUNG ’16, LAURA PETRO ’16 MODELED BY DIMITRI ANTONIOU ’16, JILLIAN KARANDE ’18, JOSHUA RICHARDSON ’16, AND ELIZABETH VAZIRI ’15 PHOTOGRAPHED BY ISABELLA CUAN ’18, ANNAIS PAETSCH ’17, AMY CHEN ’18 STYLED BY LAURA PETRO ’16, DYLAN PETRO ’15, MAX WANG ’15 EMILY HSU ’16. VASILIKI PAPANIKOLOPOULOS ’16

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FROM THE GROUND UP

Whether it be advocating for sustainable water sources or getting students to attend tree prunings, the Penn Environmental Group works hard to make the world around BY MERIAH O’NIELL us a more eco-friendly place.


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DIRECTED BY ASHLEY LEUNG ’16, ISABELLA CUAN ’18 AND AMY CHEN ’18 MODELED BY ARTHUR CHEN ’16, CAPUCINE LE MEUR ’16, BEVAN PEARSON ’16 AND JOHNANNA MATT ’16 PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMY CHEN ’18 AND ANNAIS PAETSCH ’17 STYLED BY JESSIE CHOI ’16, BENJAMIN ZOU ’18

On Bevan Pearson: Overalls, turtleneck, headband, stylist’s own. On Arthur Chen: Shirt and pants, model’s own. On Johnanna Matt: Shirt, pants, shoes, stylist’s own. On Capucine Le Meur: Sweater and hat, stylist’s own. THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 21


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ave you ever taken a stroll across campus and noticed the recycling bins at every turn? You have the Penn Environmental Group (PEG) to thank for that. Founded in 1971, PEG is the oldest environmental group on Penn’s campus. It started with the simple goal of providing recycling services for the Penn community, but nowadays that’s just the tip of the iceberg. This ambitious group takes on a different environmental campaign every semester, working with the Penn community to enact lasting change while educating students along the way. This semester, PEG’s campaign is focused on water — conservation, awareness and everything in between. Most students are probably aware of the economic incentives behind drinking tap versus bottled water, but Bevan Pearson (C’18), the group’s Sustainability and Waste Liaison, can name a few surprising reasons as well. She explains, “Tap water is regulated by the EPA, while bottled water is regulated by the FDA — there are stricter requirements on the cleanliness of tap water than on bottled water.” But the water itself isn’t the only concern. Co-director Arthur Chen (C’15) notes, “The plastic is made from petrochemicals, which in general requires oil byproducts, not to mention the process from making the plastic requires a lot of wasted water.” PEG doesn’t just make compelling arguments; it also puts them into action. Currently, the group is engaging with campus organizations like Bon Appétit and Penn Dining to spur an increase in water refill stations around campus so that everyone can have access to more environmentally conscious water alternatives. You’ve probably seen these refill stations in places such as Pottruck and the Arch building, but PEG wants to see more — and apparently students do too. Carlos Couce (C’17) explains, “I love not having to buy water when I’m visiting La Casa in Arch, but I wish it was that easy everywhere on campus.” To keep students in mind and to make sure stations are placed where they are most wanted, PEG even conducted a student survey and found that the highest demand for new stations is in Van Pelt. In addition to increasing refill locations, PEG also hopes to make the locations of existing stations more readily available so that connecting students to eco-friendly water can be easier than ever. This proactive approach is one of the reasons Pearson was so drawn to the group in the first place. “[It’s great] to make actual positive changes within the university and on campus,” she explains. “It’s nice to be able to join something because you want to, not because you need special qualifications.” But it doesn’t end on Penn’s campus—service events in the Philadelphia area happen regularly, and getting involved is as easy as signing up for an event or even coordinating your own. Just this January, Pearson organized a tree pruning at Francisville Farm, a small orchid in nearby Fishtown. By trimming the fruit trees, which lie dormant for the winter, volunteers helped ensure that fruit will grow properly come spring. However, “volunteers” in this case meant Pearson and the one other student present. Pearson explains, “at the orchid pruning, three people said they would come, and then two people dropped out the night before and the morning of, so I ended up going with just one other person.” Such poor attendance is something both Chen and Pearson would love to see change in the future. Inciting campus interest is a continuous struggle for PEG but one it hopes to tackle by incorporating social media and making environmental awareness fun. This has also meant major overhauls in the organization’s structure—moving away from a committee system, one in which members were split into groups based on a common initiative, like politics or service events, and switching to the campaign based system that rolled out this year. Chen hopes this will foster a more inclusive environment—one in which the entire group can cohesively confront environmental issues to come.

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AS SIMPLE AS WXYZ The career of jewelry designer and Penn alumna Laura Wass has been nothing short of transformative — from Penn student to jewelry designer for Queen Bey, Wass proves that you don’t have to go to art school to succeed in the design world. BY EMILY CHENG

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aura Wass C’08 has not exactly walked the career path of a typical Penn graduate. Instead, her post-grad resume includes launching her own brand less than four years out of college and collaborating with prominent fashion brands. At Penn, Wass majored in Latin American and Latino Studies and was initially intent on pursuing a career in human rights and international law. But despite her legal ambitions, there was no doubt that design was always a part of her DNA. Every summer, she enrolled in traditional goldsmith and jewelry smith courses at the Penn Design School. She also cites courses in the English Department, particularly those taught by Professor Kenneth Goldsmith, who is known for such unconventional courses as the famous “Wasting Time on the Internet” writing seminar launched this semester, for providing her with creative inspiration. “I see Kenny’s mind-bending introduction to the history of art, subversive culture and uncreative writing as fundamental in teaching me how to think,” Wass said. This artistic impulse and creative immersion led her to diverge onto an unexpected career trajectory in design and subsequently led to the conception of her brand, WXYZ Jewelry, in 2012. Since its birth, WXYZ Jewelry has maintained a signature futuristic style, marked by the use of complex geometric structures and iridescent metals. Wass has always looked to architecture and science for inspiration, even citing the neo-futuristic architect and pioneer of the geodesic dome Buckminster Fuller as a primary influence on her work. “I was really enthralled by the process of thinking through construction,” said Wass. “I found my inspiration by looking at the world around me and synthesizing its forms.” Indeed, Wass’s designs have been extremely reflective of her native surroundings in Brooklyn, New York. Her jewelry incorporates many visual elements of day-to-day life in the city, from the subway to skyscrapers. In her pieces featuring geodesic metal structures the influence of New York’s perpetually-under-

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construction topography shines through. Likewise, the minimal use of color is reminiscent of the city’s tendency towards subtle palettes. Within the production process, Wass seeks to merge her background in traditional metalsmithing with her forward-thinking mantra. She fluctuates between using traditional techniques and innovative industrial processes such as laser cutting and injection molding. “My collection is an exploration of how to bring the two worlds [of industrial and handmade] together,” she explains. This design process culminates in products that express both “where we are and where we’re going,” she adds. “This is what the future looks like!” With its unconventional and futuristic designs, jewelry from WXYZ is bound to turn heads. “I wanted my jewelry to be a mode of expression for the wearer, almost like a secret code between people,” Wass said. And her designs have indeed created a cult-like attraction. According to Wass, wearers have even commented that they have been stopped on the street and asked for the source of their mesmerizing statement pieces. Obviously, WXYZ jewelry is not for your average wallflower. On the contrary, Wass envisions the women wearing her jewelry as empowered, idiosyncratic and exciting individuals who are not afraid to become the center of attention. “For me, the most exciting thing about design is creating a conversation piece,” she declares. In November 2014, R&B icon Beyoncé released a music video for her song “7/11.” In one scene, as Queen Bey relaxes in a luxe hotel lobby, she is seen rocking a WXYZ geodesic baseball cap and bangles. This feature was instrumental in kick-starting growth in awareness of WXYZ Jewelry. In addition, Wass’s creations were recently featured in the New York Times’ T Magazine style section alongside fashion giants Louis Vuitton and Lanvin, and have also been showcased in Vogue Thailand and The Coveteur, among others. And Wass shows no sign of slowing down. Currently, a collaboration is in the works with Miuniku, a Mumbai-based line


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run by sisters Nikita and Tina Sutradhar who won the LVMH Special Prize for Young Fashion Designers in 2014. “For me as a designer, collaborations are the most exciting,” Wass says. “It’s invigorating to find new materials and work with other creatives.” In the wake of her fast-paced career growth, Wass has encountered many challenges, particularly in dealing with the business aspect of her brand, which is at odds with her academic background. Looking back at her time at Penn, Wass expressed regret for not taking more courses at Wharton to prepare her for managing a business. “There were so many resources at my fingertips that I just wasn’t accessing because I was on a different path,” she said. “I’m a designer. That’s what I love to do and my true passion. But ultimately, I am running a business, and a lot of the time that trumps my role as a designer.” In a fashion industry that is constantly evolving, Wass notes a shift towards a business-focused paradigm and the need for innovative individuals with the management, marketing and retail expertise to partner with designers. “As more creatives are finding their voices, making products and bringing their vision to the world, the business aspect is absolutely fundamental,” she says. “Designing a business can be just as exciting, challenging and interesting as designing a product.” Despite not engaging in Wharton’s business culture, Wass acknowledges that

Penn has been an important creative catalyst for her career. She credits this to mentors such as Professor Joan Curran and multi-media artist Brent Wahl, who taught her invaluable skills in painting and photography and helped her navigate the intricacies of the design world. The artistic training she received at Penn has been instrumental to the visual presentation of her products and to creating “a world and a story around them.” “It’s been a big transition from my work at Penn to my work now,” Wass admits. “But the school allowed me to explore a variety of different fields and really grow creatively.” Wass’s explosive success as a designer can put the more creativelyminded Penn students at ease. While many students enter Penn with tunnel-vision and a single career in mind, her transformation demonstrates that the university experience can lead you in unexpected yet serendipitous directions. Her experience also illustrates the utility of having both creative training and a grounding in business. With her holistic formula of modern design sense, business skills and practical experience, no fashion magazine, runway or music video is beyond reach. All images courtesy of wxyzjewelry.com.

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THE METAMORPHOSIS OF THE HIGH HEEL We’ve all heard of Manolo Blahniks. But to understand the roots of this classic shoe design, we went back in time and tracked the transformation of the eponymous high heel. BY JULIE SHANUS

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s Coco Chanel once said, “Give a girl the right shoes and she can conquer the world.” Shoes can both empower women and tell stories of their own. A look back at the evolution of high heels provides a parallel account of the metamorphosis of the woman in society, from the 1920s flapper wearing a strappy stiletto to the classic ’90s lady sporting an elegant, slim-cut “Brigitte Bardot” Manolo Blahnik pump. Between these decades, shoes like the wedge, stiletto pump, go-go boot and platform heel were all introduced, each representing a different version of the prototypical woman in society. Historically, heels served both a social and a practical purpose. On a social level, they asserted an image of status. Platform overshoes called chopines were developed during the Middle Ages and adapted by the Venetians as a symbol of wealth and social standing for women. Heels even caught the attention of European royalty, as “Louis heels” — named after France’s King Louis XIV — became popular symbols of nobility in the 1700s. On the other hand, many 16th-century Venetian aristocrats also wore heeled shoes for more practical reasons — to avoid wet, dirty streets. Similarly, for centuries the Japanese geta, which represents an amalgamation of a wooden clog and an open-toed flipflop, has kept the foot dry in the rain and above the hot ground in the summer months. Heels have followed a rollercoaster trajectory to become the product they are today. As quoted in the “Metamorphosis” section of the Killer Heels exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum, “While all heels can be agents of transformation, some appear to be undergoing a metamorphosis themselves.” Creative designers like Christian Louboutin, who rose to fame in the 1990s, have reinvented high heels into their own artistic statements, liberating them from many prior constraints. Louboutin developed his passion for shoe design after a trip to the Museum of African Art, where he saw a sign showing a woman’s sharp-heeled shoe, crossed out with a vivid red line. Hence, the red-bottomed Louboutin heel was born. On choosing this red-base design, Louboutin remarked, “a lot of women [dress] only in black,” but even if they don’t like colors, red cannot be avoided, for it is part of the body, with elements of red on nails and lips. Louboutin, whose renowned luxury brand now produces over 850,000 shoes each year, has forever changed the shoe industry, breaking all boundaries with sky-high heels, spike-covered smoking slippers and pattern-clashing sequined kicks. Contemporary designers like Sophia Webster have also surpassed traditional boundaries associated with women’s heels. At only 29 years old, Webster has built a shoe brand associated with candy colors and pop patterns. Her designs draw clever references from movies, including Mean Girls and Clueless, and eventually caught the attention of J. Crew, with whom she recently collaborated for an exclusive collection. Symbols of metamorphosis manifest themselves in Webster’s designs in butterfly motifs — hand-drawn and hand-painted butterfly wing patterns that she designed at the Royal College of Art and which are reflected directly in shoes such as her Cherub Winged Lace-Up Mule, Winged Leather Sandals, Rousseau Jungle Floral Pump and Evangeline Angel Wing Sandal. Not many designers can pull off a pointy watermelon toe (literally resembling the fruit), but Webster has managed to awe her audience with these wild shoes. Her designs support the belief that high heels have transformed into a canvas for creativity — designers are no longer constrained by societal notions of the “right” shoes. In the fashion of many women’s movements, the high heel has certainly come a long way. From practical beginnings, the high heel — with the help of innovative designers and women who dare to dress to the nines —is truly reaching new heights. Image courtesy of: fineartamerica.com

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PRINTING THE FUTURE Grace Choi noticed racial inequality and disproportionality in the makeup industry and developed a technological solution for the social problem. BY STEPHANIE FAGBEMI

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he makeup industry is currently discriminating against people of color. There is a clear disproportion of shade and vibrancy in color choices that prevents those with darker complexions or even those who simply want to be creative with their makeup from buying the products they crave. Grace Choi is a revolutionary inventor who has engineered a solution to this problem. The beauty industry is evolving— with advances in technology and the development of new methods of product application, including airbrush makeup and foam hair dyes, it is becoming sci-fiesque. Cosmetics are moving into the future. Enter Mink, a 3D makeup printer that allows consumers to literally print makeup directly from the comfort of their homes. Taking into consideration our obsession with technology and our innate human quality of impatience, the Mink printer advertises to “turn any camera, phone or laptop into an endless beauty aisle.” Choi, Mink’s creator, came up with the idea out of her frustration with consumers being forced to pay extra for unique makeup options. When Choi first started inventing, one of her products was a BB Cream, which acts as a moisturizer, primer, concealer, and foundation. After asking one of her Harvard Business School mentors for advice in marketing her brand efficiently, the mentor’s advice surprised her: “Go with the lighter shades. Those people have more money to spend.” The average black woman cannot find her shade of foundation at the local drugstore, and Choi felt that she and other people of color were underrepresented in the $60 billion beauty industry. She was determined to change that. Mink is marketed toward young girls who have not yet developed their makeup habits and are learning how to apply makeup from YouTube tutorials. These girls often look to imitate the palettes of the gurus they follow, like YouTube stars Michelle Phan and Kandee Johnson. However, the biggest hurdle that new makeup buyers tend to face is lack of availability of a variety of products. By printing samples right at home, Mink eliminates this aspect (and the hassle) of makeup shopping.

Logistically, the printer works similarly to

Image courtesy of Twitter.

the average inkjet printer. All you need is a phone, camera or computer (any device that can detect color concentrations will suffice), along with the Mink printer, ink and substrate (a colorless powder or cream). Then all you have to do is snap a photo of a color you like, detect the color by selecting the hex code via a program like Photoshop and click print. Depending on what product you’d like to produce, you can switch the substrates to print an eyeshadow, lipstick or blush of any color your heart desires. Thanks to Mink, getting makeup is now as easy as printing out an essay for class (and without any actual writing). According to Choi, Mink is poised to

Founder of the Mink printer Grace Choi.

revolutionize the way we obtain and apply makeup; the printer should be cheaper to use than buying makeup from a store. As a result, companies will be rushing to lower prices to compete. “The makeup industry makes a whole lot of money on a whole lot of bullshit,” Choi says. “They charge a huge premium on something tech provides for free. That one thing is color.” The printer itself is predicted to launch at $300, but the ink and substrate are intended to be incredibly affordable considering the average woman spends $15,000 on makeup in her lifetime. With the only limit to color being your creativity, we will start to see more vibrant colors, more experimentation and risktaking, and new and improved application techniques. People will be able to express their individuality with greater ease and get exactly the look they want without the limit of what stores have in stock. With the printer set to be available for purchase this year, it seems that beauty standards will finally be in the hands of consumers. THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 29


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FASHION\thewalk DIRECTED BY ASHLEY LEUNG ’16, ISABELLA CUAN ’18, AMY CHEN ’18, ANDREINA VAN MAANEN ’17 AND ALEXANDER MINTZ ’18 MODELED BY KYLA AYERS ’18, CHRIS SENER ’16 AND KEVIN ZHAI ’16 PHOTOGRAPHED BY SARA-PAIGE SILVESTRO ’16 AND LIZ HWANG ’16 STYLED BY NOLAN HILL ’18, MASOMA IMASOGE ’17, LINDA LIN ’18 AND JESS SUNG ’17 BEAUTY BY ANASTASIYA KRAVCHUK-KIRILYUK ’17

eavor Decked in subtle prints and crisp silhouettes, get ready for any adventure that comes your way. THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 31


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On Kyla Ayers: Jumpsuit, stylist’s own. THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 33


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On Kyla: Jumpsuit, $625, at Intermix; Jacket, stylist’s own.

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On Chris Sener: Shirt, model’s own. On Kevin Zhai: Shirt and shorts, at Stars & Stripes.

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On Chris: Shirt and pants, model’s own. On Kyla: Crop top, $375, at Intermix; Skirt, stylist’s own.

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TAKING ROOT: GARDEN

As buds appear on trees and the wind softens its bite, Philly's garden scene gears up for the season. But this sight isn't limited to the spring — Philly’s garden culture is reviving the city socially, economically and environmentally. Over the past few aren't simply modest vegetable gardens; they're urban farms, community gardens, pop-up gardens and beer gardens, and they're taking up residence in the heart of the concrete jungle. The question is, why are gardens becoming an “It” thing in Philly, and what does that mean for the city? BY ANDIE DAVIDSON REVIVING THE URBAN SCENE: POP-UP GARDENS

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Images courtesy of Isabella Cuan.

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mble through the city streets in the summer, and you might stumble upon an unexpected patch of green in a lot that only a few months before hosted only weeds and trash. These pop-up gardens are becoming increasingly common in Philly. A pop-up garden is a temporary installation, usually set up in a vacant city lot, featuring plants, edible veggies and various programs and activities. The roots of the pop-up trend in Philly can largely be traced to the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's (PHS) annual pop-up garden, which launched in Center City in 2011. Since then, both the pop-up movement and the PHS garden in particular have exploded. According to PHS Director of Communications Alan Jaffe, the PHS popup has blossomed from 5,000 visitors the first year to 6,500 visitors the second year, 28,000 in 2013 and 52,000 this past summer. "Philadelphia is embracing the concepts," Jaffe said. "They’re getting more and more popular [and] we’ve seen other organizations and businesses opening up similar kinds of outdoor gardens." Initially, the PHS garden focused on daytime programming, a spot for families and local residents to learn about gardening and PHS programs and to simply relax outside. Education is still a component of the garden: visitors can learn about the types of plants that can be grown in urban gardens and get tips on starting their own green spaces. As of 2013, however, PHS kicked up the game with the introduction of a beer garden, evening programs and tasty bites from local restaurateurs and food trucks. Similar spaces such as Spruce Street Harbor Park at the Penn’s Landing Marina and Garden Variety in Northern Liberties picked up on the trend with outdoor dining and gathering "yard" spots. Suddenly, gardens were no longer simply daytime neighborhood novelties but rather summer hotspots. And this focus on fun is the key aspect of the gardens. Most pop-up gardens, though they may grow a few vegetables, don't have the space to focus on food production. They do, however, enliven the urban landscape. On a literal level, the gardens spruce up vacant lots and unfrequented areas, turning urban eyesores into "urban oases." Beyond that, they serve as social gathering spots, bringing communities together and fueling Philly's summer scene. "With the pop-up gardens, we’re giving people a new experience in the urban environment," Jaffe explained. "We’re giving them an opportunity to enjoy the streets of Philadelphia in a new way, the energy of the city in a new way." Beer gardens are now taking the lead in this, attracting a younger urbanite crowd looking to enjoy sultry summer nights. In addition to the advent of the beer garden in PHS's summer pop-up, several other pop-up beer gardens have hit the Philly scene in recent years, including the Independence Beer Garden in Old City and the beer gardens at Eakins Oval, Spruce Street Harbor Park and Morgan's Pier. Many of these serve local craft beers, further supporting local trade with Philly beers like Yards and Flying Fish. Yet it isn't all fun and games. On top of creating a fun nightlife scene, these spaces also help forge a safer city overall. "We know that when we clean empty lots, we actually make neighborhoods safer,” Jaffe noted. “There’s less violence in neighborhoods where we work." Vacant lots are notorious hotspots for crime, and evidence (including a 2011 study by Penn professor Charles Branas) has linked rehabilitated green spaces to reduced levels of violence. It makes sense: instead of a shadowy cave, you have a bustling crowd of people and legitimate business. On that note, the gardens also offer an economic boost to neighborhood businesses. More people means more sales, so lively garden crowds (read: shoppers) are a boon to nearby shops. According to Jaffe, PHS has observed up to a 10 percent increase in business in shops surrounding their gardens. Additionally, he notes that “greening" spaces improves property values as much as 10 percent. "We’re making [the city] more attractive," Jaffe said, "and when you make a neighborhood more attractive, you also stimulate economic redevelopment in those neighborhoods."


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CULTURE BLOOMS IN PHILLY TRANSFORMING NEIGHBORHOODS AND URBAN HEALTH: URBAN FARMS As part of the effort to greenify the urban landscape and lifestyle, some Philadelphians are transporting the farm into the city. Though less mainstream than pop-up and beer gardens, urban farms have garnered a dedicated set of enthusiasts and continue to increase in popularity. Philadelphia has a long history of urban agriculture, all the way back to the Vacant Lot Cultivation Association in the 1890s. Despite a few dry spells, the urban farm movement has enjoyed city government support for most of this history — a trend that continues today. Urban farms fit right in with the city’s rising “green” focus. They're getting a boost from city programs such as Mayor Nutter's Greenworks initiative, which as part of its goal to make Philly the "greenest city in America by 2015” set plans to increase green space in the city and make local food more accessible. Far more than simply patches of dirt and seeds, urban farms are tackling the issues of city spaces, nutrition and community development one plot at a time. Like pop-up gardens, they offer a means to revive communities and beautify the city by putting vacant lots to use and cleaning up lowincome areas. However, urban farms are usually permanent, providing a more lasting, transformative impact on city spaces. In a world of fast food and overpriced organics, urban farms offer local, fresh and affordable produce to their neighborhoods. The homegrown goods are sold at farmstands and farmers markets or distributed through CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) programs. Prices are generally low, and programs like Greensgrow Farms' Local Initiative for Food Education, which gives food-stamp recipients a special veggie box and cooking tips, help make this more accessible for lower-income Philadelphians. At the same time, they help boost environmental health by promoting local goods and sustainable farming methods. Part of this lies in education — the farms help educate people on both nutrition and sustainability through workshops, supplies and tips for home gardening and more. In the end, it's about community — a safe community with clean city blocks, a united community with festive social hubs, a healthy community with local food — and reinvigorating Philadelphia. "More and more, these urban environments are becoming more livable,” Jaffe said. "In the concrete jungle, it’s really nice to have a little bit of a jungle, to have some greenery to soften the landscapes of the city."

Pop-up & Beer Gardens in Philly:

Urban Farms in Philly:

PHS Pop Up Garden (location to be announced April/May) http://phsonline.org/greening/pop-up-gardens

Mill Creek Farm 49th & Brown St., West Philadelphia http://millcreekurbanfarm.org

The Oval at Eakins Oval 2451 Benjamin Franklin Parkway http://www.theovalphl.org/

Emerald Street Farm 2312 Emerald St., Fishtown https://emeraldstreeturbanfarm.wordpress.com

Spruce Street Harbor Park 401 S. Columbus Blvd. http://www.delawareriverwaterfront.com/places/

Greensgrow Farms 2501 E. Cumberland St., Fishtown www.greensgrow.org

Independence Beer Garden 100 S. Independence Mall West http://www.phlbeergarden.com/

Farm 51 51st & Chester St., West Philadelphia https://farm51.wordpress.com/

Morgan’s Pier 221 N. Columbus Blvd. http://www.morganspier.com/

Bartram’s Garden 5400 Lindbergh Blvd. http://www.bartramsgarden.org/# Schuylkill River Park Community Garden 25th & Spruce St. (along the Schuylkill) http://www.srpcg.org/ THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 39


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FROM GARDENS TO GLAMOUR Fashion and food collide with designs from innovators like Takaya Hanayuishi and Fulvio Bonavia. BY KATHERINE LITTEL

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hether it be at a runway show or a gallery exhibition, there are many critical elements that make a design stand out – color, texture, pattern, etc. Yet to truly differentiate oneself as a designer or artist requires more than just the ability to create a collection of stylish garments; one must set oneself apart creatively. Increasingly, designers are incorporating bold and unexpected materials into their clothing and art. We have grown accustomed to seeing recycled or nonconventional materials showing up on the runway, and as a result, designers are forced to continually invent new ways of incorporating distinctive elements to boost shock value. The range of accepted items in design is broadening with each new season of runway trends, as biodegradable materials are even finding their way onto the scene. Although it might not be the first material to come to mind, one of the most limitless additions to the fashion world is food. The possibilities for its transformations on the runway are as endless as they are on your plate. Over a decade ago, Japanese artist and former chef,

Hanayuishi Takaya, made the short jump from the kitchen to the garden and set the stage for others to follow. He merged his two loves — fashion and food — into the brand Hanayuishi, where he manipulates flowers, fruits and vegetables into magnificent hairpieces, and true works of art. In doing so, he uses common elements and transforms them into something even more beautiful. Self-described as “the one who ties together flower and person,” Takaya creates individualized and unique floral works of art, all of which are dependent on the fresh ingredients and models at hand. Today, his art is showcased in live performances, weddings and editorial features. The raw and natural quality of his work is captivating. His combination of nude bodies and brilliant, fresh ingredients along with the contrast of the dramatic colors mesmerizes onlookers. It is easy to understand why his work enthralls. Not only is it full of originality, but it also reminds us of nature’s constant cycle and the human connection to the environment. Even the brand marks itself as “unthinkable design for the infinite future.”

(This page) Image courtesy of Artsy Forager. (Opposite page) Images courtesy of Pondly.

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“What we eat has become a metaphor for the fashion industry, which needs more genuineness and naturalness, a slower pace, and a search for quality and pleasure.” Designer Yumi Katsura noted while at the latest exhibit that “Takaya’s work is art, and I like to work with people like him. I enjoy collaborating with people that are brilliant.” Takaya is not alone in bringing unusual objects to the design table. Many have followed suit, turning flowers into art pieces of their own. Takaya’s experiment in transformations has turned into a worldwide sensation. As far as replication of trends through food goes, Italian photographer Fulvio Bonavia has the market cornered. His work recreating iconic styles as well as executing his own designs is evidenced in A Matter of Taste, his collection of edible creations. His innovations with food in fashion led to this compilation of truly astonishing pieces of art, including shoes entirely of eggplant, boots made from rice and a lettuce thong. And it doesn’t stop with editorials. One major trend in wearable fashion at the moment can be found within any price range: food-printed clothing. From Kate Spade’s donut bangle to Italian label Frankie Morello’s hamburger sweatshirt, food is turning into a dominant element of

fashion, whether as a pattern or as a physical element. Designers Maurizio Modica and Pierfrancesco Gigliotti of Frankie Morello explained when introducing last year’s food-themed collection, “What we eat has become a metaphor for the fashion industry, which needs more genuineness and naturalness, a slower pace, and a search for quality and pleasure.” The main point of appeal for many designers lies in the fact that when working with organic materials, the apparel assumes a strict expiration date. The overlap in the spheres of fashion, art and food is hard to deny. This union present in work by Takaya and many others functions to literally embody how fashion is morphing with the seasons. Who knows what seasonal food will be next seen atop the head of a model? All that can be assumed is that these innovative designers will find ways to manipulate it into fresh, aesthetically pleasing (and edible) feasts for the senses.

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BARE ESSENTIALS

DIRECTED BY ISABELLA CUAN ’18, ASHLEY LEUNG ’16 MODELED BY KEA EDWARDS ’16 AND LUCY HOVANISYAN ’16 PHOTOGRAPHED BY DYANA SO ’16 STYLED BY MARIANA PAVIA ’17 AND EMILY CHANG ’17 BEAUTY BY EXIA BURNS ’17

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On Lucy Hovanisyan: Earring, at Piper Boutique; Scarf, top and shorts, stylist’s own.


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On Kea Edwards: Scarf and dress, stylist’s own.

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TREND WATCH

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WHITE OUT

The full-on white look will become increasingly popular as we transition into spring. How to pull it off? Think not only white jeans, but also white trouser pants paired with structured white blazers and pointy heels.

BY JULIE SHANUS

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TREND WATCH

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CULOTTES

These structural pants look great with anything from crop tops to moto jackets. They create a chic, effortless look and have been featured on several runways as well as countless fashion blogger accounts, such as The Man Repeller.

BY JULIE SHANUS

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A GUIDE TO GLOBALIZE YOUR BEAUTY ROUTINE

KOREA Snail gel cream Snail gel cream is a cult favorite in South Korea, a country known for being one of the most adventurous when it comes to beauty products. Although the idea of snail mucus as a skin product might be a bit offputting at first, it’s worth a shot if you’re suffering from acne or dark spots. Known as a magical cure-all substance, snail gel cream is rich in elastin, glycolic acid and other proteins. In addition to helping with blemishes, the cream also soothes sunburns and provides a moisturizing makeup base. While we aren’t sure if this trend will catch on in America, it’s definitely something to try if your skin needs some rejuvenation. Mizon Snail Recovery Gel Cream, $8.49, Amazon Dr. Organic Snail Gel Cream, $30, Holland and Barrett

TAHITI Monoi oil Move aside, plain ol’ coconut oil, it’s time to introduce a new superstar in the beauty world: monoi oil. First popularized in French Polynesia, monoi oil is an infused perfume oil made by soaking the petals of Tiaré flowers in coconut oil. Authentic monoi oil is hard to find because it follows strict manufacturing procedures — including using only handpicked Tiaré flowers and undergoing a precise extraction process to maintain the highest concentration of oils — but the hunt is worth it. Real monoi oil contains a variety of essential fatty acids, including lauric acid, an oil that aids in hair growth, repair and shine. It’s also packed with antioxidants like vitamin E and ferulic acid, a completely plant-based product that prevents signs of aging and soothes inflammatory conditions like atopic dermatitis. Carol’s Daughter Monoi Oil Sacred Strengthening Serum, $30, Dermstore.com NARS Monoi Body Glow II, $59, Sephora

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FASHION\thewalk Whenever we’re abroad, we always like to try out some new products and diversify our beauty regime. We’re here to share some of our favorites - the newest, hottest, and most unique beauty products on the global market right now – and luckily, most of them don’t BY TINA HSU ILLUSTRATIONS BY GLORIA YUEN

FRANCE Bioderma Créaline cleanser Favored by models who need quick makeup changes, Bioderma Créaline is a one-of-a-kind makeup remover. This magical elixir wipes away all traces of foundation, eyeliner and even mascara in seconds. Bioderma Créaline performs just as well as other heavy oil-based makeup removers without leaving any oily residue — it feels just like water and requires no rinsing after use. It’s perfect for normal-to-dry skin because it’s completely soap-free and great for sensitive skin because it contains soothing cucumber extract. Bioderma Créaline Ultra-Mild Cleanser, Amazon, $14.99

INDIA Tumeric cream With the growing movement towards organic goods, it’s obvious why Ayurvedic products are becoming popular in the United States. Ayurveda is an ancient medicinal system that emphasizes natural healing and holistic practices. Most Ayurvedic products are completely vegan, using only ingredients found in nature. One of the most popular of these products is turmeric cream. This glossy, pale yellow cream is made with turmeric root, a plant with antibacterial properties. These properties prevent skin infections, and the cream can also be used to sterilize wounds on other parts of the body and to prevent any post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Try turmeric oil as a targeted spot treatment for acne and other blemishes. As an added bonus, this product is extremely wallet-friendly. Vicco Turmeric Skin Cream, $3.30, Amazon North American Herb & Spice Turmerol, $26.59, Swanson Vitamins

GHANA African black soap Looking for a soap to exfoliate, moisturize and cleanse at the same time? Try African black soap, a real multitasker that can be used as a face cleanser, body scrub and shampoo. Don’t be scared by its color — black soap is just a mixture of cocoa pod ashes, plantain skin grounds, palm oil and shea butter. Together, these ingredients are known to trap water in the skin and provide all-natural moisture. Black soap helps soothe irritated skin, leaving it soft and refreshed, and it also protects skin from the coldest winter chills. Even better, black soap is completely natural, vegan and free of any parabens or synthetic fragrances. SheaMoisture African Black Soap with Shea Butter, $4.99, Ulta Raw African Black Soap, $5, Amazon

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thewalk/FASHION Image courtesy of ecouterre.com

MADE IN AMERICA Innovative and ethical designers are challenging what it means to be BY PAIGE PARSONS “Born in the USA.”

O

ften, we don’t think twice about checking that little tag inside our clothes that reads “Made in:” But as consumers become increasingly aware of where their products come from, it is no longer enough to call your outfit patriotic because it is covered in stars and stripes—we want to know if our clothing has been created in the U.S. As the moniker “Made in the U.S.A.” becomes more and more of a fashion statement in itself, many labels are using this attribute to pull in sales, even if it comes with significantly higher prices. With the impossibly low cost of overseas production, a result largely stemming from inhumane sweatshop practices, shopping malls across America have displayed cheap, disposable clothing for years. Customers with packed closets buy fast fashion pieces in an attempt to keep up with the incredibly rapid pace of seasonal trends. Today, around 97% of clothing sold in America is produced overseas, but as shoppers have started to shift their priorities, more and more American-made fashion has emerged. This growing “Made in the U.S.A.” movement has brought the knowledge of clothing origins into consumer’s hands, politicizing the act of purchasing a cheap dress from a chain like Zara. Now, consumers attach an ethical narrative to their desire for high-quality products. Philadelphia is the perfect city to see this growing ethical awareness play out in its innovative, localized fashion scene: cheap enough for less overhead costs than New York, active enough for small businesses to find their markets, and home to a growing

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millennial population that takes a special interest in the ethical statements of their consumerism. To catch a glimpse of what this looks like, one can take a quick trip to Old City, where the shop Art in the Age of Mechanical Production is located. The eclectic shop and gallery, AITA for short, is stocked with regionally inspired and domestically made goods. In a room set up to look like a well-curated living space, AITA’s own line of spirits sits atop wooden crates among leather goods, such as a tanned River City Leather wallet handmade in Gallipolis, Ohio. Work crafted by local artists is also featured in the store. Vintage pieces are stocked alongside quality menswear, such as a wool baseball jacket by Fidelity Sportswear, produced in the outskirts of Boston, and the classic chambray buttondowns by Pennsylvania-based Gitman Vintage. The style reflects the neighborhood the store is seated in, fitting today’s Philadelphia as classically as it does yesterday’s. “We get people who are making calculated decisions about where their money is going,” explained Bob Myaing, who as manager and buyer of the store has seen its products and customers evolve over the eight years it has been in business. With locality, the design process can also extend into the retail sphere. Myaing is able to give feedback to designers after noticing customer’s reactions to their products; a woman fiddles awkwardly with the pockets of a dress, and a Baltimore women’s apparel designer is able to turn that information into design alterations within a short period. Each May, a Northern Liberties gallery and


FASHION\thewalk boutique, Art Star, hosts an annual retail and art show, the Art Star Craft Bazaar, at Penn’s Landing. Over 150 vendors are carefully selected by the shop’s owners Erin Waxman and Megan Brewster, who choose a diverse range of artists reflective of the quirky aesthetic landscape of local handmade goods in Philly. The emphasis on products that are “Made in the U.S.A.” goes beyond these physical spaces. Etsy functions as the virtual marketplace for artists, seamstresses and independent manufacturers from all over the globe. Online Etsy “Shops” often sell individualized, homemade items, like GemBlue of Denver, Colorado, which features handmade gold and sterling silver geometric post earrings and simplistic necklaces. In person or online, it’s not always easy to tell where an item was made, and transparency is only typical when the conditions are favorable for the company. The “Made in America” label is truthful to varying degrees based on the retailer; a product can legally maintain the label if it meets the Federal Trade Commission’s “all or virtually all” standard, meaning the majority of raw materials must be found in the U.S. and the most significant product transformation must happen in the U.S. The Los Angeles-based women’s apparel brand Reformation highlights why the “virtually all” concession exists, as the company is forced to outsource about half of its raw materials. This is necessitated by the removal of most textile manufacturers from the U.S. over the past few decades, causing companies to look abroad to get quality delicate woven fabrics. Despite this, 100% of Reformation’s designing, cutting, sewing and distribution are done at or within miles of its Los Angeles headquarters, which designates the products as “Made in America.” For Reformation, keeping production local aligns with its desire to be environmentally responsible and maintain fair labor practices. This clarity is reflected in the cohesive design of the apparel, consisting of feminine pieces with clean lines and quality materials. “Our design studio is in the same building as our factory, so it’s very easy for changes to be made and for problem-solving,” said Kathleen Talbot, senior sustainability and business operations manager at Reformation. American-made retailers boast higher quality products, which can be attributed to the rules in the U.S. that ensure that domestic factories pay workers by the hour rather than by piece, a method used outside the U.S. that inadvertently promotes cutting corners to increase earnings. Designers also maintain higher control and participation in the production process when it’s happening in major American cities, closer to their headquarters. Another label that combines its ethical philosophy with its production model is the travel gear and accessory company, Stone + Cloth, which makes everything within a two-mile radius of its Los Angeles headquarters. After travelling and seeing the disparity of education resources in lesser-developed areas, founder Matthew Clough set out to design a perfect backpack, “The Benson,” that

combined influences of adventurous travel and everyday schoolwork. Locally produced, the backpacks are meticulously detailed, with a pocket for every item and a sturdiness that will gracefully handle both textbooks and climbing gear. Stone + Cloth is dedicated to promoting its mission of funding scholarships for students in Tanzania. “Although producing goods locally creates a great deal of advantages over sourcing abroad, the main reason is speed. Making our bags in Los Angeles allows us to create, modify, update and produce goods at a faster pace. This is important because speed to market is important,” explained Clough. “The modern consumer is one that’s connected to the world. They know what’s going on in the far corners of the country and even further corners of the world through social media, blogs and online news publications. We feel this shift has lead to an increase in conscious consumerism,” said Clough. “The millennial wants to do more than just shop. They want to make a difference here and abroad. By making our bags in LA and giving back in Tanzania, we’ve got them covered.” Go up a few echelons in pricing, and one will find a similar phenomenon in the LA and New York-produced Rag & Bone. The two Brit-born designers, David Neville and Marcus Wainwright, instilled their adopted American patriotism into the visual identity of their New York-based brand. The brand formed out of a simple desire to make quality men’s denim. Rag & Bone now encompasses men’s and women’s lines that focus on simple, American staples produced right. The products Rag & Bone sells are simple, yet they also have an air of American grit coupled with their wearability. A women’s cropped trench coat, for example, retails at $675, and its lack of a hem is advertised as a “raw edge detail.” It’s clear that Rag & Bone is selling a distinct design philosophy along with the physical product, yet the costs of production should be acknowledged for what they are. With close detail paid to every aspect of the production process by the team of designers, the reputation the company has built has a costly basis. Nevertheless, when the craftsmanship is evident, buying American-made can be a statement both aesthetically and in a way that translates personally held values into clothing. As the boom of fast fashion settles down, the necessity of selecting investment pieces over keeping up with the rampant onslaught of trends is intuitive. Although the focus on domestically made products seems of the moment, the degree to which we take it seriously can determine the future of fashion. By buying into companies that feed back into local economies, or at the least pay their workers a respectable wage, here or abroad, the consumer makes a statement that responsible fashion is better fashion. Not to mention, there is a certain novelty of wearing a piece that you get to feel connected to by virtue of your own local or national identity.

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SENIOR SPOTLIGHT While gearing up for a sunny summer, we couldn’t forget to direct a special farewell to the this graduating class who undoubtedly brightened our college experiences – even if some of them do have an unhealthy obsession with black. As jealous as we are of the incredible opportunities that await them when they leave us, we absolutely must set aside our pride and wish them the best in life and the best of luck! BY STEPHANIE FAGBEMI

MONIKA HAEBICH Major: English Position: Art Director What are your plans for next year? Employment? What made you decide to join The WALK? All of the people working for The WALK were incredible, and the many all-nighters confirmed that. How has your style changed since you first arrived at Penn? Fewer studs, more black. I’ve also stopped trying to DIY things; it’s time to accept that I’m not crafty. Favorite piece of clothing? My Penn Polo hat — it’s always covered in dirt from the barn, but that just gives it character, right?!

All illustrations by Max Wang C’15 All photos by Amy Chen C’18 and Isabella Cuan C’18

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WALK ON\thewalk

MAX WANG

DANIELLA SAKHAI

Major: Psychology with a minor in Fine Arts Position: Editor-in-Chief (Past: Photography Director, Photographer) What are your plans for next year? Attending medical school (I think) Who is your WALK model crush? I photographed Simone for our Summer 2014 issue cover, and she was a dream to work with! If you were an item of clothing, what would you be? A pair of men’s pointed leather Chelsea boots. Least favorite Penn trend? Trying to pass off anything as “normcore.” Also, Barbour jackets. Fashion icon? Aila Wang (Alexander Wang’s niece) — that girl is way cooler at five than we could ever hope to be.

Major: Visual Studies Position: Creative Director What are your plans for next year? I’m moving back to New York City and working at Nielsen in Brand Innovation and Data Analytics. What have you learned from being involved with The WALK? How to improvise Favorite Penn trend? Oversized scarves Least favorite Penn trend? Sloppy Penn sweatpants Style essential you’d die without? Adidas sneakers

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BREE JACKSON

ROBYN RAPAPORT

Major: English with an emphasis in Creative Writing Position: Style Director What are your plans for next year? Not sure yet… What has been your favorite part of working with The WALK? The oft-chaotic yet tonic photo shoots. Things fell apart. Things came together. They always did. What makes for a good outfit? Personal style and confidence. Good outfits don’t have to be trendy. Style advice for your freshman self? Stop trying to be trendy! Is there any trend you wish could be in style? No makeup.

Major: History Position: Stylist and Staff Writer What are your plans for next year? Working in entertainment in LA (hopefully as an assistant to a motion picture/television literature agent) Who is your WALK model crush? Alessia Lenders What do you always look for when you’re shopping? Classic t-shirts Fashion icon? Sienna Miller Favorite piece of clothing? Fiorentini and Baker Moto Boots — I’ve had them since eighth grade and I wear them almost every day of every season

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GRACE GUAN

ALEXIS RICHARDS

Major: Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) with a minor in Consumer Psychology Position: VP of Internal Affairs – Event Planning and Marketing What are your plans for next year? I’m headed back to the West Coast (*best coast*)! What have you learned from being involved with The WALK? Fashion is so much more than wearing nice clothes and going shopping — it's awesome to see so many students collaborate together to create a publication full of self-expression in so many forms. Style essential you’d die without? My black rainproof Doc Martens! Cardinal rule of style? Every outfit should be comfortable enough to last through a day of classes, meetings and studying, followed by a night of spontaneous adventuring (and most likely dancing at Smoke's).

Major: Communications with a minor in Consumer Psychology Position: President of Penn Fashion Collective What made you decide to join The WALK? I heard about the Collective and The WALK before I even applied to Penn, back when Penn Fashion Collective was still called Dzine2Show. I knew before I even came to campus that this was an organization that I needed to be in, and it was my first-ever GBM. The Collective has been part of my life at Penn from the second I stepped on campus, and I wouldn’t have had it any other way. Favorite Penn trend? I LOVE that students here aren’t afraid to wear fur (faux or real) on a regular basis. Locust Walk is, after all, THE walk, and there’s no reason not to treat it like your own personal runway.

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NICOLE MALICK Major: Sociology Position: Staff Writer (VP External Affairs of the Fashion Collective) What are your plans for next year? Not sure yet — hopefully something creative! What have you learned from being involved with The WALK? How much fun it is to pursue, investigate and write a profile. Favorite designer? For everyday, Vince. For the spectacle, Chanel. Maybe one day: Prabal Gurung. Your style in three words? Better with age. Is there a trend you wish could be in style? I wish personally tailored clothes were more the norm — it’s so chic! Fast fashion just doesn’t do it for me.

ALEX MORITZ

NOT PICTURED:

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Major: Visual Studies Position: Stylist What are your plans for next year? I’m moving to New York City and working in the Executive Development Program for Macy’s. What is your favorite WALK piece? “Old City Love,” Winter 2012, my first WALK piece. Fashion icon? Jane Birkin. Is there a trend you wish could be in style? I’m pretty happy with the comebacks right now. Your style in three words? Casual, simple and classic.


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ANDIE Davidson Major: English with a concentration in Creative Writing Position: Features Editor & Staff Writer What are your plans for next year? I wish I knew! Hopefully something in writing/editing/ publishing. I’d love to stay in Philly, but we’ll see! What made you decide to join The WALK? I’ve been interested in magazine journalism for a while, and I love writing and fashion, so it seemed like a good fit. And I love the mix of fashion/lifestyle/culture that The WALK covers. Style advice for your freshman self? Don’t be afraid to mix it up a bit. What makes for a good outfit? Variety and a bit of risk — have fun with it! Also, comfort, and something you’re excited to be wearing. I think you can really tell when someone feels awkward in his or her outfit. Fashion pet peeves? Seeing someone else wearing the same clothes as me!

CAROLINA BELTRAN Major: English with a concentration in Creative Writing Position: Beauty Director What are your plans for next year? I’m working at a talent agency in Los Angeles. Who is your WALK model crush? Allie Tiger. Cardinal rule of style? Comfort first. Your style in three words? Easy, simple, Californian. If you were an item of clothing, what would you be? A good white t-shirt.

JULIA VITALE Major: Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) Position: Staff Writer What are your plans for next year? Still deciding. What is your favorite part of working with The WALK? Working with others also interested in fashion. How has your style changed since you first arrived at Penn? I’ve gotten more adventurous with my style, caring less about fitting the Penn mold. Cardinal rule of style? Be yourself; cultivate your own style rather than adhering to what others are doing. Fashion pet peeves? Seemingly identical tight black dresses which dominate any and every social event.

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THE WALK IS IN YOUR CLOSET Andrew shein, C'15 The WALK: How would you describe your personal style? Andrew Shin: Urban youth. The WALK: What is your favorite thing to wear right now? AS: Probably band tee shirts or Bucketfeet Shoes, artist-designed canvas shoes. Bucketfeet is a Chicago-based company with a mission to ‘connect people through art by tapping into the creativity and diversity of the world.’ The company makes shoes with crazy designs and is a great source for one-of-a-kind pieces. Check it out at http://www.bucketfeet.com/index.php/. The WALK: What would you say differentiates your style from others’? AS: I’m not sure how differentiated my style is, but in general I try to wear things that are comfortable and fit well. TheWALK: What most heavily influences your fashion decisions? AS: People watching. The WALK: How would you say your style has evolved during your time at Penn? AS: I don’t think it has changed much, but as we get older we become more comfortable in our own skin and care less what others think. I think that this mentality has allowed me to express myself more with time. The WALK: What is your fashion pet peeve? AS: There isn’t something that immediately comes to mind, but I like to see my friends and family take risks. So something that bothers me is when someone tells someone else that he/she “can’t pull that off.” All images photographed by Miru Osuga C’16.

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WALK ON\thewalk The WALK got an inside peek into the closts of these two stylsih students BY JULIA VITALE

EGE OZYEGIN, C'15 The WALK: We love your style. What drives your fashion decisions? Ege Özyegin: Thank you! At school I try to dress comfortably, as I am in class or in meetings all day. So, I try to be comfortable yet stay stylish. Even with jeans or basic skirts, I try to add a stylish element to my outfit, like a colorful scarf, other accessories or jewelry. I’m a big jewelry person. I wear a lot of rings and bracelets. In the winter I wear black a lot, so I brighten up my outfit with colorful pieces like silk scarves or statement jewelry. I consider my style feminine most of the time and I am inspired by a lot of celebrities and designers. The WALK: What is your favorite season to dress for and why? EO: Spring and summer because I love wearing color, and to me white and colorful sun dresses are only for spring and summer. Even though I have tried, I can’t really use white in the winter except in blazers and sweaters. I also like white more on my skin when I am tanned. I am also a big shorts person, so I love combining ripped high-waist jean shorts with blue or denim shirts, espadrilles and a bandana. Also I love the floral and cut-out trend for this summer. The WALK: What is your favorite item in your closet right now? EO: My Chanel tweed jacket and Rag & Bone ripped jeans because I wear them all the time and they are very versatile pieces. Even though it is a very classic piece, I wear my tweed jacket day and night from brunch to business meetings. I am also in love with my micro black Hermès Kelly bag that I got this summer. I use it all the time, whether I am going out at night or just shopping with friends during the day. The WALK: How would you define your personal style? EO: I would define it as feminine and elegant. Yet in daily life, especially at school, I try to stick with comfortable pieces. Audrey Hepburn, Jackie Kennedy and Grace Kelly are some of my style icons. I think that says a lot. I also love bold, minimal and distinctive jewelry – pieces that you cannot find everywhere. The WALK: What do you look for when shopping? EO: I tend to look for comfy pieces with a stylish edge, and in the summer I look for color but also for fabrics that breathe. I love elegant pieces and I usually shop keeping in mind what is in for the season, but I also love timeless pieces. My closet is a mix of super trendy pieces and timeless classics. The WALK: Is fashion a passion of yours? How/when did it start? Do you plan on pursuing it? EO: Yes, fashion is a major passion for me. I don’t really know when it started, probably when I was very young and used to watch my mother dress up. She is one of my biggest inspirations, both as a woman and also in terms of her style and fashion choices. She is also my best shopping friend and I trust her style choices a lot. I really want to have my own jewelry line one day, yet this is not a career I want to pursue right now. I also interned at Vogue during my freshman summer, which was a super fun and amazing experience. THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 63


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