The Business Journals - Week of December 28

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TR US TE D J O U R NALI S M AT YO U R FI N G E RTI P S

DECEMBER 28, 2020 VOL. 56, No. 52

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Peter Greenburg in an airliner flight simulator.

FEARLESS FLYING TESTING AND REINSTILLING TRUST KEY FOR TRAVEL REBOUND BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

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irports such as Westchester County, TweedNew Haven and Hartford’s Bradley International stand a good chance of seeing airline activity increase as the pandemic winds down. But first, they have to confront the “F” word. “The worst four letter word that starts with ‘F’ when it comes to travel is

‘fear.’ And we have a loss of trust out there now, we have a loss of confidence and we have fear. That’s a trifecta for people staying home and I try to mitigate that with facts,” said Peter Greenberg, travel editor for CBS News and the author of numerous travel books. “To me, it’s investigative reporting about the process of travel. Nobody needs me to tell them that Brazil is beautiful. Somebody else can

do that. I’m about telling you the things you need to know so you can get there and get home.” Greenberg had just returned to New York from a mid-December trip to Istanbul when the Business Journal spoke with him. He suggested that three major things need to happen before travel returns to pre-Covid levels. “One is rapid-response, reliable, wide» FEARLESS FLYING

BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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n ambitious effort to accelerate Stamford’s growing reputation as a viable workspace alternative to New York City is scheduled to open in the spring. Dubbed The Village, the 133,000-square-foot facility at 860 Canal St. is being marketed by the Wheelhouse conglomerate as an indoor-outdoor work-

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play environment that is designed to bring together companies representing content and media, brands and marketing, social and experiential, and finance and investment in one central hub. “Everybody knows about the move from Manhattan to Fairfield and Westchester counties,” which has been accelerated by Covid, Wheelhouse CEO Brent Montgomery told the Business Journal. “We moved to Fairfield County about six years ago and thanks to what (developer) BLT has done on the waterfront, we decided this was the right place to do this.” “We” includes Montgomery’s wife, Courtney, who is CEO of Wheelhouse Properties and developer of The Village.

“BLT has built these incredible high-rises and there are all these bright, young professionals,” she said. “But it seemed like there was something missing, and that’s where we came in.” The Village was an abandoned warehouse before the Montgomerys bought it in December 2017. Ground was broken in August 2018 to create a campus involving coworking, office and meeting space, production facilities, a ground-floor restaurant, indoor/outdoor rooftop space with a bar and nearly 1,000 feet of walks around the marina. “We’ve stayed pretty much on track” with the construction schedule, she said. “There have » THE VILLAGE

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Quit your crumbling

Westchester, Hudson Valley infrastructure ‘ripe for a bipartisan win’ MAIN OFFICE TELEPHONE 914-694-3600 OFFICE FAX 914-694-3699 EDITORIAL EMAIL bobr@westfairinc.com WRITE TO 701 Westchester Ave., Suite 100J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407

BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

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fter watching a series of promised national “infrastructure weeks” come and go over the past four years with no progress made to roll out a plan that would fix the country’s roads, bridges and other failing infrastructure, believers in the need for a massive infrastructure effort are anticipating bipartisan support for at least some elements in President-elect Joe Biden’s $2 trillion four-year infrastructure proposal. The need for work on the nation’s roads, bridges, sewer and water lines, airports, railroads and communications networks has been well-documented and the Biden plan positions the needed work as a surefire way to create millions of jobs, seize global technological leadership and grow the economy. While it may be redundant for a motorist stopped by the side of a road because of a flat tire caused by a pothole the size of a moon crater, a new report by TRIP, a national transportation research nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., provides stark data on the condition, use and safety of New York’s roads, highways and bridges and the state’s future mobility needs. The TRIP report states that New York drivers are saddled with staggering losses totaling $26 billion each year because of roads that are deteriorated, congested and lack some desirable features. The report lumps Westchester and Fairfield into the New York-Newark-Jersey City geographic area, while treating Poughkeepsie, Newburgh and Middletown in Dutchess and Orange counties as a distinct territory. The report found that 47% of major roads in New York state are in mediocre or poor condition. In the area, including Westchester and Fairfield, it’s 68% with only 10% rated as fair and 21% rated as good. In the Dutchess and Orange areas roads rate as 41% mediocre or poor, 21% fair and 38% good. While vehicular traffic in the state dropped by as much as 45% beginning in April of this year due to Covid, by September it had

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DECEMBER 28, 2020

Publisher Dee DelBello Executive Associate Publisher Dan Viteri Managing Editors Bob Rozycki Director, Content and New Product Development Karen Sackowitz Associate Publisher Anne Jordan

Rebar is exposed on a column of a bridge along the Cross County Parkway in Yonkers. rebounded to just 10% below what it had been in September 2019. “The reality is we had an infrastructure deficit before we were dealing with the economic fallout of the Covid pandemic and to defer these types of investments and repairs is, frankly, bad fiscal policy because the need and the cost only gets worse as conditions get worse,” Mike Elmendorf, president of the Associated General Contractors of New York (AGCNY) told the Business Journal. “In the Covid package that Congress just agreed to, there is an additional $10 billion nationwide for state departments of transportation. We believe that is going to translate into over $400 million of additional resources that would be available to invest in New York’s roads and bridges,” Elmendorf said. “There’s also significant investment in transit, which is good news. Looking forward, and I said the same thing four years ago and it didn’t pan out but I’m more hopeful now I guess, infrastructure is ripe for a bipartisan win.” Elmendorf said that infrastructure is an obvious place for a new administration and Congress to come together to achieve something that is important for jobs and the economy. “Our industry is ready to go and do the work. The need certainly is there in New York and across the country,” Elmendorf said. FCBJ

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Fred Hiffa, a consultant to Rebuild New York Now, a coalition supporting infrastructure improvement efforts that is based at the AGCNY Albany office, said, “For Hudson Valley residents, there are particular issues especially with bridges. The longer you defer the full reconstruction of the bridges and the pavement the bigger that bill gets and it gets to a point where you just can’t sustain and continue to do the level of work that is necessary.” Hiffa, who at one time served as first deputy commissioner of the New York State Department of Transportation, noted that not all of the taxes collected at the gas pump are paying for road improvements. “We’re looking for long-term answers, which we’re really not seeing yet,” Hiffa said, referring to interruptions in the normal financial planning process due to the economic slowdown. “Historically, the DOT has had a five-year capital program matching the five-year federal capital program for highway funding because you don’t build a bridge in a week. It’s a multiyear process. You have to have that funding stream in place for multiple years.” A TRIP report from September 2019 that covered Hudson Valley bridges said 13% were rated as poor/structurally deficient yet carried approximately 2.6 million vehicles each day. The report

found that at that time 64% of the 2,551 Hudson Valley bridges were in fair condition, indicating that the structural elements are sound but minor deterioration has occurred to the bridge’s deck, substructure or superstructure. There were 588 Hudson Valley bridges rated in good condition. “Pothole season becomes a bigger event every year when we continue to Band-Aid things that should be rebuilt,” Elmendorf said, while crediting Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo for making infrastructure investments. “Even with that progress it’s still a fraction of what’s necessary to bring the system into a state of good repair. You look at what the DOT paving cycle is; it is stretched well beyond the expected life or the possible life of any paving material. We know that these pavements are not going to last but because of the available resources you’re sort of in triage mode.” Elmendorf pointed out that the construction industry has kept working throughout the pandemic on essential projects. “On the highway side, the things that we’re talking about, roads and bridges, they have been essential from day one,” Elmendorf said. “These men and women have been out there working, they’ve been keeping commerce flowing, they’ve been keeping paychecks flowing, they’ve been keeping supply chains open, which is critical.”

NEWS Senior Enterprise Editor • Phil Hall Copy and Video Editor • Peter Katz Bureau Chief • Kevin Zimmerman Senior Reporter • Bill Heltzel, Reporters Georgette Gouveia, Peter Katz Research Coordinator • Luis Flores ART & PRODUCTION Creative Director Dan Viteri Graphic Designer Sarafina Pavlak ADVERTISING SALES Manager • Anne Jordan Metro Sales & Custom Publishing Director Barbara Hanlon Account Managers Marcia Pflug, Heather Monachelli, Frank Rose Events Sales & Development • Marcia Pflug Marketing & Events Director • Fatime Muriqi AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT & CIRCULATION Circulation Manager • Sylvia Sikoutris Telemarketing • Brianne Smith ADMINISTRATION Contracted CFO Services Adornetto & Company L.L.C. Human Resources & Payroll Services APS PAYROLL Westchester County Business Journal (USPS# 7100) Fairfield County Business Journal (USPS# 5830) is published Weekly, 52 times a year by Westfair Communications, Inc., 701 Westchester Ave., White Plains, NY 10604. Periodicals Postage rates paid at White Plains, NY, USA 10610. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Westchester County Business Journal and Fairfield County Business Journal: by Westfair Communications, Inc., 701 Westchester Ave, White Plains, NY 10604. Annual subscription $60; $2.50 per issue More than 40 percent of the Business Journal is printed on recycled newsprint. © 2020 Westfair Communications Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.

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Insurer accuses Regeneron of kickbacks to inflate Eylea price BY BILL HELTZEL bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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nitedHealthcare Insurance Co. has accused Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. of engaging in a kickback scheme that inflated the cost of Eylea, its most profitable drug, and bilked Medicare out of millions of dollars. UnitedHealthcare Insurance accused the Tarrytown company of fraud and racketeering in a lawsuit filed Dec. 17 in U.S. District Court, White Plains. “Regeneron set Eylea’s price well beyond what the market would otherwise bear,” the lawsuit states, and left Medicare plan sponsors such as United “to foot the large majority of the inflated bill.” “We are reviewing the details in the complaint,” Regeneron spokesman Joe Ricculli said in an email, “and will vigorously defend ourselves against this lawsuit.” Eylea is priced at $1,850 per dose and is administered every four to eight weeks for an annual cost of about $10,000. Medicare has spent $11.5 billion on the drug since 2013, according to the lawsuit, and UnitedHealthcare Insurance has paid $917 million on behalf of Medicare patients. The Food and Drug Administration approved the drug in 2011 for treatment of wet, age-related macular degeneration, where abnormal blood vessel growth in the back of the eye causes blind spots, blurry vision and eventually blindness. Genentech Inc. makes a comparable drug, Lucentis, priced at $2,000 a dose. It also makes Avastin, a similar drug approved for certain forms of cancer that also has been found about as effective as Eylea and Lucentis for treating macular degeneration. Doctors may prescribe Avastin off-label for that purpose. It costs $55 per dose. Yet despite the price differential, Eylea is the top-selling drug of its kind, the lawsuit states, and UnitedHealthcare Insurance said Regeneron has achieved that unlikely result by breaking federal and state anti-kickback laws. The health care insurer accuses Regeneron of scheming with the Chronic Disease Foundation of Frisco, Texas. The Chronic Disease Foundation (CDF) covers cost-sharing charges that patients are unable to pay. The purpose of cost-sharing fees, such as co-pays and deductibles, is to motivate doctors to prescribe and patients to use cheaper drugs, and by doing so, to spur competition by drugmakers. Drug companies may not pay cost-sharing fees, according to the complaint, but sometimes they waive the charge. To the patient, the drug is free, but the health care insurer still has to pay the balance of the price. Thus, Avastin at $55 is more expensive than Eylea at $1,850, to the patient. But drug companies can then charge more to health care insurers.

Drugmakers may also make donations to patient assistance programs, such as Chronic Disease Foundation, to cover cost-shares. The program must be a bona fide, independent charity. Drugmakers may not form, fund or control the organization. And the charity is expected to cover costs of all comparable drugs for a particular therapy. The reason for the rules, according to the lawsuit, is that cost-sharing programs can lead to kickbacks, where the subsidy is steered only to a particular drug. Then the manufacturer can increase the overall price and offset the cost ofFuneral the donation. Beecher Flooks Home That’s what UnitedHealthcare Insurance WCBJ claims happened here. 7.375” w x 7.125” h “Regeneron 11-26-19, 3pmcovertly funneled illegal kickbacks to patients through a purportedly independent charity, the CDF, to ensure that … contractual obligations would not restrain Eylea’s price,” the complaint states.

“Regeneron was thus able to charge significantly higher prices for Eylea and bilk United out of tens, if not hundreds, of millions of dollars.” In 2012, Regeneron donated $600,000 to CDF, according to the complaint, and balked at donating more because it did not want to help subsidize Genentech’s drugs. CDF asked for more, and a Regeneron official allegedly calculated that a $32.6 million donation could generate $198.5 million in sales, for a return on investment of 465%. Regeneron donated $35 million in 2013, and company executives understood, according to the complaint, that the donations would cover cost-sharing obligations only for Eylea patients. United also claims that Regeneron concealed its relationship with CDF from its auditors. “Regeneron’s scheme worked precisely

as planned,” the lawsuit states. “Regeneron maintained an artificially high price and reaped windfall profits for years.” Sales of Eylea have generated $22.4 billion in revenue since 2011, according to the complaint, and represent about 60% of Regeneron’s annual revenue. United said it does not yet know the full scope of damages caused by the alleged illegal conduct. The United lawsuit was filed a week after Regeneron sued the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, as well as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, claiming that a new federal drug pricing rule for Medicare will devastate U.S. pharma. In that lawsuit, Regeneron said the government has singled out Eylea as costing twice as much as in comparison countries. United is represented by Robins Kaplan LLP attorneys in Manhattan and Minneapolis.

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Suite Talk

Suite Talk: Russell Yankwitt, managing partner at Yankwitt LLP

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When I left the government 12 years ago now, my thought process was that I could run a small firm in Westchester, use my New York City clients and charge less given that the overhead is much less in Westchester.

welve years ago, Russell Yankwitt sat at his kitchen table to plan his transition out of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York and into private practice. He first set up his firm, Yankwitt LLP, in New York City before relocating to White Plains in 2010, where he has grown the operation into a 20-person workforce. In this edition of Suite Talk, Business Journal Senior Enterprise Editor Phil Hall interviews Yankwitt about his place within Westchester’s legal landscape and the challenges of practicing law in the midst of a pandemic.

Why did you decide to start your own law firm?

“When I left the government 12 years ago, my thought process was that I could run a small firm in Westchester, use my New York City clients and charge less, given that the overhead is much less in Westchester. It turned out that there was tremendous amount of business in Westchester County — and there wasn’t a law firm in Westchester that had former federal law clerks, former federal prosecutors or attorneys of the caliber of my team. “So, with a little bit of hard work and a lot of luck, it worked out better than I expected. I did not think that 10 years later I would have 18 employees. That was not part of the grand plan.”

What were you doing for the government before you started the law firm?

“I was trained at Skadden Arps in Manhattan. And then after working there for years I went to the U.S. Attorney’s Office where I was a federal prosecutor, which is a phenomenal job — you’re working on behalf of the government and trying to do right every day. It’s not about winning or losing — it’s really about trying to do the right thing and you’re working with phenomenal people who are civic minded. “It was really a fabulous job. My original game plan was to stay there three to four years, and I ended up staying eight years.”

How has the legal landscape in Westchester changed in the years since arriving in the county?

“There are ebbs and flows in litigation, but for the most part it stayed the same. There was a time period during

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­­— Russell Yankwitt

Russell Yankwitt the Obama administration when there was a lot of employment work related to the Fair Labor Standards Act — that was almost one-third of the federal docket of the Obama administration. In the Trump administration, a lot of attention was on his immigration policies and fewer people who are immigrants wanted to sue in federal court because they were afraid of deportation and other issues. So, there was a decrease in the Fair Labor Standards Act. “Right now, there’s an increase in litigation involving the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and there are a few plaintiff’s lawyers who go around suing all the restaurants and hotels for lack of complying with the ADA, so that’s a new line of work people have been doing. “But for the most part, the breach of contract cases, the corporation cases, the shareholder disputes have remained the same in Westchester.”

How has the Covid-19 pandemic impacted the legal landscape in Westchester?

“In the first quarter, the courts were closed and did not have the infrastructure they have now to handle the caseload while they were closed. Being a defense lawyer and having a fiduciary duty to my clients, we used that to delay everything. Even though my clients all had strong defenses, there was no rush to pay legal fees and no rush to have these cases decided. WCBJ

“So, we started extensions for the first quarter. Now, both the federal courts and state courts are working fabulously, but I have not been inside a courtroom since March 12. But I’ve appeared a dozen times in state court and federal court. We are litigators and all we do is litigate, but we’re appearing on Zoom. Thankfully, business can still progress and people can have their cases heard, but now it is all done electronically.”

Your law firm was also expanding during this pandemic period. Why did you decide to expand at a time when a lot of firms may have put hiring on hold or were laying people off? “Even if you have a great team, if Mickey Mantle says, ‘Hey, I’m willing to play on your team,’ you’ve got to hire Mickey Mantle. With the three hires we’ve made since the pandemic, each one is more fabulous than the next. Every one of them clerked for a federal judge, which is very hard to find among people that want to work in Westchester — it’s a very small pool. And we’re trying to keep it where everybody in the firm has clerked for a federal judge. That separates us from all the other law firms in Westchester County — and, frankly, there’s very few firms in New York City that can say that.”

How are you marketing your law firm? And where do you get your

clients from?

“I think the best marketing we can do is to do great work at a reasonable price. I personally review every invoice that goes out the door and I make sure that every client is treated specially — and that we try to give discounts wherever we can. “And we try to do great work. Winning cases is the best way to market. PreCovid, we did very few trials in the state of New York — we tended to do two to three trials a year and we tended to win these trials. Word gets on the street that we’re trial lawyers who are not afraid to try cases, and that’s been great for business. “Fortunately, our clients usually have one mistake or one problem that we deal with, and then we don’t hear from them again. But they’re very loyal to us and they refer their friends and their colleagues to us.”

Are there clients or cases that you don’t want to take?

“I don’t do matrimonial work. My view is when I was in the government, I tried to do what was just and what was right. As a private litigator, my goal is to win. So, when it comes to matrimonial disputes, when there’s custody issues with children, I don’t want to be involved in that because I don’t want to be fighting for somebody who, in my own judgment, doesn’t necessarily deserve to win. Otherwise, we’re happy to sue anyone.”


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1

The Village—

Renderings of The Village.

Brent and Courtney Montgomery.

been some delays, but parts of the building should be done by mid-February.” Also very much playing in Stamford’s favor was the fact that ITV America, the U.S. arm of London-based broadcaster ITV, moved to 860 Canal St. in 2018 — as did the then-newly formed Wheelhouse Entertainment, where Brent Montgomery had been CEO for three years. “We bought it before I started Wheelhouse, when I was still running ITV America,” he recounted. “The idea was to get a place in Stamford for ITV. When I left to start Wheelhouse, I continued to be partners with ITV.” Montgomery made his bones in the entertainment field with a string of reality TV hits, including “American Restoration,” “Counting Cars” and especially “Pawn Stars;” the latter alone reportedly netted him over $350 million. That Wheelhouse has hit the ground running is no secret; Jimmy Kimmel joined its entertainment division as a partner in 2018, launching his own content hub,

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Kimmelot, in the process. Other celebs include Kevin Hart and Odell Beckham Jr., while its investing arm, Wheelhouse Partners, works with such companies as L Catteron, Tusk Ventures and The Chernin Group. Montgomery said that while the firm started out being about 90% entertainment-focused, it is now more like 50%. Thus was born The Village — as in “It takes a …” Networking plays an important part; meeting with the brain trust behind Nantucket’s Cisco Brewers and Stamfordbased Mike’s Organic convinced both companies to take space in The Village; it will be the former’s first Connecticut outpost. Besides those, ITV and Wheelhouse itself, other tenants include Apicii, the bespoke hospitality management and concept development company based in Greenwich Village, and a private social club “where creators and entrepreneurs mix with celebrities, athletes, musicians and titans of industry.” WCBJ

Montgomery said The Village is now about 75% occupied. He added that other recent visitors include various business leaders, Gov. Ned Lamont and Stamford Mayor David Martin, who in a statement said, “Stamford has always been an innovative, commercially driven city with the feel and benefits of a small town. Workspaces like The Village represent the vision and opportunity that are attracting our future workforce and residents to the community, and Covid only accelerated this movement. I look forward to The Village opening in our city and to welcoming all who recognize that Stamford is the place to be.” The Village also features Connecticut’s first LEED V4 commercial building, which Courtney Montgomery said had been in development even before Covid. “That reflects how the way we do business is changing,” she said. “We can offer something that’s become critical for people. With our filtration and ventilation systems, we bring in 100% fresh air from the outside,

so we’re not just recirculating the same air throughout the building. There’s touchless entry, faucets and doors that you operate with a foot-stomper.” Brent Montgomery said the project, which cost around $50 million, will bring roughly 600 jobs to the state, and noted that most of the work has been done by Connecticut-based vendors, most of them within Fairfield County. As for whether the New York-toStamford migration is here to stay, he said he believes that “it’s not one size fits all. A lot of people like the idea of their kids being able to play outside in a safer environment, where you can teach them to ride a bike. In the city, most people don’t even have cars. “Why not move out here than put up with the commute?” he continued. “I also think you’re going to see more employers allow their employees to work off-site and not have to be in the headquarters five days a week — they’ll be more willing to split the difference.”


Keeping It

| By Fatime Muriqi

The secret sauce to social media marketing as a career BY FATIME MURIQI Fmuriqi@westfairinc.com

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t’s no surprise that social media is taking over the world in almost every aspect possible. Now more than ever, we’re all feeling the need to connect with others and communicate beyond what we used to. With so many platforms to network, learn and utilize, it’s become apparent that every person — and now every business — needs a social marketing guru on staff. The social media landscape is evolving daily, and businesses and brands need to ensure they have strategies and staff that can evolve with it. With social media marketing becoming a degree in many universities, you don’t have to actually spend that kind of money to land a job. If you want to know how, just read along. Obviously, you need to be able to navigate all social media landscapes and have knowledge of what each of them are before you are able to market a brand or a business. Start off with opening an account with the biggest social media giants: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and the new, ever-growing TikTok. Embracing your own account and interacting with others will get you to understand the technical side of things. There’s a lot more to it than just knowing how to “post.” Probably the most important area of a social media marketing specialist is having a social media strategy. You’ll be responsible for defining, developing and incorporating your brand through all of these channels — it’s super important! The best way to reach your audience or client is by being social. You can accomplish this by: • Doing extensive analysis and research on your competitors — see what they’re up to (good and bad). • Understand your goal. What’s your marketing objective? Build your social media strategy on what you’d like to get done and what you want your target audience to learn from you or your brand. • Distinguish content pillars that will guide your social marketing strategy and then determining which social media platforms will be optimal to those specific strategies. • Plan. It. Out. Seriously. Whip out a designated calendar and plan every single post on every single channel. This will help with your overall goal and relieve you of coming up with content every day. (Side note — My favorite desktop app to do this is later.com.) Social media has become a pay-to-play arena: If you’re not paying, you’re not playing. While it’s crucial for businesses to have a social media spending budget, it can be a challenge to get the best bang for your buck when it comes to advertising on social media. Here are some certifications I recommend you get under your belt before you go off spending someone else’s money, plus they’re free and look amazing on your resume!

Facebook Blueprint

Great to learn Facebook ads and manager and how to run paid social media with more than 90 eLearning courses for both Instagram and Facebook. If you’re going to try to earn any of these certifications, I highly recommend this one.

Hubspot Academy

ly helpful when staying up to date on new trends.

Google Garage

Learn Google analytics and more on how to measure effectiveness of digital marketing via Google.

Neil Patel

Just go follow him. Go! He teaches you a lot about SEO and content marketing. Many don’t realize this, but your social media posts need SEO help too. You can also analyze your own website for best SEO optimization. Social media marketing management is pervasive

across all businesses with a marketing function. The scope of career paths and diverse range of roles mean that whether you’re a community manager, content marketer or media coordinator, social media marketing is a transferable skill that can make an impact on your career or business goals. The best part is, you can learn it all pretty much for free by taking online courses and gaining as much experience as possible. Fatime Muriqi is marketing and events director with Westfair Communications. She can be reached at fmuriqi@ westfairinc.com.

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LAZ Parking, WellSpark Health create ‘next generation’ benefit program BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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ne of the nation’s largest parking companies has partnered with a ConnectiCare subsidiary to develop what it calls a “next generation employee benefit program” designed to improve employee health and its financial bottom line. “For the last few years, we’ve realized how hard it can be to navigate the health care system,” said Andi Campbell, senior vice president of human resources at LAZ Parking. “And it was not just for our frontline workers, but for our more educated senior staff as well.” The Hartford-based company, which operates lots throughout Fairfield County, hired a pair of full-time life coaches to help employees better manage their own health as well as the ins-and-outs of the ever-shifting health care system. “But we didn’t have the technology to take it to the 2.0 level,” Campbell said. “We wanted to be able to dig into our claims data and be more proactive in identifying people who were in, or were on the verge of being in, the chronic disease category.”

While one tech company could handle the data mining, “it just wasn’t enough,” she added. “We kept looking for someone who could help us with everything we were looking for, and eventually I was introduced to Bert.” That would be Roberta Wachtelhausen, president of WellSpark Health. Part of ConnectiCare, WellSpark offers a program powered by Silver Fern Healthcare’s proprietary behavior diagnostic toolset to address the unique bio-psycho-social aspects of each individual. Using data to create customized programs, WellSpark achieves what Wachtelhausen calls “an outside-ofthe-box, single-point solution.” “Are there other companies that do what we do? Yes and no,” she said. “They might focus on weight loss or controlling high blood pressure, but we feel that you have to look at the whole person — their physical, psychological and social health.” While WellSpark’s diabetes prevention program has been recognized as exceeding national averages of traditional CDC programs, yielding increased average weight loss and reduced A1c levels, it can reach further by providing emotional support and helping to solve multiple business issues

Andi Campbell, senior vice president of human resources at LAZ Parking.

Roberta Wachtelhausen, president of WellSpark Health. associated with the health of a workforce. These include the cost of absenteeism related to illness, disability and workers compensation, Wachtelhausen said. Campbell said the approach fits well with LAZ’s dedication to “conscious capitalism,” the concept created by Whole Foods co-founder John Mackey and marketing professor Raj Sisodia. That approach revolves around the idea that companies should operate ethically while pursuing profits, and that they should try to serve all of their stakeholders — not just management and shareholders, but also employees, the environment and humanity at large. “The bottom line is that we are providing a better set of tools and education to our workforce,” Campbell said. “A lot of our employees come from different places around the world, so there can be language barriers and customs when it comes to seeking health care that are different than what we have here. We feel that this is part of our responsibility as an employer, and that it’s the right thing to do.” The Covid-19 pandemic has further strengthened LAZ’s resolve, she said; the company has furloughed hundreds of employees around the country and is now in the process of hiring many of them back. Working with WellSpark, LAZ is redesigning its health program for 2021, including measures that can help reduce a worker’s insurance costs through engaging with a number of educational initiatives. Those encompass virtual meetings with health

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care coaches, watching instructional videos and regularly visiting their physicians. “We can’t force them to go into our plan,” Campbell said. “But we had a 93% enrollment at a time when we thought our target of 90% was aggressive.” “There are two soft spots where these types of programs typically fall down,” Wachtelhausen said. “One is employee engagement. You can’t just roll a ball out on the playground and expect people to play. You have to identify what will really work with your workforce, the how’s, why’s and when’s. It really has to be a joint effort — clearly, if we succeed, our client succeeds too. “The other thing is measurement,” she continued. “It’s the return-on-investment question — what does the client get out of this?” That is where cutting down on illness-related absenteeism comes into play, both women said. “It’s the ‘say, stay and strive’ approach,” Campbell said. “You want your employees to say good things about you as a company, have them stay with you, and strive to help them achieve their goals.” As a parking company — one that operates over 1.2 million parking spaces in over 3,100 locations around the country — LAZ has its share of work-related injuries, she said; having strong health practices in place can help them to recover more quickly. “Even if they’re not enrolled in our program,” Campbell said, “we take the approach of, ‘Why not apply the same healthy practices?’”


Fairfield County

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STAY TUNED FOR THE WINNERS. Visit westfaironline.com/40under40/

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REGISTER ONLINE AT: westfaironline.com/40under40/ WestfairOnline For more information or sponsorship inquiries, contact Barbara Hanlon at bhanlon@westfairinc.com or 914-358-0766. For event information, contact Faime Muriqi at fmuriqi@westfairinc.com. CHAMBER PARTNERS: Darien Chamber of Commerce | The Business Council of Fairfield County | Wilton Chamber of Commerce | Greater Norwalk Chamber of Commerce | Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce | Ridgefield Chamber of Commerce | Westport-Weston Chamber of Commerce | Greater Danbury Chamber of Commerce | Greenwich Chamber of Commerce | Bridgeport Regional Business Council | Stamford Chamber of Commerce

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Contributing Writer

| By Howard E. Greenberg

2020: Covid and the Westchester office market BY HOWARD E. GREENBERG

T

he Covid-19 lockdown that began in mid-March spurred a Work from Home revolution. As of mid-December, there is very sparse attendance in Westchester offices (on the order of 10

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percent or less), and building amenities, including cafeterias and fitness centers are generally closed. Work from Home (WFH) continues to be the norm. The overwhelming majority of companies do not yet have plans to have significant numbers of employees physically back in their offices. Businesses are generally functioning fairly well in the new environment, but they would certainly like to get their employees and managers back into their office space and into a more normal environment for collaboration, mentoring and management. I fully expect that there will be an ongoing WFH component for most companies going forward, whether it is for a day or two per week or the entire week. “This year has seen an unprecedented change in the Westchester County commercial real estate market,� said Karolina Alexandre, research manager for Newmark. “At the onset of the pandemic, real estate decisions took a backseat to business operations and revenue preservation and growth as health and safety remained crucial to corporate policies. Short-term lease renewals were the norm for those businesses that were unsure what the future would bring in terms of revenue and pandemic-related regulations. Businesses whose revenues were stable, and/or who could predict their future needs, were in the market and making deals at prices that ref lected the economic impact of the pandemic. Interestingly, some of the impacts on our absorption and vacancy statistics had nothing to do with Covid at all.� At the end of 2019, the consensus in the Westchester County commercial real estate community was that our market had turned a major corner. Overall office inventory was significantly reduced as a result of many years of repurposing and demolition of obsolete office buildings. Office space vacancy was down. Taking rents had begun to rise, and we all said that we were entering a landlord’s market, after literally decades of being purely a tenant’s market. But the numbers turned around very quickly. While there were many stories in the press about New York City companies looking for satellite office space in suburban markets, my personal belief is that these companies were doing research and putting the results in a file. Many Westchester office tenants who


Contributing Writer

| By Howard E. Greenberg

Many Westchester office tenants who had looming lease expirations chose the BandAid approach. They asked their landlords for a one- or two-year extension, which were generally granted at the tenant’s present rental rates. ­­— Howard E. Greenberg

had looming lease expirations chose the Band-Aid approach. They asked their landlords for a one- or two-year extension, which were generally granted at the tenant’s present rental rates. Companies were furloughing and laying off employees. Uncertainty is not good for real estate, as people are reluctant to make expensive, long-term decisions in periods of uncertainly. No one had any idea what the new regulations (i.e., social distancing within offices) would be once offices were reopened, and how they would affect the attendance and workflow once offices were reopened. Even 10 months into the pandemic, there seems to be an extremely small number of tenants in the market for so-called “hub and spoke” spaces. This expression refers to NYC-based companies that are looking for short-term space to house some of their suburban employees who want or need to be in an office but are not willing to travel to New York on public transportation. These deals are typically done at pre-Covid market rates, in already built ‑ out space (typically with just new paint and carpet rather than a full build-out) and are occupied very shortly after lease signing. Shortterm or not, these are windfall deals for landlords, who bypass the expensive construction and free rent periods. The last quarter is continuing 2020’s generally slow leasing activity. Even deals in progress are taking long times to get done. For various reasons (most of them non-Covid), spaces are coming back to the market, so vacancy statistics will continue to rise in 2021. Newmark expects approximately 1 million square feet of negative absorption by year’s end. There is an undetermined number of tenants that are in default because of the effects of Covid. As there is currently a moratorium of commercial evictions in New York state, landlords are not yet permitted to speak to those tenants to ascertain whether or not they can get current with their rent or will end up defaulting and vacating their space. This process will take many months to sort out once the moratorium is lifted, so further vacancies will likely be added to the inventory in mid-late 2021.

As our office inventory has reduced to less than 27 million square feet over recent years, the effect of these additional vacancies will be magnified as a percentage of the inventory. It also looks like the year end total leasing velocity will be less than 700,000 square feet, as compared with 1.2 million square feet, 1.7 million square feet and 2.1 million square feet in the previous three years. These numbers are sobering, but not unexpected. Uncertainty is certain and it is

yet to be seen how the county’s commercial real estate market will look in 2021 and beyond. Stay tuned as the effects of the vaccine will become evident and we head into a post-Covid world. Howard E. Greenberg is president of Howard Properties Ltd. He has represented tenants and landlords for 34 years in Westchester County, throughout the United States and in Europe. He can be reached at 914-997-0300 or howard@ howprop.com.

PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO EMPLOYEES DURING COVID-19 RECOVERY You need to make sure that they’re healthy and you need to make sure that there’s a sense that you as an employer have their best interests at heart. However, you will find there are circumstances with the potential for employer liability. There are quite a few State, Federal and NYC employment laws you need to be very sensitive to in terms of whether you can compel somebody to come to work…” (Excerpted from the Westchester County Business Journal, Aug. 3.)

WE CAN HELP JEFFREY D. BUSS jbuss@sbjlaw.com 914-476-0600

YONKERS, NY

733 Yonkers Avenue, Suite 200 Yonkers, NY 10704 914.476.0600

NEW YORK CITY

60 East 42nd Street, Suite 4600 New York, NY 10165 212.688.2400

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LONG ISLAND, NY

1305 Franklin Avenue, Suite 300 Garden City, NY 11530 516.207.7533

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FOCUS ON

TRAVEL WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNALS

Travel industry preps for pent-up demand in 2021 BY KAREN SACKOWITZ ksackowitz@westfairinc.com

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hile the travel industry has certainly taken a hit this year, desire for travel has only grown due to pent-up demand, a factor that experts say will impact 2021. “One of the things we’ve seen consistently in studies is that people are happier when they have a trip planned; with Covid, travel has been taken away,” said Jim Bendt, managing director of emerging products for global luxury travel network Virtuoso. “You know how hard it was to find toilet paper last spring? We’re going to start to see that with travel as availability begins to tighten up.” While some may think discounted deals will be plentiful as life slowly returns to normal in the coming year,

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Bendt said simple supply and demand factors will likely debunk that assumption. “You have all these people who had trips planned for 2020 that had to cancel, and they now have future travel credits; plus you just have all of us who have been home, thinking, I need to get out of here,” he said. “The best options will be in demand, so travelers don’t want to wait.” Susan Wilson of Hidden Gem Travel Consulting in Wilton is already feeling the demand from clients who want to reschedule canceled plans. “I have a family that was supposed to go to Argentina last April and now they want to go next December,” she said. “We’re rebooking now because we know once the borders reopen things are going to pick up like crazy.” To help clients look ahead to brighter days, one of the tools Wilson uses is WCBJ

Wanderlist, a digital Virtuoso product that helps people envision their dream trips and organize their wish lists ahead of time. “Wanderlist uses a Netflix-style multimedia portal people can use to not only search and save destinations, but also find curated experiences, many of which you can’t find via Google,” Wilson said. “The interactive nature uses images, videos, music; plus, you can invite family members to collaborate within the platform to create a trip to fit everyone’s vision.” Wilson said one factor that first drew her to the relatively new service was a natural partnership with wealth advisers. “They want to offer more to clients and are becoming more involved in things like how to best manage not just your assets, but your health, your leisure time; all areas that impact getting

ready for retirement,” she said. “With Wanderlist they can marry the travel dreams of their clients with their financial goals.” While Wanderlist launched in 2019 as a paid service, the 2020 shutdown prompted Virtuoso to move to a free version. “We opened it up so people could start collecting ideas, collaborate and look for inspiration. When it’s time to start putting together an actual travel plan, they can then hire one of our professional advisors,” Bendt said of the fewer than 200 Virtuoso agents specially trained in the Wanderlist service. Wilson is one such agent. She said she’s already hearing from eager clients, all with the same general sentiment. “Oh my gosh, I can’t wait to talk to you when the world reopens.”


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Fearless flying—

spread testing and I’m talking about a biometric approach that will ‘zap’ you at every touch point in your trip whether you’re going to the grocery store or Mongolia and let you know within 45 seconds whether you’re positive or negative and then have the infrastructure built-in to take care of you if you actually test positive. We’ll get used to it the way we take our shoes off at the airport security checkpoint,” Greenberg said. “The other two issues are ill will and trust, and that’s where the travel industry needs to do a much better job.” As examples of ill will, he pointed to the experiences of travelers who had booked trips and bought travel insurance only to discover that the fine print excluded coverage for trips canceled because of a pandemic and, because of Covid-19, they were out of luck when it came to getting a refund. As an example of customers losing their trust that business will do the right thing, Greenberg pointed to the estimated $9 billion being withheld by airlines, hotels, cruise lines and tour operators from customers seeking refunds due to changes in travel plans caused by the coronavirus. “Put yourself in the position of the consumer. Who wants to give an interest-free loan to the airlines or the cruise lines for two years? They want their money back. So, what’s going to incentivize them to reserve another ticket and pay more money if they’re not given a guarantee?” Greenberg asked. “The three things that we have to deal with are the medical issues and the ill will issues and the trust issues. They all can be handled. The people running these companies have to realize it’s not how much it costs, its how much it’s worth. If you want people to come back and travel you have to give them a security blanket or a guarantee that covers those three areas. When you do that, people will come back exponentially. The travel industry won’t be able to handle the numbers so many people will want to travel at that point.”

Breathe easy

As far as the health aspects of flying, “I’ve done stories on the air circulation systems on jets before the pandemic. They’re phenomenal. “The HEPA filtration system works better than any in your home or anything even in a hospital because cold air comes into the plane at minus 60 degrees. It’s brought into the engines and then heated, brought into the airline cabin and purged out every three minutes and replaced. You can’t get a better deal than that.” But there is a problematic fact of life about aircraft. “Airline cabins and social distancing

Even if you block the center seat the distance between you and the window seat and me and the aisle seat is still only 25 inches and it doesn’t even take into account the guy sitting behind you 14 inches away who just sneezed. ­­

— Peter Greenberg

are mutually exclusive to begin with. You can’t widen the cabin. You’re not going to get six feet of lateral separation. Even if you block the center seat the distance between you and the window seat and me and the aisle seat is still only 25 inches and it doesn’t even take into account the guy sitting behind you 14 inches away who just sneezed. “So, it’s a nice optic for the airlines to block the middle seat and Southwest and Alaska and JetBlue have done that although all three of those airlines are ending that program at the end of this month. Delta is the only exception; they’re going to continue through the end of March.” He said it will be interesting to see if keeping the middle seats empty gives Delta a sales advantage over legacy carriers American and United that are selling those seats.

Bad news, good news

Asked about possible long-term impacts from the recent elimination of routes by the legacy national airlines, Greenberg said: “As the federal bailout money ended for the major airlines, American, Delta and United no longer were required to fly their route system as was part of the deal for getting that money. They had to keep

everybody on payroll and fly their route system. When those provisions ended, each airline announced about 30 different cities they were no longer going to keep on their schedules. “They were dropping cities: Springfield, Illinois; Roswell, New Mexico; Hartford, Connecticut or New Haven. On the surface you would think this spelled doom and gloom for the smaller airports and the people living in those communities would then have to drive hours to get to an airport just to begin their trip.” Greenberg said that instead of too much doom and gloom, the void has started to be filled by smaller air carriers seeking to become bigger. “Who showed up to fill that void? People you never would have expected: Frontier, Allegiant, Spirit and Southwest,” Greenberg said. “In a typical year, Southwest Airlines might have added one new route, one new city. They just announced 12 of them. Frontier just announced 19 of them. And, Spirit and Allegiant are about to make their announcements soon. They see this as an opportunity because of what’s going to be coming back first. It’s not business travel. It’s leisure travel, and those are leisure travel airlines.” JetBlue in the past couple of months added two dozen city pairs to its route FCBJ

structure, including on Dec. 18 the addition of nonstop flights between Bradley International and Los Angeles, San Francisco and Las Vegas. In November, it had added flights to Cancun, Mexico, from the Hartford-area airport. Greenberg said there has been a radical shift in travel behavior regarding where people are going. “In the old days, people would pick a vacation destination that served their vacation destination needs. That’s all changing now,” he said. “Now, they’re picking a destination that serves their lifestyle needs, their work-life balance needs. In many cases, you’re seeing entire families moving as a unit for longterm stays in a distant location where they don’t have to commute, where the parents can work remotely, the kids can learn remotely. They can do all the social distancing they want, they’re saving money because nobody’s commuting, they’re not going out to restaurants every night.” Greenberg said that costs for that type of travel can be as low as $30 per person per day. However, “You can’t wake up in Westchester for that. When you think about it, we may see some long-term implications here based on something that nobody planned.” WCBJ

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Good Things THE ALDRICH PRESENTS OUTDOOR SOUND INSTALLATION

IMPROVING LIVES OF OLDER ADULTS AND CAREGIVERS Field Hall Foundation in Cortlandt Manor is now preparing for its grants in support of programs and projects in Dutchess, Putnam and Westchester counties. The deadline for submitting a Letter of Inquiry for the Spring 2021 cycle is Jan. 15. Priority will be given proposals that fall within the following focus areas: food insecurity, home-based care services, respite services, safety and security, social work/case management and transportation.

Since 2019, the Foundation has awarded more than $1 million in grants ranging from $2,500 to $75,000. Nonprofits with operating budgets under $1 million are eligible for small grants up to $15,000; those with an operating budget over $1 million are eligible for full grants. For more information and to discuss potential proposals, contact: Patti Lavan Horvath, program officer, at 914-813-9103 or phorvath@ fieldhallfdn.org.

BARNUM FINANCIAL DONATES TOYS TO CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL The SKG Team at Barnum Financial Group, led by Ben Soccodato and Chris Kampitsis, a group of knowledgeable and experienced certified financial planners, surprised children from the Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital in Valhalla with a giant shipment of toys from their Amazon Wish Lists. Everything from iPads to Legos, to coloring books, puzzles, art supplies, board games, karaoke machines, wireless earphones and more, plus a check donation to the hospital in

honor of The SKG Team’s clients in lieu of traditional holiday gifts, were distributed. “We have been confronted with a unique and challenging year and celebrating with friends and family during the holidays is much different. Some have experienced difficult financial times, health challenges, the loss of a loved one or other hardships,” said Soccodato “Our goal this year was to make the holidays as uplifting and empowering as possible. …”

Frank Stella’s Stars, A Survey at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, now to Sept. 7.

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield is presenting Scores for the Stars, 2020-21, a two- part series by artist Ander Mikalson dedicated to Frank Stella’s Stars. The first part is a two-channel sound installation on view in the museum’s Sculpture Garden from now to Jan. 3. It celebrates the winter solstice, which occurred Dec. 21, a time when our largest star, the sun, is lowest in the sky. The scores for the winter

solstice are excerpted from eponymous summertime tunes. Visitors are encouraged to explore the outdoor works by Stella and experience Mikalson’s installation together in real time. Part II will occur as a live performance at The Aldrich on the summer solstice June 20, when the sun is highest in the sky. Mikalson’s Scores for the Stars was created in response to the exhibition

Frank Stella’s Stars, A Survey. It was organized by Education Director Namulen Bayarsaihan and Senior Curator Amy Smith-Stewart. Frank Stella’s exhibit is on view inside the museum through May 9; the outdoor work installed throughout the museum’s grounds is on view through Sept. 7. Born in 1983, Mikalson is a New Yorkbased artist working in performance, sound, sculpture and drawing.

COMMUNITY-FOCUSED HOME CARE AGENCY SUPPORTS CHARITIES

CVLC WELCOMES NEW MEMBERS TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS! Connecticut Veterans Legal Center’s (CVLC) mission is to provide free legal services to veterans facing homelessness and mental illness to overcome the legal barriers to health care, housing and income. To help CVLC meet these goals, seven new members were added to the organization’s Board of Directors. With diverse backgrounds and unique experiences, the new board members will help CVLC continue to deliver life-changing legal services to veterans across Connecticut and the U.S. The new members are: Joe Cherico, Margaret Donovan, Rosendo Garza, Paul Greatsinger, Erik Lohr, Aza Mosley, and Stephan Rice. Cherico is an attorney and the office managing partner for the Stamford office of McCarter & English. He is a graduate of Fordham University and Fordham Law School. Donovan is an assistant US attorney in the District of Connecticut, and a former Army JAG

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officer. Garza, a Marine infantry officer, currently serving in the Reserves graduated from the UCONN School of Law and now works with Day Pitney as an energy attorney. Greatsinger is a UCONN graduate and a retired Marine Infantry officer who is now a financial advisor at Morgan Stanley. Lohr is a former Navy submariner and nuclear reactor operator who graduated with honors from UConn Law in 2002. He now serves as the head of defensive litigation within the Connecticut Attorney General’s Office. Mosley is counsel for the state of Connecticut Department of Insurance. Rice is a former Army judge advocate who now works at the Pratt & Whitney division of Raytheon Technologies, where he is associate general counsel for the military engines business. He is a graduate of George Washington University and Harvard University. FCBJ

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From left Mario DAquila, ALS founder and chief operating officer; Sharon DAquila, ALS co-founder; and Kerry Walsh, executive director, CCFP. Courtesy Assisted Living Services Inc.

Assisted Living Services Inc. (ALS) presented a $2,000 check to the Cheshire Community Food Pantry Inc. on Dec. 17. The donation was generated from the home care provider’s “Jeans for a Cause” initiative. Each year, employees give $1 on Fridays when they choose to wear jeans to work. ALS then matches the total contribution and gives the

proceeds to a local cause. “We chose the Cheshire Food Pantry as our designated charity this year based on rising food insecurity in our town triggered by high unemployment rates,” said Mario D’Aquila, “The Cheshire Community Food Pantry is different from many food pantries

because it uses a client-choice model in which clients are allowed to select their own groceries,” said Executive Director Kerry Walsh. “This model provides food subsidies to low-income families in crisis, while nurturing their ability to be independent. We are grateful for the donation from Assisted Living Services.”


ART$WCHALLENGE $300,000 COUNTDOWN

Stephanie Kauffman

AMERICARES NAMES DEPUTY DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR, STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS Americares, the health-focused relief and development organization headquartered in Stamford has welcomed Stephanie Kauffman as its new deputy development director, strategic partnerships. She will be responsible for scaling the growth of corporate, foundation, individual and public fundraising initiatives, cultivating strategic partnerships and broadening engagement with public, pharmaceutical and health partners. “Stephanie brings a wealth of experience directing strategic partnerships and has an incredible track record of creating impact and growth for iconic brands in various industries, including health care,” said Americares Senior Vice President and Chief Development Officer Jenny Goldstein. Prior to joining Americares, Kauffman served as the chief partnerships officer at the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, where she led revenue growth and brand visibility through best-in-class partnerships. Previously she was a longtime marketing and brand partnerships executive at Universal Studios, a division of NBCUniversal. Kauffman earned a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Florida Southern College. She currently sits on the Board of Directors of the International Women’s Media Foundation, which champions strengthening women’s roles and voice in global media. She lives in Westchester County, New York. Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

The Art$WChallenge, a unique public/ private partnership among ArtsWestchester, Westchester County Executive George Latimer and the Westchester County Board of Legislators has made available $300,000 in matching grant money to benefit arts and cultural groups in Westchester County through Dec. 31. More than 120 arts organizations are eligible for between $1,500 to $7,500 in matching funds based on their ability to raise private monies before the year’s end. ArtsWestchester CEO Janet Langsam explained, “Community support has enabled us to keep the arts alive and vital in Westchester in good times—and in not so good times. Right now is one of those not so good times.” In a recent ArtsWestchester study of Westchester cultural organizations, 87% of organizations reported they were not faring well during the pandemic. Fifty-five groups have already made their Art$WChallenge match, together raising $485K in new private donations, of which $237K were eligible for the match. Latimer said, “Despite the havoc caused by Covid-19, the Westchester arts community has rallied in a way that continues to provide engaging virtual and in-person cultural programs for county residents….” Benjamin Boykin, chairman of the Westchester County Board of Legislators

Daniel Claudio

Hudson Valley Economic Development Corp. PJS Jazz. Nioka Workman of Firey String Sistas.

WCM Gandesh Workshop.

said, “The Art$WChallenge program is a powerful example of a public/private partnership that pays dividends for the economy. Since the inception of the Art$WChallenge in 2007, a total of $3.9 million in private money has been raised and invested in Westchester County’s cultural sector….” Through Dec. 31, new or increased donations made to any eligible Westchester arts group will be matched by ArtsWestchester with support from Westchester County government.

Kinga Lesniak of the Nowodworski Foundation said, “For the first time, we are allowed to participate in the Art$WChallenge. Our main source of funding is our yearly fundraising gala and it can’t happen this year. So far we’ve collected almost $5,000 in donations. That may be small money for big organizations, but for us it’s really important.” Visit: https://artswestchester.org/ grants/artswchallenge/ and make a difference today.

BCW WELCOMES FOUR NEW BOARD MEMBERS Four leaders from different county business sectors joined The Business Council of Westchester (BCW) Board of Directors effective in January. They include Dr. Robert Amler, Donnovan Beckford, Christie Houlihan and Stacey Tompkins. Marsha Gordon, BCW president and CEO, said “… These accomplished professionals’ insights will guide our efforts to create economic opportunity for all, especially during this challenging time.” Amler is vice president for government affairs at New York Medical College. He is also dean of the School of Health Sciences and Practice and Institute of Public Health and professor of public health, pediatrics and environmental health science. Beckford is the CEO and executive director of the Westchester Community Opportunity Program (WestCOP), where he is responsible for its strategic vision. Houlihan is senior director and counsel at Houlihan-Parnes Realtors LLC. Her work focuses on development, financing and legal representation for the company’s portfolio. Tompkins, president of Tompkins Excavating in Putnam Valley, started her career in the food service industry; she is now the majority owner of Tompkins Excavating, which specializes in commercial site development.

Dr. Robert Amler

Hudson Valley Economic Development Corp. (HVEDC) in Poughkeepsie recently announced the addition of Daniel Claudio, director of new business development at PTS Contracting in Armonk to its Advisory Board of Directors. PTS is a full-service health care contractor serving the tri-state area. “…PTS has a long-standing history of construction and industry-specific knowledge in the medical field, an important arena in these unprecedented times. I look forward to working with them on existing and new projects, which will help bring innovative and reliable construction to the Hudson Valley,” said Mike Oates, president and CEO of HVEDC. Growing up in Montgomery Clausio said, “…I am excited to join Mike and my fellow colleagues who share in my hometown pride, as a member of the Advisory board at HVEDC. I have no doubt that our partnership will result in continued success of our community through win-win solutions….”.

CONNECT WITH westfair communications

Donnovan Beckford

westfaironline.com wagmag.com Christie Houlihan

Stacey Tompkins

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Good Things PARTNERSHIP HELPS CONSUMERS DECIDE WHAT BRANDS AND NONPROFITS TO SUPPORT Wow to Pop Inc., based in Greenwich, has partnered with Poltio, a digital consumer engagement platform to support ActionnateÔ , which will be launching the first quarter of 2021. It will aggregate data on its web platform for use by consumers, brands and nonprofits. With its proprietary data base, it is the only centralized data repository with comprehensive snapshots where consumers can go to validate brands and nonprofits to determine if they are meeting their avowed social causes, corporate governance and product standards. Conversely, it informs brands and nonprofits as to the degree to which they are engaging relevant consumer clusters and thereby meeting market demand or if they need to pivot to do so. Ahmet Tosan, founder and CEO of Poltio said, “We at Poltio love to empower brands who build communities of interest and help them regularly engage and have an in-depth understanding of their users in conversation….” Kathryn Minckler, founder and CEO of Wow to Pop said of Poltio, “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to partner with Poltio. Their innovative quizzes and other content tools are at the cutting edge and will augment our engagement and communications strategies to provide our partners and brand subscribers with meaningful consumer data and insights related to their sustainability and other important operating initiatives.” Poltio was launched in 2014 in Istanbul, Turkey, and today is helping some of the world’s top brands and institutions globally to drive engagement with their consumers. Wow to Pop was founded in 2018 to develop significant market insights, intelligence and innovative communications products. Its first product is Actionnate™.

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DECEMBER 28, 2020

UNITED HEBREW RENOVATION TAKES THERAPY TO NEW LEVEL United Hebrew of New Rochelle has completed the major renovations at its shortstay rehabilitation facility, showcasing state-of-the-art equipment and redesigned space. The upgrades give Westchester residents access to cutting-edge therapy services in a safe, modern, homelike environment at a center recently ranked by “U.S. News & World Report” as one of the nation’s best. A re-designed therapy gym offers space for therapists from Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, a United Hebrew partner, to spread out and offer safe, socially distanced therapy sessions. The new NeuroGym equipment — portable therapeutic devices — allows therapists to bring rehab directly to the rooms of residents who have limited mobility. “At United Hebrew, we are committed to the future, which means we always want to be ahead of the curve,” said Rita Mabli, president and CEO. Jintronix, a high-tech virtual reality rehab tool, which delivers beneficial exercises in an engaging format video-game style, via television monitor, with the guidance of a therapist is also part of the new additions. “Our rehab residents are having a lot of fun at the same time they’re regain-

Bud Hammer

NEW CHAIRMAN OF UNITED WAY BOARD

Therapy gym at United Hebrew of New Rochelle.

ing balance and strength,” noted Helen Dallaris, United Hebrew’s director of rehabilitation. The renovations are in addition to the amenities already offered at United Hebrew, including private rooms, each with their own bathroom, in-room conveniences such as Wi-Fi, flat-screen televisions, and a 24-hour nurse call system, and a

rehab gym offering magnificent views of the Long Island Sound. United Hebrew of New Rochelle is a vibrant not-for-profit, nonsectarian, multiservice campus of comprehensive care nestled on 7.5 acres. It has been serving the Westchester metropolitan area since 1919 and today, serves more than 1,000 residents and clients daily.

LEADERSHIP PROMOTIONS AT SPRINGWORKS THERAPEUTICS SpringWorks Therapeutics Inc. in Stamford, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing life-changing medicines for patients with severe rare diseases and cancer, recently announced that Badreddin Edris, Ph.D., currently chief business officer, has been promoted to chief operating officer, and L. Mary Smith, Ph.D., currently senior vice president of clinical research and development, has been promoted to chief development officer. In his remarks about the promotions, Saqib Islam, CEO of SpringWorks, said “They both embody SpringWorks core values, continuously looking for opportunities on behalf of the patients we ultimately work for. I look forward to partnering with them and the rest of our experienced leadership team as we advance our 10 clinical development programs for patients with severe rare diseases and cancer. Edris joined SpringWorks in 2018 as chief business officer to lead the company’s corporate strategy, business devel-

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Badreddin Edris

opment and intellectual property efforts. Previously he was an investment and operating professional on the private equity team at OrbiMed. Before that Edris was a management consultant at Bain & Company. He received his Ph.D. in genetics from Stanford University. Smith joined SpringWorks at its inception in 2017 and was a founding member of the management team. Prior to joining SpringWorks, Smith was the executive vice president of Gene Ther-

L. Mary Smith

apy at Bamboo Therapeutics, a wholly owned subsidiary of Pfizer. Previously she was the vice president of product development at United Therapeutics where she was responsible for development programs in oncology, regenerative medicine and virology. She holds a Ph.D. in microbiology/immunology from the University of New Hampshire and received her postdoctoral training at Emory University under a NIH post-doctorate research fellowship.

The United Way of Westchester and Putnam’s Board of Directors has named Katonah resident Bud Hammer as its new chairperson. Hammer, who succeeds June Blanc, joined the United Way board in 2017 and co-chaired the resource development committee and annual golf event since 2018. “I look forward to leading the board of such a relevant and resilient organization in order to provide a helping hand to hundreds of thousands of our neighbors who are struggling to survive and giving them hope for a better tomorrow through its education, financial stability and health initiatives,” said Hammer. Hammer is the president and general manager of Atlantic Westchester Inc., an award-winning commercial and industrial HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) business located in Bedford Hills. The company holds HVAC licenses in Westchester, Putnam and Rockland counties and Connecticut. When Covid-19 arrived Hammer and his Atlantic team helped United Way with its Emergency Food Distribution in Putnam County and its Heroes and Homebound Hot Meals Delivery programs. “His leadership (Hammer) and support will be essential to the organization’s continued impact in the community and I look forward to working closely with him,” said Tom Gabriel, president and CEO of the United Way. Hammer graduated from Pace University in 1986 with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in marketing.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.


UNITED WAY’S TAKE A WALK IN HER SHOES EVENT

United Way of Westchester and Putnam in White Plains hosted its annual and first virtual Women’s Leadership Council “Take a Walk in Her Shoes” event Dec. 8. Maria M. Trusa, CEO of Formé Medical Center and Urgent Care was recognized as its 2020 “Woman of Distinction.” Trusa, an immigrant from the Dominican Republic and Tarrytown resident, was the executive director of Scarsdale Medical Group where she worked for more than 26 years. In September 2015, she joined Formé Medical Center as CEO bringing with her the vision to help the underserved and uninsured community gain access to affordable, transparent, dignified and high-quality medical care. “Maria has a powerful story and her impact on our community has been incredibly substantial. She has been leading the charge in providing health care services to the most vulnerable, uninsured residents in Westchester County,” said United Way President and CEO Tom Gabriel. The evening also included a dialogue on diversity, equity and inclusion with Mecca E. Mitchell, senior vice president of diversity and community relations for Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth) and former chief diversity officer for the state of New York, and Elizabeth Bracken-Thompson, partner at Thompson & Bender and United Way’s 2017 Woman of Distinction honoree. The event helped to raise funds to support ALICE women, children and families affected by the ongoing pandemic and economic crisis. ALICE stands for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed. At its core, it is a new way of defining and understanding the struggles of households that earn just above the federal poverty level, but not enough for a survival budget.

WALL-TO-FORK FRESH When Malka Levine says, “It’s 30 degrees outside and our farm is thriving,” she isn’t talking about some minor miracle in Monsey. The marketing director for Evergreen Market is referring to the store’s newly installed, state-of the-art indoor vertical farm. What’s more, she adds, “Our organic produce is flying off the shelves.” Freshly harvested veggies are always in season at the iconic kosher supermarket thanks to a revolutionary wall farm that lets people not only choose clean, fresh-picked produce but also see exactly where it comes from. Since its debut last month, the 20foot high geoponic soil-based indoor farm made by Vertical Field, an Israeli agtech company that produces innovative vertical agricultural solutions. has opened customer’s eyes to the quality and benefits of pesticide-free greens and produce. One customer, Bracha Kimmel, a self-described non fan of kale, reported, “I wanted to tell you how incredible the kale tasted. I loved it. She traveled all the way from her home in Brooklyn to the Monsey store to check out the vertical field greens. Evergreen sells produce from its onsite urban farm at competitive prices in individual pots, making the “buying local” experience more convenient than ever. Pesticide-free and grown in soil that is never exposed to bugs, all products are

Jeanette Gisbert, executive director of Volunteer New York!, kicks off the Boot Camp program.

PREPARES COMMUNITY LEADERS FOR BOARD SERVICE

Healthy, Kosher, Sustainable Produce is Always in Season at Evergreen Market – Even in Winter. Courtesy vertical field’s urban farm system.

Star-K Kosher Certified for purity. Geoponic vertical farming yields a new crop every few days, ensuring that fresh greens and herbs will always be in season. Guy Elitzur, the CEO of Vertical Field, said, “We are extremely excited by our partnership with Evergreen. They are

precisely the type of supermarket that has the right customer base and will successfully integrate the latest technological advances in geoponic farming.” The company recently signed an agreement with Rami Levy, Israel’s largest supermarket chain, to install Vertical Field’s urban farms at dozens of its locations.

NEW BOARD MEMBERS AT WCF

Volunteer New York!’s fifth annual Nonprofit Board Boot Camp presented with The Business Council of Westchester, kicked off with two sessions in December and concludes with a Nonprofit Board Speed Dating event in late January. This virtual three-part professional development series offers local professionals and business leaders a guided path to board service and to have a larger impact on their community. The virtual Boot Camp sessions prepare participants to become successful and valued nonprofit board members and are designed to benefit those who are new to board service, as well as those with seasoned backgrounds. Since first introduced in 2015 by Volunteer New York!, this event has helped local nonprofits connect with hundreds of prepared board. And in 2019, “The Wall Street Journal” used this event as an example of how nonprofits have had to innovate to successfully fill board seats.

GREENWICH HOLIDAY STROLL REIMAGINED

Andrew Herz

The Westchester Community Foundation (WCF) has added three new board members to help continue its mission, started in 1975, to improve the quality of life in Westchester by addressing community issues, promoting responsible philanthropy and connecting donors to critical, local needs. The new board members include Andrew Herz, counsel to Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler; John Tolomer,

John Tolomer

president and CEO of The Westchester Bank; and Ginny Loughlin, president of AppliedGood, a consulting firm specializing in nonprofit leadership development, transition management and community building. Laura Rossi, WCF executive director, commented on the new members, “Their individual expertise will enable us to continue assisting donors in their charitable

Ginny Loughlin

giving and invest in smart and effective solutions for Westchester County.” The Foundation’s Board of Advisors oversees its annual grantmaking and community leadership initiatives. In 2020, the foundation awarded 73 grants totaling $2 million. It also created a Covid-19 Response Fund, which raised $2 million and has awarded $1 million to date to meet emergency needs.

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The year 2020 marked the 12th annual Greenwich Holiday Stroll with a twist. This year’s event, amid the Covid pandemic, became the first-ever Virtual Greenwich Holiday Stroll, Dec. 1-24, of holiday shopping and dining featuring video highlights from Greenwich retail stores and restaurants throughout Greenwich, village of Old Greenwich, Byram, Glenville, Cos Cob and Riverside. More than 100 merchants participated in the digital event, sharing their holiday merchandise and gift ideas. Online ordering, deliver, and curbside pick-up options were all available. The Virtual Greenwich Holiday Stroll was created and produced by TMK Event Marketing, LLC, a Greenwich-based company.

DECEMBER 28, 2020

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Good Things BANK AND WEBE108 WARM UP THOSE IN NEED

On Dec. 3 more than 1,000 winter coats, hats, scarves and gloves, for men, women and children were collected by Stamford-based First County Bank in partnership with Connoisseur Media Connecticut’s WEBE108. The warm winter wear was dropped off at First County Bank branches in Stamford, Norwalk and Fairfield, where members of the WEBE108 street team were onsite collecting donations, which benefited the Bridgeport Rescue Mission. “We asked and the community answered. The outpouring of donations at our branches to help those less fortunate this winter, was warming to see,” said Robert Granata, chairman and CEO of First County Bank. “Through the support of others, we were able to surpass last year’s donation number of 300 winter items, tripling the donations this year, all in a day,” he added. “We are proud to partner with the team at First County Bank to help the Bridgeport Rescue Mission keep our neighbors a bit warmer this winter season. We were all hands-on deck to help this wonderful organization assist folks during a very difficult time for many. I am thankful for the support from First County Bank. It’s wonderful to see local organizations working together for the good of others,” said Kristin Okesson, senior vice president, general manager, Connoisseur Media Connecticut.

LIONS CLUB PRESENTS SERVICE AWARDS The Hudson Gateway Realtor® Foundation, the charitable arm of the Hudson Gateway Association of Realtors®, recently presented a check for $2,000 to Feeding Westchester, the Elmsford-based organization that sources and distributes food and resources to feed people who are hungry in every town in Westchester. It sources food from some 80 farmers, wholesalers and retailers, which is inspected, sorted and packed at its 30,000-square-foot distribution center. Trucks then deliver food more than 300 partner food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters and day care centers. “We are grateful to the Hudson Gateway Realtor® Foundation for their support,” said Karen C. Erren, president and CEO, Feeding Westchester. In addition, Feeding Westchester provides children with the nutritious, kid-friendly and easy-to-prepare food they need on the weekends. Each year, almost 60,000 BackPacks of child-friendly meals are distributed. Since 2014, the Hudson Gateway Realtor Foundation has donated thousands of dollars to charities and nonprofits throughout the Hudson Valley.

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TALK SHOW HOSTS RAISE CASH AND TOYS FOR CHILDREN’S CHARITIES One of Connecticut’s most popular morning team, Chaz and AJ (WPLR and WFOX), spent a recent week onair, on-line and at Jordan’s Furniture New Haven collecting cash and toys equaling more than $166,000 to be distributed to five local charities. “The outpouring of generosity in this very difficult year was truly incredible,” Chaz said. “Every year we try to raise a little bit more than the year before but our expectations for 2020 were very measured. We are absolutely blown away by this total.” The toys and cash were immediately distributed to five local charities, which were chosen through a grant submission process. The five charities included the McGivney Community Center Bridgeport, Boys and Girls Club of Lower Naugatuck Valley, Center for Family Justice, Team Inc. and Central Connecticut Coast YMCA. “Chaz and AJ are an incredibly unique, powerful show” remarked Kristin Okesson, senior vice president/market manager Connoisseur Media, which owns radio clusters in the region. She said, “They have spent 2020 trying to calm, educate and entertain their loyal audience, but most importantly lend a helping hand to families in need. “

Felicia Feng Zhang

GREENWICH MUSIC TEACHER RECEIVES DISTINCTION AWARD

Chaz, AJ and Santa.

BURKE OPENS NEW OUTPATIENT SITE Burke Rehabilitation Hospital in White Plains announced the opening of an outpatient rehabilitation location in Elmsford at 555 Taxter Road. This new site provides state-of-the-art physical, occupational, speech and specialty therapy treatment for patients who have experienced an illness, injury or surgery. Burke’s expert therapists use the latest research-based techniques available to ensure each patient reaches maximum recovery. “The health care demands of our local communities have shifted toward outpatient services,” said Jeffrey Menkes, Burke Rehabilitation Hospital president and CEO. “Now more than ever, patients need high-quality, compassionate rehabilitation therapy care close to their homes. Our expanding network of outpatient sites helps meet that need.” Other locations include Armonk, two in the Bronx, Mamaroneck, Purchase, Somers, two in Yonkers and Burke Rehabilitation Hospital’s main campus. FCBJ

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The new Burke Rehabilitation Hospital outpatient facility in Elmsford.

For more information or to make an appointment, call 914-597-3870 or visit burke.org/outpatient. Burke Rehabilitation Hospital is a not-for-profit, acute rehabilitation hos-

pital founded in 1915 through an endowment from philanthropist John Masterson Burk. It is the only hospital in Westchester County dedicated solely to adult rehabilitation medicine.

Felicia Feng Zhang of Greenwich has received the 2020 Teacher Distinction Award from The Royal Conservatory of Music. More than 50% of students quit music lessons in public school, but Zhang with students as young as 3, has her own unique quick sight-reading method, which helps students build confidence from the very first lesson. Born in Qingdao, Shandong, China, Zhang was raised in a household of professional music educators. Her mother, Professor Wenju Sui, and her brother, Professor Jin Zhang, are both well-known piano educators in China. Zhang’s daughter, Clara, played piano at Carnegie Hall and Madison Square Garden at the age of 6. And her young son, Alexander, has also played at Carnegie Hall and other venues. Now a resident of Greenwich, Zhang founded The All Talent Academy, which focuses students on a holistic education that goes far beyond what traditional music schools offer. She believes in training the whole mind while developing multi-intelligent skills, building confidence and fostering good habits. In 2016, 26 of her students won international piano competitions with first- and second-prize awards and were invited to perform in Carnegie Hall. Zhang studied at Beijing Normal University, receiving a bachelor’s degree with honors in fine arts in music education with a major in piano pedagogy. She was the first graduate student in China to receive a master’s degree in music education. After graduating, she became a full-time piano faculty member in Beijing Normal University, teaching applied piano to undergraduate students. Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.


HGRF PRESENTS DONATION TO FEEDING WESTCHESTER

NATURE MUSEUM RECEIVES GRANT

Albert M. Schenck

COMMERCIAL BANKING TEAM GAINS MEMBER The addition of Albert M. Schenck, who has joined KeyBank as a senior relationship manager responsible for managing new and existing relationships with middle-market commercial clients, will help grow the bank’s commercial banking resources in Connecticut and Massachusetts. He reports to Commercial Sales Leader Matthew Hummel. “Al brings more than 20 years of experience serving commercial clients in Connecticut and metro New York and joins us with a reputation as one of the top-performing commercial bankers in our market,” said Hummel. Schenck spent the last 12 years with Wells Fargo as a senior relationship manager in Connecticut. He also held commercial banking positions with Webster Bank, The Bank of New York and The Chase Manhattan Bank. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from Babson College. KeyCorp’s roots trace back 190 years to Albany, New York. Headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio, with several offices in Westchester County, it is one of the nation’s largest bank-based financial services companies, with assets of approximately $170.5 billion.

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When the Covid-19 pandemic forced the Hudson Highlands Nature Museum in Cornwall-on-Hudson to suspend educational programming in late March, the leadership and board looked to play to its strength of nature-based outdoor learning and play to support its mission of creating future stakeholders in the shared community environment. The first opportunity to do that came in July. By scaling back the overall size and creating individual age-group pods, the museum’s Director of Education Jenny Brinker successfully planned and ran a healthy (and infection free) eight-week summer camp for children. The response by their families was overwhelmingly positive with parents thankful their children could safely interact with other children after months of social isolation. In September to restart the highly regarded Young Naturalist (YN) program serving almost 100 mid-Hudson families with a nature-based preschool, the Nature Museum planned to build two outdoor pavilions so that classes could spend much more time outside, even when the weather was less than ideal. Just as the Nature Museum leadership was developing its plans for new outdoor classrooms, Cornwall-on-Hudson residents Matt and Kathryn Wilhelm, proprietors of local business

Matt Wilhelm of EKB Kitchens and the Matthew and Kathryn Wilhelm Charitable Fund presents a check to the Hudson Highlands Nature Museum to build outdoor classroom pavilions

EKB Kitchens, reached out to encourage the Nature Museum to apply for a grant from their modest family foundation. (The Wilhelms have been giving back to the community in this way for several years.) Within several weeks of submitting the grant application the Nature Museum was informed that it had received a

NEW ROCHELLE REAL ESTATE BROKERAGE GAINS NEW AGENTS

Ben Burton

Zack Morris

Houlihan Lawrence, headquartered in Rye Brook, has announced that Ben Burton and Zack Morris have joined the company as agents for the New Rochelle brokerage. Burton’s real estate experience includes work with developers Westrock Development and Alfred Weissman Real Estate. He will be working with the Jocelyn Burton Team at Houlihan Lawrence, which is headed by his mother Jocelyn Burton who

is the No. 1 agent in the New Rochelle office. Burton is a graduate of New York University. Morris, who was born and raised in New Rochelle, was previously a sales assistant with The HES Group in Marlboro, New Jersey. Prior to that he worked as a baseball coach and instructor for A Game Sports in New Rochelle. He will also be working with the Jocelyn Burton Team at Houlihan Lawrence.

$5,000 donation. For this support the Nature Museum will name one of the pavilions in honor of the Matt and Kathryn Wilhelm Family Foundation. Founded in 1959, the Hudson Highlands Nature Museum focuses on environmental education with a mission to develop responsible caretakers of the environment.

The Hudson Gateway Realtor® Foundation, the charitable arm of the Hudson Gateway Association of Realtors®, recently presented a check for $2,000 to Feeding Westchester, the Elmsford-based organization that sources and distributes food and resources to feed people who are hungry in every town in Westchester. It sources food from some 80 farmers, wholesalers and retailers, which is inspected, sorted and packed at its 30,000-square-foot distribution center. Trucks then deliver food more than 300 partner food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters and day care centers. “We are grateful to the Hudson Gateway Realtor® Foundation for their support,» said Karen C. Erren, president and CEO, Feeding Westchester. In addition, Feeding Westchester provides children with the nutritious, kid-friendly and easy-to-prepare food they need on the weekends. Each year, almost 60,000 BackPacks of child-friendly meals are distributed. Since 2014, the Hudson Gateway Realtor Foundation has donated thousands of dollars to charities and nonprofits throughout the Hudson Valley.

NORTHMARQ’S DONATION TO WARTBURG

Robert Ranieri, left, managing director NorthMarq Capital and David J. Gentner, Wartburg president and CEO.

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NorthMarq Capital donated $5,000 to Wartburg’s Friedrich project in Mount Vernon in support of its wellness programs. The grant was nominated by Robert Ranieri, managing director at NorthMarq’s Westchester office and also Wartburg’s Board chairman. In 2018, NorthMarq created a community fund to support organizations that focus on improving access to affordable housing or eradicating homelessness in the markets it serves for commercial real estate financing. Friedrich’s opened on Wartburg’s 34-acre campus in 2013, offering studio and one-bedroom handicap-accessible apartments for the 62+ community of active seniors. It is the first-ever Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-certified building in Mount Vernon. “We are honored to receive this donation from NorthMarq Capital. It will help us to continue our work on wellness and issues of loneliness and isolation,” said Dr. David J. Gentner, Wartburg’s president and CEO. DECEMBER 28, 2020

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Good Things LMMM COLABORATES WITH MAGNET SCHOOL The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum in Norwalk collaborated with Tracey Magnet School of Norwalk, a National Blue Ribbon School and National School of Character, on a service learning project that connects 19th century holiday dolls and toys to those cherished by many of Tracey’s students and their families today. Tracey Magnet School Principal Theresa Rangel said, “I am continually humbled that our school, which has a focus on the soft skills of social-emotional learning, has been able to demonstrate our core values and enhance the lives of our students by modeling what matters most in life – the ability to make a positive contribution to the community and the world….” Tracey fourth graders, inspired by the museum’s exhibit as well as the toys and dolls that are highlighted in their own diverse cultures, put their creativity to work and crafted dolls, which are currently on

HEALTHFIRST’S DONATION TO FEEDING WESTCHESTER view in the mansion’s Billiards Room. Organized by LMMM Education Program Director Iliana Begetis and Tracey Character Education Theme Coach Kristen Penta, Tracey students and teachers took a virtual tour of the Christmas Playtime exhibit at the mansion with LMMM Education Docent Midge Lopat. Students researched, explored and shared various winter holidays and traditions from around the world, including their own cultures. From this learning and using various forms of media such as paper, fabric and colored yarn, Tracey fourth graders crafted their dolls for the exhibit. Tracey Magnet School is Connecticut’s only state and national School of Character and also a 2019 National Blue Ribbon School. For more information, visit lockwoodmathewsmansion.com, e-mail info@ lockwoodmathewsmansion.com, or call 203-838-9799.

JAPANESE ARTS AND CULTURE FOR THE NEW YEAR The Arts Mid-Hudson Folk Arts Program and the Mid-Hudson Japanese Community Association in Poughkeepsie will premiere the video “Traditional Arts: Japan” at 2 p.m. Jan 9, via Facebook and YouTube in place of the annual kakizome or first writing of the year, due to the pandemic. The video will feature the practice of kakizome and other Japanese traditional arts, including origami (paper folding) and sumi-e (ink-wash painting) and the preparation of mochi and ozoni for New Year’s meals. The transition to a new year is a time to voice hopes and desires for the future in the form of resolutions, wishes and other forms of stating intentions

going forward, at least for the next 12 months. The Japanese express their desires with kakizome, the ritualized first calligraphy writing of the year. Kakizome, which translates to “first writing,” takes place within the first few days of the year and is about positive wishes for the New Year. The Mid-Hudson Japanese Community Association is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to introduce Japanese culture to the local community, to foster a sense of community among Japanese residents and to be a bridge for cultural exchanges between Japanese and non-Japanese residents of the Hudson Valley.

NYMC VICE CHANCELLOR FOR DIVERSITY APPOINTED Mill Etienne, M.D., 2002 New York Medical College (NYMC) graduate and presently associate dean of student affairs and associate professor of neurology and medicine in the School of Medicine (SOM) at NYMC has been appointed to the collegewide position of vice chancellor for diversity and inclusion, effective immediately. In this new role, Etienne will work to enhance the diversity of the entire New York Medical College and Touro College of Dental Medicine (TCDM) community by promoting equity and inclusion in all aspects of teaching, student life, faculty recruitment, clinical practice and research. He will also oversee the Office of Diversity and Inclusivity, working closely with Ray Whitt, M.D., assistant

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Mill Etienne

professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and Yvonne Thornton, M.D., professor Etienne is a visiting scholar at the National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care at Tuskegee University as well as director of the Epilepsy and EEG Laboratory at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, part of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network. He is currently president of the New York State Neurological Society. FCBJ

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One of the nation’s largest not-forprofit health insurers, Healthfirst, made a generous donation to Feeding Westchester in Elmsford, which helped Westchester County’s largest nonprofit hunger-relief organization provide nutritious meals for nearly 40,000 families (or 150,000 people) this holiday season. Its donation stocked Feeding Westchester’s Mobile Food Pantry and Fresh Market Program with more than 88,000 pounds of food. “The economic crisis caused by the pandemic has led to devastating consequences for those who were already struggling,” said Pat Wang, president and CEO of Healthfirst. “For many of our members, including one million Medicaid clients, food insecurity has always been an issue. Covid-19 has dramatically worsened the situation and laid bare how many of our neighbors lack the basic necessities to sustain a healthy life.” Healthfirst is committed to reducing health disparities across its membership and member communities through the work it does every day. This

Healthfirst’s donation to Feeding Westchester enabled the nonprofit to provide 44 pallets (or 88,000 pounds) of fresh, nutritious food to those in need.

holiday season, the company supported healthy communities by helping those struggling to put food on the table. Feeding Westchester’s network of nearly 300 partner agencies and programs throughout the county are serving between 260,000 – 300,000 residents who are hungry each month — more than twice as many as preCovid-19. The nonprofit has distributed nearly 20.4 million pounds of food or 17 million meals, in the last year compared to 10.1 million pounds in 2019. “Many families and individuals right

here in Westchester County are facing unprecedented challenges this holiday season,” said Karen C. Erren, president and CEO of Feeding Westchester. Healthfirst has earned the trust of more than 1.6 million members by ensuring access to affordable and high-quality health care. Sponsored by downstate New York’s leading hospital systems, Healthfirst’s unique advantage is rooted in its mission to put members first by partnering closely with its broad network of providers on shared goals.

LOUNSBURY HOUSE EXPANDS BOARD

David McInnis

Catherine Savoca

Chris Tiberio

Lounsbury House, Ridgefield’s historic community center, recently announced the appointment of three new Board of Director members as well as the full slate of officers and directors for 2021. Joining the board are David McInnis, Catherine Savoca, and Chris Tiberio. “All three of our newest board members embody the spirit of community and bring talent, expertise and energy to the table. We are very fortunate to have them by our side as we work to strengthen community, preserve local history and continue to position Lounsbury House as Fairfield County’s premier private event venue,” said Executive Director Suzanne

Brennan. McInnis has nearly two decades of global recruitment experience and is president and founder of Willard Powell Inc., a Stamford-based executive recruitment firm specializing in Fortune 100 financial, insurance, technology and health care industries. As a 26-year Ridgefield resident, Savoca has volunteered in many organizations in support of the community where she and her husband and three children reside. She currently works in New York City as chief operating officer for an executive search firm specializing in the fashion, retail and beauty industry.

Tiberio is the current executive director of Risk and Insurance Management Linde PLC in Danbury (formerly Praxair). Previously, he was the global risk manager at IBM and divisional risk manager at PepsiCo. Outgoing Lounsbury House Board co-presidents, Alex Bellina and Laura Brennan were praised for their exemplary leadership, and a new slate of officers for 2021 was welcomed: President Jill Rae, Vice Chair Robert J. Creamer, Treasurer Antonia Riordan, Secretary Patricia Ross and returning directors Wendy Beurket, Tiffany Brooks, Caroline Kellen and Christine Wohl.


Thank You to the Business Community for Supporting ArtsWestchester This Year. With your help, we have supported the following 120 arts organizations with grants. Accent Dance NYC Actors Conservatory Theatre Afrikan Healing Circle Inc. Antonia Arts Arc Stages ArchForKids Arts and Culture Committee Asbury-Crestwood United Methodist Church Axial Theatre Ballet des AmĂŠriques School & Company Bedford Playhouse Bethany Arts Community Blue Door Art Center Bridgemusik Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts Chappaqua Orchestra Chiku Awali African Dance, Arts & Culture Clay Art Center CLC Foundation Clocktower Players Concordia Conservatory Copland House Dennis P. McHugh Piermont Public Library Downtown Music at Grace The Emelin Theatre for the Performing Arts Emotions Physical Theatre Fine Arts Orchestral Society of Yonkers Friends of Music Concerts The Friends of the North Castle Public Library Hamm & Clov Stage Company Hammond Museum Harrigan Educational & Cultural Center Haverstraw African American Connection Haverstraw RiverArts Fund Historic Hudson Valley

Hoff-Barthelson Music School Hudson Chorale Hudson Stage Company Hudson Valley MOCA Hudson Valley Writers' Center India Center of Westchester Jacob Burns Film Center Jazz Forum Arts Katonah Museum of Art Lagond Music School Little Radical Theatrics Lyndhurst, A National Trust for Historic Preservation Mamaroneck Artists Guild Manhattan Tap Mount Vernon Friends of Parks and Recreation Mount Vernon Public Library Music Conservatory of Westchester Neuberger Museum of Art New Era Creative Space New Rochelle Council on the Arts New Rochelle Opera New Westchester Symphony Orchestra Northern Star Quilters' Guild Nowodworski Foundation Nyack Library Ossining Documentary & Discussion Series Ossining Public Library Paramount Hudson Valley Arts Pelham Art Center The Picture House Regional Film Center PJS Jazz Society The Play Group Theater Pleasantville Music Theatre Peforming Arts Center at Purchase College Rehabilitation Through The Arts

The Revelators River River Writers Circle Rivertowns Art Council Rockland Arts Festival Committee Rockland County Choral Society Rockland Independent Living Center dba BRIDGES Rockso Ekkquinox Steelband Ruth Keeler Memorial Library The Rye Arts Center The Scarsdale Arts Council The Schoolhouse Theater & Arts Center Songcatchers Sound Shore Chorale of New Rochelle Steffi Nossen Dance Foundation Symphony of Westchester Taconic Opera Tarrytown Music Hall Rebecca Thomas - A Palo Seco Flamenco Company Tutti Bravi Productions Untermyer Performing Arts Council Urban Studio Unbound Wartburg Westchester Children's Chorus Westchester Children's Museum The Westchester Chordsmen Westchester Collaborative Theater The Westchester Italian Cultural Center Westchester Philharmonic Westchester Public Private Partnership for Aging Services White Plains Performing Arts Center YoFi Fest Yonkers Riverfront Library Youth Theatre Interactions

ArtsWestchester’s grants programs reach every community in Westchester County, providing support to artists and arts and cultural groups both large and small.

Artsw.org/donate @artswestchester

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Facts & Figures U.S. BANKRUPTCY COURT White Plains & Poughkeepsie Local business cases, Dec. 16 - 22

Arctic Air Heating and Cooling, Blauvelt, 20-23284-RDD: Chapter 7, $45,451 assets, $95,816 liabilities. Attorney: Dwight D. Joyce. Willemma Corp., Ossining, doing business as 145 Antiques, 20-23291-SHL: Chapter 11, $59,914 assets, $122,812 liabilities. Attorney: Charles A. Higgs.

U.S. DISTRICT COURT, White Plains Local business cases, Dec. 16 – 22

UnitedHealthcare Insurance Co., Minnesota vs. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc., Tarrytown, 20-cv-10664-VB: Racketeering. Attorney: Ronald J. Schutz. Structural Steel and Bridge Painters of Greater New York, White Plains vs. All American Pressure Cleaning & Painting, Jamaica, New York, 20-cv-10764-KMK: Enforcement of employee benefits. Attorney: Dana L. Henke. American Christmas, Mount Vernon vs. Mount Hawley Insurance Co., Peoria, Illinois, et al, 20-cv-10772-NSR: Insurance. Attorney: Michael J. Forino.

Wanda A. Nieves, Valley Cottage, et al, vs. United Hospice Inc., New City, 20-cv-10790-KMK: Job discrimination. Attorney: John J.P. Howley. Laborers International Union Local 235, Elmsford vs. M.V.M. Construction, Mount Vernon, 20-cv-10830: Labor-management relations. Attorney: Michele J. Harari.

DEEDS Above $1 million 19 Lawrence St LLC, Eastchester. Seller: Anthony F. Chiarello, Glen Head. Property: 19 Lawrence St., Yonkers. Amount: $1.8 million. Filed Dec. 18. 590 COM LLC, Thornwood. Seller: TRD Properties Inc., Thornwood. Property: 590 Commerce St., Mount Pleasant. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed Dec. 16. Kirkland New York Property Holdings LLC, Purchase. Seller: Eugenio Minvielle, Paris, France. Property: 330 Stuyvesant Ave., Rye. Amount: $5.7 million. Filed Dec. 14. MKJT LLC, New York City. Seller: Janet H. Harckham, Katonah. Property: 277 Mount Holly Road, Bedford. Amount: $2.2 million. Filed Dec. 14. S and V New York Iron Works Inc., Bronx. Seller: Rocha Realty LLC, Yonkers. Property: 39-47 Ash St., Yonkers. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed Dec. 15. TPG Central Park Avenue LLC, New York City. Seller: HSBC Bank USA N.A. Property: 2205 Central Park Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $2.3 million. Filed Dec. 15.

AccrueMe and Luxe Bath, Rockland vs. Mark Woeppel, Tulsa, Oklahoma, 20-cv-10777PMH: Contract. Attorney: Neil Flynn.

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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DECEMBER 28, 2020

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ON THE RECORD

Below $1 million 1119 Howard Street LLC, Croton-on-Hudson. Seller: Chester Rental Properties Inc., Peekskill. Property: 1119 Howard St., Peekskill. Amount: $300,000. Filed Dec. 15. 128 Elm Realty LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Grace Natuzzi, Yonkers. Property: 128 Elm St., Yonkers. Amount: $200,000. Filed Dec. 14.

Broadway Training Center of Westchester Inc., Hastings-on-Hudson. Seller: John A. Wazeter, et al, Hastings-on-Hudson. Property: Washington Avenue, Greenburgh. Amount: $800,000. Filed Dec. 18. Earth Improvements Inc., Dobbs Ferry. Seller: Joseph Granchelli, Mamaroneck. Property: 1071 Grove St., Rye. Amount: $403,550. Filed Dec. 18.

20 Old Road Lane LLC, Mount Kisco. Seller: Barbara A. Phillips, Mount Kisco. Property: 20 Old Road Lane, New Castle. Amount: $778,000. Filed Dec. 15.

Edson Avenue Development Group LLC, Mount Vernon. Seller: Onysha D. Norfleet, et al, Mount Vernon. Property: 134 S. Eighth Ave., Mount Vernon. Amount: $245,000. Filed Dec. 14.

209 Harrison Avenue LLC, West Harrison. Seller: Vitetum Properties LLC, Bronxville. Property: 209 Harrison, Harrison. Amount: $865,000. Filed Dec. 15.

FCR Builders Group LLC, Yonkers. Seller: Holly Place Associates Inc., Hastings-on-Hudson. Property: 1 A Holly Place, Greenburgh. Amount: $96,000. Filed Dec. 15.

512-119 LLC, Trumbull, Connecticut. Seller: Yosemite Avenue Inc., White Plains. Property: 12 Yosemite Ave., Greenburgh. Amount: $200,000. Filed Dec. 15.

Gabel Westchester LLC, Fort Lee, New Jersey. Seller: Robert J. Spence Jr., et al, White Plains. Property: 701 Pondside Drive, 701, Greenburgh. Amount: $762,500. Filed Dec. 16.

A. Maiorano Holdings LLC, Eastchester. Seller: Antoinette McKenna, et al, Rye. Property: 765 Pelham Road, New Rochelle. Amount: $425,000. Filed Dec. 15. A. Maiorano Holdings LLC, Eastchester. Seller: Thomas P. McKenna, et al, Rye. Property: 763 Pelham Road, New Rochelle. Amount: $425,000. Filed Dec. 15. Athena Property Solutions LLC, New York City. Seller: U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Property: 11 Dogwood Road, Somers. Amount: $245,811. Filed Dec. 14. Bleecker Heights Marine LLC, Clermont, Florida. Seller: Infinity Holdings Group Inc., Newburgh. Property: Route 9, Hudson River, C-12, Cortlandt. Amount: $89,500. Filed Dec. 15.

Holly Place Associates LLC, Yonkers. Seller: Louis Pardy, et al, Hastings-on-Hudson. Property: 1 Holly Place, Greenburgh. Amount: $118,000. Filed Dec. 15. Person2Person Properties LLC, White Plains. Seller: Kevin T. Agee, et al, Elmsford. Property: 908 Old Country Road, Greenburgh. Amount: $280,000. Filed Dec. 15. Sanjust LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: G. Stutman Condo LLC, Dobbs Ferry. Property: 381 Broadway, 1C, Greenburgh. Amount: $285,000. Filed Dec. 14. Your New Home LLC, Peekskill. Seller: Christopher B. Meagher, White Plains. Property: 4 Rolling Way, Peekskill. Amount: $74,350. Filed Dec. 15.

westchester county

JUDGMENTS Hudson View Care Center Inc., Yonkers. $26,801 in favor of Elite Maintenance Services LLC, Fairlawn, New Jersey. Filed Dec. 15. Scully Construction LLC, North White Plains. $495 in favor of HY2 Mount Kemble LLC, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania. Filed Dec. 16.

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicated a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed. 349 MV LLC, et al. Filed by Toorak Capital Partners LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $401,250 affecting property located at 349 S. Fourth Ave., Mount Vernon 10550. Filed Dec. 3. Aridom Enterprises LLC, et al. Filed by U.S. Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $570,000 affecting property located at 7 Maple St., Valhalla 10595. Filed Dec. 3. Carvin, Mary Elizabeth, et al. Filed by U.S. Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $110,000 affecting property located at 5 Charles St., Mount Pleasant 10595. Filed Dec. 1. Fogler, Jonathan P., et al. Filed by Wilmington Savings Fund Society FSB. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 39 Whittier Hills Road, North Salem 10560. Filed Dec. 2.

Luiso, Joseph, as executor and heir to the estate of Robert Luiso, et al. Filed by U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $497,250 affecting property located at 90 Oak St., Harrison 10528. Filed Dec. 3. Maldonado, Lyda A., et al. Filed by U.S. Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $525,000 affecting property located at 423 Halstead Ave., Mamaroneck 10543. Filed Dec. 3. Murphy, Corinne M., individually and as trustee of the R and C Family Trust, et al. Filed by Reverse Mortgage Solutions Inc. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $742,500 affecting property located at 14 Fay Place, White Plains 10604. Filed Dec. 2. Riker, Martin L., et al. Filed by Wilmington Savings Fund Society FSB. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $650,000 affecting property located at 2 Patriots Farm Court, Armonk 10504. Filed Dec. 4.

MECHANIC’S LIENS 42 Rigby St LLC, as owner. $3,515 as claimed by A-1 Transit Mix Inc., Bronx. Property: in Yonkers. Filed Dec. 11. Baccellieri, Sandy, as owner. $7,000 as claimed by JC Remodeling Contracting Inc., Yonkers. Property: in Pelham. Filed Dec. 10. THCC Realty LLC, as owner. $33,782 as claimed by Cioffi 1 Inc., Thiells. Property: in Greenburgh. Filed Dec. 10. Willow Ridge Country Club Inc., as owner. $11,583 as claimed by Metro Milorganite Inc. Property: in Harrison. Filed Dec. 8.


Facts & Figures NEW BUSINESSES

PATENTS

This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.

Generating test data based on data value rules of linked data nodes. Patent no. 10,872,090 issued to Brett Rosen, et al. Assigned to Mastercard International, Purchase.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS Counter Culture Vision, 40 E. Sidney Ave., Apt. 4C, Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Jordan Macafity. Filed July 23.

Genetically modified major histocompatibility complex mice. Patent no. 10,869,466 issued to Lynn MacDonald, et al. Assigned to Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown.

Cozy Nails Spa, 1462 Nepperhan Ave., Yonkers 10703, c/o Monica Torres and Nely Torres. Filed July 23.

Multimodal analyte sensor network. Patent no. 10,871,479 issued to Josephine Chang, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

Curt’s Garden and Lawn Care, 2072 Albany Post Road, Montrose 10548, c/o Curtis Hernandez. Filed July 23.

Process for identifying completion of domain adaptation dictionary activities. Patent no. 10,872,205 issued to Charles Beller, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

Impact World, 251 Woodland Ave., Apt. 1F, Yonkers 10703, c/o Moises Robalo. Filed July 23. Makeup by Joi, 40 E. Sidney Ave., Apt. 4C, Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Joi M. Brown. Filed July 23. One Nation Worship, 123 Croton Ave., basement, Ossining 10562, c/o Moises Aguilar. Filed July 23. The Westchester Auto Detailer, 59 Breckenridge Ave., Port Chester 10573, c/o Alberto Michael Acevedo. Filed July 23. The Worship Connection, 2109 Maple Ave., Cortlandt Manor 10567, Oscar D. Gutierrez. Filed July 23. Whitestone Infusion Healthcare, 440 Warburton Ave., No. 5L, Yonkers 10701, c/o Amy Newmann. Filed July 23.

Secure processor-based control plane function virtualization in cloud systems. Patent no. 10,872,145 issued to Victor Brown, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

Mastercard International, Purchase. System and method for stand-in processing. Patent no. 10,872,323 issued to Piyush Sharma, et al. Assigned to Mastercard International, Purchase. Tool to provide integrated circuit masks with accurate dimensional compensation of patterns. Patent no. 10,872,188 issued to Alan Rosenbluth. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

HUDSON VALLEY

North, Jared, Jersey City, New Jersey, as owner. Lender: Ulster Savings Bank, Kingston. Property: 3078 Route 44/55, Gardiner 12525. Amount: $520,600. Filed Dec. 18.

Shekomeko LLC, New York City. Seller: Keeler Lane Development Corp., Millbrook. Property: in Northeast. Amount: $4.4 million. Filed Dec. 18.

Bark and Trees LLC, Accord. Seller: Janet Schechter, Ossining. Property: 5 Meadowlark Road, Rochester. Amount: $180,000. Filed Dec. 16.

Pulaski, Andrew, et al, Kingston, as owner. Lender: Ulster Savings Bank, Kingston. Property: 135 Ruby Road, Kingston 12401. Amount: $614,000. Filed Dec. 14.

Below $1 million

Bulls Head Properties LLC, Clinton Corners. Seller: Christopher Heinz, et al, New York City. Property: in Clinton. Amount: $279,500. Filed Dec. 18.

Roanoke Properties NY Inc., Monroe, as owner. Lender: RCN Capital LLC, South Windsor, Connecticut. Property: in Newburgh. Amount: $20,000. Filed Dec. 18. TH Developments LLC, New Windsor, as owner. Lender: LendingOne LLC, Boca Raton, Florida. Property: 26 Guernsey Drive, New Windsor 12553. Amount: $195,600. Filed Dec. 15.

DEEDS BUILDING LOANS Above $1 million

Steep-switch field-effect transistor with integrated bi-stable resistive system. Patent no. 10,872,962 issued to Julien Frougier, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

Forest Edge 12 LLC, Monroe, as owner. Lender: Northeast Community Bank, White Plains. Property: in Kiryas Joel. Amount: $2.2 million. Filed Dec. 16.

Syringe systems, piston seal systems, stopper systems and methods of use and assembly. Patent no. 10,869,966 issued to Michael Cupicha, et al. Assigned to Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown.

Mitchell, Amber Noelle, Kingston, as owner. Lender: Mid-Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union, Kingston. Property: 638 Ulster Landing Road, Saugerties 12477. Amount: $2.4 million. Filed Dec. 14.

Systems and methods for managing digital identities associated with users. Patent no. 10,873,853 issued to Ashfaq Kamal, et al. Assigned to

Below $1 million FA2071 LLC, Accord, as owner. Lender: Ulster Savings Bank, Kingston. Property: 2071 Route 32, Kingston 12401. Amount: $241,000. Filed Dec. 14.

Above $1 million 13 Hands Equine Rescue Inc., Clinton Corners. Seller: Anthony N. Pizzella, et al, Merrick. Property: 59 Tuscan Way, Stanford. Amount: $1.5 million. Filed Dec. 14. Bulls Head Properties LLC, Clinton Corners. Seller: Christopher Heinz, et al, New York City. Property: in Clinton. Amount: $1.8 million. Filed Dec. 18. CVS Wood Realty LLC, Manhasset. Seller: 390 Broadway Associates, Manhasset. Property: in Woodstock. Amount: $1.9 million. Filed Dec. 18. Erose Holdings LLC, Brewster. Seller: Alka Realty Inc., Brewster. Property: 25 Fields Lane, Brester 10509. Amount: $4.5 million. Filed Dec. 16. NS Retail Holdings LLC, Dallas, Texas. Seller: BRE RC Beekman SS New York LLC, Chicago, Illinois. Property: in Beekman. Amount: $12.4 million. Filed Dec. 18.

157 Mallory Road LLC, New York City. Seller: William J. Fenrich, et al, Verbank. Property: 157 Mallory Road, Union Vale. Amount: $650,000. Filed Dec. 14. 196 Marine LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Chad Crawford, Kingston. Property: 191 Wall St., Kingston. Amount: $355,000. Filed Dec. 21. 23 Ridge Marlboro LLC, Mountaindale. Seller: Concetta Terminato, et al, Middle Village. Property: 23 Ridge, Marlborough. Amount: $61,654. Filed Dec. 18. 250 Lasher Road LLC, Tivoli. Seller: Sunday Hagicostas-Chuda. Property: in Red Hook. Amount: $65,000. Filed Dec. 15. 94 Canopus Hollow Realty LLC, Putnam Valley. Seller: Pauline M. Galvin, Yonkers. Property: 94 Canopus Hollow Road, Putnam Valley 10579. Amount: $255,000. Filed Dec. 21. ACREI LLC, New York City. Seller: Dorothy D. Manley, Middletown. Property: 23 Wawayanda Ave., Middletown. Amount: $105,000. Filed Dec. 1. Alrace LLC, Long Island City. Seller: PHD IC LLC, Brooklyn. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $365,000. Filed Dec. 14. APB Custom Inc., Warwick. Seller: Lott Ventures LLC, Wallkill. Property: in Shawangunk. Amount: $89,000. Filed Dec. 15. APB Custom Inc., Warwick. Seller: Lott Ventures LLC, Wallkill. Property: in Shawangunk. Amount: $85,000. Filed Dec. 15.

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Central Hudson Gas and Electric Corp., Poughkeepsie. Seller: Largay LLC, Boiceville. Property: in Ulster. Amount: $100,000. Filed Dec. 22. CSX Transportation Inc., Jacksonville, Florida. Seller: Brightstar New York Holdings LLC, Palm Coast, Florida. Property: in Ulster. Amount: $503,000. Filed Dec. 22. Cyrano Properties LLC, Amherst, Massachusetts. Seller: Rhinebeck Bank, Poughkeepsie. Property: 5 Manchester Road, Poughkeepsie. Amount: $140,000. Filed Dec. 14. Falanga Farms LLC, Middletown. Seller: Allen H. Zoghby, Middletown. Property: in Mamakating and Mount Hope. Amount: $55,000. Filed Nov. 30. Hudson Highlands Land Trust Inc., Garrison. Seller: County of Putnam, Carmel. Property: Ridge Road, Philipstown. Amount: $71,500. Filed Dec. 18. J. Miller Properties LLC, Wallkill. Seller: Timothy Murphy, et al, Montgomery. Property: in Shawangunk. Amount: $150,000. Filed Dec. 18. Largay LLC, Boiceville. Seller: Central Hudson Gas and Electric Corp., Poughkeepsie. Property: 2229-2271 Route 9W, Ulster. Amount: $100,000. Filed Dec. 22. Little Big Falls LLC, Rhinebeck. Seller: Donald K. Osterndorff, Rhinebeck. Property: in Clinton. Amount: $350,000. Filed Dec. 15.

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Facts & Figures Lower Ackert Hook Partners LLC, Rhinebeck. Seller: Alice Kohn Dolby, et al, Atlanta, Georgia. Property: in Rhinebeck. Amount: $421,500. Filed Dec. 14.

Teakettle Spout LLC, New York City. Seller: Emil K. Lienan, et al, Rhinebeck. Property: in Rhinebeck. Amount: $175,000. Filed Dec. 16.

Freedom Income Tax Centers Inc., Monroe. $5,000 in favor of the Workers’ Compensation Board of the State of New York, Albany. Filed Nov. 30.

Maristan Properties Inc., Carmel. Seller: County of Putnam, Carmel. Property: 33 Upland drive, Philipstown. Amount: $57,000. Filed Dec. 15.

Temple Hill Brands LLC, Newburgh. Seller: Richard W. Roth, Newburgh. Property: 3032 Route 9W, New Windsor 12553. Amount: $750,000. Filed Dec. 1.

Hudson Valley Bagel Company Inc., New Windsor. $10,119 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 3.

Oak Ridge Estates LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Artcraft Wire Goods Inc., Ellenville. Property: 399 Oak Ridge Road, Ellenville 12428. Amount: $385,000. Filed Dec. 15.

The Moy LLC, Accord. Seller: William H. Collier III, Ellenville. Property: in Rochester. Amount: $250,000. Filed Sept. 15.

Lysyczyn’s Custom Lawn Care Inc., Pine Bush. $4,444 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 15.

Palisades Interstate Park Commission, Bear Mountain. Seller: Orange County Land Trust Inc., Mountainville. Property: in Warwick. Amount: $310,000. Filed Nov. 30. Phoenix Tattoo LLC, New Windsor. Seller: Little Britain LLC, Newburgh. Property: in Walden. Amount: $180,000. Filed Dec. 1. PJ One Enterprises LLC, Middletown. Seller: Lloyd Cotton, Poughkeepsie. Property: 14 Cotton Way, Poughkeepsie. Amount: $165,000. Filed Dec. 16. R.J. Gullo Properties Inc., Buffalo. Seller: Vincent E. Carl, Kingston. Property: 12 Wrentham St., Kingston. Amount: $225,000. Filed Dec. 22. Rinaldi Holding LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Poughkeepsie Urban Renewal Agency, Poughkeepsie. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $290,000. Filed Dec. 18. San Miguel Academy of Newburgh, Newburgh. Seller: Church of St. Francis of Assisi, Newburgh. Property: 245 and 249 Renwick St., Newburgh. Amount: $552,000. Filed Dec. 1. Sauchuk Industries LLC, Waldwick, New Jersey. Seller: Dennis W. McGraw, Millbrook. Property: 53 Oaks Road, Lloyd. Amount: $166,001. Filed Dec. 21. SGB Realty Group LLC, Monroe. Seller: Stanley Rhodes, Newburgh. Property: 329 Meadow Ave., Newburgh. Amount: $80,000. Filed Dec. 1.

The Orchard Project LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Fred L. Schiller, et al, Houston, Texas. Property: in Plattekill. Amount: $145,000. Filed Dec. 15. Universal Communications Network Inc., New York City. Seller: Edward H. Dudek, Middletown. Property: 123-125 Sprague Ave., Middletown. Amount: $325,000. Filed Dec. 1. Westside Building and Restoration Inc., Poughkeepsie. Seller: Rosemarie Mitchell, et al, Millbrook. Property: 5 Valley Farm Road, Washington. Amount: $260,000. Filed Dec. 14.

JUDGMENTS 17K Food Mart Inc., Montgomery. $518 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 3. Black Magnet Enterprises Inc., Middletown. $22,237 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 3. Climate Change HVAC of New York Inc., Monroe. $1,314 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 3. CZR Autobody Inc., Fort Montgomery. $10,548 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 3.

Rauschenbach Tack Shop Inc., Newburgh. $753 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 3. Rosendale Bridge Plaza LLC, Rosendale. $783 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 15. Shaffers Department Store Corp., Monroe. $824 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 3. Techwiz Design Inc., Monroe. $1,237 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 3. The Beverly Bar Inc., Kingston. $7,404 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 15. Woodstock Landscaping and Excavating LLC, West Hurley. $1,687 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 15. Yobo Inc., Wallkill. $19,271 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Dec. 15.

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicated a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed.

Amundson, Kelli, et al. Filed by HSBC Bank USA N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $1 million affecting property located at 7 Paul Drive, Mahopac 10541. Filed Dec. 15. Cloud, Deena R., et al. Filed by Community Loan Servicing LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $183,700 affecting property located at 824 E. Peenpack Trail, Sparrow Bush 12780. Filed Nov. 25. Effner, Susan, et al. Filed by U.S. Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 323 Hasbrouck Ave., Kingston 12401. Filed Dec. 22. Galicia, Francisco, et al. Filed by Towd Point Mortgage Trust 2017-1. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $144,000 affecting property located at 225 Linden Ave., Middletown 10940. Filed Nov. 25. Heirs and distributees of the estate of Samuel Pollak, et al. Filed by Wilmington Savings Fund Society FSB. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $296,000 affecting property located at 14 Smith Hill Road, New Hampton 10958. Filed Nov. 24. Hommel, Debra L., et al. Filed by the State of New York Mortgage Agency. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $68,800 affecting property located at 7 Hilton Place, Saugerties 12477. Filed Dec. 15. Lakatosh, Erin Smith, as executrix of the estate of Liam E. Smith, et al. Filed by Specialized Loan Servicing LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $225,000 affecting property located at 1016 Route 82, Hopewell Junction 12533. Filed Nov. Dec. 15. Munet, Ruben, et al. Filed by Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $216,000 affecting property located at 8 Knapp Ave., Middletown 10940. Filed Nov. 24.

Ovensen, Jeanne, et al. Filed by Matthew Scopteuolo. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $190,000 affecting property located at 43 Weathervane Drive, Apt. 13, Washingtonville. Filed Nov. 25. Soto, Samuel Jr., et al. Filed by Wilmington Savings Fund Society FSB. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $190,000 affecting property located at 138 Vails Gate Heights Drive, New Windsor 12553. Filed Nov. 25. Strollo, Helen O., individually and as surviving spouse of William R. Strollo, et al. Filed by Nationstar Mortgage LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $585,875 affecting property located at 93-95 E. Market St., Hyde Park 12538. Filed Nov. Dec. 17.

MECHANIC’S LIENS Adelaar Farms LLC, Ulster Park, as owner. $30,745 as claimed by New York Crushing and Recycling, Ulster. Property: 83 Union Center Road, Ulster Park 12487. Filed Dec. 21. EFG DRA Heritage LLC, as owner. $12,942 as claimed by Old Homestead Realty Properties Inc., Hyde Park. Property: 3532 North Road, Poughkeepsie. Filed Dec. 18. Golden Property Group LLC, as owner. $16,460 as claimed by Shaffer Plumbing and Heating Inc., Carmel. Property: 8 Hillside Road, Kent. Filed Dec. 15. Malcolmson, Anne, Putnam Valley, as owner. $16,983 as claimed by Douglas Marshall Cooper Associates LLC, Pound Ridge. Property: 51 Park Drive, Putnam Valley 10579. Filed Dec. 18. Sipos, Michelle, as owner. $16,650 as claimed by Uni Equities Providers Corp., Chester. Property: 39 Lakeside Drive, New Windsor. Filed Dec. 2.

NEW BUSINESSES This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.

PARTNERSHIPS Drywall Repair and Painting, 149 Academy Ave., Middletown 1940, c/o Ludbin Calderon-Cruz and Henry Jose Rivera Calderon. Filed Nov. 24. Taconic Property, 2156 Route 301, Carmel 10512, c/o Leah Kelleher and Stephen Kelleher. Filed Dec. 18.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS 1st Place Time and Auto Sales, 200 Ulster Ave., Ulster Park 12487, c/o Raymond Navara. Filed Dec. 15. Bruce Buley Construction, 102 Nelson Hoff Road, Saugerties 12477, c/o Bruce Buley. Filed Dec. 18. Dayana Tree Service, 73 Prospect Ave., No. 2, Middletown 10940, c/o Edgardo Raul Juarez Velasquez. Filed Nov. 24. Hobson House Antiques, 6 Market St., Ellenville 12428, c/o Luis E. Diaz. Filed Dec. 15. Hudson Valley Sweets, P.O. Box 610, Port Ewen 12466, c/o Paige Victoria Yavaniski. Filed Dec. 21. JnJ Construction, 140 Berme Road, Apt. 2, Ellenville 12428, c/o Jose Joel Gonzalez Lebron. Filed Dec. 21. La Haynes Unlimited, 15 Amster Road, Wallkill, c/o LouAnn Alleyne-Haynes. Filed Nov. 24. MJ Landscaping, 42 Holland Drive, Hurley 12491, c/o Matthew Jacob VanValkenburgh. Filed Dec. 21. Newburgh Menagerie, 512 Upper Ave., Newburgh 12550, c/o Joshua Scott Manley. Filed Nov. 24. Sapphire Builders, 669 Glasco Turnpike, Saugerties 12477, c/o Billy J. Cox. Filed Dec. 21. Sefi Selections, 3 Hight St., Cold Spring 10516, c/o Felix Jimenez. Filed Dec. 16. SMNE Consultant Services, 13 Wedgewood Lane, Middletown 10940, c/o Stuart Timothy Carver. Filed Nov. 24. Tierney Home and Yard, 35 Stanley St., Kingston 12401, c/o Richard Tierney. Filed Dec. 15.

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Facts & Figures BUILDING PERMITS Commercial 34 East Putnam Avenue Corporate Suites, White Plains, New York, contractor for 34 East Putnam Avenue Corporate Suites. Perform replacement alterations at 34 E. Putnam Ave., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $50,000. Filed November 2020. Almeida, Emanuel, Somers, New York, contractor for Daniel J. Vasquez. Construct an in-ground swimming pool and required safety barrier at 52 Fairfield Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $82,000. Filed November 2020. c/o Marx Realty, New York, New York, contractor for c/o Marx Realty. Perform replacement alterations at 102 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed November 2020. Cardillo Pools and Spas LC, New Rochelle, New York, contractor for Glen and Peggy Tso. Construct in-ground swimming pool and required safety barrier at 78 Burning Tree Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $103,000. Filed November 2020. JMK Construction Group, Westport, contractor for Christ Church Greenwich. Construct a new Building to Neighbor donation facility at 254 E. Putnam Ave., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $1,594,214. Filed November 2020. Meehan and Ramos Pools LLC, Stratford, contractor for Gregory and Caroline Martinez. Construct an in-ground swimming pool and required safety barrier at 10 Club Road, Riverside. Estimated cost: $70,000. Filed November 2020. Ocean North Pools LLC, Stamford, contractor for James R. Hexter. Construct an in-ground swimming pool and required safety barrier at 46 Park Ave., Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $97,850. Filed November 2020.

Shoreline Pools Inc., Stamford, contractor for 543 Stanwich LLC. Construct an in-ground swimming pool and required safety barrier at 543 Stanwich Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $85,000. Filed November 2020. The DeLuca Construstion Co., Stamford, contractor for Greenwich Hospital. Modify surgery unit into pulmonary unit by installing and relocating doors and install a new workstation at 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $95,687. Filed November 2020. TMA Construction LLC, Greenwich, contractor for Yuri Dubrovsky. Construct a new pool house at 8 Boulder Brook Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $150,000. Filed November 2020.

Residential 6 Butternut Lane LLC, Riverside, contractor for 6 Butternut Lane LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 5 Pleasant View Place, Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $3,680. Filed November 2020. 64 Park Avenue LLC, Old Greenwich, contractor for 64 Park Avenue LC. Add two bedrooms and bathrooms in attic at 64 Park Ave., Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $56,000. Filed November 2020. Connecticut Basement System, Seymour, contractor for Robert and Catalina Weiser. Install one sump pump and rigid fire-rated foam insulation board at 14 Hidden Brook Road, Riverside. Estimated cost: $20,864. Filed November 2020. Cortes Construction LLC, Fairfield, contractor for Kent L. McHale. Renovate fixtures at 185 Putnam Park, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $8,000. Filed November 2020. Cortes Construction LLC, Fairfield, contractor for Frank Rinaldi. Renovate kitchen, remove wall, expand entrance at 151 Putnam Park, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $10,400. Filed November 2020.

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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ON THE RECORD

CT Environmental & Build, Greenwich, contractor for KD International Group Realty. Perform new construction using existing foundation at 27 Glen Ridge Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $228,000. Filed November 2020. Davenport Contracting Inc., Stamford, contractor for Itzhak and Amira W. Margolis. Repair damages after tree fell onto roof at 32 Mianus View Terrace, Cos Cob. Estimated cost: $245,000. Filed November 2020. DiLorenzo Builders LLC, Ansonia, contractor for John J. Pearl and Hilary E. Pearl. Add new garage and playroom and renovate kitchen, mudroom, bedrooms and bathrooms at 44 Calhoun Drive, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $900,000. Filed November 2020. Gambrill, Eunice Jennings, Greenwich, contractor for Eunice Jennings Gambrill. Construct second-floor addition and renovate interior windows, kitchen, baths and laundry at 34 Thunder Mountain Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $300,000. Filed November 2020. Gatehouse Partners LLC, Greenwich, contractor for Charles Santoro. Renovate guest house at 4 Alden Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed November 2020. Giant Siding & Windows Inc., White Plains, New York, contractor for Daniel A. Foell. Install new siding at 14 Stag Lane, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $34,350. Filed November 2020. Hoffman, Adam and Jess Hoffman, Cos Cob, contractor for Adam and Jess Hoffman. Install new portable spa at 20 Licata Terrace, Cos Cob. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed November 2020. The Home Depot USA, Atlanta, Georgia, contractor for Elisabeth Elsinger. Remove and replace windows at 5 Glen St., Unit 306, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $2,086. Filed November 2020.

J. Salvatore & Sons Inc., Yonkers, New York, contractor for Laura and Aaron Boone. Convert part of storage space to office at 22 Oak Drive, Riverside. Estimated cost: $62,250 Filed November 2020. JR Stanley Builders LLC, Darien, contractor for Sebnem Erim. Change garage door at 20 Cobb Island Drive, Cos Cob. Estimated cost: $8,500. Filed November 2020. Katchko Construction Services, Stamford, contractor for 469 Field Point Road LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 469 Field Point Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed November 2020. Lucisano, Frank, Ridgefield, contractor for Walter Pye. Finish basement, including game room, full bathroom and exterior wood deck at 37 Tower Road, Riverside. Estimated cost: $150,000. Filed November 2020. Moonlit Construction LLC, Greenwich, contractor for Richard D. Blue. Remove and discard unit fireplace and install new prefab gas-fired direct-vent fireplace unit at 3 Roosevelt Ave., Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed November 2020. Moriarty Brothers Constructors, Stamford, contractor for 2 Larkspur Lane LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 2 Larkspur Lane, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $22,500. Filed November 2020. Newfield Contracting, Stamford, contractor for Barbara Higgins. Turn storage closet into a laundry closet at 1 Putnam Hill, Unit 2B, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $5,800. Filed November 2020. Newfield Contracting, Stamford, contractor for Ursula Cunnane. Renovate hall bath and kitchen and install new doors, trims, molding and base board at 3 Putnam Hill, Unit 3E, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $42,000. Filed November 2020.

Novitsky, Elliott, Riverside, contractor for Elliott Novitsky. Install a new portable spa at 18 Flower Lane, Riverside. Estimated cost: $23,000. Filed November 2020. PDB Construction LLC, Seymour, contractor for Liwen Yaacoby. Build over flat roof to extend master bedroom and renovate bathrooms at 6 Glen Court, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $120,000. Filed November 2020. Pol, Sebastian, Old Greenwich, contractor for Sebastian Pol. Construct shed for outdoor seating at 10 Ben Court, Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $5,000. Filed November 2020. Pro Custom Solar LLC, South Plainfield, contractor for Juan Munyo. Install roof-top solar panels at 55 Valleywood Road, Cos Cob. Estimated cost: $17,224. Filed November 2020. Pulick, Douglas C. and Cynthia R. Pulick, Riverside, contractor for Douglas C. and Cynthia R. Pulick. Remodel first-floor bathroom at 310 Palmer Hill Road, Riverside. Estimated cost: $30,279. Filed November 2020. RAM Affiliates LLC, Cos Cob, contractor for Thomas W. S. Groves. Add basement and garage below open deck at 6 Weston Hill Road, Riverside. Estimated cost: $250,000. Filed November 2020. Roddy, Bryan F., Norwalk, contractor for Mr. Elbrum and Mrs. Lawrence. Remodel kitchen and family room and enclose covered porch at 23 Old Stone Bridge Road, Cos Cob. Estimated cost: $85,000. Filed November 2020. Ross, Jay, Greenwich, contractor for Peter Cruikshank. Renovate bathrooms at 31 Horseshoe Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed November 2020. Ruggiero, Anthony William, Greenwich, contractor for Anthony William Ruggiero. Build a new single-family dwelling at 40 Aiken Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $3,000,000. Filed November 2020.

fairfield county

Silvas, Rose, Greenwich, contractor for Rose Silvas. Remove closet and install new French door at 124 Putnam Park, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $6,000. Filed November 2020. Sound Beach Partners LLC, Stamford, contractor for 7 Meadow Place LLC. Construct a new single-family dwelling at 7 Meadow Place, Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $4,000,000. Filed November 2020. Stern, Peter M. and Elie Strauss, Greenwich, contractor for Peter M. Stern and Elie Strauss. Renovate kitchen at 69 Stonehedge Drive South, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $47,000. Filed November 2020. Stevenson, David W., Ballston Spa, New York, contractor for David W. Stevenson. Subdivide retail space at 228 Sound Beach Ave., Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $48,000. Filed November 2020. Sunrise Solar Consulting LLC, Milford, contractor for The Mill Owners Company LLC. Install PV modules using ballasted roof-racking system at 10 Glenville St., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $292,000. Filed November 2020. Tesla Energy, Rocky Hill, contractor for 131 Havemeyer Enterprises. Install roof-top solar panels at 131 Havemeyer Place, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $38,352. Filed November 2020. Velezis, Paul, Waterbury, contractor for Palmer Point Condo Association. Replace hydronic heating pipes, remove drop ceiling and install new flat-panel lighting fixtures at 9 River Road, Cos Cob. Estimated cost: $350,000. Filed November 2020. Wasim, Yaser and Anna L. Wasim, Riverside, contractor for Yaser and Anna L. Wasim. Construct master bedroom and bedroom above family room at 22 Riverside Lane, Riverside. Estimated cost: $247,000. Filed November 2020.


Facts & Figures Yankee Custome Builders Inc., New Canaan, contractor for Lee Sangyeup and Kwon Sooh. Perform replacement alterations at 16 Rock Ridge Ave., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $5,000. Filed November 2020. Young, Kevin E., Newtown, contractor for Steve and Alex Cohen. Construct a new swimming pool at 30 Crown Lane, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $150,000. Filed Nov. 2020.

COURT CASES Bridgeport Superior Court Plymouth Rock Assurance Corp., Hartford. Filed by Chancelier Audena, Norwalk. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-20-6100794-S. Filed Oct. 7. Herrera-Molina, Edwin, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Ernestine Keeling, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Paul Joseph Ganim, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-20-6101200-S. Filed Oct. 21. Jones, William, et al, Trumbull. Filed by Labinot Gjini, Stratford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Moore O’Brien & Foti, Middlebury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-20-6101110-S. Filed Oct. 16.

Barrioscardonadegramajo, Nory, et al, Stratford. Filed by Providencia Carolina, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Dana P Lonergan, Trumbull. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-20-6101183-S. Filed Oct. 21. KMK Insulation Inc., et al, North Haven. Filed by Sri Fire Sprinkler, LLC, Albany, New York. Plaintiff’s attorney: Traub Lieberman Straus, et al, Watertown. Action: The plaintiff was hired to install a water-sprinkler system at a premise. Prior to the installation, the defendants allegedly caused damage by using coupling bolts at the facility and plaintiff was forced to expend time, money and resources to ameliorate the damage caused by the defendants. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-206101185-S. Filed Oct. 21.

Danbury Superior Court Guzhco, Manuel J., Danbury. Filed by Zoila Sigua, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Luis A Medina, Norfolk. Action: The plaintiff and defendant purchased a premise and had an oral agreement of partnership with rights of survivorship for each other and it would then pass to their sons. In addition, plaintiff provided all her income for the family’s living expenses, furnishing and appliances for the property. However, the defendant breached the agreement by giving his new wife use and occupancy of the property, including plaintiff’s bedroom and personal belongings and locked plaintiff out of her bedroom. As a result, plaintiff suffered damages and defendant has been unjustly enriched by failing to pay plaintiff for the benefits he received for 20 years. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-20-6037066-S. Filed Sept. 8.

Samplecenter Realty Limited Partnership, New Milford. Filed by Joanne Finkle, New Milford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Alan Barry & Associates, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff was a business invitee and while in the parking lot controlled and maintained by the defendant she fell due to a crack in the asphalt. As a result, the plaintiff suffered injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-20-6037172-S. Filed Sept. 16. Embree, Ernest J, Brookfield. Filed by James C McLaughlin, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Matthew Julian Forrest, Wethersfield. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-20-6037474-S. Filed Oct. 16. Brito, Luis, et al, Baltimore, Maryland. Filed by Manuel Quinde-Cambisaca, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-206037756-S. Filed Nov. 17. Development Asset Group LLC, et al, Danbury. Filed by Milton Mosquera, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Gould Law Group LLC, New Haven. Action: The plaintiff fell three stories, landing on construction equipment, thereby suffering injuries. The incident was caused by the negligence of the defendants not ensuring that all workers had safety equipment. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-206037394-S. Filed Oct. 7.

Stamford Superior Court Panera LLC, et al, Westport. Filed by Kim Harford, West Haven. Plaintiff’s attorney: McNamara & Kenney, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff was lawfully on the defendants’ premises when a slippery condition made the rug move, causing the plaintiff to fell and suffer injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-20-6049040-S. Filed Oct. 28. Kiani, Hamid K., et al, Hartford. Filed by Leon Etienne, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: The Pickel Law Firm LLC, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FSTCV-20-6049023-S. Filed Oct. 27. Lynn, Gary, et al, New Rochelle. Filed by Lizabeth Lewis, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Papcsy Janosov Roche, Norwalk. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FSTCV-20-6049041-S. Filed Oct. 28.

DEEDS Commercial 239 Tuckahoe Lane LLC, Stamford. Seller: Maureen A. Keltos, Fairfield. Property: 239 Tuckahoe Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $300,500. Filed Nov. 5. 64 Park Avenue LLC, Greenwich. Seller: Carole Monette, Old Greenwich. Property: 64 Park Ave., South, Old Greenwich. Amount: $1,965,000. Filed Nov. 2.

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By the Pond LLC, Palm Beach, Florida. Seller: Patrick Burke and Sara Burke, Jensen Beach, Florida. Property: 44 N. Porchuck Road, Greenwich. Amount: $3,330,000. Filed Nov. 4.

Abarca, Matthew and Jennifer Rodriguez, Harrison, New York. Seller: Francesco P. Lagana and Paula R. Lagana, Stamford. Property: 52 Severance Drive, Stamford. Amount: $530,000. Filed Oct. 29.

Byrwa, Vivian Wendie and Joshua Clayton Byrwa, Stamford. Seller: Interlaken Road LLC, Stamford. Property: 193 Interlaken Road, Stamford. Amount: $1,450,000. Filed Oct. 29.

Adamucci, Nicholas J., Greenwich. Seller: Karen Soika and Pavel Soika, Greenwich. Property: 23 Nicholas Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $621,000. Filed Nov. 2.

Christmas Residence Trust, Greenwich. Seller: James A. DeNaut and Anne S. DeNaut, Greenwich. Property: 100 Meadow Wood Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Nov. 2.

Ahmad, Aneela and Mohammad Ahmad, Old Greenwich. Seller: Kamil Zdunek and Miley Nakamura. Greenwich. Property: 15 Ferris Drive, Old Greenwich. Amount: $899,000. Filed Nov. 2.

Dietrich, Andrew Morgan and Anna Eng Dietrich, Stamford. Seller: Brooklyn Realty Holdings LLC, Brooklyn, New York. Property: 25 Walnut Ridge Court, Stamford. Amount: $1,136,879. Filed Oct. 30.

Azevedo, Maria and Roberto Azevedo, Greenwich. Seller: Keith Denholm and Karolyn Denholm, Greenwich. Property: 398 Stanwich Road, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Nov. 2.

Howe, Laura C., Old Greenwich. Seller: RZ Enterprises LLC, Naugatuck. Property: 32 Warsaw St., Fairfield. Amount: $436,000. Filed Nov. 4.

Bazar, Barbara C. and Todd J. Bazar, Fairfield. Seller: Joanne Eckert, Fairfield. Property: 50 University Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $549,000. Filed Nov. 4.

Markley, Ann Lynn, Greenwich. Seller: Old Church Road LLC, Palm Beach, Florida. Property: 2 Old Church Road, Unit 3, Greenwich. Amount: $2,000,000. Filed Nov. 2.

Bilotti, Joseph P. and Claudia A. Bilotti, Stamford. Seller: Claudia A. Bilotti and Joseph P. Bilotti, Stamford. Property: 251 Briar Brae Road, Stamford. Amount: $1. Filed Oct. 29.

Schickler, Sloan and Paul F. Riska, New York, New York. Seller: Thomas Vris M.D. LLC, Norwalk. Property: 6 Fox Run Road, Norwalk. Amount: $950,000. Filed Oct. 27.

Bria, Francis R. and Martina Bria, Bridgeport. Seller: Orlando Villanueva and Alison Villanueva, Fairfield. Property: 410 Old Hickory, Fairfield. Amount: $590,000. Filed Nov. 5.

USA Management LLC, Stamford. Seller: Anthony C. Manousos Sr. and Carol A. Manousos, Norwalk. Property: Highland Road, Stamford. Amount: $515,000. Filed Oct. 30. Vasquez, Hector, Norwalk. Seller: Norwalk Property LLC, Norwalk. Property: 150 S. Main St., Norwalk. Amount: $174,745. Filed Oct. 27. Visokey Partners, Stamford. Seller: Steven Rose and Sheila Rose, Stamford. Property: 1594 Long Ridge Road, Stamford. Amount: $650,000. Filed Oct. 30.

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Brock, Marcus and Patricia Point-Dujour, Stamford. Seller: Marcus Brock and Patricia Point-Dujour, Stamford. Property: 881 Rock Rimmon Road, Stamford. Amount: $N/A. Filed Oct. 29. Burke, Justin, Greenwich. Seller: Henry Amato and Christine Amato, Greenwich. Property: 47 Glen Road, Greenwich. Amount: $1,562,500. Filed Nov. 4. Calderon Baharian, Jennifer, Norwalk. Seller: Beverly B. Finch, Norwalk. Property: 75 Cranbury Road, Norwalk. Amount: $507,179. Filed Oct. 23.

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Facts & Figures Chen, He, Norwalk. Seller: Paul Davis and Jennifer Davis, Norwalk. Property: 5 Lancaster Drive, Norwalk. Amount: $385,000. Filed Oct. 22.

Fratangelo, Robert and Angela Fratangelo, Westport. Seller: Francis J. Hagerty III, Wilton. Property: 15 Cavray Road, Norwalk. Amount: $940,000. Filed Oct. 22.

Chen, Yilei and Dan Zhu, Ryebrook, New York. Seller: Irene D. Mailloux, Trumbull. Property: 9 Trefoil Court, Fairfield. Amount: $410,000. Filed Nov. 5.

Gallucci, Caroline Ann, Fairfield. Seller: Steven J. McCay and Luke J. Gilleran, Fairfield. Property: Unit 126, The Mosswood Condominium, Fairfield. Amount: $297,500. Filed Nov. 6.

Lara Guzman, Zacarias, Norwalk. Seller: Johanna Muro, Norwalk. Property: 12 Blake St., Norwalk. Amount: $425,000. Filed Oct. 23.

Gussmann, Philip and Jillian Sakovits, Astoria, New York. Seller: William Birks Erskine, Norwalk. Property: 1 Alden Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $702,000. Filed Oct. 22.

Larsen, Jonathan, Stamford. Seller: Amanda N. Trofa, Stamford. Property: 44 Strawberry Hill Ave., Unit 5D, Stamford. Amount: $249,999. Filed Oct. 29.

Hansen, Amy C., Cos Cob. Seller: George J. Ogilvie and Susan HC Ogilvie, Greenwich. Property: 20 Spezzano Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $505,000. Filed Nov. 2.

Larson, Ian E. and Jacqueline M. Larson, Norwalk. Seller: Amedeo Feola and Mina Feola, Trumbull. Property: 142 Ponus Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $490,000. Filed Oct. 27.

Ciambriello, Charles and Dawn Ciambriello, Hamden. Seller: Robert L. Deaky, Fairfield. Property: 251 Oldfield Road, Fairfield. Amount: $428,000. Filed Nov. 3. Coronios, Christina, Pelham, New York. Seller: Lynn Markley, Greenwich. Property: 88 Greenwich Hills Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Nov. 2. Cruz, Edgar and Anne Franchesca Ramos, Yonkers, New York. Seller: Anthony G. Marro, Stamford. Property: 146 Cold Spring Road, Unit 9, Stamford. Amount: $303,000. Filed Oct. 30. Dellavalle, Joseph, Yonkers, New York. Seller: Barbara Wilkov, Stamford. Property: 143 Hoyt St., Unit 6J, Stamford. Amount: $355,000. Filed Oct. 29. DeMarco, Joseph and Jennifer DeMarco, Hoboken, New Jersey. Seller: Brij M. Jairath and Nirmal Jairath, Fairfield. Property: 255 Aran Hill Road, Fairfield. Amount: $790,000. Filed Nov. 3. Donahue, Scott Thomas and Victoria Watts Donahue, Hoboken, New Jersey. Seller: Donald P. Reilley and Emily Reilley, Fairfield. Property: 1022 Mill Hill Road, Southport. Amount: $989,500. Filed Nov. 6. Eng, Wilson S., Norwalk. Seller: Douglas Bell Mayhew and Gerald F. Longo, Norwalk. Property: Unit 607, Foxboro Court Norwalk. Amount: $465,000. Filed Oct. 22. Erensen, Cynthia P., Cos Cob. Seller: Susan L.M. Anderson, Cos Cob. Property: 100 Cat Rock Road, Cos Cob. Amount: $N/A. Filed Nov. 4.

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Hu, James, Rego Park, New York. Seller: Leonardo Oscar Garcia-Berg and Veronica Calomarde, Greenwich. Property: 22 Glenbrook Road, No. 415, Stamford. Amount: $130,000. Filed Oct. 30. Hull, Richard and Kiandra C. Dixon, Bridgeport. Seller: Roger L. Burtraw II and Chris L. Burtraw, Fairfield. Property: 683 Old Stratfield Road, Fairfield. Amount: $565,000. Filed Nov. 6. Iyer, Hari and Hema Athreya, Fairfield. Seller: Leigh Jaffe, Fairfield. Property: 520 Pemburn Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $853,000. Filed Nov. 4. Kaufman, Marcia and Sidney Kaufman, Greenwich. Seller: Christopher Lawrence and Catherine Lawrence, Greenwich. Property: 294 Round Hill Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2,850,000. Filed Nov. 3. Kolakowski, Matthew H. and Brianna A. Perricone, Wallingford. Seller: Christine McGurn, Norwalk. Property: 52 E. Rocks Road, Norwalk. Amount: $557,500. Filed Oct. 27.

Kot, Michael and Alexandra Sanky, Merrick, New York. Seller: Douglas J. Kling and Ellen M. Deluca, Norwalk. Property: 340 Newtown Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $395,000. Filed Oct. 26.

Matarese, Sara A. and Michael J. Matarese, Hingham, Massachusetts. Seller: Virginia M. Giuffre and Joel G. Giuffre, Fairfield. Property: 188 Verna Hill Road, Fairfield. Amount: $1,026,000. Filed Nov. 6. McGrath, Christopher and Deborah Green, Brooklyn, New York. Seller: Caitlin M. Allen, Stamford. Property: 12 Prince Place, Stamford. Amount: $560,000. Filed Oct. 30. Melgar, Caroll, et al, Stamford. Seller: Steve A. Mendes and Wendy J. Mendes, Norwalk. Property: 15 Bobwhite Drive, Norwalk. Amount: $428,000. Filed Oct. 26. Moor, Anthony and Karen G. Moor, Stamford. Seller: Daizo Motoyoshi and Maiko Motoyoshi, Greenwich. Property: 15 Dearfield Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Nov. 4. Oberst, Darren and Namee Oberst, Scarsdale, New York. Seller: Kerry Adam Demascus and Pamela Georgia Demascus, Greenwich. Property: 425 Taconic Road, Greenwich. Amount: $3,795,000. Filed Oct. 29. Parkington, Shawn, Greenwich. Seller: John J. Verzaro, Fairfield. Property: 131 Royal Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $201,000. Filed Nov. 5.

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Prohl, Kristen, Greenwich. Seller: Kristen Prohl and Kevin Kleinbardt, Greenwich. Property: 150 Bedford Road, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Nov. 4. Scully, Patrick J., Norwalk. Seller: Jacqueline M. Larson and Ian E. Larson, Norwalk. Property: 20 Roosevelt St., Norwalk. Amount: $420,000. Filed Oct. 26. Sherman, John, Greenwich. Seller: Housing Authority of the City of Stamford, Stamford. Property: 6668 Durant St., Stamford. Amount: $630,000. Filed Oct. 30. Smith, Dean and Pamela Smith, Stamford. Seller: William Dempsey and Rebecca Balsley, Stamford. Property: 92 Shady Lane, Stamford. Amount: $579,500. Filed Oct. 29. Trotta, Anthony T. and Sarah M. Trotta, Fairfield. Seller: Colleen H. Adams, Trumbull. Property: 225 Primrose Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $448,500. Filed Nov. 3. Wulff, Robert, Old Greenwich. Seller: Mitchell Karlan and Mary Karlan, Greenwich. Property: 11 Lighthouse Lane, Old Greenwich. Amount: $0. Filed Nov. 4.

JUDGMENTS Adams, Donald, Stamford. $74,931, in favor of Stamford Acquisition I, LLC, Stamford, by Goldman Gruder & Woods LLC, Norwalk. Property: 1 Southfield Ave., Unit 214, Stamford. Filed Dec. 7. Belletsky, Deborah M., Fairfield. $19,050, in favor of CACH LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada, by the Law Offices of Steven Cohen LLC, Bronx, New York. Property: 139 Barry Scott Drive, Fairfield. Filed Dec. 7. Coello, Miguel, Fairfield. $1,844, in favor of Midland Funding LLC, San Diego, California, by Schreiber Law LLC, Salem, New Hampshire. Property: 28 Alyssa Lane, Fairfield. Filed Dec. 15. Debrosse, Marie, Norwalk. $43,789, in favor of Norwalk Acquisition I, LLC, Norwalk, by Goldman Gruder & Woods LLC, Norwalk. Property: 5 Quaker Road, Norwalk. Filed Nov. 20.

Hudson, Larita G., Stamford. $6,460, in favor of Cavalry SPV I, LLC, Valhalla, New York, by Tobin & Marohn, Meriden. Property: 38 Barmore Drive West, Stamford. Filed Dec. 7. Ismail, Mohammed, Stamford. $9,252, in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio, by Schreiber Law LLC, Salem, New Hampshire. Property: 29 Saint Benedict Circle, Stamford. Filed Dec. 15. Maher, Virginia M., Stamford. $9,347, in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio, by Schreiber Law LLC, Salem, New Hampshire. Property: 191 Skyview Drive, Stamford. Filed Dec. 15. Salehzadeh, Ahmad, Greenwich. $4,881, in favor of Unifund Corp., Cincinnati, Ohio, by Tobin & Marohn, Meriden. Property: 31 Hettiefred Road, Greenwich. Filed Dec. 3. West, Delcia F., Stamford. $1,282, in favor of Cavalry SPV I, LLC, Valhalla, New York, by Tobin & Marohn, Meriden. Property: 73 Seaton Road, Stamford. Filed Dec. 11.

LIENS Federal Tax Liens Filed 0 Mohawk LLC, 41 Mohawk Lane, Cos Cob. $5,729, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Nov. 6. 20 Idar Court LLC, 20 Idar Court, Greenwich. $7,365, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Nov. 6. 35 Leonard Avenue LLC, 35 Leonard Ave., Greenwich. $3,749, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Nov. 6. Ermert, Lida, 28 Westminster Road, Danbury. $52,138, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Dec. 16. Feda, Kelly M. and Randall J. Feda, 12 Artic St., Greenwich. $5,301, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Nov. 6.

Hamilton, Doster Shawna, 361 N. Maple Ave., Greenwich. $49, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Nov. 5. KD International Group Realty Inc., 150 Pemberwick Road, Greenwich. $6,535, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Nov. 5. Kipp, Heather A. and Erik I. Kipp, 217 Bronson Road, Southport. $78,102, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Dec. 16. Kochersperger, Jane Fahringer, 49 Valley Road, Cos Cob. $2,681, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Nov. 6. Leblanc, Victoria M., 133 Alma Drive, Fairfield. $6,888, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Dec. 7. O’Haras LLC, P.O. Box 320129, Fairfield. $17,230, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Nov. 30. Sheehey, Michael B., 9 Lafayette Court, Greenwich. $136, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Nov. 6. Walsh, Dionne E., 57 W. Brother Drive, Greenwich. $16,597, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Nov. 6. Wu, Tong and Kevin Wang, 887 Lake Ave., Greenwich. $22,875, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 6. Zalewski, Rafal, 2 Echo Lane, Norwalk. $7,898, civil proceeding, tax. Filed Dec. 9.

MECHANIC’S LIENS Cohen, Ira and Susan Cohen, Greenwich. Filed by Domestic Kitchens & Cabinets LLC, by Greene Law PC. Property: Round Hill Road, Greenwich. Amount: $31,027. Filed Dec. 1. Stamford Metro Green Residences LLC, Stamford. Filed by W & W Brothers Painting LLC, by Walter Leopoldo Cabrera-Jara. Property: Building D, 717 Atlantic St., Stamford. Amount: $118,000. Filed Dec. 10. The Body Shop International Limited, Syoseet, New York. Filed by Retail Construction Services Inc., by Gerald F. Kuntz. Property: Units 1 2 and 3, SONO Collection Condominium, Norwalk. Amount: $39,711. Filed Nov. 23.


Facts & Figures LIS PENDENS

LEASES

337 Cove Road LLC and John Doe, Stamford. Filed by John P. Regan, Stamford, for the city of Stamford. Property: 337 Cove Road, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Dec. 16.

Fragiacomo, Erica, by John W. Sullivan. Landlord: River Haven Inc., Stamford. Property: 54 W. North St., Stamford. Term: 3 years, commenced Sept. 28. Filed Nov. 24.

Donovan, Shawn, Fairfield. Filed by Costello, Brennan & DeVidas PC, Fairfield, for Ann Donovan. Property: 77 Wakeman Road, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed Dec. 1.

Romanello, John and Margaret Romanello, by John Jordan. Landlord: Putnam Park Apartments Inc., Greenwich. Property: 130 Putnam Park, Greenwich. Term: 30 years, commenced Oct. 21. Filed Oct. 23.

Fabian, Peter, Fairfield. Filed by Willinger, Willinger & Bucci PC, Shelton, for Nancy Delgado-Fabian. Property: 97 Alvin St., Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed Dec. 11.

Wakefern Food Corp., by Kenneth Kliban. Landlord: Turnpike Shopping Center LLC, Fairfield. Property: 1975 Black Rock Turnpike, Fairfield. Term: 11 years, commenced Sept. 28. Filed Nov. 24.

Lavanda, Richard P., et al, Fairfield. Filed by McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce LLC, Hartford, for Reliant Loan Servicing LLC. Property: 181 Burroughs Road, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Dec. 14.

MORTGAGES

Murphy, Steven, Stamford. Filed by Costello, Brennan & DeVidas PC, Fairfield, for Dana Murphy. Property: 35 Mill Stone Circle, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed Dec. 4. Racovita, Eduard and Adina Racovita, Stamford. Filed by Rosenberg & Rosenberg PC, West Hartford, for Redstone Manor Association Inc. Property: 39 Glenbrook Road, Unit 2A, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Dec. 7. Raposo III, Daniel P., et al, Norwalk. Filed by the Law Offices of Keith K. Fuller, Enfield, for Advantage Capital LLC. Property: 6 Birchside Drive, Norwalk. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Dec. 9. Yoder, Merle E., et al, Greenwich. Filed by McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce LLC, Hartford, for US Bank National Association. Property: 739 Lake Ave., Greenwich. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Dec. 3.

Broad, Danielle and Manuel B. Broad, Fairfield, by Elliot Dubin. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA, 101 N. Philips Ave., Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Property: 491 Lockwood Road, Fairfield. Amount: $418,523. Filed Oct. 26. Brown, Kendra M. and Timothy Brown, Norwalk, by Laura A. McGeachy. Lender: Prosperity Home Mortgage LLC, 14501 George Carter Way, Suite 300, Chantilly, Virginia. Property: 12 Old Lantern Place, Norwalk. Amount: $420,000. Filed Oct. 23. Cheong, Yoo Sun and Matthew N. Suberlak, Greenwich, by Joel M. Kaye. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 28 Oak St., Greenwich. Amount: $2,219,720. Filed Oct. 30. Csuka, Daniel and Susan Masters, Fairfield, by Kim Rizzo Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 2850 Redding Road, Fairfield. Amount: $760,480. Filed Oct. 27. Donovan, John and Sara Mion, Fairfield, by Thomas B. Lynch. Lender: CrossCountry Mortgage LLC, 6850 Miller Road, Brecksville, Ohio. Property: 61 Dogwood Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $440,000. Filed Oct. 26.

Evans, Samantha, Norwalk, by Ryan L. Mintz. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 296 Main Ave., Unit 9, Norwalk. Amount: $117,000. Filed Oct. 23. Goldstein, Peter D. and Marge W. Lilienthal, Stamford, by Domenica Schiavulli. Lender: William Raveis Mortgage LLC, 7 Trap Falls Road, Shelton. Property: 342 Stamford Ave., Stamford. Amount: $926,000. Filed Oct. 27. Horowitz, Paul, Greenwich, by Mary Jo L. Whelan. Lender: Citizens Bank NA, 1 Citizens Plaza, Providence, Rhode Island. Property: 96 Indian Head Road, Riverside. Amount: $430,000. Filed Oct. 30. Jania, Gregory and Wendy Jania, Stamford, by Loretta F. Glacier. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 63 Thornwood Road, Stamford. Amount: $805,175. Filed Oct. 27. Karamanian, Carlos G., Stamford, by Daniel M. McCabe. Lender: Caliber Home Loans Inc., 1525 S. Belt Line Road, Coppell, Texas. Property: 31 Ivy St., Stamford. Amount: $377,250. Filed Oct. 26. Lara Guzman, Zacarias, Norwalk, by Ryan L. Mintz. Lender: Warshaw Capital LLC, 2777 Summer St., Suite 306, Stamford. Property: 12 Blake St., Norwalk. Amount: $403,750. Filed Oct. 23. Lin, Handa and Mei Lin, Greenwich, by James C. Tsui. Lender: Finance of America Mortgage LLC, 300 Welsh Road, Building 5, Suite A. Horsham, Pennsylvania. Property: 12 Nedley Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $428,000. Filed Oct. 30. Neuner, Kevin and Elaine Neiner, Stamford, by William P. Osterndorf. Lender: Morgan Stanley Private Bank National Association, 4270 Ivy Pointe Blvd, Suite 400, Cincinnati, Ohio. Property: 123 Harbor Drive, Unit 712, Stamford. Amount: $527,450. Filed Oct. 26.

Nolletti, Jeffrey R. and Amy M. Nolletti, Greenwich, by Antonio Faretta. Lender: Loandepot.com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 351 Pemberwick Road, Unit 505, Greenwich. Amount: $504,000. Filed Oct. 30. Ouellette, Joseph and Elly Ouellette, Norwalk, by Jonathan T. Hoffman. Lender: CrossCountry Mortgage LLC, 6850 Miller Road, Brecksville, Ohio. Property: 24 Ravenwood Road, Norwalk. Amount: $490,000. Filed Oct. 26. Picciano, Aileen M. and Brian M. Picciano, Fairfield, by Pamela Shapli. Lender: CrossCountry Mortgage LLC, 6850 Miller Road, Brecksville, Ohio. Property: 180 Hill Brook Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $601,450. Filed Oct. 27. Radoncic, Lejla, Fairfield, by Charles M. Batt. Lender: Home Point Financial Corp., 9 Entin Road, Suite 200, Parsippany, New Jersey. Property: 85-87 Beacon View Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $373,117. Filed Oct. 26. Riccio, Matthew, Fairfield, by Billy Larkin Evers. Lender: Hanscom Federal Credit Union, 1610 Eglin St., Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts. Property: 36 Churchill St., Fairfield. Amount: $260,000. Filed Oct. 27. Rodiles, Amanda and Eduardo Rodiles, Norwalk, by David A. Roberts. Lender: Total Mortgage Services LLC, 185 Plains Road, Milford. Property: 79 Creeping Hemlock Drive, Norwalk. Amount: $360,000. Filed Oct. 26. Russell, Chiharu and John Russell, Stamford, by Aaron Charney. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 37 Longview Ave., Stamford. Amount: $351,550. Filed Oct. 26. Trampe, Julia Nix, Greenwich, by Karen Adelsberg. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 30 Meadow Wood Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $3,000,000. Filed Oct. 30.

Unnold, Nicholas L., Stamford, by Gerald M. Fox. Lender: Stearns Lending LLC, 401 E. Corporate Drive, Suite 150, Lewisville, Texas. Property: 123 Harbor Drive, Unit 702, Stamford. Amount: $453,000. Filed Oct. 26. Weglian, Matthew B., Norwalk, by John J. Bove. Lender: Prosperity Home Mortgage LLC, 14501 George Carter Way, Suite 300, Chantilly, Virginia. Property: 20 Deepwood Lane, Norwalk. Amount: $479,000. Filed Oct. 26. Zetchi, Mohamed Akli and Sabrina Chateauvert, Greenwich, by Erin Spiess Chan. Lender: TD Bank NA, 2035 Limestone Road, Wilmington, Delaware. Property: 141 Old Church Road, Greenwich. Amount: $253,030. Filed Oct. 30.

NEW BUSINESSES Essential Cleaning Services LLC, 30 Glenbrook Road, Unit 1E, Stamford 06902, c/o Verania Ardon. Filed Nov. 9. Fusaro’s Market, 646 High Ridge Road, Stamford 06905, c/o Michael Fusaro. Filed Nov. 9. Quartiere Stamford LLC, 51 Bank St., Stamford 06901, c/o Jeffrey Pandolfino. Filed Nov. 10. Bronhealth.com LLC, 41 Erickson Drive, Stamford 06903, c/o Todd Thomas, Filed Nov. 12. Bronhealth.com, 41 Erickson Drive, Stamford 06903, c/o Amstel Ventures LLC. Filed Nov. 12.

Dynamic Digital Marketing, 68 Winding Brook Lane, Stamford 06902, c/o Carla Cintron. Filed Nov. 13. Lucy’s Professional Cleaning, 17 Forest Lawn Ave., Stamford 06905, c/o Lucinea Ribeiro. Filed Nov. 13. BKS Partners Baldwin, 6 Landmark Square, Fourth floor, Stamford 06901, c/o Krystyn Sherman Partners LLC. Filed Nov. 16. The Wig Surgeon, 401 Commons Park South, Unit 462, Stamford 06902, c/o Yvonne Harris. Filed Nov. 16. Judy’s Alterations, 53 Prospect St., Unit 108, Stamford 06901, c/o Judith Eged. Filed Nov. 16.

PATENTS Rotating loudspeaker. Patent no. 10,873,797 issued to Riley Winton, et al. Assigned to Harman International, Stamford. Method for operating a multinozzle extruder using zig-zag patterns that provide improved structural integrity. Patent no. 10,870,235 issued to David Mantell, et al. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. Modular radial impeller drum for printing devices. Patent no. 10,870,269 issued to Richard Campbell, et al. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk.

High Ridge Fish Market, 873 High Ridge Road, Stamford 06905, c/o Sang Y. Lee. Filed Nov. 12. Cathand Beauty Salon LLC, 1 Hyde St., Stamford 06907, c/o Catherine Andrade Velasquez. Filed Nov. 12. Springdale Salon-Barbershop, 1 Hyde St., Stamford 06907, c/o Esmeralda Kuqani. Filed Nov. 12.

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LEGAL NOTICES Notice of Formation of Bais 1604, LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 11/12/2020. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 107 N Water Street, Peekskill, NY 10566. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62721 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: 914 Records, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/13/20. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 86 Chatsworth Ave, Larchmont, New York 10538, principal business location of the LLC. Purpose: any lawful business activity. #62722 Notice of Formation of SMYNS, LLC filed with SSNY on May 12, 2020. Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11229. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62723

Notice of Formation of Ztreet Musician LLC amended to Zstreetmusician LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/9/20. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Michael Lichtenstein, 420 Lexington Ave, Ste 300, NY, NY 10170, the registered agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. #62725 Notice of Formation of REEX Capital, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/30/2020. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Felix Hernandez, 542 Van Cortlandt Park Ave 1F Yonkers, NY 10705. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62726 Notice of Formation of REEX Management, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/29/2020. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Felix Hernandez, 542 Van Cortlandt Park Ave 1F Yonkers, NY 10705. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62727 Notice of Formation of REEX Realty, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/30/2020. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Felix Hernandez, 542 Van Cortlandt Park Ave 1F Yonkers, NY 10705. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62728

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DECEMBER 28, 2020

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Alex MonAus Group, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with NY Secy. of State on 08/27/20. Office located in Westchester Co. Secy. of State designated as agent upon which process may be served. Secy. of State shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him/her to: 63 Beechwood Avenue, Mount Vernon NY, 10553 (the LLCĂ­s primary business location). LLC may engage in any lawful act or activity for which a limited liability company may be formed. #62729 Notice of Formation of 270 PROSPECT LLC. Principal office Westchester County. Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) designated as agent for service of process. SSNY shall mail a copy of the process served against the LLC to 2 Wilson Place, 1st Floor, Mt. Vernon, NY 10550. Articles of Organization of the LLC filed with the SSNY on November 9, 2020. Purpose: Any lawful act(s). #62730 Notice of Formation of HOME 93 LLC Principal office Westchester County. Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) designated as agent for service of process. SSNY shall mail a copy of the process served against the LLC to 2 Wilson Place, 1st Floor, Mt. Vernon, NY 10550. Articles of Organization of the LLC filed with the SSNY on November 16, 2020. Purpose: Any lawful act(s). #62731

Notice of Formation of Joada LLC. Art. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/25/20. Office located in Westchester Cty. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail copy of any process against it served upon him/her to principal business location: 84 Kimball Ave, Yonkers, NY 10704. Purpose: any lawful activity. #62732 Notice of Formation of TRPS 560 Mad LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with Secy of State (SSNY) on 12/2/2020. Office: Westchester Cty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 343 Trenor Dr New Rochelle NY 10804. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62734 Notice of Formation of TRPS 800 Mad LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with Secy of State (SSNY) on 12/2/2020. Office: Westchester Cty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 343 Trenor Dr New Rochelle NY 10804. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62735 Notice of Formation of TRPS 441 Yates LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with Secy of State (SSNY) on 12/2/2020. Office: Westchester Cty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 343 Trenor Dr New Rochelle NY 10804. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62736

Sealed bids will be received as set forth in instructions to bidders until 10:30 A.M. on Thursday, January 21, 2021 at the NYSDOT, Office of Contract Management, 50 Wolf Rd, 1st Floor, Suite 1CM, Albany, NY 12232 and will be publicly opened and read. Bids may also be submitted via the internet using www.bidx.com. A certified cashier’s check payable to the NYSDOT for the sum specified in the proposal or a bid bond, form CONR 391, representing 5% of the bid total, must accompany each bid. NYSDOT reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Electronic documents and Amendments are posted to www.dot.ny.gov/doing-business/opportunities/const-notices. The Contractor is responsible for ensuring that all Amendments are incorporated into its bid. To receive notification of Amendments via e-mail you must submit a request to be placed on the Planholders List at www.dot.ny.gov/doing-business/opportunities/ const-planholder. Amendments may have been issued prior to your placement on the Planholders list. NYS Finance Law restricts communication with NYSDOT on procurements and contact can only be made with designated persons. Contact with non-designated persons or other involved Agencies will be considered a serious matter and may result in disqualification. Contact Robert Kitchen (518)457-2124. Contracts with 0% Goals are generally single operation contracts, where subcontracting is not expected, and may present direct bidding opportunities for Small Business Firms, including, but not limited to D/W/MBEs. The New York State Department of Transportation, in accordance with the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the Department of Transportation and Title 23 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 200, Title IV Program and Related Statutes, as amended, issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all who respond to a written Department solicitation, request for proposal or invitation for bid that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability/handicap and income status in consideration for an award. BIDDERS SHOULD BE ADVISED THAT AWARD OF THESE CONTRACTS MAY BE CONTINGENT UPON THE PASSAGE OF A BUDGET APPROPRIATION BILL BY THE LEGISLATURE AND GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK. Please call (518)457-2124 if a reasonable accommodation is needed to participate in the letting. Region 08: New York State Department of Transportation 4 Burnett Blvd., Poughkeepsie, NY, 12603 D264404, PIN 881346, FA Proj Z240-8813-463, Columbia, Dutchess, Orange, Westchester Cos., Geotech Subsurface Exploration, Region 8 - Region-Wide in Various Municipalities, Bid Deposit: 5% of Bid (~ $40,000.00), Goals: DBE: 0.00%

Sealed bids will be received as set forth in Instructions to Bidders (https://www. dot.ny.gov/bids-and-lettings/construction-contractors/important-info) until 10:30 A.M. on Thursday, January 21, 2021 at the NYSDOT, Contract Management Bureau, 50 Wolf Rd, 1st Floor, Suite 1CM, Albany, NY 12232 and will be publicly opened and read. Maps, Plans and Specifications may be seen at Electronic documents and Amendments which are posted to www.dot.ny.gov/doing-business/opportunities/ const-notices. The New York State Department of Transportation, in accordance with the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the Department of Transportation and Title 23 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 200, Title IV Program and Related Statutes, as amended, issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all who respond to a written Department solicitation, request for proposal or invitation for bid that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability/handicap and income status in consideration for an award. Please call (518)457-2124 if a reasonable accommodation is needed to participate in the letting. Region 08: New York State Department of Transportation 4 Burnett Blvd., Poughkeepsie, NY, 12603 D264324, PIN 881368, FA Proj Z510-8813-683, Westchester Co., Bridge Rehab: Four Bridges in City of Yonkers, Village of Elmsford, Towns of Greenburgh and Mount Pleasant, Bid Deposit: 5% of Bid (~ $1,500,000.00), Goals: DBE: 10.00%

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LEGAL NOTICES SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK ñ COUNTY OF WESTCHESTER INDEX # 54375/2014FILED: 11/20/2020 SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS WITH NOTICE MORTGAGED PREMISES: 25 Woodrow Avenue, Yonkers, NY 10710. Plaintiff designates WESTCHESTER County as the place of trial based on the location of the mortgaged premises in this action. APPLE BANK FOR SAVINGS, Plaintiff, HELENA JOHNS A/K/A HELENA LEE STEVENS A/K/A HELENA SANFORD AS HEIR AT LAW AND NEXT OF KIN OF GLADYS JOHNS; CLARISSA JOHNS INDIVIDUALLY AND AS HEIR AT LAW AND NEXT OF KIN OF GLADYS JOHNS; JOCHOL JOHNS, JR. AS HEIR AT LAW AND NEXT OF KIN OF GLADYS JOHNS; MARCIA JOHNS AS HEIR AT LAW AND NEXT OF KIN OF GLADYS JOHNS; LATONIA JOHNS AS HEIR AT LAW AND NEXT OF KIN OF GLADYS JOHNS; ìJOHN DOEî AND ìJANE DOEî 1through 50, intending to be the unknown heirs, distributees, devisees, grantees, trustees, lienors, creditors, and assignees of the estate of MARK ANTHONY JOHNS who was born in 1958, and died on January 18, 2018, a resident of the County of Westchester, their successors in interest if any of the aforesaid defendants be deceased, their respective heirs at law, next of kin, and successors in interest of the aforesaid classes of person, if they or any of them be dead, and their respective husbands, wives or widows, if any, all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to the Plaintiff, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE, WEST STAR FUEL OIL CORP., MAURICE ìDOEî (REFUSED LAST NAME), ìJANE DOEî (NAME REFUSED), ANTHONY JOHNS, JOHN JOHNS, WESTCHESTER ANESTHESIOLOGISTS PC, VERONICA DANIELS COMMUNITY FUEL OIL CO., Defendants. TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiffís Attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within thirty (30) days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York) in the event the United States of America is made a party defendant, the time to answer for the said United States of America shall not expire until sixty (60) days after service of the Summons; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. This action was commenced to foreclose a mortgage against real property 25 Woodrow Avenue, Yonkers, NY 10710. Dated: March 13, 2020. McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC, /s/___________ Caren Bailey, Esq., Attorneys for Plaintiff, 1 Huntington Quadrangle, Suite 3C20, Melville, NY 11747. (631) 812-4084. (855) 845-2584 facsimile. File # 14-310710. HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE New York State requires that we send you this notice about the foreclosure process. Please read it carefully. SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT You are in danger of losing your home. If you fail to respond to the Summons and Complaint in this foreclosure action, you may lose your home. Please read the Summons and Complaint carefully. You should immediately contact an attorney or your local legal aid office to obtain advice on how to protect yourself. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE The State encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies, and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by New York State Department of Financial Servicesí at 1-800-269-0990 or visit the Departmentís website at WWW.DFS.NY.GOV. RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS YOU ARE NOT REQUIRED TO LEAVE YOUR HOME AT THIS TIME. You have the right to stay in your home during the foreclosure process. You are not required to leave your home unless and until your property is sold at auction pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure and sale. Regardless of whether you choose to remain in your home, YOU ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR PROPERTY and pay your taxes in accordance with state and local law. FORECLOSURE RESCUE SCAMS Be careful of people who approach you with offers to ìsaveî your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeownerís distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. #62747

Notice of formation of Cultural King, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the SSNY on 08/17/20. Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against It may be serve. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 70 HAWTHORNE AVENUE, SUITE C1508, YONKERS, NY 10701, Purpose: Any Lawful purpose. #62737 Rudi’s Lens LLC. Filed 8/11/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 25 Wellesley Ave, Yonkers, NY 10705 Purpose: All lawful #62738 RTR Boutique LLC. Filed 7/22/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 119 Pondfield Road #978, Bronxville, NY 10708 Purpose: All lawful #62739 Mama’s Boy Floor Care LLC. Filed 7/7/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 1767 Central Park Ave Ste 116, Yonkers, NY 10710 Purpose: All lawful #62740 Lofts on Fifth, LLC. Filed 8/18/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 399 Knollwood Road, Suite 318, White Plains, NY 10603 Purpose: All lawful #62741

FCBJ

The Articles of Organization of From the Roots, LLC (ìThe Companyî) were filed with the Secy of State (SSNY) on 03/09/2020. The office of the Company is located in Westchester County, NY. Kristen N. Gizzi Esq., PLLC has been designated as Agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served. The two managing members of the company are Caroline Woznuk-King and Megan OíConnorSzatman both with an address of 141 Katonah Avenue, Katonah NY 10536. The post office address within or without the State to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him or her is: 201 Saw Mill River Road, Yonkers NY 10701. The Company was formed for any lawful business purpose or purposes permitted under the NY LLC Act. #62742 Stanaj Development LLC. Filed 9/23/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 35 Overkill Rd, New Rochelle, NY 10804 Purpose: All lawful #62743 Sunnyside Design LLC. Filed 8/21/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 3 Parkview Pl, Tuckahoe, NY 10707 Purpose: All lawful #62744

WCBJ

Taylor C West LLC. Filed 8/17/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 203 Horseshoe Circle, Ossining, NY 10562 Purpose: All lawful #62745 155 W 71st 2A LLC. Filed 8/12/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 770 Davenport Ave, New Rochelle, NY 10805 Purpose: All lawful #62746 Notice of Formation of JPeter Rental Property LLC filed with SSNY on November 9,2020. Office: Westchester County, NY. United States Corporation Agents, Inc. designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 7014 13th Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62748 23 S. Division Street Realty LLC. Filed 11/2/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 51 Central Ave, Ossining, NY 10562 Purpose: All lawful #62749 6 Main LLC. Filed 11/4/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 102 White Rd, Scarsdale, NY 10583 Purpose: All lawful #62750 Notice of Formation of Queen’s Resources LLC. filed with SSNY on 12/9/20. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, P.O. Box 485, Yonkers, N.Y. 10703. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62751

DECEMBER 28, 2020

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