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AWARD WINNING EDITORIAL

APRIL 5, 2021 VOL. 57, No. 14

TR US TE D J O U R NALI S M AT YO U R FI N G E RTI P S westfaironline.com

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MONSTER SMASH Two veteran stars

Travel and tourism sector looking for rebound in ’21

rescue theater owners

BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

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wo old-time TWB Loan Decisionmonsters Banner Ad in a histormatch 6” w x ic 1.5” death h are helping lead the way 2-9-21 to recovery for a movie theater industry that was financially devastated by the pandemic. One such theater, National Amusements’

Showcase Cinema de Lux City Center 15 in downtown White Plains, is capitalizing on the new spectacular monster movie “Godzilla vs. Kong” by showing it not just once on April 3, but 24 times in various auditoriums at City Center, including the giant-screen IMAX theater. The idea was for as many people as possible

to be able to see it despite seating capacity in each auditorium being sharply limited to ensure social distancing due to the virus. “‘Godzilla vs. Kong’ is tracking better than any movie in terms of advance sales than any since the start of the pandemic,” Mark Malinowski, vice president of global » MONSTER SMASH

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BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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sk Judy White, president and owner of Wilton Center Travel Ltd., how business was in 2020 and receive a succinct reply. “Nonexistent.” White’s daughter Margaret Sanko, a certified travel consultant at

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the company, provided a bit more detail. “New business gradually tailed off until it was nonexistent,” she told the Business Journal. “But there was a lot of rebooking of clients’ vacations, starting in the spring of 2020, which kept us busy.” The same song played at travel agencies across the country throughout last year. Travel’s economic footprint in the U.S. declined by 42% last year, from $2.6 trillion in 2019 to $1.5 trillion, according to end-of-year totals prepared for the U.S. Travel Association by the research firm Tourism Economics.

In addition, the group’s research found that travel-supported jobs fell by 5.6 million in 2020 (16.7 million to 11.1 million), representing 65% of all American jobs lost to the economic fallout from the pandemic. Travel and tourism had supported employment for 11% of the U.S. workforce prior to the onset of Covid, the group said. “While the gradual progress of vaccinations has provided hope that a turnaround may be on the horizon, it is still unclear when travel demand will be able to fully rebound on its own,” said U.S. Travel » TRAVEL IN ‘21

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Stamford Partnership’s Jon Winkel reflects on efforts to help shepherd city through Covid crisis BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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s has been the case for all of us, it has been an unusual year-plus for Jon

Winkel. The founder of Stamford Innovation Week promised upon being named executive director of the Stamford Partnership in October 2019 “a queue of cutting-edge projects.” Ultimately that came to be true; just not in the way that he’d originally thought. “If there was a small silver lining” to weathering the Covid crisis, Winkel told the Business Journal, “it was that we’ve been very focused on training and workforce development — which were always issues anyway.” The 501(c)(3) nonprofit describes itself as “dedicated to enhancing Stamford’s business environment and the quality of life for all those who live, work, shop, dine and learn in the city.” And, through the efforts of Winkel, Partnership Chairperson Jodi Gutierrez, Vice Chair April Condon and the organization’s board, it has done just that. The group was able to form relationships with an array of other organizations and individuals that, Winkel said, further raised the Stamford Partnership’s profile and underscored how important it is to the city and the region. One such initiative involved Stamford’s restaurants, which — as was true throughout the country — was among one of the business sectors hardest hit by the pandemic. The group introduced a dining bond initiative that sold gift certificates at 85% of face value. “We had been receiving a lot of feedback from the community” about the restaurants’ plight, Winkel said. “They were devastated very early on, so I started racking my brain about what we could do to have the most immediate impact. “We saw that bonding programs were going on in other cities,” he said, “so that seemed like the best thing to do.” The group’s website currently has about 700

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requests for redemptions of those bonds, he noted. The partnership team was also able to reclaim from the Fairfield County Business Council — another early victim of the crisis — its Leadership Program. “A couple of the Business Council’s alumni got in touch with us,” Winkel said. “We all agreed that it had been a shame and even a tragedy to lose that program. It was a bit of a ‘Kumbaya’ moment.” Rebranded as Leadership Fairfield County, the program — limited to 30 participants — involves mid- to senior-level professionals and politicians exploring a wide variety of issues facing the city and Fairfield County. The first class quickly filled up and Winkel said that companies have been more supportive of it during the Covid era than ever before. At the start of 2020, the Stamford Partnership introduced SWIFI, a high-speed public Wi-Fi system in key areas throughout the downtown and central business areas, including the UConn Stamford campus and Columbus, Veterans and Mill River parks. Winkel said that, as most banking, education, telemedicine and appointment scheduling efforts moved online as the pandemic raged, SWIFI became an increasingly critical service. “It also makes for a better visitor experience in and around downtown,” he said, with usage growing on average by 20% from month to month; over 65,000 people have used SWIFI over the last 12 months. Winkel said he’d like to see the service expand to the city’s east and west sides — “We’re applying for grants to do that” — while acknowledging that the ongoing advent of 5G will also have an effect on SWIFI’s future plans. The group has also introduced the Stamford Promise, a scholarship fund for high school seniors who meet academic and community service requirements, and The Data & Analytics Leaders Network, its working group on data science to pursue large-scale investment in Stamford in the computer and data FCBJ

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MAIN OFFICE TELEPHONE 914-694-3600 OFFICE FAX 914-694-3699 EDITORIAL EMAIL bobr@westfairinc.com WRITE TO 701 Westchester Ave., Suite 100J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Publisher Dee DelBello Executive Associate Publisher Dan Viteri Managing Editor Bob Rozycki Associate Publisher Anne Jordan NEWS Senior Enterprise Editor • Phil Hall Copy and Video Editor • Peter Katz Fairfield Bureau Chief • Kevin Zimmerman Senior Reporter • Bill Heltzel, Reporters Georgette Gouveia, Peter Katz Research Coordinator • Luis Flores Assistant Editor • Bridget McCusker

At the start of 2020, the Stamford Partnership introduced SWIFI, a highspeed public Wi-Fi system in key areas throughout the downtown and central business areas. Jon Winkel, executive director of The Stamford Partnership. Photo by Matthew Brown / Hearst Media. science industries. The latter group comprises the Stamford Partnership, AdvanceCT, the state of Connecticut and several additional stakeholders to assist executives in finding the types of information and connections they may not otherwise be aware of, Winkel said. The partnership has also launched a new workforce development and digital skill-building program, TechFWD, designed to help individuals learn the digital skills needed to create or grow small businesses. Programs will focus on marketing automation, web development, digital analytics, social media marketing, content marketing and much more. As for Stamford Innovation Week — which Winkel and his associates there considered canceling in 2020 — it ended up thriving. “The question was, ‘What kind of message would we be sending if, in the face of adversity, we just folded up?’” he said. “We decided unanimously that we needed to do

the event in any way, shape or form that we could.” Leaning on virtual technology turned out to be just the sort of innovation the initiative was formed to spotlight, he said, adding that the group expects to be back fully in person in 2021 — though the event will be pushed back from its traditional September to October to “give us a little bit of a cushion” should Covid regain its strength. With the influx of New York residents into Connecticut in general, and Stamford in particular, Winkel said he believes Stamford Partnership is well positioned to gain even more ground in the community. “They’re the same reasons you always hear,” he said. “Quality of life, being close to both Boston and New York, good transportation — well, there’s room for improvement there,” he laughed. “But it’s all fitting together like a puzzle. And we’re going to be right there to help fit it together.”

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Scarsdale couple challenges village approval of neighbor’s ‘massive’ walls plan

BY BILL HELTZEL bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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Scarsdale couple is suing the village architectural board to stop an adjacent property owner from building retaining walls that they claim will diminish the value of their home by as much as $194,000. Mark and Victoria Nadler petitioned Westchester Supreme Court on March 25 to annul the Board of Architectural Review decision approving “massive, fortress-like retaining walls” that would loom over their backyard. The dispute concerns two properties in the Greenacres neighborhood. The Nadlers own a 2,452-square-foot house built in 1951 on a 0.39-acre lot at 171 Brite Ave. EJK 4 Kingston LLC, a Bronx company managed by Edward Ciarletta, owns a 3,564-square-foot house built in 1924 on a 0.6-acre lot around the corner. EJK bought the property in 2019 for $1.15 million. On March 1, the village architectural board approved EJK’s application for the retaining walls and landscaping. The board’s job is to preserve and promote the character and appearance of the village and to conserve property values, according to the petition. It must take into account the natural features of the site and the character of the neighborhood. It must make specific findings on whether a proposed structure will impair the use and enjoyment of nearby properties, and whether the structure

(top left) The property as it currently exists. (top right) Simulation of the property with the proposed changes.

would be visually offensive. The architectural board made no findings, according to the petition, and EJK did not explain why the walls are needed. The Nadlers submitted expert reports that depict the proposed walls as massive. A lower wall would run for 81 feet and a higher wall for 94 feet. Trees and vegetation would be removed from the hillside. The Nadlers would feel walled in, the petition states. They would have less privacy. Instead of a view of a wooded hillside, they would see an institutional-like structure “having no place in a residential zone in Scarsdale.” An appraiser who valued the Nadler’s home at $1,290,486 estimated that the walls would diminish the property value by 10% to 15%, or $129,000 to $194,000. The Nadlers allege that the architectural board abused its discretion and they want the court to nullify and reverse the decision. Village Attorney Daniel Pozin did not reply to an email message asking for the village’s position. White Plains attorney Clifford L. Davis represents the Nadlers.

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ArtsWestchester says, ‘ReStart the Arts’

BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

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hile plans are being developed to reopen Broadway and off-Broadway theaters by September and bring back the $15 billion a year New York City theater industry from the Covid-19 shutdown, the campaign “ReStart the Arts” has been launched by ArtsWestchester to help reopen theaters and bring back other arts activities in Westchester and Rockland counties. The “ReStart the Arts” campaign was created to seek $1 million in Covid-19 recovery funds from the state to distribute to arts organizations, performance venues and individual artists. A nationwide pool of federal Covid-19 recovery money has been available for arts organizations to go after. The relief package from December 2020 included $15 billion in grants for entities and individuals operating live performance venues, performing arts organizations, museums, independent movie theaters and talent agencies. The newly passed American Rescue Plan included $135 million in funding for the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities to support arts and cultural organizations and $1.25 billion for Small Business Administration grants to help concert venues and performing arts centers that had to cancel performances. On March 26, members of Westchester’s state Senate and Assembly delegations joined with representatives of arts organizations for a news conference at ArtsWestchester’s Mamaroneck Avenue

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headquarters in White Plains. The group is the largest private not-for-profit arts council in New York state. ArtsWestchester’s CEO Janet Langsam, said, “ArtsWestchester, with our affiliates, and there are least 150 of them, have gotten together and said, ‘We need to restart the arts in Westchester and we need the help of the Assembly and of the Senate.’ And, you guys have been so supportive of the arts in the past. We need you to rally up in Albany for $1 million to restart the arts here in Westchester County.” Langsam pointed out that in addition to offering outlets for creative expression the arts brings people and communities together. “The arts are a way to bring people together and we have worked for many, many years trying to make sure that what we do is fair, equitable and really reaches down to every community in Westchester,” Langsam said. She emphasized that arts has a $172 million economic impact and employs more than 5,200 people in Westchester. The White Plains event came a day after New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio told a briefing that the city is targeting a September opening for Broadway and off-Broadway shows with some theaters possibly opening before then. He said the city is “working with the Broadway community now to develop the plans to make the reopening go smoothly. We need it back on every level. And the hope that comes with live performance, the hope that comes from our cultural community. This is also absolutely crucial. This is going to be a year to turn things around. WCBJ

And our artists, our performers, our cultural community are going to lead the way and encourage people and inspire the people. So, it’s time to raise the curtain and bring Broadway back.” The mayor said that they are developing a crowd management plan and over the next four weeks will be setting up dedicated vaccination sites specifically for the theater industry. “We’re also going to have a mobile unit that will serve off-Broadway theaters. It’s so important to make sure that people are getting vaccinated now, as we look forward to the fall. Also, to make sure that testing is available on an ongoing basis, so there will be pop-up testing sites at and near theaters on Broadway and off-Broadway,” de Blasio said. “The city will be actively engaged in helping theaters to manage crowds before and after shows. I’m calling upon the state to please quickly issue clear guidance for theater workers in terms of masks usage, in terms of how we use proof of vaccination or proof of negative testing to help ensure that everyone can work and that crowds can come back in the fall.” In White Plains, State Sen. Shelley Mayer said, “Arts are the touch of life we are missing and this is the moment to bring them back. We are fighting hard to make ArtsWestchester a dedicated line in our budget.” She said they also are trying to get more funding for the New York State Council on the Arts. State Sen. Peter Harckham said, “We are talking about an economic multiplier. When people come to patronize the arts and experience the arts they’re dining out,

From left: Assemblymen Tom Abinanti and Chris Burdick; state Sens. Peter Harckham and Shelley Mayer; and Janet Langsam. Photo by Peter Katz.

they’re shopping, they’re going to gas stations, staying in our hotels, paying hotel tax. This is a dynamic way to get people to our downtowns.” State Assemblyman Tom Abinanti characterized the arts in Westchester as “the heart and soul of our community and they are the lifeblood of our economy.” State Assemblywoman Amy Paulin said that getting back to the arts also means getting back to normalcy. State Assemblyman Chris Burdick suggested that the arts are an important part of the fabric of life in Westchester. One of the representatives of the arts organizations was Waddell Stillman, president and CEO of Historic Hudson Valley, who said, “It takes a lot to regroup, to reassemble, to rehire, to recruit, to reconnect with audiences and thereby restart the arts.” Laura deBuys, president and executive director of The Picture House Regional Film Center in Pelham said that the federal CARES Act funding has helped keep many organizations from having to go out of business but now more support is needed because “we have to redesign programming, we have to make our spaces safer and we have to fund the artists so they can get back to the business of creating.” The state legislators expressed optimism that the funding ArtsWestchester was seeking could be approved in relatively short order.


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Travel in ‘21—

Association President and CEO Roger Dow upon the report’s release on March 17. “With the travel industry suffering such a disproportionate share of losses, policymakers need to understand that a nationwide economic recovery effectively hinges on a travel recovery.” To that end, the group is pressing Congress to pass the bipartisan Hospitality and Commerce Job Recovery Act, which would provide: • a temporary business tax credit to revitalize business meetings, conferences, and other structured events; • a temporarily restored entertainment business expense deduction to help entertainment venues and performing arts centers recover; • an individual tax credit to stimulate nonbusiness travel; and • tax relief for restaurants and food and beverage companies to help restore food service jobs and strengthen the entire American food supply chain. The organization submitted a letter to Capitol Hill signed by more than 80 major travel-related companies and organizations urging lawmakers to pass the bill. According to a fact sheet issued by the bill’s five co-sponsors, “Hotel employment is unlikely to reach pre-pandemic employment levels until at least 2023. More than 70% of hoteliers said they could close or be forced to make additional layoffs without federal assistance.” The association is also among 26 organizations to sign a separate letter asking the White House to set a May 1 deadline to reopen international travel. According to the letter, international arrivals from Mexico to the U.S. fell by 62% in 2020; those from Canada plunged by 77%; and those from overseas markets plummeted by 81% — for a total loss to the U.S. economy of $146 billion last year. The travel association estimates that, if nothing is done to lift international travel bans and bring back demand, 1.1 million American jobs will not be restored and $262 billion in export spending will be lost by the end of 2021. However, if travel from the top inbound markets to the U.S is able to safely resume by July 4 — and can reach an average of 40% of 2019 levels for the remainder of this year — the group says that it would aid the economic recovery by adding $30 billion in incremental spending and bringing back 225,000 American jobs. The May 1 deadline is in accordance with President Joe Biden’s priority to make every American eligible for a vaccination by that date. According to the latest available data from the American Hotel & Lodging Association, as of September 2020 Connecticut had lost 38% of its direct hotel jobs, and 23% of its total hotel-related jobs.

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Bookings down at Booking Holdings Travel behemoth Booking Holdings, based in Norwalk, was hit hard last year as well. Room nights dropped by about 58%, adjusted earnings before taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBTDA) swooned by 85%, gross travel bookings were down by 63% and total revenues plunged by 55% to $6.8 billion from 2019. In announcing those results on Feb. 24, Booking Holdings President and CEO Glenn Fogel called 2020 “the biggest disruption to modern global travel the world has ever seen.” However, he added, “With many travel restrictions now in place around the world, we believe there is once again a high level of pent-up demand for travel. But when this demand will be fully unlocked is of course difficult to predict and it will depend on vaccination rates and other factors.” “After a year spent at home, and missing so many of life’s important moments, we’re seeing a strong demand for travel,” Ben Harrell, chief marketing officer at Booking Holdings’ subsidiary Priceline. “And the vaccination rollout continues and travel begins to ramp up, we want to make it easier than ever for travelers to enjoy additional savings.” The company plans to offer a variety of promotions this spring, and in November introduced loyalty program Priceline VIP, which allows travelers to book at deep discounts while unlocking additional perks such as added coupons for flights, hotels, and rental cars. Harrell said consumer response has been strong. “Travelers need to feel confident in both their personal safety and in their booking choices as they resume travel,” Harrell said. “That means in addition to vaccinations and regular precautions, such as wearing masks and social distancing, they’ll want to understand cleanliness and safety measures onsite.” In response, Priceline has added WCBJ

search filters to its platform that allow users to see hotel cleanliness scores and where new Covid-19 cleaning protocols have been put into place. Connecticut Office of Tourism (COT) Executive Director Randy Fiveash told the Business Journal that, according to its February/March “Tourism Insights” survey, 69% of respondents said they plan to travel more this year than they did in 2020, with 41% saying they’ll travel in the next three months, 54% in the next six months and 60% in the next nine months. “The tourism industry was hit pretty hard,” Fiveash, who retired from his COT position on April 1, said, estimating that it was down by as much as 50% from 2019. (Under normal circumstances, the state’s tourism industry brings in some $15.5 billion, generates $2.2 billion in tax revenues and supports over 123,000 jobs.) “But that data shows that there is pent-up demand to get out, and to do it safely.” As proof, he cited additional data that found that 81% of New England residents said they didn’t want to travel more than 100 miles, at least in the short-term — “which is pretty darned good for us,” Fiveash said. “A hundred miles pretty much takes in all of Connecticut, as well as Boston and New York. We’re in a sweet spot in that travel realm.” The COT’s marketing efforts this year will be effectively split 50-50 between in-state and out-of-state initiatives; previously about 80% of its target was out of state. “We want to get people to see their state with new eyes,” Fiveash said. “There are things right in their backyard they might not be aware of.” The outgoing executive director predicted a “solid recovery beginning this summer. We’ve added 1,300 jobs since January. But international travel is going

to take a little longer to return.” Priceline’s Harrell agreed, though he noted that “the one exception is Mexico, where travel bookings are up almost 200% year over year.” “As 2021 moves forward,” he continued, “we predict travelers will be increasingly interested in taking some of the trips they have missed out on over the past year, but with an eye focused on getting the best deal possible. While it will be a long road to a full recovery, we remain cautiously optimistic and expect to see leisure travel begin to rebound this summer.” Meanwhile, Wilton Center Travel is experiencing an uptick in business. “Over the past couple of weeks we’ve received quite a few calls and bookings for this year,” Sanko said. “Here in Connecticut the vaccines are going well, which helps.” “We just had some clients return from Hawaii,” White added, “and they said it was absolutely fabulous, because there were hardly any other tourists. They said it was one of the best vacations they’d ever taken.” White — who was in Africa last March when Covid reared its ugly head, and returned just in time to see everything shut down — said she hoped more customers would see the importance of relying on travel agents to handle the details of their trips, especially given the uncertainty that still pervades the world. “When we reopened we saw people by appointment only,” she noted. “And that’s something we’re going to continue to do,” both for safety reasons and for improved efficiency. Looking ahead, White said, “We’re being a little more creative, given all the time and effort we spent last year working with clients to reschedule. It’s been a bit of a trial, but we were able to get through it.”


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CONTRIBUTING WRITER

| By Fran Pastone

When women-owned businesses thrive, there is no ceiling BY FRAN PASTORE

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arch and April are big months in the ongoing effort for women’s rights. In March, we took time to recognize generations of women innovators and advocates as we celebrated Women’s History Month as a nation. And in April, Connecticut follows, with the Women’s Business Development Council (WBDC) hosting the annual tradition of Women-Owned Business Day — an opportunity to celebrate and share the economic impact of the thousands of women owned enterprises in the state. In the waning days of a pandemic that caused an economic downturn, which many market analysts are describing as a “she-cession,” it is more important than ever to raise the awareness of our elected leaders about the important work of WBDC and its 24-year-long effort to make economic equality for all women a priority. On April 21, the Women’s Business Development Council (WBDC) plans to host its seventh annual Women-Owned Business

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Monster smash—

marketing for Showcase Cinemas told the Business Journal. “City Center and the IMAX are tracking particularly well. Because we have reduced capacity due to state guidance we are adding more and more shows to allow as many people to see the movie as possible. There are already sold-out shows and this movie is really showing that people want to go back to the movies.” Malinowski said many people in the industry have been looking at that picture as almost a barometer for what’s likely to happen in the coming months. “Last weekend, in the international launch, it actually broke records in China, close to $70 million, and then the overall international cume was $125 million for the weekend,” Malinowski said. “It’s super exciting for us to see that people want to go back to the movies and this movie is demonstrating it.” Malinowski said that people are anxious to get out of the house after a year of disruption and an incentive to go out for the theater experience is that the spectacular images and sounds of movies such as “Godzilla vs. Kong” can’t be experienced if the movie is streamed to a home television set. “The effects are amazing; it’s a creative film. People have been anxious to get off the couch,” Malinowski said. “Our

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Day, virtually, to address real issues that affect women-owned enterprises. WBDC is making the necessary space to create a consolidated, powerful voice for women business owners and entrepreneurs throughout Connecticut. This annual awareness gathering, hosted by WBDC and leadership statewide, is an opportunity for women entrepreneurs to be heard by legislative officials, and for those officials to illustrate that they value women-owned businesses as an integral part of the Connecticut economy. “Value” is an ideal word to describe the economic engine of women-owned businesses that contribute over $16 billion to Connecticut’s gross product each year — proving that there is no glass ceiling when women entrepreneurs thrive. During a time when many resources were forced to close or were overwhelmed, WBDC increased support for women entrepreneurs — aspiring and established alike — sixfold. We helped businesses realign their business models, assisted in the application process for PPP grants and

other relief, and identified new ways to deliver our services in an economy impacted by the pandemic. We continue to witness women overcome unprecedented challenges, and can attest to their resilience, tenacity and courage firsthand. As a result, WomanOwned Business Day 2021 will be especially compelling. We invite all entrepreneurs — past, present and future — to join us as we share successes and remarkable adaptations as an inspiration for meaningful legislative reform. As WBDC and the women we serve migrate from an unprecedented economy into a fiercely uncertain one, we need to ensure we are creating a framework for success that aligns our leaders’ policies with our business owners’ needs. WBDC is proud to support Connecticut’s women-owned businesses. We look forward to celebrating your empowerment and our renewed dedication to advocate on your behalf. Join us on April 21 by registering here.

Fran Pastore is a devoted catalyst of women’s economic equity and the founder and CEO of the Women’s Business Development Council, a leading organization for championing female entrepreneurship and women’s economic equity.

staff is trained. We have new air filtration systems in all of our theaters including City Center, so basically all of the protocols we’ve put into place since last year are making people feel more comfortable but this movie is giving them a reason to come back.” Just how quickly audiences come back will determine whether and how quickly theaters pull out of the financial bind that the pandemic placed them in. According to Comscore, which tracks box office revenues, the pandemic year 2020 saw only $2.25 billion in domestic box office compared with $11.4 billion in 2019. “Though the pandemic has caused much disruption to the theatrical business, there are encouraging signs of recovery in many countries around the world,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst at Comscore. “Today we know that audiences are anxious to return to enjoying the theatrical experience and the many notable successes just prove that if cinemas are open and offer great content, moviegoers will indeed be excited to watch appealing movies on the big screen.” Doug Murdock, executive director of the Connecticut Association of Theatre Owners, noted that in Connecticut movie theaters were allowed to reopen on a restricted basis last June. “They were way ahead of the curve compared with New York,” Murdock told

the Business Journal. “With the film studios pulling back on their release schedules it’s been hit or miss and some of the companies chose not to reopen right away while others took their time and looked at the audience levels, closed for a bit, and reopened, so it’s been up and down. For those that have been open, there has been audience interest and they’re all just waiting for the A-list movies to come out.” Murdock said that theaters in Connecticut, as elsewhere, had a very strong business model before the pandemic. “While this has decimated some theaters we think we’ll come out stronger,” Murdock said. “Right now we’re limited to a 50% capacity in Connecticut and a curfew right now still is in place to 11 p.m.” Phil Contrino of the National Association of Theatre Owners pointed out that cinemas can’t be profitable while operating at sharply reduced capacity, but the association’s members nonetheless are glad to be able to reopen their doors and put their employees back to work. “Capacity limits will increase and we’ll get back to levels where we can operate profitably. A big part of that will be major releases coming out,” Contrino told the Business Journal from his association’s Washington, D.C., headquarters. “The fact that New York and Los Angeles weren’t open held up a lot of the studios from

releasing their big pictures and now that they are open it gives studios what they need to keep those movies on the release calendar and that’s crucial.” Contrino said that his group, in consultation with leading epidemiologists, developed the program CinemaSafe for theater owners to adopt. It provides safety and health protocols based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines. He noted that theater owners have been adapting their refreshment stands to help ensure safety from the virus. “It’s hard to open without concessions. Basically, you’re not going to be profitable if you don’t have concessions. Its a massive component of a theater’s profitability and it’s what people want when they go to the movies,” Contrino said. Contrino suggested that because people have spent so much time sitting and watching content on their couches at home there’s going to be a huge surge in movie attendance. “There’s no question that a lot of our members are going to have huge financial hurdles to overcome as a result of this,” Contrino said. “They’re definitely optimistic about the ability to rebound and start to sell tickets again really quickly during the summer when big releases are coming out.”

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Welcome to Xenhouse: Stamford athletes team up to form unique training facility BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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hree Stamford friends with a keen interest in athletics will open a training facility in Stamford this summer. Not that unusual, perhaps. Except that two of its co-owners — Desmond Hinds and Alex Joseph — have known each other since they were 7 years old. Their relationship with the third, Ross Bertrand, dates back only to middle school. (A fourth member, Richard Rodriguez, joined a couple of years ago.) “We’ve always been close,” Hinds told the Business Journal. “And we all have a lifelong love for playing football.” Indeed, Joseph spent time with the Green Bay Packers, Oakland Raiders, Carolina Panthers and San Francisco 49ers in addition to playing college ball at Temple. Bertrand played for the University of Albany and Hinds for Iona College and Pace University. That all three earned degrees — Hinds with a B.S. in Business Management and an M.S. in Sports Management; Joseph with a B.A. in Criminal Justice; and Bertrand with a B.S. in Science — may go some way in explaining another unusual aspect of their business:

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Its name, Xenhouse. “We were going to go with ‘The Training Lab,’” Hinds said. “But everyone was telling us, ‘That’s not a brand, there’s all kinds of places with names like that. You gotta do better.’” At a loss, Hinds said he spent hours mulling it over online before finding a list of words to describe Jesus Christ, with the Greek word “xenodochial,” which means “to help strangers,” leaping out. “We took ‘xen’ from that and added ‘house’ to make it one word,” he said. And that is the third unusual thing about the business. While many training facilities tend to promise to give not only one’s body but also one’s mind a workout, the Xenhouse team takes it a step further. Hinds said that, when he and Rodriguez first approached each other about forming the company, the latter “asked me what I wanted to do, what my dream was.” The answer: Giving back to the Stamford community by helping kids — particularly underprivileged ones — by providing what Hinds said is “more than just physical training.” Again, the xenodochial approach. “We want to help kids from a physical,

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(left) Owners: Ross Bertrand, Alex Joseph and Desmond Hinds. (right) Xenhouse. mental and emotional approach,” he said. “And that includes life lessons, like how to do your taxes or build a business — things that we learned later in life.” Though determined to set up shop in Stamford, Hinds said the search for the right place took some time. Certain areas that would have been gimmes during the three friends’ youth were now out of their price range, he said. Then a Realtor friend showed them 6 Dyke Lane in the south end, “which had been completely under our radar but fit perfectly,” Hinds said. The 3,300-square-foot facility will pro-

vide training in a number of disciplines, from general and sports-specific to yoga and programs for those with special needs. Due to open this summer, Xenhouse will initially be staffed by the three friends but expects to add trainers and support staff as business grows. Hinds said that Xenhouse plans to draw customers not only from Stamford but from Darien, New Canaan, Westport, Stratford and Bridgeport as well. “We’re also in the process of trademarking ‘#PAID,’ which reflects paying your daily dues to achieve greatness,” he said. “We’re completely invested in this.”


Condo board sues Eastchester ZBA over size of planned apartments BY BILL HELTZEL bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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wners of the Enclave condominium in Eastchester don’t want a developer to build a larger apartment building across the street. The condo’s board of managers sued the Eastchester Zoning Board of Appeals on March 18 for granting Augustus Development LLC rights to construct a building behind the Shoppes @ Eastchester that will exceed neighborhood height restrictions, in a petition filed in Westchester Supreme Court. The proposed 5-story, 21-apartment structure “will constitute an eyesore” and grant “an unjustified windfall on a sophisticated and experienced developer,” according to a petition filed in Westchester Supreme Court. “The board was very thorough in its review of the matter,” Town Attorney Louis Reda said. “The town will defend the zoning board … and it will be up to the court to decide.” The Enclave is a 24-unit condominium at 24 Ray Place, around the corner from the White Plains Road commercial strip. When Augustus Development of Pleasantville bought a vacant 0.59-acre parking lot at the crest of Ray Place for $1 million in 2019, developer John Saraceno calculated that he had to build a fifth floor to “realize the full potential and value of the property,” according to zoning records. Augustus Development asked the zoning board for 10 variances that would allow a larger, higher structure, as well as other concessions. Four public hearings were held. The zoning board determined that the apartments would be consistent with the character of the neighborhood, according to its findings: • It would be slightly taller than the Enclave. • It would not appear out of place or out of scale in the busy, mixed-use commercial corridor. • The requested variances are not substantial. • The building would not have an adverse physical effect on the neighborhood or the environment. The zoning board also found that Augustus Development’s alleged financial difficulty that prompted the request for variances was self-created. But that issue alone does not preclude granting the variances. The zoning board approved the variances on Jan. 12 by a 3-2 vote. The Enclave board of managers, led by Srishantha Malagoda, disputes most of the zoning board findings. The board’s job is to prevent construction of inappropriately large structures, the petition states, grant the minimum variances

necessary, and protect the character of the neighborhood. A portion of the property may have no more than 2.5 stories, under the zoning laws, and the variances let the developer add from 17.5% to 67% height. The parking lot is 25 feet higher than White Plains Road. The top of the apartment building would be 80 feet higher than the road and would tower over the commercial district on one side and a residential neighborhood on another side. The board also allegedly failed to consider the impact of the building on the stormwater runoff and on the aged sewer system. The Enclave claims it was denied due process. Augustus was allowed to present more information after the last public hear-

A view from White Plains Road. ing was closed in November, according to the petition, but town officials would not allow the zoning board to consider a legal analysis presented by the Enclave’s attorney, Andrew D. Brodnick.

That analysis, the petition states, “may well have affected a single vote, which would have changed the outcome.” The Enclave is asking the court to annul the 10 variances.

Looking towards the future

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SUITE TALK Suite Talk: Robert Withers, president and CEO of M1 Capital Corp.

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hile many people are optimistic that there is a light at the end of the Covid-19 tunnel, the reality is that the economy is still in the tunnel. And while some aspects of life are returning to a pre-pandemic status, commercial real estate is not one of them. In this edition of Suite Talk, Senior Enterprise Editor Phil Hall speaks with Robert Withers, president and CEO of M1 Capital Corp. in White Plains, on the challenges that continue to impact the commercial property sector.

We last visited with you in June 2020 for our YouTube Video Conversation series.

How has the state of the commercial property evolved since that time? “It depends on the asset class. If you’re talking about valuations, all of them have seen some impact that can range anywhere between 15% or 20% all the way to 40%. “Multifamily and office fared the best and are the least impacted, and industrial has done well. But the small mom-and-pop, commercial mixed-use properties — maybe it’s some apartments over two or three retail units — have found themselves in trouble, along with the smaller strip centers and even some of the larger shopping centers due to issues that were already there but were exacerbated by the virus.

“I think over the next six months to eighteen months there’s going to be some pain in the core asset classes, and that probably has a lot to do with lenders taking very defensive positions. Rent collections are not really going back to normal anytime soon — and how many times can you issue a forbearance? Some of these larger landlords have two or three forbearances that they have worked on, and sooner or later the bill comes due. Forbearances really don’t do anything but kick the can down the block. “What you’re going to need to see is a reworking of a lot of these mortgages. Whether or not they’re institutional or conventional mortgages, they’re going to have to

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be modified.” For commercial property owners who are either in default or nearing default to a lender and need a way to get funding to help them out, what are the best options available? “If you’re having an issue with your commercial mortgage bill, you need to modify it. Usually, what’s best to work with an intermediary, either a company like ours or an attorney who ‘speaks bank.’ The modification can come in several ways. “Part of the process involves repositioning, and a lot of commercial landlords are going to find themselves with properties that no longer work with the current tenancy or the current purpose; the property is just not going to work as a restaurant or a bodega or whatever it is. They have to reposition it and work with a lender to create a better opportunity for themselves with the property if they want to hold on to it. “For example, maybe a small strip center that has five or six retail stores is no longer anchored by a strong tenant — maybe you want to raze it and create office or multifamily. I’ve seen that deployed down in Florida where small motels don’t work anymore and they’re being reconfigured into apartments.” What about refinancing? Are commercial property owners finding it easy to refinance their mortgages? “The fundamentals of the property have to be strong. If your property has a restaurant or any sort of retail component that depends on traffic coming in and out of your business, there’s going to be intense scrutiny put on that lease. “Lenders are diving into the metrics into the business fundamentals of the tenants like I’ve never seen before. They have to understand what is going to be there and if the tenants can continue to be able to pay the rent so that the owner can pay the mortgage.” Is credit readily available today for commercial property borrowers? “Credit is not getting looser, it’s getting tighter. Banks are in business to be able to make loans, but they’re more cautious. They’re lending at a lower loan-to-value instead of 75% leverage — they may consider a 65% or 70% leverage. “I don’t see credit loosening up anytime later this year due to the fallout and the repercussions of what we’re going through now. That is going to be felt for a while. I think there’s money available, but it’s not aggressive and it’s going to be well into 2022 until you start seeing banks return to normal, whatever that is.”


Rakow sues landlord for $170K

Service Stability Strength

BY BILL HELTZEL bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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akow Commercial Realty Group claims that a $3.4 million offer it lined up with a self-storage developer to buy a White Plains industrial property fell through when the landlord scuttled the deal. Now Rakow is demanding a $170,000 commission from the landlord, in a complaint filed March 22 in Westchester Supreme Court. But Joseph Cerniglia, the owner of the property, says Rakow’s claim “has no basis or merit, and they don’t have their facts correct.” The property is at 206-210 Ferris Ave., along the Metro-North train tracks, south of Interstate 287 and across the street from Gardella Park. It is the home of Sentrale Construction Corp., operated by Cerniglia, whose recent jobs include working on the Tappan Zee Bridge Maintenance Facility in Tarrytown. In December 2019, a real estate company controlled by Cerniglia gave Rakow, of West Harrison, exclusive rights to market and sell the property for at least 180 days. Rakow would receive a 5% commission for a sale. Rakow says it identified William Warren Properties Inc. of Santa Monica, California, as a buyer. The company operates 190 storage buildings, including StorQuest Self Storage facilities in Briarcliff Manor and Port Chester. Cerniglia’s company agreed last July to sell the Ferris Avenue property to William Warren Properties for $3.4 million, according to the complaint. But despite having a “ready, willing and able” buyer, the complaint states, Cerniglia’s company returned a $150,000 deposit and refused to allow the buyer to conduct due diligence, “effectively forcing the termination of the deal.” Rakow claims that Cerniglia’s company defaulted on their agreement, triggering Rakow’s right to collect a $170,000 commission. Cerniglia’s company has refused to pay, according to the complaint filed by Eastchester attorneys Joseph E. Sarachek and Zachary E. Mazur, and has breached the contract. “We are disputing their claim,” Cerniglia said in an email. “We are fighting it.” Rakow does not explain in the complaint why Cerniglia would walk away from $3.4 million. But on March 17, five days before the Rakow lawsuit was filed, Cerniglia sold the property to a Mount Vernon company controlled by Richard, Robert and Angela Persico. The price, according to a deed recorded in Westchester County, was $4.1 million.

“They have the same values that we do,” Dean says. “They know who we are. They’re loyal, hard working and they’re there for us.”

PASCAL COFFEE ROASTERS Dean Pialtos, President and CEO

The Pialtos family has been in business as Pascal Coffee Roasters for four generations—that’s more than 100 years providing high quality coffee and service in the Hudson Valley. When they needed a loan for more trucks and equipment, they chose a local bank that shares their commitment to customer service: Tompkins Mahopac Bank.

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HERSTORY Marla Beth Enowitz’s journey from stay-at-home mom to artist/entrepreneur BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

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tamford’s Palace Theatre has been closed since the Covid-19 pandemic took root, but some much-needed razzmatazz has been added to the darkened venue’s Atlantic Street glass windows: a brightly kaleidoscopic mural titled “Stars for the Stars” featuring hundreds of abstract stars in varying sizes and colors floating beneath a curtain of lush clouds. “Stars for the Stars” is the creation of Marla Beth Enowitz, a Rye Brookbased artist and founder of Marla Beth Designs, which is a new business that creates abstract expressionist paintings and murals on commission. “I started the business in June of last year during the quarantine,” Enowitz said. “It was a way for me to express myself and it was very medicinal for me — I really didn’t expect anything more than to just share what I was doing during my quarantine time.” Enowitz had no previous experience starting a business — she admitted to a “short career in advertising” prior to her 10 years as a stay-at-home mother — and her art training was anything but academic. “My education started with Bob Ross at seven years old,” she said, referring to the iconic host of the long-running PBS series “The Joy of Painting.” “I set up my easel in my parents’ living room and did everything he did. And he was a fabulous teacher.” Although the Marla Beth Designs website refers to Enowitz’s work as abstract expressionism, she prefers to define her work as “happy art” — and, indeed, her bright colors and bold patterns certainly create a degree of artistic jollity. Enowitz initially began sharing her work via social media, but word-of-mouth spread much faster than she anticipated and she soon began fielding requests for original work. To date, she has received more than 40 large-scale commissions from across the country, with original works of approximately 5 feet by 6 feet in measurement. “I now have over 3,300 followers on Instagram — people find me and it’s really unbelievable,” she said. “I’m shipping a big piece to Tucson, Arizona this week.” Last fall, Enowitz received her first

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commission for a publicly displayed work for a 600-square-foot mural at The Westchester mall in White Plains. The work, titled “Gumballs,” is painted on the glass of the former Justice store and brings a startling burst of multiple hues to the cavernous space. Enowitz completed the work in the span of two weeks and received something of a workout in the process. “It is about 14 feet high, so I really got up there — and I’m a tiny person,” she laughed. With the Palace Theatre mural, Enowitz sought to channel the venue’s impact on the public imagination during WCBJ

the pre-pandemic era. “To have that closed during Covid is such a loss for the public and the performers,” she said. “My inspiration was a gesture to the performers, with the hope that they will come back soon. This was just a little red carpet to roll out for when things can proceed in the world again.” Enowitz worked in acrylic paints on “Stars for the Stars” and used a variety of brushes to achieve different textural results. And while creative work is achieved in a solo execution, she admits that she receives some extra help when her “dear husband will come along to drop off” the ladders needed for the

Marla Beth Enowitz with her mural “Gumballs” at The Westchester. Contributed photo

upper edges of the work. Enowitz is now planning her third public work at The Jefferson Valley Mall in Yorktown Heights and is offering a line of canvases via her website for which she will donate the profits to the art program at The Arc Westchester, a nonprofit assisting the developmentally disabled. “I’m just doing a lot and enjoying every minute of it,” she said.


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It happened here: When the U.S. did business with Nazis

YOUR MORNING T COMMUTE, COFFEE, & NEWS.

BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

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11/18/20 4:16 PM

he complex nature of American attitudes toward Nazi Germany prior to the U.S. entry into World War II were the subject of a virtual lecture presented March 29 by Fairfield University’s Judaic Studies Program and the Bennett Center for Judaic Studies. Guest speaker Bradley Hart, associate professor at California State University in Fresno and author of the critically acclaimed book “Hitler’s American Friends: The Third Reich’s Supporters in the United States,” noted that many major U.S. corporations played an important role in the rise of Hitler’s regime and continued to do business with the Nazi government after World War II began September 1939. “Some of America’s biggest corporations did business in the Third Reich, and very happily so,” said Hart. “The automotive industry was particularly egregious of this. Ford had a Cologne automotive plant that later was converted into aircraft engine production, forcibly by the Luftwaffe. General Motors also has its division in Germany. Both of these car makers decided not to pull out — they actually complied with the Nazi regime and put Nazi Party members on the board of directors and fired Jewish employees. They were very willing simply to collaborate.” Hart pointed out that the involvement of U.S. companies in the rise of Nazi Germany can be traced to the pre-Nazi 1920s when banks loaned money to rebuild a post-World War I Germany “because they saw an opportunity there.” But when Hitler ascended to power in 1933, their business operations continued despite the severe changes in German domestic policies. “This was a moment of moral testing for these corporations,” Hart said. “You had a regime that was asking you to fire employees because of their gender, their race and religion. And these companies didn’t refuse to divest from the German market.” At least one major company continued business operations when Germany overran most of Europe. Hart noted that when a Ford Motor Co.-owned plant in France was destroyed in a British bombing mission in May 1942, company president Edsel Ford had an odd set of priorities regarding its destruction. “Ford writes a letter because he’s seen a photo in the newspaper of the Ford plant being bombed — it’s actually on fire,” Hart continued. “But it’s not identified as the Ford plant and he writes, ‘Well, I’m glad they didn’t identify what the plant was, because that could look bad for us.’ It was more about a public relations problem than a moral or ethical problem.” Hart’s book notes that a 1943 investigation by the U.S. government of the Ford oper-

German American Bund parade in New York City on East 86th St. Oct. 30, 1939. Courtesy Library of Congress. ations that remained in wartime France were used “for the benefit of Germany” and were condoned by company founder Henry Ford, whose “name was irrevocably sullied” by his advocacy of anti-Semitic conspiracy theories in the 1930s. Other major U.S. companies were also involved in the Third Reich’s rise to power. “IBM had a German division that became involved in demography work and actually helped put together demographic models that will be related to the Holocaust later on,” Hart said. “Coca-Cola has a division in Germany — a lot of people don’t know this. There’s a great story: Coca-Cola was actually so popular in the Third Reich that there was a group of German POWs being brought into New York Harbor late in the war, and they saw a Coca-Cola billboard on one of the buildings in America and thought Coke was a German thing. This is the beginning of globalization.” But Hart pointed out that the corporate world was not alone in initially viewing Nazi Germany with a sense of respect. The German-American Bund, a pro-Nazi organization of ethnic Germans living in the U.S., organized summer camps for youth and held rallies and marches extolling Hitler’s vision. The America First campaign sought to encourage isolationism as war raged in Europe, with iconic pilot Charles Lindbergh delivering addresses that many viewed as mirroring the Nazi anti-Semitic talking points. “There were millions of Americans that engaged with a fascist-leaning media,” Hart said. “I’m thinking Father Coughlin, the most popular radio hosts in history with up to 30 million listeners on a weekly basis and an outright apologist for Nazi Germany in this period. You have Gerald B. Winrod, who is a Protestant wannabe-Coughlin in Kansas, who runs for Senate and only is defeated because the Republican Party steps in it and runs a former governor against him in the primary. “It’s undeniable that what we would see as fascism or proto-fascism will always have some appeal for some number of people,” Hart added. “And I think, fortunately, it’s never been a majority in this country.”


FOCUS ON

BANKING WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNALS

ABA offers optimistic outlook on the economy and banking BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

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he American Bankers Association (ABA) not only foresees consumer and business credit markets doing well in the second quarter of 2021, it found that U.S. consumers are happy with the way their banks have performed during the Covid19 crisis. The ABA has an economic advisory committee that is composed of 15 chief economists from leading financial institutions across the nation that provides perspectives on regional and national banking and economic conditions, including quarterly reports and forecasts. The advisory committee reported optimism for the second quarter of 2021 in view of there now being additional federal financial relief and accelerating vaccine distribution. It pointed to not only the recently enacted American Rescue Plan that extends many provisions of

the original Covid-relief CARES Act but also to the government now allocating $10 billion for the vaccine rollout, industry-specific relief for restaurants, airlines, entertainment, the arts and other areas and more than $100 billion for schools along with $350 billion for state and local governments. The committee also cited several other policies that are in place, including restrictions on evictions and foreclosures and the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). The ABA saw vaccination efforts as the key to many businesses fully reopening and to millions of Americans returning to work. The committee found that in December more than one-sixth of consumers reported that paying for usual household expenses was “very difficult.” It said that as of early March, nearly 35 million people continued to struggle to make ends meet. A separate ABA study found that a year into the Covid-19 pandemic, U.S. consumers are happy with their banks and value the

banking industry’s support throughout the pandemic. The study was conducted by Morning Consult on behalf of the ABA. It included a national sample of 2,200 adults. The interviews were conducted online and the data were weighted to approximate a target sample of adults based on age, race or ethnicity, gender, educational attainment and region. Results from the survey had a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points. The survey was conducted in early March. The survey concluded that 86% of Americans with a bank account said they were “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with their primary bank and 96% rated their bank’s customer service as “excellent,” “very good” or “good.” The survey found that 74% of adults approved of their bank’s response to Covid-19. The ABA noted that throughout the pandemic banks have processed more than 300 million government Economic Impact Payments and they delivered nearly $650 billion

in Small Business Administration PPP loans. “During a year of economic hardship for consumers and businesses, banks across the country have stepped up to support those affected by this unprecedented public health crisis,” said Rob Nichols, ABA’s president and CEO. “These survey results reflect the countless hours employees at banks of all sizes have spent providing critical assistance to individual and business customers over the last year. Americans clearly appreciate the support our industry has provided during this challenging time.” The study found that 34% of U.S. adults were aware of their bank’s programs to assist customers experiencing financial hardships, and one-third of that 34% have utilized at least one of those programs. The study reported that 72% who were aware of their bank’s assistance options during the pandemic now have a more favorable opinion of the financial institution. FCBJ

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The survey found that 84% of those responding said banks are important to the nation’s economy. About 40% of survey respondents who work at a small business said their company received a Small Business Administration PPP loan, and 92% of them said it made a difference for the business. In addition, 59% classified that difference for the business as being a major one. Eighty-nine percent of them said the PPP loan helped to preserve jobs at that business. The survey asked how the bank customers received their own Economic Impact Payment from the government and 72% said it was as a direct deposit while 20% said they received checks and 8% received prepaid debit cards that were delivered by banks. The ABA noted that U.S. banking is a $21.9 trillion industry employing more than 2 million people that has extended nearly $11 trillion in loans and is responsible for safeguarding $17 trillion in deposits. APRIL 5, 2021

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Fed and AARP report: Small firms owned by older Americans struggling Bank Statement:

THE NEW NORMAL can't be conquered with the

SAME OLD SERVICE. BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

Where the brightest bankers live.

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he Federal Reserve Bank of New York and AARP have released a report that shows not all is well among older entrepreneurs as the economy pulls out of Covid-19. In noting that four out of five small employee firms have owners who are age 45 or older, the Fed and AARP said that during the spring of 2020 more than 20% of small businesses closed with 25% of those having owners age 45 and up. Although the total number of small businesses with doors open has rebounded somewhat according to the Fed and AARP, the number of active firms owned by those at least 45 years old is down 9% compared with a decline of only 2% for firms with owners under 45. In the world of small businesses, approximately 80% of owners are older than 45, according to the report. It found that 25% of the business owners who are at least age 45 are concerned about their personal credit scores or about losing assets due to late debt payments. The Fed and AARP found the number of active businesses owned by whites 45 and older declined 8% for the year ending in January 2021. The decline for Asian owners in the same age group was more than twice as steep, at 19%. The drop was 16% for Black owners and 11% for Latinos. Interviews with small-business owners and data from the U.S. Census, the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances, and Federal Reserve Banks’ 2020 Small Business Credit Survey were used in com-

piling the report. The vast majority of firms with owners 45 and older saw their year-over-year revenues decline, with 90% of Asian-owned firms, 85% of Black-owned firms, 81% of Latino-owned firms and 77% of whiteowned firms losing sales. Half of the firms in the report that were still in business at the end of 2020 characterized their financial condition as being “fair” or “poor.” The Fed and AARP found that almost 30% of firms overall said they didn’t expect sales to return to normal until 2022 or later. Claire Kramer Mills, assistant vice president at the New York Fed, said, “This illustrates the profound disruption the pandemic caused to small businesses and the stress it’s placed on older business owners’ financial health. A majority of older firm owners either reduced their salary or didn’t take one at all, dipping into personal savings to cover business expenses.” Nancy LeaMond, AARP executive vice president, said of older entrepreneurs, “They often have assets they can and do use to fund their businesses, but this can be very problematic. Accessing retirement funds is of particular concern since there is a shorter time-horizon to rebuild those accounts. “ The report concluded, “As surviving firms adapt to changing business conditions, our analysis indicates that many will be looking to repair both their business and personal finances. The experience of the pandemic creates opportunities for financial institutions to rethink how they can serve the financial needs of older entrepreneurs, particularly those owned by people of color, more effectively.”


Fairfield and Westchester Counties

DOCTORS of DISTINCTION

Saluting those who go beyond the diagnosis

2021

DEADLINE: July 1 • NOMINATE AT: westfaironline.com/dod2021/ Historically, once-a-century a catastrophic health crisis hits the world like what we are experiencing right now. In Westchester and Fairfield counties the dramatic and courageous response of our health providers gives us the opportunity to give them a special tribute and recognition.

HERE’S YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO NOMINATE THOSE WE CAN’T THANK ENOUGH

AWARD CATEGORIES: All In The Family No Land Too Far Cutting Edge Caring For All Female Trailblazer Promise For The Future • Team • • • • • •

Urgent Care Lifetime Achievement • Power Couple • Health Executive Of The Year • Oustanding Nurse • Telehealth • •

SAVE THE DATE: September 23 WestfairOnline For sponsorship inquiries, contact: Marcia Pflug at mpflug@wfpromote.com or 203-733-4545.

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HEALTH CARE PARTNERS:

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Good Things NWH APPOINTS NEW MEMBERS TO FOUNDATION BOARD Vascular surgeon Kenneth A. Goldstein, M.D., and longtime volunteer Melissa Welch have been named to the voluntary board of directors of the Northern Westchester Hospital (NWH) Foundation in Mount Kisco Keeva Young-Wright, president of the foundation, said “Both Dr. Goldstein and Ms. Welch have a longstanding relationship with the hospital and a firm commitment to advancing the health and wellbeing of our community.” Goldstein has served as chief of vascular surgery at NWH; program director, vascular surgery at Phelps Memorial Hospital Center in Sleepy Hollow; and, chief, vascular surgery, Northwell Health, Westchester Division for the past five years. Previously, he spent a decade as the chief, endovascular surgery Weiler Division, Albert Einstein Hospital of the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. Goldstein received his MD with distinction in vascular research from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University. Welch spent eight years as a litigation attorney in New York City before making the decision to stay at home to raise her children, both of whom were born at Northern Westchester Hospital. She earned her Juris Doctorate from Fordham Law School and a bachelor’s degree from Franklin and Marshall College.

NORWALK SYMPHONY’S SPRING CONCERTS Smaller ensembles of Norwalk Symphony Orchestra players and guests will be streamed in the two remaining spring Chamber Music concerts. The program on April 16 titled “Spring Strings,” starts with Mozart’s Divertimento in D Major, KV 136 and is followed by the Spring Concerto from Antonio Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. The program on May 21 titled “Woodwinds and Brass,” will feature Paul Dukas’s Fanfare to La Péri and a selection of fanfares by Giovanni Gabrieli, and pieces by Britten and Ruggles. “A ‘silver lining’ of pandemic-induced social distancing has been the opportunity to explore and break out into smaller ensembles in some truly wonderful programs,” said the symphony’s Music Director Jonathan Yates. Tickets are $20 for household and $5 for students for the full series. Visit norwalksymphony.org/buy-online for tickets and complete information on the concert presentations.

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35 ACTS OF KINDNESS FOR LAW FIRM’S 35TH

Crystal Hawkins-Syska

HGAR LAUNCHES FAIR HOUSING CHALLENGE INITIATIVE

From left: Kathryn Collins, partner at Feldman, Kleidman, Coffey & Sappe LLP; Kane; a five-year-old German shepherd available for adoption at Compassionate Animal Rescue Efforts of Dutchess County; Thomas Behnke, vice president of CARE of DC; and Karen LeCain, founder and director of CARE of DC.

Feldman, Kleidman, Coffey & Sappe LLP (FKC&S), a Fishkill-based law firm with clients throughout the Hudson Valley and Capital District, is commemorating its 35th anniversary with a giving campaign: 35 Acts of Kindness in the local community. In addition to the firm’s typical annual giving donations will be made to organizations pre-selected by FKC&S staff.   “It has been a privilege to serve the legal needs of clients in this community over the last 35 years,” said Jeffrey M. Feldman, founding partner of FKC&S. “There is no better way to express our gratitude than to give back to organizations that are dedicated to the welfare of our region.” 

Compassionate Animal Rescue Efforts of Dutchess County (CARE of DC), a no-kill, nonprofit pet adoption agency located in Wappingers Falls, was the first to receive a gift during the campaign when the firm donated $5,000 in March. “We are so grateful for this generous donation from Feldman, Kleidman, Coffey & Sappe,” said Karen LeCain, founder and director of CARE of DC. “The animals in our care depend on the support of the community and we are thrilled to put this contribution toward giving them the happy and healthy lives they deserve.” Founded by Feldman and Paul Kleidman in 1986, FKC&S’s compassionate attor-

neys and support staff have a long-standing track record of investing both time and money in a wide array of charitable causes that embody the values of their firm. Lauded for their efforts through the years, Feldman and team received the 2016 Headliner Award for Leadership in Business and Community from the Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce and the Mid-Hudson Valley Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals’ award for Leadership in Corporate Philanthropy in November 2019. Feldman, Kleidman, Coffey & Sappe specializes in the practice of personal injury law and professional liability defense.

FARM PROJECT TO INCREASE LOCAL FOOD ACCESS Poughkeepsie Farm Project (PFP) is launching a new program, “CSA is a SNAP,” that offers a 50% discount to members purchasing a share using SNAP/EBT (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program/ Electronic Benefits Transfer). The program is possible through PFP’s partnership with the Hudson Valley CSA (community supported agriculture) Coalition, a network facilitated by Glynwood Foundation, of more than 100 farms in the mid-Hudson Valley region. CSA is a SNAP is supported by the Gus Schumacher Nutrition Incentive Grant Program from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Members paying with SNAP/EBT to purchase discounted shares on a weekly basis are allowed half shares at $12 FCBJ

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per week and whole shares at $24 per week. In addition to CSA is a SNAP, PFP provides Sponsored Shares available to low-income families on a sliding-scale basis. The farm serves 120-plus individuals within the Poughkeepsie community with sponsored shares annually. The farm has also temporarily suspended its workshare and provides shares at a self-selected sliding-scale fee to enable community members to continue to access locally grown food. PFP has also added a new CSA distribution site in the city of Poughkeepsie at Sun River Health located at 75 Washington St. Madeline Henriquez, PFP’s executive director, said “CSA is a SNAP was first implemented into our Community Supported

Agriculture (CSA) program last year to improve the accessibility and affordability of local food for Poughkeepsie residents. It is just one of the ways we are cultivating a just and sustainable food system.” PFP has grown its impact substantially since it began in 1999 with three acres of revived farmland leased from Vassar College and 70 CSA shareholders. Twenty years later, more than 500 families are shareholders that take home 80% of the 90 tons of certified naturally grown produce harvested each year from PFP’s 15-acre urban farm. The other 20% is distributed through PFP’s Food Share program, which aims to address hunger, increase access to affordable, nutritious food, and create a healthier community.

The Hudson Gateway Association of REALTORS® (HGAR) is launching its “Fair Housing Challenge” initiative in observance of the U.S. Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) “National Fair Housing Month” for April.   HUD’s campaign includes efforts to end housing discrimination and raise awareness for fair housing rights in communities throughout the nation.  HGAR’s Fair Housing Challenge has been distributed to its 13,000 REALTOR® members stretching from Manhattan to Orange County and consists of three segments:  a simulated exercise in fair housing, an Implicit Bias Training video and an “At Home with Diversity” online certification course.    “As an Association, we are committed to ensuring that all of our members practice fair housing in all of their transactions,” said Crystal Hawkins-Syska, HGAR president.  “In fact, our theme this year is ‘the American Promise,’ which represents our dedication to helping all people realize the American dream of home ownership.”  The Implicit Bias Training video helps REALTORS® understand how our unconscious brains categorize information and stereotypes and offers practical tools to override hidden biases. The workshop offers many “de-biasing” practices that not only help to reduce bias, but also improve relationships with people.  The “At Home with Diversity” (AHWD) certification course teaches REALTORS® how to work effectively with diverse populations and build business success in today’s multicultural real estate market.    “Our Association has always believed in educating our REALTORS® about the vital importance of fair housing and we remain committed to upholding the principles of the Fair Housing Act,” said Richard Haggerty, HGAR CEO.


HASTINGS’ EDUCATOR TAKES ON CUNY POST

Curtis Nowosad

NY JAZZ BAND SCHEDULED FOR TRINITY CHURCH One of New York’s most prominent jazz bands — the Curtis Nowosad Quartet — will perform a rare local area concert, open to all regardless of religious affiliation, on the front lawn of Trinity Episcopal Church, 651 Pequot Ave., Southport,  on Sunday, April 24  at 3 p.m.  A key player in galvanizing New York’s jazz cultural and spiritual awakening, Nowosad has been a major force in The Harlem Sessions, organized by renowned pianist Marc Cary. His New York-based ensemble has held court throughout the city, including fullweek residencies at Dizzy’s Club at Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC). “We’re delighted to present the Curtis Nowosad Quartet to our community,” said Robert Kwan, music director at Trinity Episcopal Church. “They are master musicians and we’re in for a fun afternoon of top-notch entertainment. We welcome everyone who loves jazz.” To comply with federal, state and local guidelines, social distancing measures will be in place. All attendees must wear masks and be  registered  in advance  for contact tracing purposes. Attendance at the event will be limited to 100 and no one will be admitted without tickets and advance registration. People should bring their own chairs.  Tickets for the Curtis Nowosad Quartet are $20 for adults, $10 for students and seniors, $55 for a family (2 adults and unlimited students/children); children 10 and under are free.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

The City University of New York (CUNY) recently announced that it is appointing Lehman College Interim President Daniel Lemons, of Hastings on Hudson, to serve as interim university provost for CUNY, effective May 29. The appointment will not impact the June 30 date that Lemons’s tenure as Lehman president is set to end. Instead, he will serve in both roles during the month of June. “It has been an honor and privilege to serve in the roles that I have had at CUNY,” Lemons said, “and I look forward to stepping into the interim University provost position to continue advancing the mission and values of the world’s greatest public university.” Dr. Fernando Delgado, who was appointed by the CUNY Board of Trustees last month after a two-year search, begins his term as Lehman’s next president July 1.Lemons has served as Lehman’s interim president since July 2019. Prior to that, he

served as Lehman’s interim senior vice president and interim dean for academic affairs in the office of the provost. At CUNY, he will fill the position currently held by Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost and former Lehman College President José Luis Cruz, who is leaving CUNY to become the next president of Northern Arizona University. “We are fortunate to have an accomplished, experienced educator of Dr. Lemons’s caliber to step up to perform this important role and to afford us the time needed to identify Dr. Cruz’s successor through a rigorous national search,” said CUNY Chancellor Dr. Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. Lehman has marked several important milestones under Lemon’s tenure raising millions of dollars to accomplish renovations, new buildings, scholarships, Covid relief funds and environmental programs. In December, the high quality of Lehman’s work with members of underserved communities

gained affirmation in the form of a $30 million gift from author and philanthropist MacKenzie Scott. Lemons has spent the bulk of his career at CUNY. A professor emeritus of biology at City College, where he worked for nearly 30 years, his research in cardiovascular and comparative physiology led to the invention of a mechanical heart simulator that is still widely used in educational settings.   He took a one-year leave of absence from CUNY in 2012 to co-found the Global Energy Model Institute, an NGO that focused on developing clean, sustainable and replicable energy projects in regions of extreme poverty in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Lemons began his career at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He holds a doctorate from Columbia University, a master’s degree from Portland State University and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Goshen College.

ENSURING COMMUNITY KIDS HAVE ACCESS TO FOOD

ENTA EXPANDING Dr. William M. Portnoy who is an independent, New York City-based otolaryngologist and facial plastic surgeon, will be moving to Miami and will transition his New York practice and the care of his patients to the physicians at ENT and Allergy Associates (ENTA) LLP in Tarrytown, effective May 1. ENTA will take over Portnoy’s office, Chelsea Otolaryngology, at 160 W. 18 St. It will be staffed by veteran otolaryngologists Drs. Anna Aronzon and Edward Nahm, along with allergists and immunologists Hale Yarmohammadi, M.D., and Robert Sporter, M.D.  “I am absolutely delighted that ENTA will be taking over my practice here in New York City,” commented Dr. William Portnoy. “I have enjoyed a very complementary relationship with my colleagues at ENTA over the past 20 years and highly regard their commitment to being on the leading edge of health care. I have every confidence my patients and their families will continue to be well cared for.”  To learn more about ENTA visit http://www.entandallergy.com.

CONNECT WITH westfair communications

From left: Scott Kostrya, Jersey Mike owner; Kristen Gizzi, executive director, Litchfield Crossings; and Angela Chastain, founder of Camella’s Cupboard.

Jersey Mike’s Subs recently celebrated its grand opening at Litchfield Crossings, New Milford’s largest shopping center, and was given an enthusiastic welcome especially when guests feasted upon its “True American Sub.” Free coupons were given out and as well as a charitable contribution to Camella’s Cupboard, a New Milford based nonprofit.

Scott Kostrya, Jersey Mike’s owner, said “We are excited to be a part of the Litchfield Crossings family and already feel at home in this family friendly town. We are also pleased to be partnering with Camella’s Cupboard and assisting their efforts in continuing their good works in the community.” Camella Cupboard was founded

in 2018 by Angela Chastain with the goal of providing the children of New Milford year-round food access especially when they are out of school. “Camella’s Cupboard is …grateful to be the recipient of their (Jersey Mike) Grand Opening fundraiser. It’s wonderful to see Jersey Mike support the community with such generosity,” said Chastain. FCBJ

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Good Things Energy Innovator To address Vassar Graduates Vassar College President Elizabeth H. Bradley has announced that Jessica O. Matthews, an award-winning innovator and entrepreneur, will deliver the address at Vassar’s 157th Commencement on June 6, Matthews, a Poughkeepsie native, is the founder and CEO of Uncharted Power, a sustainable infrastructure company that helps cities turn their sidewalks into data centers to improve grid resilience, broadband connectivity and mobility. The company recently partnered with Poughkeepsie to demonstrate the potential of this new technology. “Jessica O. Matthews was born less that two miles from our campus and the impact of her unique vision has been both local and global,” Bradley said. “Today’s world needs fearless, unconventional thinkers and Jessica’s message to our graduates is sure to be inspiring.” Matthews’s career began in 2008 when she was a junior at Harvard University. For an assignment in an engineering class, she and a classmate invented the Soccket, a soccer ball that generates electricity when it is kicked around the field. She founded Uncharted Power in 2011 and since then, has shifted the company’s focus to building sustainable infrastructure platforms to help cities build a more equitable and sustainable future for its residents. Matthews is currently working on several projects with public and private organizations in the city of Poughkeepsie. The daughter of Nigerian immigrants, Matthews is a dual citizen of the United States and Nigeria. The idea for the Soccket first emerged while visiting relatives in Nigeria. When the community’s electricity was interrupted and air-polluting diesel generators were used to keep the lights on, Matthews saw the need for better ways to generate power. Her invention led to an invitation to the White House by President Barack Obama to represent small companies for the signing of the America Invents Act in 2012. She earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology and economics from Harvard University, an MBA from Harvard Business School, and is listed on more than 12 patents and patents pending. She was selected as one of  Fortune’s Most Promising Women Entrepreneurs, Forbes magazine’s 30 Under 30, and Harvard University Scientist of the Year.

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NYMC RECEIVES $2.2M

New York Medical College (NYMC) is one of 35 colleges and universities across New York state to receive funding from the Higher Education Capital (HECap) Matching Grant Program, which supports infrastructure improvements at New York’s private, not-forprofit colleges and universities. The latest round of funding in the amount of $2,219,031 will be used for creating open-concept laboratory space capable of housing multidisciplinary research teams and shared instrumentation at NYMC, which will complement the renovations already being planned as part of NYMC’s energy performance project. Campuses that receive grants are re-

quired to invest at least $3 of their own funds for every $1 of state funds received. “The HECap grant will support laboratory renovations that will be transformative to NYMC’s ability to develop and accelerate research programs seeking novel treatments and strategies against COVID-19, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases and other significant public health challenges, as well as attract new translational investigators and the most talented M.D., masters and Ph.D. students,” said Robert W. Amler, M.D., vice president for government affairs and dean of the NYMC School of Health Sciences and Practice. The project to develop approximately

20,000 square feet of modern, high-performance, open-concept laboratory space capable of housing multidisciplinary research teams and critically important shared instrumentation in the Basic Sciences Building, will attract investigators and students and will enhance research funding. The project will commit to sustainable building and operations and will integrate high-performance, cost-effective systems and sustainable finishes that reduce environmental impact while offering superior indoor environmental qualities without compromising the primary goals of functionality and quality of the research space.

UNITED WAY’S IMAGINE GALA

PepsiCo presented United Way of Westchester and Putnam’s annual Imagine Gala, virtually on Thursday, March 25. The gala celebrated the community contributions and generosity of its 2021 “Spirit of Caring” honorees: Entergy, Indian Point Energy Center; Walter D. Hosp; and Jeannette S. Warner. Every donation to the Imagine Gala helps United Way continue to provide critical services to the community’s most vulnerable residents who are affected by the ongoing Covid-19 public health and economic crises. FCBJ

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Entergy was presented with the Corporate Citizenship Award for its support of underprivileged communities in the county as well as schools and nonprofit health and human services organizations. Hosp, a resident of Edgemont and the CEO of ZenRE Holdings, received the United Way Chairman’s Award for his longstanding service and significant charitable and support of the organization. Longtime Scarsdale resident, Warner, an attorney and United Way’s vice

chair of advocacy received the Community Philanthropy Award for her longtime advocacy and fundraising efforts supporting the needs of people struggling in the community. United Way President and CEO Tom Gabriel said of the honorees, “You have all been amazing sustainers of our work and we can’t thank you enough for your faith in us.” UWWP is located at 336 Central Park Ave., White Plains.

TRIVIA NIGHTS, A NATURAL FIT FOR CHILDREN Children’s Learning Centers of Fairfield County (CLC), the second-largest center-based early childhood education nonprofit in Connecticut, will host two virtual Trivia Nights: Thursday April 8 and Friday April 16, from 7 to 9 p.m. Each night will feature rounds of general trivia questions as well as a “Name That Tune” round. Online registration for individuals and teams is available at clcfc.org or http://bit.ly/CLCTriviaNight. Teams collaborate via Zoom in dedicated break-out rooms, and answers are submitted online. The cost is $50 per person per date; $100 per person, including “pub snacks” provided by Marcia Selden Catering; $375 for a team of eight players. Pick-up of the pub snacks will be the day of the Trivia Night at Children’s Learning Centers at the Palmer Hill location on the Greenwich /Stamford border. “Children’s Learning Centers of Fairfield County plays a critical role in helping and educating children and their families in our community. We know that children are curious and love music, so a Trivia Night is a natural fit for us to raise awareness as well as funding,” stated CLC CEO Marc E. Jaffe. CLC is more than an early childhood education center; it is “an economic engine.” “We enable more parents of young children to work than any other nonprofit in southwest Connecticut,” said Jaffe. In 2020, during eight weeks of the Covid-19 pandemic, CLC provided reliable and safe childcare to children of health care and frontline workers. “The pandemic did not change our resolve and commitment to prepare the next generation for a promising future,” Jaffe said. CLC has been a leader in developing and implementing high-quality and affordable early childhood education and care programs since 1902.


WLS: HELPING PEOPLE COPE WITH EMOTIONS DURING TRYING TIMES

DAY OF HOPE AT WHITE PLAINS HOSPITAL

Margaret S. Smith

NEW CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER AT BURKE Margaret S. Smith has joined Burke Rehabilitation Hospital in White Plains as its new chief marketing officer. She will oversee the hospital’s advertising, public relations, online communications and external relations with the goal of bringing Burke’s unmatched restorative care to the many patients in need of acute rehabilitation services for strokes, heart disease, brain and spinal cord injuries and neurodegenerative diseases.   “We are so pleased to welcome Margaret as a senior member of the Burke management team,” said Jeffrey Menkes, hospital president and CEO.  “Along with her experience and skills in the health care field, she is a nearly 30-year resident of Westchester County, knows our communities well and prioritizes the wellbeing of our residents.” Previously, Smith was at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, where she was the manager of the Lupus and APS Center of Excellence. Prior to working in the health care and public health fields, she was an executive in the financial services industry at J.P. Morgan Chase. Smith holds a master’s degree in public health from New York Medical College, a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale University. She is a Certified Health Education Specialist. Founded in 1915 through an endowment from philanthropist John Masterson Burke, Burke Rehabilitation Hospital it is the only hospital in Westchester County dedicated solely to adult rehabilitation medicine. It is a member of the Montefiore Health System Inc.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

From left: Tiffany Perrone, RN, assistant nurse manager infusion center; Joann Scambia – Covid survivor; Kristine Cappo, director of nursing; and Kerri El-Sabrout, vice president, patient care services.

Westchester Children’s Chorus.

From left: Sean Healy, Joann Scambia, Hugo Sosa, all Covid survivors; Larry Smith, a Covid survivor and the hospital’s chairman of the board of directors; and Susan Fox, hospital president and CEO.

Event Description: Last year on March 9th White Plains Hospital (WPH) received its first Covid-19 patient—marking the start of a journey that changed everything. One year later, the hospital brought together its leadership, Covid-19 survivors, elected officials and commu-

nity members to reflect and honor its health care heroes — first at 6:30 a.m. as its morning shift employees arrived to work and again at 6:45 p.m. as first responders joined in a community applause in front of the White Plains Hospital Emergency Department. Attending the evening program were

COvid-19 survivors, including Hugo Sosa, former FDNY captain who beat Covid after a 44-day hospitalization; The Westchester Children’s Chorus; Susan Fox, WPH president and CEO; White Plains Mayor Tom Roach; and nurses, physicians and staff who led the Covid fight.

PACE TRANSFORMS SPACE TO HEALTHCARE HUB Pace University will transform Lienhard Hall, home to its College of Health Professions on the Pleasantville campus, into a modernized Healthcare Hub with the help of $1 million in state funding. With these funds, Pace will add programing for students preparing for careers in the region’s burgeoning health care and biotechnology sector while adding to, and modernizing, existing lab, classroom and simulation space – all with the goal of meeting the ever-changing technology demands in the health care sector and preparing much-needed nurses in New York state. The grant, awarded as part of the New York State’s Higher Education Capital Matching Grant Program (HECap), is intended to increase preparation, laboratories and facilities in health sciences throughout the state.

Preparing for the Healthcare Hub at Pace University.

“The new Healthcare Hub on our Pleasantville campus will enable Pace University to continue our proud tradition of educating nurses and other health professionals in such high demand in our region,” said Pace President Marvin Krislov. new Healthcare Hub.”

Constructed in 1968, Lienhard Hall is the heart of the College of Health Professions. The new Healthcare Hub will allow Pace to expand capacity to educate greater numbers of pre-licensure and advanced practice nurses, as well as future faculty and nursing leaders.

WESTCHESTER COUNTY’S WOW AWARDS Westchester County Executive George Latimer joined Women’s History Month at the recent county’s First WOW awards when seven local women, nominated by their peers in their community, were honored for their extraordinary work during the pandemic and beyond. The awardees were:  • Healing Hands: Highlighting Health and Wellness,  Nubia Earth Martin of Yonkers. • The Next Generation: Spotlighting a woman working with children in education or childcare, Frances-Ann Lightsy of Mount Vernon.

•Women Supporting Women: Showcasing a local woman who continues to lift others, Mariana Alonso-Jusafaj of New Rochelle. • Charity Begins at Home: Identifying women helping the community with basic needs like housing or food, Donna Brown of Tuckahoe. • Keeping the Faith: For women who have provided spiritual guidance, Ida Silver Wiggins of Peekskill. • Not Business as Usual: Featuring an outstanding businesswoman or entrepreneur, Melissa Manice of Larchmont. • Young Woman of Westchester,

a special award honoring a teenager in Westchester County for going above and beyond in her community, Joyce Lu of Hastings-on-Hudson. Robi Schlaff, Director of the Westchester County Office for Women, said “The 2021 WOW celebration of women brought to our attention, the many stars that shine in Westchester County. The number of women nominated for extending themselves to those in need during the pandemic is evidence of the community of care we are so fortunate to have in this County. We thank them for all they did and do every day.” FCBJ

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The Westchester Library System (WLS) has been chosen to be a local program provider for New York Project Hope, the statewide crisis counseling response to Covid-19. Its crisis counseling team members are trained to help people understand and cope with their reactions and emotions to challenges of the pandemic. Through an emotional support helpline, educational materials and trusted referrals, New York Project Hope crisis counselors help people do their best to manage the stress, isolation, grief and other challenging emotions. Crisis counselors answer the Emotional Support Helpline from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. weekdays. They also help by offering coping strategies and self-care guidance. Westchester County residents can call for help at 914361-5252 or visit NYProjectHope.org.

SILVERSOURCE HOSTS VIRTUAL EVENT The 2021 SilverSource Film and Awards event, “Coming of Age in Aging America: Challenges & Solutions,” will be held online Wednesday, April 21 at 6 p.m. Featuring a panel discussion on the compelling issues raised by the film “Coming of Age in Aging America,” the event will include the presentation of the 2021 SilverSource Awards, which celebrate the exceptional contributions made to improve and enrich the lives of older adults in Fairfield County by individuals, organizations and volunteers.  Admission is free but registration is required (https://silversource.org). Registrants will be sent a link to view the film in advance, as well as a Zoom invitation to the discussion and awards.  “As we consider the challenges and benefits of an aging society, we look forward to bringing the community together to explore ideas and celebrate longevity at our film and awards event,” said Kathleen Bordelon, CEO, SilverSource. The film panel discussion will be led by Roni Lang, LCSW, Center for Healthy Aging, Greenwich Hospital; and include filmmaker Christine Herbes-Sommers; Marie Allen, executive director, Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging; Ellen Bromley, director of Social Services, city of Stamford; and Ralph Blessing, land use bureau chief and planning director, city of Stamford. SilverSource, located at 2009 Summer St., Stamford, provides a safety net to seniors in need, to keep a roof over their heads, with the heat and lights on, food on the table and the medical care they need. APRIL 5, 2021

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NOMINATE TODAY SUBMISSION DEADLINE: JULY 16 at westfaironline.com/csuite2021/

HONORING LEADERSHIP AND OUTSTANDING ORGANIZATIONS IN WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTY.

EVENT DATE: October 14, 2021 • 5 pm Nominations may be entered for those who work in the following roles, or who manage these responsibilities. For more, visit westfaironline.com/events

NOMINATION CATEGORIES: Chief Financial Officer (CFO) or the controller / financial leader Chief Technology Officer (CTO/CIO) or the technology executive Chief Executive Officer (CEO) or the top executive Chief Operating Officer (COO) Chief Medical or Marketing Officer (CMO) OR NOMINATE YOUR SENIOR EXECUTIVE THAT DESERVES HONORS, ACCOLADES OR ACKNOWLEDGMENT. WestfairOnline

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For event information, contact: Fatime Muriqi at fmuriqi@westfairinc.com. For sponsorship inquiries, contact: Marcia Pflug at mpflug@wfpromote.com or 203-733-4545.


Facts & Figures U.S. BANKRUPTCY COURT Local business cases, March 24 – 30 Watford City Lodging, Yorktown Heights, 21-22164-RDD: Chapter 11, $751,764 assets, $423,641 liabilities. Attorney: Charles A. Higgs. S&A Retail Inc., Irvington, 21-22174-RDD: Chapter 11, assets $100,000 to $500,000, liabilities $1 million to $10 million. Attorney: Joseph T. Moldovan. S&A Distribution Inc., Irvington, 21-22175-RDD: Chapter 11, assets $1 million to $10 million, liabilities $10 million to $50 million. Attorney: Joseph T. Moldovan. Arnaldo & Milqueya Vasquez, d.b.a. Mona’s Coffee House, Ossining, 21-22176-RDD: Ch. 7, assets and liabilities $100,000 to $500,000. Attorney: William W. Waldner.

District Council Painting Industry Insurance Fund, White Plains vs. JWS Times, Albany, 21-cv-2530-PMH: Civil enforcement of employee benefits. Attorney: Dana L. Henke. Carolyn Catalano, Hopewell Junction vs. Infinity Solar Systems, Pearl River, 21-cv2556-KMK: Telephone Consumer Protection Act. Attorney: Stefan L. Coleman. Kent Hollow Inc., Armenia vs. Town of Armenia Zoning Board of Appeals, 21-cv-2638-CS: Civil rights. Attorney: Brooke D. Youngwirth. Porfirio Miguel, Yonkers vs. D&G Auto Repair Inc., New Rochelle, et al, 21-cv-2663-VB: Minimum wage or overtime compensation. Attorney: Abdul K. Hassan. Pedro Lazaro vs. DC White Plains, d.b.a. Don Coqui, New Rochelle, et al, 21-cv-2666-VB: Class action, Fair Labor Standards Act. Attorney: C. K. Lee.

Watford City Lodging LLC, Yorktown Heights vs. Christopher and Jennifer Miskin, North Dakota, 21-7017-RDD: Adversary proceeding in Watford City Chapter 11. Attorney: Charles A. Higgs.

Ashley Facciola, New Windsor vs. Mid-Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union, Kingston, 21-cv-2676-VB: Class action, contract. Attorney: Joseph I. Marchese.

Watford City Lodging LLC, Yorktown Heights vs. Donna Basore, Arnegard, North Dakota, 21-7018-RDD: Adversary proceeding in Watford City Chapter 11. Attorney: Charles A. Higgs.

Mohamed Salami, Spring Valley vs. BSD Food, d.b.a. Bagel D’Lox, Monsey, et al, 21-cv-2704: Fair Labor Standards Act Attorney: Sam B. Smith.

U.S. DISTRICT COURT, White Plains Local business cases, March 24 – 30 Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to:

DEEDS Above $1 million

ON THE RECORD

Below $1 million 140 McLean LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Carl Tan, et al, Yonkers. Property: 140 McLean Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $360,000. Filed March 16. 180 Fox Meadow Road LLC, White Plains. Seller: Tarek El Moselhy, et al, Scarsdale. Property: 180 Fox Meadow Road, Scarsdale. Amount: $900,000. Filed March 17. 7 Dennison LLC, New York City. Seller: Irene Lewis, Morrow, Georgia. Property: 7 Dennison St., White Plains. Amount: $396,000. Filed March 18. 71 CSY LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: John Longwell, Yonkers. Property: 71 Chestnut St., Yonkers. Amount: $500,000. Filed March 19. 99 Cleveland Drive LLC, Croton-on-Hudson. Seller: Henry Raposeiro, Croton-on-Hudson. Property: 99 Cleveland Drive, Cortlandt. Amount: $207,500. Filed March 16. AVB Designs, Somers. Seller: Richard A. Flora, Lords Valley, Pennsylvania. Property: 2794 Heathercrest Drive, Yorktown. Amount: $315,000. Filed March 19. Bedford High Inc., Briarcliff. Seller: Antunes Equity Solutions LLC, Katonah. Property: Commerce St., Mount Pleasant. Amount: $400,000. Filed March 19. Brothers and Sisters New York LLC, Yonkers. Seller: Igor Balkovyy, et al, Yonkers. Property: 56 Etvile Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $565,000. Filed March 18. CM Investors LLC, Fresh Meadows. Seller: 263 Westchester LLC, Yonkers. Property: 263 Westchester Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $412,500. Filed March 17.

47 Brewster LLC, New York City. Seller: David A. Cannon, Scarsdale. Property: 47 Brewster Road, Scarsdale. Amount: $3.3 million. Filed March 18.

Cortlandt Development LLC, Ossining. Seller: Albert Scardera Jr., et al, Mahopac. Property: 290 Commerce St., Mount Pleasant. Amount: $600,000. Filed March 19.

County of Westchester, White Plains. Seller: Property Group Partners LLC, Wilton, Connecticut. Property: Route 22, Lewisboro. Amount: $2.3 million. Filed March 15.

Durr Properties LLC, Katonah. Seller: U.S. Bank N.A. Property: 25 Barker St., Mount Kisco. Amount: $316,500. Filed March 17. Eureka 3 Home Buyers LLC, Yonkers. Seller: William P. Ray II, Yonkers. Property: 94 St. Mary’s St., Yonkers. Amount: $195,000. Filed March 18.

Gila Development Realty Corp., Pelham. Seller: Marlene G. Sonderlich, Pelham. Property: 970 Edgewood Ave., Pelham. Amount: $840,000. Filed March 15. Ivanhoe Old Aspetong LLC, Sacramento, California. Seller: Timothy J. Joyce, Katonah. Property: Old Aspetong Road, Bedford. Amount: $750,000. Filed March 18. JDJR LLC, Ossining. Seller: Hecna LLC, Ossining. Property: 89 Main St., Ossining. Amount: $650,000. Filed March 16. Livwill Park LLC, Purchase. Seller: 68 Park Holdings Corp., East Elmhurst. Property: 68 Park Ave., Harrison. Amount: $500,000. Filed March 17. MEM Flipp Corp., Bronxville. Seller: Lucille DiMeglio, et al, Elmsford. Property: 2214 Saw Mill River Road, Greenburgh. Amount: $435,000. Filed March 17. Mianus River Gorge Inc., Bedford. Seller: Bill B. Bedford, et al, Bedford. Property: Long Ridge Road, Bedford. Amount: $280,000. Filed March 17. Mogose Equities Inc., Bronxville. Seller: William Lopez, et al, Bronxville. Property: 10 Blair St., Yonkers. Amount: $850,000. Filed March 19. S Operating LLC, New York City. Seller: Bank of America N.A. Property: 64 Amackassin Terrace, Yonkers. Amount: $315,000. Filed March 17. Tavo Holdings LLC, Mount Kisco. Seller: William Brantley Anderson, Purchase. Property: 16 Bessel Lane, New Castle. Amount: $700,000. Filed March 18. U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Seller: Albert B. Moroni, et al, Yonkers. Property: 15 Overhill Place, Yonkers. Amount: $464,430. Filed March 19.

JUDGMENTS City of Mount Vernon, Mount Vernon. $45,000 in favor of Forensic Private Investigations Inc., Port Washington. Filed March 16. Excel FSG LLC, Yonkers. $14,035 in favor of GCS Realty Company Inc., Yonkers. Filed March 19. Redcom Design and Construction LLC, West Field, New Jersey. $16,823 in favor of Lawless and Mangone Architects and Engineers LLP, Yonkers. Filed March 16.

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RSC Group LLC, Mount Vernon. $29,707 in favor of Vik XS Services Inc., Jersey City, New Jersey. Filed March 15.

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicated a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed. Belcher, Darrell D., et al. Filed by Wilmington Savings Fund Society FSB. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $403,385 affecting property located at 7 Old Knollwood Road, Elmsford 10523. Filed March 15. Bruce, Shirley M., et al. Filed by U.S Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $428,240 affecting property located at 129 S. 14th Ave., Mount Vernon 10550. Filed March 16. Cabrera, Denise Y., et al. Filed by The Bank of New York Mellon. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $286,000 affecting property located at 29 Chelsea Place, Yonkers 10710. Filed March 17. Espichan, Pedro L., et al. Filed by Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $505,000 affecting property located at 569 Locust Ave., Port Chester 10573. Filed March 19. Grimes, Roy T., et al. Filed by Bayview Loan Services LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $175,500 affecting property located at 1 Watch Hill Road, Croton 10520. Filed March 17. Hornyak, Alberta C., as appointed administrator to the estate of Holly Hornyak, et al. Filed by The Bank of New York Mellon. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $211,200 affecting property located at 1 Landmark Square, Unit 412, Port Chester 10573. Filed March 16. Kelly, Tracy J., et al. Filed by TIAA FSB. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $768,000 affecting property located at 44 Overlook Road, North Castle 10603. Filed March 18. O’Brien, Dennis P., as executor and sole heir at law of the estate of Barbara O’Brien, et al. Filed by U.S Bank Trust N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 67 S. Hillside Ave., Greenburgh 10523. Filed March 16.

Rivera, John Albert, et al. Filed by Wilmington Savings Fund Society FSB. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 14 Wheeler Drive, Cortlandt Manor 10567. Filed March 18.

MECHANIC’S LIENS 38 Roslyn Associates Inc., as owner. $56,582 as claimed by Anvil Mechanical Inc., Mount Vernon. Property: in New Rochelle. Filed March 19. Briarcliff Manor Partners LLC, as owner. $40,400 as claimed by Manor Paving Company Inc., Mount Vernon. Property: in Ossining. Filed March 15. Peirce, Joan, et al, as owner. $12,627 as claimed by Audilio M. Salazar, Mount Kisco. Property: in Mount Pleasant. Filed March 18. Pomerantz, John J., et al, as owner. $3,893 as claimed by Tardio Landscape Contracting Inc., Mamaroneck. Property: in Harrison. Filed March 17. Riveredge Owners Inc., as owner. $11,235 as claimed by Doortronix Inc. Property: in Yonkers. Filed March 15.

NEW BUSINESSES This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.

PARTNERSHIPS Natural and Beyond, 11 N. Broadway, Yonkers 10701, c/o Jalal Blackman and Elijah Blackman-Pugh. Filed Sept. 15.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS A Hidden Star Books, 10 Kent Road, White Plains 10603, c/o Esther Luckett. Filed Sept. 14. A.C. Soap by Cherly, 122 Jensen Ave., Mamaroneck 10543, c/o Cherly Reynoso. Filed Sept. 11. Alliance Glass, 129 Lyncroft Road, New Rochelle 10804, c/o Jamos Hartb. Filed Sept. 15. Brush and Saw New York, 45 Harmon Drive, Larchmont 10538, c/o Rebecca Lunn Mott. Filed Sept. 11.

Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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Facts & Figures Domo-Style, 807 Main St., Apt. 4G, Peekskill 10566, c/o Dominique Ramkaran. Filed Sept. 11. Donaldson’s Car Sale, 105 S. First St., Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Roger Anthony Donaldson. Filed Sept. 14. Final Final, 9 Grant St., Pleasantville 10571, c/o Nicholas Pacchiano. Filed Sept. 15. JR’s Maintenance Service, 3003 Purchase St., No. 106, Purchase 10577, c/o John P. Reilly. Filed Sept. 14. MichelleAvo, 255 Lafayette Ave., Cortlandt Manor 10567, c/o Shannan John. Filed Sept. 14. MJ Flowers, 262 Batle Ave., White Plains 10606, c/o Estela Cholula Gonzalez. Filed Sept. 15. MM Consulting, 413 Martling Ave., Tarrytown 10591, c/o Michael Martinucci. Filed Sept. 11. New Rochelle Massage, 271 North Ave., Suite 401, New Rochelle 10801, c/o Nathalie Pouponneau. Filed Sept. 14. Novatrade Commercial and Agricultural Equipment, 255 Huguenot St., Apt. 1417, New Rochelle 10801, c/o Cynthia Liera. Filed Sept. 11. Paws Up Pet Care, 130 Nelson Ave., Harrison 10528, c/o Nicole McAdam. Filed Sept. 11. Pest Control White Plains NY, 16 Emmalon Ave., White Plains 10603, c/o Halil Odabas. Filed Sept. 15. Rent A Teenager, 3 Pondfield Drive, Chappaqua 10514, c/o Mason Greenstein. Filed Sept. 11. RMA Architects-Greene Justice Architecture JV, 24 Ridge St., Katonah 10536, c/o Frank J. Greene. Filed Sept. 11. SCRN Cinemas New York, 15 Sunset Lane, Croton on Hudson 10520, c/o Jeremy Zeitler. Filed Sept. 14. Sohlar Industries, 231 E. Prospect Ave., Suite 4D, Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Devon W. Douglas. Filed Sept. 15. The Boutique Real Estate Group, 282 Katonah Ave., No. 2020, Katonah 10536, c/o Michele Bell-Michele Cynthia. Filed Sept. 11.

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Thomas Welding and Boiler Repair Service, 541 S. Sixth Ave., Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Lionel Thomas. Filed Sept. 15.

PATENTS Bin-conserving tokenization techniques generating tokens in reverse order and employing common device pan with differing pan sequence number values across token instances. Patent no. 10,963,871 issued to Ilgin Safak, et al. Assigned to Mastercard International, Purchase. Cell culture medium for eukaryotic cells. Patent no. 10,961,500 issued to Wei Xue, et al. Assigned to Regeneron, Tarrytown. Cryogenic-stripline microwave attenuator. Patent no. 10,964,993 issued to Salvatore Olivadese, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Email chain navigation. Patent no. 10,965,635 issued to Lorraine Herger, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Inhibition of HSD17B13 in the treatment of liver disease in patients expressing the PNPLA3 I148M variation. Patent no. 10,961,583 issued to Yurong Xin, et al. Assigned to Regeneron, Tarrytown. Intrusion detection and mitigation in data processing. Patent no. 10,965,717 issued to Alexandra Shulman-Peleg, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Logical zones for IoT devices. Patent no. 10,965,684 issued to Jeffrey Achtermann, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Method and system for fraud control of blockchain-based transactions. Patent no. 10,963,881 issued to Steven Davis. Assigned to Mastercard International, Purchase. Method and system for facilitating a cashless transaction. Patent no. 10,963,849 issued to Ankit Shreemal, et al. Assigned to Mastercard International, Purchase. Plasmonic quantum well laser. Patent no. 10,965,101 issued to Heinz Schmid, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

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Systems and methods for use in facilitating enrollment in loyalty accounts. Patent no. 10,963,901 issued to Manash Bhattacharjee, et al. Assigned to Mastercard International, Purchase.

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION BOARD JUDGMENTS Failure to carry insurance or for work-related injuries and illnesses, March 25 to March 31, 2021 324 E 112th Street Condo Association, Elmsford. Amount: $16,000. 479 Pleasantville Tavern Inc., Pleasantville. Amount: $31,000. B&M Professional Cleaning Corp., White Plains. Amount: $1,000. Be Intouch of Yorktown LLC, Yorktown Heights. Amount: $42,500. Chameleon Enterprises Inc. d.b.a. My Favorite Pizza Place, Mohegan Lake. Amount: $1,500. Corner Party International Corp., Peekskill. Amount: $5,500. Domingo’s Pizza & Deli Inc., White Plains. Amount: $1,500. Executive Drive Ventures LLC, Scarsdale. Amount: $12,000. Francis P Lajos, New Rochelle. Amount: $4,500. La Camelia Restaurant Inc., Mount Kisco. Amount: $5,500. Lash Out Loud LLC, New Rochelle. Amount: $7,500. Leonardo’s Pizza & Restaurant Inc., Larchmont. Amount: $1,500. LFMA LLC d.b.a. Taco Shack, Harrison. Amount: $4,500. Mid General Construction Inc., Ossining. Amount: $9,000. Mirlos Carpet Inc., Ossining. Amount: $5,500. MJ Fitzgerald & Son Contracting LLC, Yonkers. Amount: $2,500.

NCR Auto Cores & Security Inc., Mount Vernon and Bronx. Amount: $25,000. New Prominent Fashion Ltd., Mount Vernon. Amount: $40,500. Raymond Bates d.b.a. Bates Ambulette Service, Port Chester. Amount: $11,000. Ricardo P Beckford d.b.a. B&C Organic Cleaning Care, Mount Vernon. Amount: $14,500. Roosevelt Square Holdings LLC, Mount Vernon. Amount: $30,500. Sales Performance Services LLC, Ossining. Amount: $31,000. Santo Burrito LLC, Mamaroneck and New Rochelle. Amount: $30,500. Sibcat Corp., Larchmont. Amount: $34,500. Tigare Construction Corp., Mamaroneck and White Plains. Amount: $13,500. Toka Construction Corp., Yonkers. Amount: $1,500. Twelve Grace Corp., Port Chester. Amount: $17,500. Wobble Corp., Peekskill. Amount: $7,500.

HUDSON VALLEY BUILDING LOANS Above $1 million Wythe and Grand LLC, Highland, as owner. Lender: Salisbury Bank and Trust Co., Lakeville, Connecticut. Property: Hudson Place, Highland. Amount: $10.7 million. Filed March 12.

Below $1 million 201 Winnikee LLC, as owner. Lender: Sawyer Savings Bank. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $221,900. Filed March 24.

GVKGNE Realty Inc., as owner. Lender: FM Home Loans LLC. Property: in Amenia. Amount: $623,000. Filed March 26.

Sam’s Knob LLC, New York City. Seller: Brook Taube, New York City. Property: in Amenia. Amount: $6.8 million. Filed March 23.

Hanganu, Cristian, et al, as owner. Lender: Walden Savings Bank. Property: in Beekman. Amount: $548,000. Filed March 26.

Tre One Six LLC, Franklin Square. Seller: Ravenhouse Inc., Kauneonga Lake. Property: in Kingston. Amount: $1.5 million. Filed March 24.

Kerhonk Third Son LLC, New York City, as owner. Lender: Ulster Savings Bank, Kingston. Property: in Rochester. Amount: $325,000. Filed March 12. Popatia, Karima, et al, Jersey City, New Jersey, as owner. Lender: Ulster Savings Bank, Kingston. Property: 136 George Sickles Road, Saugerties 12477. Amount: $700,000. Filed March 22. TL Holdings of New York LLC, as owner. Lender: Vendetta Services Inc. Property: in Fishkill. Amount: $250,000. Filed March 24. Tomer, Kenneth Brent, et al, Cold Spring, as owner. Lender: Walden Savings Bank, Montgomery. Property: in Philipstown. Amount: $475,000. Filed March 16. VMS Pizza I LLC, Long Branch, New Jersery, as owner. Lender: The Gross Family Holdings LLC, et al, Sands Point. Property: 327 Towners Road, Patterson 12563. Amount: $145,800. Filed March 17. Wilma Cole 1992 Trust, et al, as owner. Lender: Bank of Millbrook. Property: in Washington. Amount: $400,000. Filed March 24.

DEEDS Above $1 million 465 Shunpike LLC, Bronxville. Seller: Jeffrey M. Zwirn, et al, Millbrook. Property: 465 Shunpike, Washington. Amount: $7 million. Filed March 19. 71 Broadway Tivoli LLC, Tivoli. Seller: Tivoli Broadway LLC, Germantown. Property: in Red Hook. Amount: $2.2 million. Filed March 17. Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. Seller: Thomas Stephen Miller, Saugerties. Property: 220 Jessop Road, Woodstock. Amount: $1.4 million. Filed March 15. Ruge’s 9G Properties LLC, Mineola. Seller: Heart Ford LLC, Rhinebeck. Property: 3667 Route 9G, Rhinebeck. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed March 16.

Below $1 million 106 Ellenville Properties LLC, Newburgh. Seller: Riddhi Ellenville LLC, Ellenville. Property: in Ellenville. Amount: $690,000. Filed March 29. 168 Otens Road LLC, Jamaica. Seller: Gisela Lienhard, New York. Property: 168 Otens Road, Wawarsing. Amount: $140,000. Filed March 10. 196 Marine LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Berkise-Weinmann LLC, Kingston. Property: 16 John St., Kingston 12401. Amount: $625,000. Filed March 11. 196 Marine LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Suzanne Oakley Taylor, Shokan. Property: in Shandaken. Amount: $660,000. Filed March 12. 1SR LLC, New York City. Seller: Monofonus East LLC, Rhinebeck. Property: 37 N. Front St., Kingston. Amount: $865,000. Filed March 8. 201 Winnikee LLC, Spring Valley. Seller: Jozo Elezovic, Clinton Corners. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $135,000. Filed March 23. 2083 Bull Run LLC, Pine Hill. Seller: Dorothy Flynn, Denver. Property: 61 Birch Creek Road, Shandaken. Amount: $132,000. Filed March 17. 209 Cricket Hill Road LLC, East Hampton. Seller: William R. Vincent, Dover Plains. Property: Cricket Hill Road, Dover. Amount: $115,000. Filed March 26. 25 S Prospect LLC, Rockville Centre. Seller: Diane R. Jackson, Aubrey, Texas. Property: 25 S. Prospect St., Kingston. Amount: $135,000. Filed March 9. 26 South Bridge Holding LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: 160 Union Street LLC, Poughkeepsie. Property: S. Perry St., Poughkeepsie. Amount: $15,000. Filed March 18.


Facts & Figures 26 South Bridge Holding LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Burton Gold Properties LLC, Poughkeepsie. Property: 39 Delano St., Poughkeepsie. Amount: $185,000. Filed March 18. 26 South Bridge Holding LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Ettore Longinotti, et al, Holmes. Property: 167 Union St., Poughkeepsie. Amount: $223,000. Filed March 19. 26 Upper Boiceville LLC, Boiceville. Seller: Erik W. Rank, Glen Ridge, New Jersey. Property: 26 Upper Boiceville Road, Olive. Amount: $125,000. Filed March 23. 3011 Route 44 LLC, Kingston. Seller: Mountain Crest Apartments LLC, Highland. Property: 3011 Route 44/55, Gardiner. Amount: $812,000. Filed March 19. 7466 South Broadway LLC, Red Hook. Seller: Mid-Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union, Kingston. Property: in Red Hook. Amount: $352,500. Filed March 15. 86 King George LLC, White Plains. Seller: Aruna V. Ramanan, Easton, Pennsylvania. Property: 86 King George Road, Poughkeepsie. Amount: $225,000. Filed March 23.

Asa 4318 Albany Post LLC, Hicksville. Seller: Ann C. Oestreicher, Eastchester. Property: 4318 Albany Post Road, Hyde Park. Amount: $60,000. Filed March 26.

Eastern View Developers Ltd., Wappingers Falls. Seller: J and P Rodeo Development LLC, LaGrangeville. Property: in Fishkill. Amount: $87,500. Filed March 26.

Industry Village 1151 LLC, Kingston. Seller: Avalon Properties Inc., Kingston. Property: 1151 Flatbush Road, Kingston. Amount: $827,000. Filed March 26.

MTGLQ Investors LP, Greenville, South Carolina. Seller: Peter M. Beach, et al, Red Hook. Property: 62 Rokeby Road, Red Hook 12571. Amount: $251,500. Filed March 23.

Rondout Savings Bank, Kingston. Seller: Welsh, Swart and Whitman Inc., Kingston. Property: 142 Schwenk Drive, Kingston. Amount: $629,000. Filed March 8.

Aslin US LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Rolland G. Smith, Santa Barbara, California. Property: 37 Rifton Terrace, Esopus. Amount: $620,000. Filed March 12.

Eastern View Developers Ltd., Wappingers Falls. Seller: J and P Rodeo Development LLC, LaGrangeville. Property: in Fishkill. Amount: $87,500. Filed March 26.

JAM Real Estate Holding LLC, East Elmhurst. Seller: Gregory C. Berardi, Bloomington. Property: 184 Grove St., Rosendale. Amount: $280,000. Filed March 26.

MTGLQ Investors LP, Greenville, South Carolina. Seller: Tirzah Sheehy, Kingston. Property: 187 Sackett St., Esopus. Amount: $124,672. Filed March 12.

Royal Strawberry Hill Farm LLC, Cleveland, Ohio. Seller: Christopher Orefice, et al, Poughkeepsie. Property: 5 Martis Way, Poughkeepsie 12603. Amount: $435,000. Filed March 19.

Blue Horizon Associates LLC, Monsey. Seller: Emily Estates LLC, Brooklyn. Property: 10 Emily Drive, Wallkill 12589. Amount: $110,584. Filed March 18.

F.P.A. Star Inc., Wappingers Falls. Seller: Robert Didato, et al, Hopewell Junction. Property: 12A Carnaby St., Wappingers Falls 12590. Amount: $120,000. Filed March 18.

Kasinathan International Group Inc., Briarcliff Manor. Seller: Thomas Schembri, Hopewell Junction. Property: 3 Hillside Lane, Hopewell Junction 12533. Amount: $80,000. Filed March 15.

Napanoch Relocation Services LLC, Wawarsing. Seller: Kristen O. Walsh, Napanoch. Property: 75 Brandy Brook Road, Wawarsing. Amount: $320,000. Filed March 12.

Finnegans Way LLC, New York City. Seller: MAH Development Woodstock LLC, New Paltz. Property: in Woodstock. Amount: $750,000. Filed March 26.

Kehoe Corp., Walden. Seller: Caroline Thompson, et al, Bath, Maine. Property: in Marlborough. Amount: $87,000. Filed March 23.

Bog Hollow Ventures Inc., Kingston. Seller: Dharam S. Bhatti, Hopewell Junction. Property: in Amenia. Amount: $199,000. Filed March 19. Bog Hollow Ventures Inc., Kingston. Seller: The Zeugma Corp., Hopewell Junction. Property: in Amenia. Amount: $116,000. Filed March 19. Bogart Glen LLC, West Palm Beach, Florida. Seller: 19 Bogart Lane LLC, Stone Ridge. Property: in Marbletown. Amount: $350,000. Filed March 19.

Flippin Crazy LLC, Kingston. Seller: Crystal L. Delgado, Kerhonkson. Property: 124 Washington Ave., Kingston. Amount: $155,000. Filed March 29. GCP Development LLC, Hyde Park. Seller: Gerard V. Blythe, et al, Poughkeepsie. Property: 67 N. Clinton St., Poughkeepsie 12601. Amount: $125,000. Filed March 26.

Castaldo Brothers Inc., Poughkeepsie. Seller: Elizabeth J. Torell, Poughkeepsie. Property: 12 Field Court, Poughkeepsie 12601. Amount: $180,000. Filed March 16.

GVKGNE Realty Inc., Monroe. Seller: Christine Lilley, Brewster. Property: in Amenia. Amount: $500,000. Filed March 26.

CBSD Enterprises LLC, Valley Stream. Seller: U.S. Bank N.A. Property: 96 E. Croton Drive, Kent 10512. Amount: $166,000. Filed March 22.

High Falls Properties LLC, High Falls. Seller: Michael Christiana, Kingston. Property: 1 Center Road, Rosendale. Amount: $76,614. Filed March 16.

Cemco Development Group Inc., Stormville. Seller: Robert Wagner, et al, Poughquag. Property: 681 Route 216, Poughquag 12570. Amount: $250,000. Filed March 19.

High Moon Cross LLC, LaGrangeville. Seller: Dana A. Lucas, Millbrook. Property: 19 Alden Terrace, Washington. Amount: $255,000. Filed March 24.

All Aspects Excavation LLC, Dover Plains. Seller: Dover Hill Associates LLC, White Plains. Property: in Dover. Amount: $10,000. Filed March 26.

DCCI Italian Center LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Wappingers Lodge 2609 Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of the U.S.A. Inc., Wappingers Falls. Property: 1196 Route 376, Wappingers Falls 12590. Amount: $500,000. Filed March 25.

Hudson Valley Developers Group LLC, Saugerties. Seller: Robert A. McKenna, Sarasota, Florida. Property: 68 Fawn Road, Saugerties. Amount: $111,000. Filed March 15.

Alpine Four Season Lodge LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Scott Fawaz, Highmount. Property: in Shandaken. Amount: $499,000. Filed March 9.

Deal House Capital Fund I LLC, Mamaroneck. Seller: Stephen John Lindquist, et al, Rhinebeck. Property: in Clinton. Amount: $275,000. Filed March 23.

Apollo Group LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Lynn Elliot LLC, Kingston. Property: in Ulster. Amount: $359,500. Filed March 8.

Dutchess Builders LLC, LaGrangeville. Seller: Olga Rashid, Poughquag. Property: in Beekman. Amount: $95,000. Filed March 18.

ABW Properties LLC, Plainfield, Illinois. Seller: The Matthew Camerino and Casandra Honovich, Cortland Manor. Property: 202 Barrett Hill Road, Mahopac 10541. Amount: $2,000. Filed March 23. ABW Properties LLC, Plainfield, Illinois. Seller: The Matthew Camerino and Casandra Honovich, Cortland Manor. Property: 48 Worthington Drive West, Carmel. Amount: $3,000. Filed March 23. All Aspects Excavation LLC, Dover Plains. Seller: Dover Hill Associates LLC, White Plains. Property: in Dover. Amount: $25,000. Filed March 26.

Hudson Valley Home Rentals LLC, Kingston. Seller: Michael A. Spada Jr., Kingston. Property: in Kingston. Amount: $160,000. Filed March 29. Hughes Realty LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Patrick Kelly, et al, New York City. Property: 146 Old Kings Highway, Ulster. Amount: $275,000. Filed March 15.

KLK Holdings LLC, Pine Plains. Seller: Wells Fargo Bank N.A. Property: 7 S. Cross Road, Staatsburg 12580. Amount: $79,500. Filed March 15. KTB Properties LLC, Pine Plains. Seller: Philip Amelio, Pine Plains. Property: in Pine Plains. Amount: $170,000. Filed March 17. Malore Holdings LLC, Peekskill. Seller: Howard Gragert, Putnam Valley. Property: 1 Oscawana Lake Road, Putnam Valley. Amount: $42,500. Filed March 15. Mavi Mantar LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Kenneth Clarence Oakley, Accord. Property: Oakley Road, Marbletown. Amount: $302,400. Filed March 12. MFH Development LLC, New Paltz. Seller: Matthew J. Wheeler, et al, Trumbull, Connecticut. Property: Mount Valley Road, Boiceville. Amount: $46,500. Filed March 17. Mitchell M and Company Inc., Wallkill. Seller: Tara M. Stant, New York City. Property: 1559 Route 9W, Marlborough. Amount: $235,000. Filed March 22. Mohonk and Main LLC, High Falls. Seller: 1219 State Route 213 E LLC, High Falls. Property: in Marbletown. Amount: $435,000. Filed March 26. MorAlley LLC, Kingston. Seller: Kingston Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses Inc., Wallkill. Property: 15 Barbarosa Lane, Kingston 12401. Amount: $127,500. Filed March 12.

Nejame New York Land LLC, Danbury, Connecticut. Seller: Town of Southeast, Brewster. Property: 301 Milltown Road, Brewster 10509. Amount: $241,000. Filed March 17. Normin LLC, Bronx. Seller: Jane Kartsch, et al, Mahopac. Property: 36 Lillian Road, Mahopac 10541. Amount: $451,000. Filed March 19. Open Space Institute Land Trust Inc., New York City. Seller: Jennifer A. Franze, et al, LaGrangeville. Property: Canopus Hill Road, Putnam Valley 10579. Amount: $382,500. Filed March 22. P and J Property Walnut Street LLC, New Windsor. Seller: Douglas E. Benfer, et al, Marlboro. Property: 1153 Route 9W, Marlborough. Amount: $230,000. Filed March 23. Peckham Materials Corp., Brewster. Seller: Tyson M. Kreig, Red Hook. Property: in Pleasant Valley. Amount: $6,000. Filed March 18. Poughkeepsie NY Homes LLC, Monroe. Seller: Saba Group LLC, Poughkeepsie. Property: 203 Winnikee Ave., Poughkeepsie. Amount: $241,000. Filed March 15. QJA Enterprises LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Rovin Persaud, Poughkeepsie. Property: 10 Balding Ave., Poughkeepsie. Amount: $100,000. Filed March 22. Ricci Properties NY LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Seller: Tina Herdman, Phoenicia. Property: 31 Station Road, Shandaken. Amount: $90,000. Filed March 19. Rochester Creek Find LLC, Accord. Seller: Jack L. Gordon, New York City. Property: 283 Dug Road, Rochester. Amount: $970,000. Filed March 25.

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RV Group-4 LLC, Bearsville. Seller: Carollee Carpino, Kingston. Property: 7 Clifton Terrace, Kingston. Amount: $80,000. Filed March 17. Shenandoah Hudson River Properties LLC, Highland. Seller: 15 Commercial Avenue LLC, Milton. Property: 15 Commercial Ave., Lloyd. Amount: $189,000. Filed March 25. Sleight Farm Holdings LLC, Wappingers Falls. Seller: Henry G. Page Jr. Development Ltd., LaGrangeville. Property: Lots 13, 25, and 40 Keith Drive, LaGrange. Amount: $225,000. Filed March 26. SSLI Holdings LLC, Kingston. Seller: John Stowell, Saugerties. Property: in Kingston. Amount: $75,000. Filed March 26. Stone Crop LLC, et al, West Hurley. Seller: Portable Restroom Rentals LLC, Norwich. Property: in Saugerties. Amount: $50,000. Filed March 24. SVG Holdings LLC, Nanuet. Seller: Breezy Valley Stables LLC, Wallkill. Property: in Shawangunk. Amount: $520,500. Filed March 15. Tannery Brook Farmhouse LLC, New York City. Seller: Lalita’s Guesthouse LLC, Kingston. Property: 33 Tannery Brook Road, Woodstock. Amount: $549,000. Filed March 16. Terra Ferma New York LLC, Armonk. Seller: LPH Properties Inc., LaGrangeville. Property: 1397 Route 52, Carmel 10512. Amount: $350,000. Filed March 18. The People of the State of New York, Albany. Seller: Anthony Morando, Mahopac. Property: Pudding St., Putnam Valley 10579. Amount: $22,450. Filed March 26. The People of the State of New York, Albany. Seller: Cherie M. Lopez-Statuto, East Setauket. Property: in Olive. Amount: $165,000. Filed March 22.

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Facts & Figures TL Holdings of New York LLC, Hopewell Junction. Seller: Yung W. Lee, et al, Monroe, New Jersey. Property: 1784 Route 52 and Cary Road, Fishkill. Amount: $375,000. Filed March 24. TomChris Homes LLC, Wappingers Falls. Seller: Aldo Palmieri, et al, LaGrangeville. Property: Martin Road, LaGrangeville 12540. Amount: $130,000. Filed March 24. Toro Realty LLC, Putnam Valley. Seller: Omer Fahim, et al, Queens Village. Property: 169 Dean Road, Carmel 10512. Amount: $490,000. Filed March 17. Upstate Cottage LLC, Rosendale. Seller: Barbara Eaton, Pahrump, Nevada. Property: 50 Church St., Rosendale. Amount: $156,000. Filed March 26. Vela Holdings LLC, Beacon. Seller: JDS Home Buyers LLC, Pomona. Property: 60 Franklin St., Kingston. Amount: $400,000. Filed March 15. Vinum Vallis LLC, Edgewater, New Jersey. Seller: Katharine Stiassni, et al, Sharon, Connecticut. Property: in Northeast. Amount: $280,000. Filed March 22. Weichert Workforce Mobility Inc., Morris Plains, New Jersey. Seller: Eric T. Kenney, Wappingers Falls. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $395,000. Filed March 23. Wellesway Properties LLC, Kingston. Seller: Brian L. Findholt, et al, Kingston. Property: in Kingston. Amount: $575,000. Filed March 23. Xela Ventures LLC, et al, Beacon. Seller: Benjamin Turk, New York City. Property: 154 Third Ave., Kingston. Amount: $85,000. Filed March 16. Zielonka Properties LLC, Wallington, New Jersey. Seller: Dmitri Chomut, et al, Asbury, New Jersey. Property: in Wawarsing. Amount: $40,000. Filed March 11.

JUDGMENTS 107 Main Street Restaurant Corp., New Paltz. $12,892 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 23.

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AGP Industries LLC, High Falls. $1,000 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 17. Atlas Motor Lodge, Highland. $28,014 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 8. Cembra Inc., Accord. $1,161 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 23. Custom Laminate Products Corp., Milton. $227 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 17. DP Foster Carpentry and Remodeling Inc., Saugerties. $3,357 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 17. Highland Hospitality LLC, Highland. $30,921 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 8. Hudson Valley Window Cleaning Inc., Highland. $669 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 23. Jentrip Ltd., New Paltz. $13,768 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 17. Kon-Tiki Trading Co., New Paltz. $2,126 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 17. Omstyle LLC, Woodstock. $1,219 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 8. Pineview Bakery II, Shokan. $1,262 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 8. Rockefeller Consulting Inc., Kingston. $7,438 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 17.

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Tailspin Furniture LLC, Woodstock. $4,623 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 23. Vapeology 2 Inc., Kingston. $6,181 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed March 17.

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicated a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed. Beal, Bernard B., et al. Filed by Kondaur Capital Corp. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 312 Gardner Hollow Road, Poughquag 12570. Filed Nov. March 23. Brown, Phoebe A.R., et al. Filed by NJCC-NYS Community Restoration Fund LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $183,000 affecting property located at 619 Willow Brook Road, Clinton Corners 12514. Filed Nov. March 10. Cattau, Robert C., et al. Filed by Wells Fargo Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $148,000 affecting property located at 2651 New Prospect Road, Pine Bush 12566. Filed March 26. Heirs and distributees of the estate of Anna D. Chetirkin, et al. Filed by PHH Mortgage Corp. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $300,000 affecting property located at 23 Holly Hills Drive, Woodstock 12498. Filed March 16. Liuni, Michael M., et al. Filed by U.S. Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $63,395 affecting property located at 1277 Lucas Turnpike, Rosendale 12472. Filed March 23. Power, John F. Jr., et al. Filed by Citibank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $150,000 affecting property located at 690 Gipsy Trail Road, Carmel 10512. Filed March 16.

Sharkey, Maureen E., et al. Filed by J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Corp. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $245,000 affecting property located at 27 William St., Carmel 10512. Filed March 16.

MECHANIC’S LIENS Catano, Catherine, as owner. $1,596 as claimed by Adams Plumbing and Heating Inc., Patterson. Property: 31 Warren Drive, Patterson. Filed March 16. Hegel, Maryann, as owner. $268,333 as claimed by R.A. Nilsen Construction Inc., Verbank. Property: 450 N. Tower Hill Road, Millbrook. Filed March 23. Hotchandani Marrone and Rosenweig LLC, et al, as owner. $14,070 as claimed by Collier Construction LLC, Middletown. Property: 400 Westage Business Center Drive, Fishkill. Filed March 24. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, as owner. $2,604 as claimed by M.M.G. Fire Equipment Inc., Poughkeepsie. Property: 51 Livingston St., Poughkeepsie. Filed March 23. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, as owner. $35,540 as claimed by Evergreene Architechtural Arts Inc. Property: 45 Reade Place, Poughkeepsie. Filed March 26.

NEW BUSINESSES This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.

PARTNERSHIPS Ulster Car Service, 290 Aaron Court, Kingston 12401, c/o Mellisa Weaver and Tristan Richter. Filed Feb. 26.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS Building Repair and Restoration, 503 E. Mountain Road North, Cold Spring 10516, c/o Ivonne Ledesma-Winkler. Filed Feb. 26.

Cakes and Bakes By Sugarlips, 320 Hurley Ave., Kingston 12401, c/o Alexis Vera Perusse. Filed Feb. 11. CQC, 35 Dirks Terrace, Highland 12528, c/o Connor Q. Colabella. Filed Feb. 24. Dancing Bear, 3 Meadow Lane, Accord 12404, c/o Carole E. Pearson Epstein. Filed Feb. 12. DB Management, 321 W. Saugerties Road, Saugerties 12477, c/o Daniella Browne. Filed Feb. 19. E.J. Trucking, 24 O’Neil St., Kingston 12401, c/o Elijah London. Filed Feb. 16. Engineered Glass Solutions, 57 Orchard St., Marlboro 12542, c/o Javier Sanchez. Filed Feb. 23.

My Guy Property Management, 89 Southfield St., Kingston 12401, c/o Korey Jubie. Filed Feb. 22. Nielson Water Systems, 163 Plains Road, New Paltz 12561, c/o Michael A. Nielson. Filed Feb. 23. Palletman, 2320 Route 9W, Saugerties 12477, c/o Marcos A. Valle. Filed Feb. 17. Paramount Earthworks, 19 Caponero Drive, Rosendale 12472, c/o William Watson, IV. Filed Feb. 22. Parisi Masonry, 105 Cottontail Lane, Woodstock 12498, c/o Sky Blue Parisi. Filed Feb. 22. Philip Bender, Ph.D., 1886 Route 9, Garrison 10524, c/o Philip Jay Bender. Filed March 19.

Hair By Leash, 190 North Drive, Saugerties 12477, c/o Alisha Borozny. Filed Feb. 22.

Revenue Chasers Consulting, 662 Albany Post Road, New Paltz 12561, c/o Carl John Ragmac. Filed Feb. 23.

Hudson Valley Dye Works, 18 Church Lane, High Falls 12440, c/o Dawn M. Mueller. Filed Feb. 18.

Score More Vintage, 46 Kleine Kill Drive, New Paltz 12561, c/o Ivy Sciandra. Filed Feb. 23.

JMMotorsports, 76 Clove Brook Drive, Cold Spring 10516, c/o Jeffrey Mason. Filed March 16.

Serenaty Drives, 504 Sprout Brook Road, Garrison 10524, c/o Ashley Frances-Ann Jackson. Filed March 15.

Joyous Home Handyman, 276 Spillway Road, West Hurley 12491, c/o Dennis O’Clair. Filed Feb. 22. Kindred Spirits, 442 Guilford Road, New Paltz 12561, c/o Patricia Morse. Filed Feb. 17. Lady Ghana Designs, 207 Harvest Way, Saugerties 12477, c/o Thananyi Carr. Filed Feb. 17. Lilly’s All Naturals, 8 Jill Court, Patterson 12563, c/o Neglita Mactas. Filed March 22. Lorenzo’s Rental, Lippon Park, Route 209, Wawarsing 12489, c/o David Lorenzo. Filed Feb. 26. Ms. Pema’s Garden, 15 Degraff St., Bloomington 12411, c/o Pema K. Cliett. Filed Feb. 17.

Shine Bright Music Group, P.O. Box 750, Shawangunk 12589, c/o Javon Giovanni Gonzalez. Filed Feb. 26. Simpleturf Lawncare, 56 Deyo St., Rosendale 12486, c/o Frederick Albert Warncke III. Filed Feb. 10. Space Time Properties, 100 Prospect St., New Paltz 12561, c/o Matthew Bennett. Filed Feb. 12. The Cuppy Place, 307 Mountain View Lane, Ellenville 12428, c/o Beatriz Perez. Filed Feb. 19. Top Tier Fitness, 72 Wiltwyck Ave., Kingston 12401, c/o Mark Gadomski. Filed Feb. 25.


Facts & Figures BUILDING PERMITS Commercial MCG Construction LLC, Harrison, New York, contractor for 316 Courtland Realty LLC. Perform interior fit-out for scientist instrument assembly at 316 Courtland Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $300,000. Filed Feb. 24. O&G Industries Inc., Torrington, contractor for the city of Stamford. Perform an installation of ceiling, insulation and sprinkler system at 888 Washington Boulevard Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $180,043. Filed Feb. 11. Pensiero, Anthony, Stamford, contractor for Park Properties LLC. Create two loading-dock areas with overhang doors and dock levelers at 12 Omega Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $50,000. Filed Feb. 5. Signature Construction Group of Connecticut Inc., Stamford, contractor for Four Stamford Plaza Owner LLC. Perform an interior renovation of an existing space at 107 Elm St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $225,000. Filed Feb. 10. Signature Construction Group of Connecticut Inc., Stamford, contractor for Two Stamford Plaza Owner LLC. Perform an interior reduction to core of 263 Tresser Boulevard Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $60,000. Filed Feb. 26. Southport Contracting Inc., Bridgeport, contractor for the city of Stamford. Perform a supplemental cooling upgrade for 911 Center at 888 Washington Boulevard, Stamford. Estimated cost: $595,000. Filed Feb. 9. Suggs, Anthony J., Danbury, contractor for Wolff Willard T. Wolff, et al. Install a 22kw standby generator to the rear right side of house and install a transfer switch in the garage at 125 Wedgemere Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $9,000. Filed Feb. 11. Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken.

Residential Holzner, Louis, Newtown, contractor for Staab Geralyn Staab, et al. Install 24kw Generac generator and advanced technology systems. Generator will be powered by two 120-gallon propane tanks at 118 Tall Oaks Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $9,518. Filed Feb. 19. The Home Depot USA Inc., Atlanta, Georgia, contractor for Jenne Frederick. Remove and replace one window at 70 Strawberry Hill Ave, Stamford. Estimated cost: $1,039. Filed Feb. 9. The Home Depot USA Inc., Atlanta, Georgia, contractor for Sanchez Julio Sanchez, et al. Remove and replace five windows without structural changes at 1142 Hope St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $4,085. Filed Feb. 19. In 2 Blue Design LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Peter P. Ferraris Jr., et al. Construct a concrete swimming pool with patio and mechanicals at 32 Jeanne Court, Stamford. Estimated cost: $82,000. Filed Feb. 23. John C. Landsiedel Construction Co., Stamford, contractor for Betty W. Rice. Open walls and floor of first-floor full bathroom and replace framing and subfloor at 118 Thi Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed Feb. 10. Kaesmann Builders LLC, Southport, contractor for Marc Levy. Add a toilet and wet bar to exercise room and replace window and existing shower at 46 Pond View Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $75,000. Filed Feb. 18. Kay, David J., Stratford, contractor for Alfredo and Ewelina Sylvia Rios Rojas, et al. Install 22kw Generac generator with 200-amp advanced technology systems at back of home/garage and add two propane tanks at 355 Atlantic St., Apt 15c, Stamford. Estimated cost: $10,200. Filed Feb. 9. Lamontagne, Daniel M., Bethel, contractor for Ventura Jorge. Construct a new single-family dwelling on vacant land at 18 Ann St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $250,000. Filed Feb. 2.

ON THE RECORD

Lang, Christopher J., Norwalk, contractor for Christopher Watkins. Perform the construction of a new fiberglass in-ground pool at 1763 Shippan Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $60,000. Filed Feb. 17.

Pro Custom Solar LLC, South Plainfield, New Jersey, contractor for Hugo Vega. Install roof-top, rail-less solar panels at 90 Diaz St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $17,829. Filed Feb. 1.

Magyari, William, Stamford, contractor for Danielle Roth. Perform kitchen renovation and fireplace conversion to gas at 52 Lantern Circle, Stamford. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed Feb. 23.

Pro Custom Solar LLC, South Plainfield, New Jersey, contractor for John Yates and Margarita M. Marin. Install roof-top, rail-less solar panels at 36 Cedar Heights Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $28,322. Filed Feb. 1.

Manny Construction LLC, Waterbury, contractor for Whaley Carolyn A. Whaley, et al and Heather Daniels. Remove existing shingles on roof, install ice and water pro-armor underlay and new asphalt shingles at 59 Davenport Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $47,194. Filed Feb. 18. Mark’s Carpentry LLC, Stamford, contractor for Irene Hagenbuch Sanjana. Add a shower stall in an existing restroom at 140 Fourth St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $6,500. Filed Feb. 22. NU Face of Connecticut LLC, Plantsville, contractor for Maggie Anderson. Remove existing shingles and replace with ice and water synthetic underlayment with ridge vent and seam tape at 271 Sun Dance Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $7,000. Filed Feb. 16. NU Connecticut Solutions LLC, Stamford, contractor for Roz and Mitch Rubin. Redo two bathrooms, replace tile on floors, toilets, lights, fans, vanities and sinks at 83 Courtland Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $7,000. Filed Feb. 3. Phil’s Main Roofing LLC, Norwalk, contractor for William Johnson. Re-roof 161 Hubba Road Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $13,552. Filed Feb. 11. Power Home Remodeling Group LLC, Chester, Pennsylvania, contractor for Diane M. Babala. Remove and replace 14 windows with all-tempered glass at 584 Hope St., Unit 1, Stamford. Estimated cost: $16,242. Filed Feb. 19. Pro Custom Solar LLC, South Plainfield, New Jersey, contractor for Georgina Franco. Install rooftop, rail-less solar panels at 220 Courtland Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $27,209. Filed Feb. 1.

Pro Custom Solar LLC, South Plainfield, New Jersey, contractor for Juan D. Agudelo and Claudia L. Quiquivix. Install roof-top, rail-less solar modules at 18 Leona Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $15,666. Filed Feb. 22. Przypek, Kevin V., Stamford, contractor for Judy and Edward Jacobson. Install a Generac 22KW air-cooled stand-by generator with new propane tanks at 293 E. Hunting Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed Feb. 23. RJ Aley Building Contractor LLC, Westport, contractor for Warner E. Waide Jr. and Cecilla Tso. Remove greenhouse, construct new crawl space, renovate kitchen and first- and second- floor corridor at 45 Barn Hill Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $1,434,630. Filed Feb. 10. Regency Developers Connecticut LLC, Spring Valley, New York, contractor for Brooklyn Realty Holdings LLC. Finish basement of single-family residence at 390 Berry St., Suite 200, Stamford. Estimated cost: $753,780. Filed Feb. 16. Rex Roofing Company of Stamford Inc., Stamford, contractor for Julian Perep and Megan Marie Keith. Replace existing roof shingles at 160 High Clear Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $12,194. Filed Feb. 9. Rosado Custom Homes & Remodelers LLC, Milford, contractor for Eliezer Kethia. Remodel kitchen, master bathroom and powder room at 65 Glenbrook Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $49,487. Filed Feb. 8.

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COURT CASES Bridgeport Superior Court Chalet, Celenia, et al, Bethel. Filed by James Kelly, Brookfield. Plaintiff’s attorney: Moore O’Brien & Foti, Middlebury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-21-6103870-S. Filed Feb 16. Courtemanche, George Edwin Kelly, et al, Norwalk. Filed by Eldevis E. Velasquez, Norwalk. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ganim Ganim Ganim & Ganim PC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-21-6104112-S. Filed Feb. 23. Martines Jr., Paul, Wilton. Filed by Dara Meath, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Tremont Sheldon Robinson Mahoney PC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-21-6103605-S. Filed Feb. 2. Perren, Chloe, et al, New Canaan. Filed by Joseph Justus, Milford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Bradley Denkovich & Karayiannis PC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-21-6103394-S. Filed Jan. 25.

Ronnow, Christopher Sergey, Trumbull. Filed by Michelle Brownlowe, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Bruce J. Corrigan Jr. Law Office, Westport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-21-6103709-S. Filed Feb. 8.

Danbury Superior Court Ali, Neshat, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by BCMB1 Trust, Miami, Florida. Plaintiff’s attorney: Halloran & Sage LLP, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff was assigned the mortgage property of the defendants. The defendants defaulted on the terms of the agreement and have failed to pay the plaintiff the amount due. The plaintiff claims foreclosure of the mortgage, possession of the property premises, monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-21-6038273-S. Filed Jan. 15. Cook, Maghen T., et al, Danbury. Filed by Maeve Cunningham, Branford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Parrett Porto Parese & Colwell PC, Hamden. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-21-6038442-S. Filed Feb. 5. Desouza-Xavier, Paloma, Danbury. Filed by Moraima Payano-Vidal, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Mario Carter Law Firm, North Haven. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBDCV-21-6038484-S. Filed Feb. 11.

Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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Facts & Figures Otavalo, Carlos, d.b.a. America Variedades, Danbury. Filed by Lilian Hernandez, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Alan Barry & Associates, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff was a customer and a business invitee of the defendant at his store. The premises were maintained and controlled by the defendant, when the plaintiff’s foot became caught on an extension cord that was lying across the premise, causing her to fall and sustain injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-216038417-S. Filed Feb. 3. Peppe, Adam M., et al, Brewster, New York. Filed by Gisele Beatriz Dacruz-Noronha, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-21-6038402-S. Filed Feb. 2.

Stamford Superior Court 12 Havemeyer Place Company LLC, Greenwich. Filed by WJ Mayer & Company, Greenwich. Plaintiff’s attorney: Mark Sank & Associates LLC, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff was a tenant of the defendant who discarded antique chairs and furnishings that belong to the plaintiff without indicating a deadline for plaintiff to remove belongings. As a result, the plaintiff suffered damages. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-21-6050026-S. Filed Jan. 13. Balunek, Phillip, et al, Norwalk. Filed by Reliant Loan Servicing LLC, Chicago, Illinois. Plaintiff’s attorney: McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce LLC, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff was assigned the mortgage property of the defendants who then defaulted on the terms of the agreement and failed to pay the plaintiff the amount due. The plaintiff claims foreclosure of the mortgage, possession of the property premises, monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-216049955-S. Filed Jan. 7.

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DeSalvo, Carol M., et al, Croton-on-Hudson, New York. Filed by Janice A. Smith, Greenwich. Plaintiff’s attorney: Connolly Brennan Ralabate PC, Stratford. Action: The plaintiff was struck by the defendants’ car. The collision was allegedly due to the negligence of the defendants. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-21-6050174-S. Filed Jan. 27. DiStefano, Lisa, Armonk, New York. Filed by Maribel Peterson, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: The Reinken Law Firm, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-20-6050122-S. Filed Jan. 21. New Neighborhoods Inc. d.b.a. Friendship House, et al, Stamford. Filed by Gloria Dorsey, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Goff Law Group LLC, West Hartford. Action: The plaintiff was legally on the premises maintained and controlled by the defendant. A pipe in the building burst and caused water to flow into plaintiff’s apartment and when she walked into her apartment, she was caused to slip and fall due to the existence of water on the floor. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-21-6050137-S. Filed Jan. 25.

DEEDS

Heidi Farmer Revocable Trust, Old Greenwich. Seller: Scott H. Farmer and Heidi Farmer, Old Greenwich. Property: 67 Tomac Ave., Old Greenwich. Amount: N/A. Filed Feb. 17.

Benevides, Marinete and Caroline Ferreira Oliveira, Fairfield. Seller: Fabricio Rinelli and Luana Fernandes, Fairfield. Property: 290 Ronald Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $510,000. Filed Feb. 17.

Dizney, Lisbeth, Fairfield. Seller: Joseph E. Kriedemaker and Kathleen Kriedemaker, Fairfield. Property: 261 Old Farm Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $650,000. Filed Feb. 16.

57 Main Norwalk LLC, Norwalk. Seller: Tiger Wynn LLC, Westport. Property: 57 Main St., Norwalk. Amount: $625,000. Filed Feb. 11.

KNI Southfield 94-802 LLC, Darien. Seller: Mia E. Schipani, Stamford. Property: 98 Southfield Ave., Unit 24, Stamford. Amount: $33,000. Filed Feb. 12.

Borelli, Rachel A., Fairfield. Seller: Carol Ann Short, Fairfield. Property: 4-6 Helen St., Fairfield. Amount: $480,000. Filed Feb. 12.

Dziejma, Adam and Malgorzata Dziejma, Norwalk. Seller: William J. Berger, Norwalk. Property: 65 Weed Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $525,000. Filed Feb. 11.

580 Sasco LLC, Fairfield. Seller: Jeffrey R. Currie, Fairfield. Property: 580 Sasco Hill Road, Fairfield. Amount: $3,000,000. Filed Feb. 10. 72 Rose Hill LLC, Newport, Rhode Island. Seller: David S. MacAllaster, Southport. Property: 72 Rose Hill Road, Southport. Amount: $1,170,000. Filed Feb. 18. Anchor Star Properties LLC, Fairfield. Seller: Donald D. Sebestyen, et al, Fairfield. Property: 545 Bronson Road, Fairfield. Amount: $605,000. Filed Feb. 16. Blass, Anatol, Stamford. Seller: 25 Forest Street 3J LLC, Miami, Florida. Property: 25 Forest St., Unit 3J, Stamford. Amount: $245,000. Filed Feb. 11. Carpe Diem Holdings LLC, Fairfield. Seller: John M. Austin, Fairfield. Property: 2182 Stratfield Road, Fairfield. Amount: $330,000. Filed Feb. 11. Chung, David and Katharine Sheridan Chung, Greenwich. Seller: 5 Brynwood Lane LLC, Greenwich. Property: 272 Round Hill Road, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Feb. 17. Dolger, Jason and Monica Leonard, Stamford. Seller: 27 Harold Avenue LLC, Stamford. Property: 27 Harold Ave., Greenwich. Amount: N/A. Filed Feb. 24.

Commercial 21 Maher Avenue Partners LLC, Greenwich. Seller: Andrew J. Pitts and Kirsten Dieterich Pitts, Greenwich. Property: 21 Maher Ave., Greenwich. Amount: N/A. Filed Feb. 16. 253 Tuckahoe Lane LLC, Stamford. Seller: June M. Naswell, Fairfield. Property: 253 Tuckahoe Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $307,500. Filed Feb. 17.

FCBJ

34 Turner Drive LLC, Scarsdale, New York. Seller: Indian Spring Limited Partnership, Greenwich. Property: 34 Turner Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1,751,000. Filed Feb. 17.

WCBJ

Gaberman, Mark and Jonathan L. Gaberman, Norwalk. Seller: Rolling Ridge 264 LLC, New York, New York. Property: 50 Aiken St., Unit 264, Norwalk. Amount: $245,000. Filed Feb. 17. Gomsa Real Estate Inc, Purchase, New York. Seller: MP Jain Holding Corp., Greenwich. Property: Unit 1, Dearfield Medical Center Condominium, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Feb. 19.

Leyrer, David and Alicia M. Tranen, Los Angeles, California. Seller: 421 Broome Street LLC, Greenwich. Property: 460 North St., Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Feb. 17. Oakvale Homes LLC, Westport. Seller: Laszlo B. Korbl, Fairfield. Property: Mill Hill Terrace, Fairfield. Amount: $325,000. Filed Feb. 9. Sheffield, Holly, Westport. Seller: Three Two Development LLC, Fairfield. Property: 272 Fairfield Beach Road, Fairfield. Amount: $2,855,000. Filed Feb. 12. Snow, Frederick Philip and Jennifer Xuan Thanh Snow, Fairfield. Seller: Beachside Estates LLC, Fairfield. Property: 21 Beaumont St., Fairfield. Amount: $1. Filed Feb. 9. The 49A Shore Road Nominee Real Estate Trust, Old Greenwich. Seller: Antonio Miranda and Beth Anne Bogner Miranda, Greenwich. Property: 49A Shore Road, Old Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Feb. 19. Watts, Thomas Gary, Lafayette, California. Seller: 303 Wakeman LLC, Fairfield. Property: 303 Wakeman Road, Fairfield. Amount: $750,000. Filed Feb. 8. Zandirad, Danielle S., Westport. Seller: Tomas Brothers LLC, Norwalk. Property: 3 Toilsome Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $270,000. Filed Feb. 17.

Residential Barksdale, Raymond, White Plains, New York. Seller: Nancy A. Mola, Norwalk. Property: 84 Taylor Ave., Unit 6, Norwalk. Amount: $195,000. Filed Feb. 19.

Canales, Sergio and Nancy Liu, Mansfield. Seller: Cynthia P. Erensen, Cos Cob. Property: 33 MacArthur Drive, Old Greenwich. Amount: $1,330,000. Filed Feb. 22. Catino, Gennaro, Stamford. Seller: Andrew Fracchia, Stamford. Property: 41 Rock Spring Road, Unit 3, Stamford. Amount: $285,000. Filed Feb. 11. Cesario, Rafael and Rosena Rivkin, Bronx, New York. Seller: Monica Vidal, Trumbull. Property: 196 York Road, Fairfield. Amount: $0. Filed Feb. 18. Chang, Anna Phoebe, Fresh Meadows, New York. Seller: Joseph E. M. Hughes, Westport. Property: 10 Ann St., Unit 302, Norwalk. Amount: $249,900. Filed Feb. 12. Contessa, Drew and Sophie Contessa, Norwalk. Seller: Marie Pauline E. Morn, Norwalk. Property: 23 Crooked Trail Road, Norwalk. Amount: $865,000. Filed Feb. 18. Crai, Diana and Michael Ciarcia, Norwalk. Seller: James Basch and Jennifer Basch, Stamford. Property: 21 Easthill Road, Stamford. Amount: $840,000. Filed Feb. 10. Cruz, Robert E. and Kim Cruz, Larchmont, New York. Seller: Cedric Der Calousdian, Stamford. Property: 180 Turn of River Road, Unit 18D, Stamford. Amount: $631,500. Filed Feb. 10. Dargin, Maksud M. and Adriana Patricia Dargin, Bridgeport. Seller: Melissa C. Hambly, Fairfield. Property: Unit 19 Maple Wood Condominium, Fairfield. Amount: $324,440. Filed Feb. 10.

Emmon, John and Susan Fanelli, Fairfield. Seller: Katherine Recor, Fairfield. Property: 514 High St., Fairfield. Amount: $350,000. Filed Feb. 11. Eustace, Cheryl, Fairfield. Seller: Bennett Trembicki and Janine Lind Trembicki, Fairfield. Property: 139 Northwood Road, Fairfield. Amount: $815,000. Filed Feb. 12. Flores-Galdamez, Elvia, Hartsdale, New York. Seller: Elizabeth M. Riina, Norwalk. Property: 126 Washington St., Unit 202, Norwalk. Amount: $255,000. Filed Feb. 16. Flynn, Patrick M., Greenwich. Seller: Mary Elizabeth Gilmartin, Greenwich. Property: 237 Lake Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Feb. 17. Forrey, Avery Carpenter and John Alexander Forrey, Riverside. Seller: Louis Stern, Blauvelt, New York. Property: 10 Newton St., Riverside. Amount: $2,312,500. Filed Feb. 17. Freimuth, Douglas M. Jennifer Redmond, Greenwich. Seller: Christina Sogaard Jensen and Bharath T. Srikrishnan, Greenwich. Property: 14 Steppingstone Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Feb. 17. Georgiu, Petros and Stacey Ann Georgiu, Norwalk. Seller: Dan Wang and Wei Hu, Norwalk. Property: 32 Purdy Road East, Norwalk. Amount: $585,000. Filed Feb. 11. Gnesin, Marc and Jamie Stuono, Norwalk. Seller: Carmen Alexis Perez Morrow and Elise K. Young, Norwalk. Property: 20 Willow St., Norwalk. Amount: $515,000. Filed Feb. 18.


Facts & Figures Gramazio, Ariel, Stamford. Seller: Alberto Garcia and Elizabeth Garcia, Hopewell Junction, New York. Property: 1 Strawberry Hill Court, Unit 12D, Stamford. Amount: $240,000. Filed Feb. 8. Guo, Sha, New York, New York. Seller: George Buttacavoli, Halesite, New York. Property: Lot 3, Map 2, Licata Terrace, Greenwich. Amount: $1,075,000. Filed Feb. 16. Halloran, Joan, Greenwich. Seller: Maureen Curry, Shoreline, Washington. Property: Unit 107, Greenwich Green Condominium, Greenwich. Amount: $285,000. Filed Feb. 22. Hasson, Caitlin C. and David J. Hasson, New York, New York. Seller: Daniel W. Scott and Pamela Scott, Fairfield. Property: 217 Osborne Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $1,260,000. Filed Feb. 8. Hernandez, Carlos, Stamford. Seller: James L. van Allen and Elaine V. van Allen, Stamford. Property: 2435 Bedford St., Unit 14C, Stamford. Amount: $490,000. Filed Feb. 9. Howard, Carla A., Scarsdale, New York. Seller: Atul Singal Aggarwal and Cortney Aggarwal, Cos Cob. Property: 50 Cat Rock Road, Cos Cob. Amount: $2,875,000. Filed Feb. 19. Jarecke, Peter J. and Penelope Mares Jarecke, Fairfield. Seller: Willam R. Casale and Elaine B. Casale, Fairfield. Property: 300 Winnepoge Drive Fairfield. Amount: $855,000. Filed Feb. 18. Kreter, Brett Hamilton and Karin Kreter, Fairfield. Seller: Sandra K. Short and Mark L. Seaman, Fairfield. Property: 165 Middlebrook Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $455,000. Filed Feb. 11. Landauer, Adam T., Stamford. Seller: Kelly Marino and Robert Marino, Stamford. Property: 46 Mitchell St., Stamford. Amount: $717,000. Filed Feb. 11.

Lange, Paul D., Rowayton. Seller: Gijs Vuursteen and Martine Schipper, Bloemendaal, Netherlands. Property: Keofferam Road, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Feb. 16. Lohani, Pranab R. and Ruchi Pandey, Greenwich. Seller: Salim Patel and Rameela Patel, Stamford. Property: 637 Cove Road, Unit B1, Stamford. Amount: $179,000. Filed Feb. 12. Lopez, Eduardo A. and Vivian Barbara Insua-Lopez, La Canada Flintridge, California. Seller: Dave Valentin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Property: 9 Hamilton Ave., Unit 5, Norwalk. Amount: $165,000. Filed Feb. 17. Mancini, Frank J., Norwalk. Seller: Frank J. Mancini III and Michelle Mancini, Norwalk. Property: 22 Friendly Road, Norwalk. Amount: $1. Filed Feb. 12. Mizrachi, Abraham, White Plains, New York. Seller: Ruth I. Chapman, Stamford. Property: 1 Broad St., Unit PH23A, Stamford. Amount: $865,000. Filed Feb. 9. Neubauer, Andrea, Fairfield. Seller: Robert H. Porter and Bridget Elizabeth Porter, Naples, Florida. Property: 304 Lancelot Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $785,000. Filed Feb. 17. Padilla, Joel Carlos, Norwalk. Seller: David J. McCabe and Monica A. McCabe, Norwalk. Property: 32 Heather Lane, Norwalk. Amount: $490,400. Filed Feb. 12. Pauli, Carolyn, New Braunfels, Texas. Seller: Frank Lorenzo and Jill Lorenzo, Fairfield. Property: 365 Fence Row Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $975,000. Filed Feb. 12. Pavalovscaia, Daniela, Norwalk. Seller: Ian William Orr and Jennifer Kathleen Orr, Norwalk. Property: 330 Sunrise Hill Road, Unit 124, Norwalk. Amount: $360,000. Filed Feb. 11.

Pearce-Kyer, Latoya Saucha and Jaherell Fred Kyer Bronxville, New York. Seller: Frances A. Geitz, Norwalk. Property: 4 Richelieu St., Norwalk. Amount: $447,250. Filed Feb. 19.

Schaefer, Carolyn, Greenwich. Seller: Stephen R. McLaughlin and Marian G. McLaughlin, Armonk, New York. Property: 71 View St., Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Feb. 19.

Perdomo Marroquin, Carlos A. and Silvia Noemi Recinos Ruiz, Greenwich. Seller: Kristina Beres, Norwalk. Property: 61 Longfellow Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $369,000. Filed Feb. 16.

Shinde, Shweta Ameya and Ameya Vilas Shinde, Stamford. Seller: Barbara Jean Lorenti, Stamford. Property: 131 Haig Ave., Stamford. Amount: $527,000. Filed Feb. 11.

Perez, Maria Teresa, Norwalk. Seller: Margaret S. Kucharski, Stamford. Property: 100 Wolfpit Ave., Unit 3, Norwalk. Amount: $255,000. Filed Feb. 17.

Smith, Patrick Dylan and Kristin Lee Sinko-Smith, Greenwich. Seller: Barbara Muenzen, Stamford. Property: 691 Westover Road, Stamford. Amount: $955,000. Filed Feb. 8.

Posner, Steven, Highland Beach, Florida. Seller: Mark R. Tutun and Holly Tutun, Stamford. Property: 334 Stamford Ave., Stamford. Amount: $1,143,835. Filed Feb. 9. Renault, Nicole T. and Boris L. Renault, New York, New York. Seller: Line Dean, Fairfield. Property: 345 Governors Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $1,900,000. Filed Feb. 9. Ritter, Sade, Mount Vernon, New York. Seller: John Dalton and Leah Dalton, Stamford. Property: 66 Seaside Ave., Unit 1, Stamford. Amount: $320,000. Filed Feb. 10. Robbins, Samantha, Fairfield. Seller: Michele Martin, Fairfield. Property: 5 Beacon View Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $292,000. Filed Feb. 12. Rubenstein, Jay J. and Julie A. Rubenstein, Harrison, New York. Seller: Nicholas D.H. Beevers and Katherine S. Beevers, United Kingdom. Property: 751 Lake Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $7,495,000. Filed Feb. 24. Ruiz, Ariana, Mamaroneck, New York. Seller: Sandra Vallejo and Carlos Vallejo, Greenwich. Property: 51B Rodwell Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $585,000. Filed Feb. 17.

Sofer, Prudy and Alfred Sofer, Miami, Florida. Seller: Rose M. Sagaria, Westport. Property: 26 Jeffrey Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2,250,000. Filed Feb. 22. Stern, Louis, Greenwich. Seller: Deborah A. Barnwell and Thomas M. Barnwell, Greenwich. Property: 223 Milbank Condominium, Greenwich. Amount: $1,975,000. Filed Feb. 16. Toland, Jennifer and Marc Toland, Stamford. Seller: Steven C. Romei, Stamford. Property: 41 Ralph St., Stamford. Amount: $720,000. Filed Feb. 12. Villanueva, Ana L., Stamford. Seller: Joseph F. Strout, Stamford. Property: 119 Coolidge Ave., Stamford. Amount: $428,000. Filed Feb. 12. Villarruel, Estefania and Andres Castro, Norwalk. Seller: Nancy G. Smalley, Norwalk. Property: 329 Strawberry Hill Ave., Unit 1, Norwalk. Amount: $280,000. Filed Feb. 11. Yadaicela, Luis E., Stamford. Seller: Daniel Estrada and Lilly Arteaga, Stamford. Property: 183 Lawn Ave., Stamford. Amount: $652,250. Filed Feb. 8.

Zuniga Calderon, Wilson, Norwalk. Seller: Theresa Purcell, Bethel. Property: 1 Pleasant St., Norwalk. Amount: $479,000. Filed Feb. 12.

JUDGMENTS Boutelle, James G., Cos Cob. $18,714, in favor of American Express National Bank, Sandy, Utah, by Mark Sank & Associates, Stamford. Property: 34 Butler St., Cos Cob. Filed Feb. 17. Daley, Audley, Stamford. $9,750, in favor of Bank of America NA, Charlotte, North Carolina, by Rubin & Rothman LLC, Islandia, New York. Property: 33 Greenwich Ave., Stamford. Filed March 11. Delmonico, Christopher, Fairfield. $2,262, in favor of Peter Barakat, Woodbury, by Joseph C. Coco, Danbury. Property: 169 Berkeley Road, Fairfield. Filed March 4. Fairview Health Care Management LLC, Edison, New Jersey. $135,800, in favor of Southern Connecticut Gas Company, Orange, by Nair & Levin, Bloomfield. Property: 930 Mill Hill Terrace, Southport. Filed March 3. Goico, Patricia, Norwalk. $5,257, in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio, by Schereiber Law LLC, Salem, New Hampshire. Property: 17 Grand St., Norwalk. Filed March 1. Sarkar, Sam, Stamford. $107, in favor of Hop Energy LLC, Bridgeport, by William G. Reveley, Stamford. Property: 154 McIntosh Road, Stamford. Filed March 15. Yax, Herlinda, Norwalk. $7,724, in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio, by Schereiber Law LLC, Salem, New Hampshire. Property: 1 Fulmar Lane, Norwalk. Filed March 1.

FCBJ

WCBJ

LIS PENDENS Choudhury, Shahi, Fairfield. Filed by Leopold & Associates PLLC, Armonk, New York, for Trinity Financial Services LLC. Property: 512 Commerce Drive, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed March 12. Chuco, Milton, et al, Stamford. Filed by Bendett & McHugh PC, Farmington, for Citibank NA. Property: 45 Frank St., Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Feb. 25. Clark, Patience, et al, Norwalk. Filed by McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce LLC, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank National Association. Property: 114 Woodward Ave., Norwalk. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed March 23. Downey, Kevin P., et al, Fairfield. Filed by Marinosci Law Group PC, Warwick, Rhode Island, for Citibank NA. Property: 138 Fairfield Place, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Feb. 26. Ellis, Christopher, Fairfield. Filed by Costello, Brennan, DeVidas, Sasso & Sinclair PC, Fairfield, for Erin Courcey. Property: 271 Fairfield Woods Road, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed Feb. 25. Fredericks, Bernard M., et al, Stamford. Filed by Law Offices of Robert J. Piscitelli LLC, Avon, for People’s United Bank National Association. Property: Revised Plot B, Map 9773, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Feb. 23. Kozicki, Darisz, et al, Stamford. Filed by McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce LLC, Hartford, for Citibank NA. Property: 107 Lockwood Ave., Unit 3B, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Feb. 26.

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Facts & Figures Morganstern, Clark, et al, Stamford. Filed by Ackerly & Ward, Stamford, for the Stamford Water Pollution Control Authority. Property: 71 Sherman St., Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Feb. 26.

Becker, Scott and Mikel Becker, Greenwich, by Andrew M. Haber. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA, 101 N. Phillips Ave., Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Property: 1 Tower Lane, Old Greenwich. Amount: $2,354,625. Filed Feb. 10.

Prasath, Shiva, et al, Stamford. Filed by Ackerly & Ward, Stamford, for River House Condominium Association Inc. Property: Unit 27, River House Condominium, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Feb. 23.

Benjamin, Techia M., Norwalk, by M. L. Blumenthal. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 26 Prospect Ave., Apt. E7, Norwalk. Amount: $167,800. Filed Feb. 10.

Screpetis, Christos, et al, Norwalk. Filed by Pilicy & Ryan PC, Watertown, for Nor-West Association Inc. Property: Unit 2-U, Nor-West Condominium, Norwalk. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed March 8. St Juste, Samuel, et al, Stamford. Filed by McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce LLC, Hartford, for US Bank National Association. Property: 10 Leslie St., Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Feb. 24.

MORTGAGES Aleksa, Jason A., Fairfield, by Robert E. Colapietro. Lender: Bank of America NA, 100 North Tryon St., Charlotte, North Carolina. Property: 636 Wilson St., Fairfield. Amount: $150,000. Filed Feb. 4. Araujo, Nichollas and Elisabeth Ritter, Norwalk, by Jason J. Morytko. Lender: Total Mortgage Services LLC, 185 Plains Road, Milford. Property: 83 Washington St. Unit 2J, Norwalk. Amount: $251,750. Filed Feb. 10. Barros, Antonio, Norwalk, by N/A. Lender: NBKC Bank, 8320 Ward Pkwy., Kansas City, Missouri. Property: 71 Wolfpit Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $468,000. Filed Feb. 11.

Jones, Kenneth P. and Kathryn C. Jones, Norwalk, by David H. Dworski. Lender: Amerisave Mortgage Corp., 3525 Piedmont Road, Suite 600, Atlanta, Georgia. Property: 6 Bonnybrook Road, Norwalk. Amount: $439,131. Filed Feb. 11.

Pasinkoff, David and Joan Pasinkoff, Stamford, by Donald E. Wetmore. Lender: Amerisave Mortgage Corp., 3525 Piedmont Road, Suite 600, Atlanta, Georgia. Property: 110 Riverbank Drive, Stamford. Amount: $234,092. Filed Feb. 9.

Kaplan, Seth and Hien Kaplan, Stamford, by Suzanna Fetter. Lender: Loandepot.com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 20 Webster Road, Stamford. Amount: $365,000. Filed Feb. 5.

Priola, Nicholas and Nicholle Priola, Norwalk, by unreadable. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 10 Vincent Place, Norwalk. Amount: $770,000. Filed Feb. 9.

Curtis, Sean S. and Catherine W. Curtis, Fairfield, by Cheryl A. Cortan. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 34 Charter Oak Road, Fairfield. Amount: $720,000. Filed Feb. 3.

Koleva, Ana, Stamford, by Kevin D. Florin. Lender: Warshaw Capital LLC, 2777 Summer St., Suite 306, Stamford. Property: 44 Strawberry Hill Ave., Unit 1F, Stamford. Amount: $178,000. Filed Feb. 5.

Schaumburg, Ernest and Vinita Saxena, Greenwich, by James Kavanagh. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA, 101 N. Phillips Ave., Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Property: 35 Shore Road, Old Greenwich. Amount: $1,560,000. Filed Feb. 10.

DeThomas, Kevin and Susan DeThomas, Fairfield, by Aaron Charney. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 255 Half Mile Road, Southport. Amount: $930,400. Filed Feb. 2.

Leo, Richard R. and Jordan K. Leo, Greenwich, by Jeremy E. Kaye. Lender: First Republic Bank, 111 Pine St., San Francisco, California. Property: 118 Greenwich Hills Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $599,100. Filed Feb. 8.

Fratczak, Anna, Greenwich, by Jeremy E. Kaye. Lender: Fairfield County Bank, 150 Danbury Road, Ridgefield. Property: 51 Forest Ave., Unit 38, Greenwich. Amount: $416,000. Filed Feb. 9.

Lu, Carlos T. and Mona C. Lu, Greenwich, by Aleksandr Y. Troyb. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 55 Stag Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $999,999. Filed Feb. 10.

Gambrill, William Jennings and Kaitlin Paul Gambrill, Greenwich, by Mark Sank. Lender: Citizens Bank NA, 1 Citizens Plaza, Providence, Rhode Island. Property: 364 Cedar Hill, Greenwich. Amount: $2,956,000. Filed Feb. 9.

Luma, Victoria and Alfredo Luma, Norwalk, by Louis J. Colangelo. Lender: Loandepot.com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 21 Ward St., Norwalk. Amount: $278,686. Filed Feb. 9.

Hoffman, Adam and Jessica Hoffman, Greenwich, by Albert T. Strazza. Lender: HSBC Bank USA NA, 452 Fifth Ave., New York, New York. Property: 20 Licata Terrace Greenwich. Amount: $800,000. Filed Feb. 8.

Morrow, Cassandra M., Fairfield, by Jeffrey Mishley. Lender: People’s United Bank NA, 850 Main St., Bridgeport. Property: 231 Webb Road, Fairfield. Amount: $100,000. Filed Feb. 2.

Serlin, Richard J. and Annamarie J. Serlin, Fairfield, by Peter Ambrose. Lender: Webster Bank NA, 145 Bank St., Waterbury. Property: 185 Flower House Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $460,000. Filed Feb. 4. Settachatgul, Kiti and Supalak Settachatgul, Fairfield, by D. Quintero. Lender: Loandepot. com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 36 Senior Place, Fairfield. Amount: $353,600. Filed Feb. 3. Smith, Patrick Dylan and Kristin Lee Sinko-Smith, Stamford, by Jenna Cardlle. Lender: Fairfield County Bank, 150 Danbury Road, Ridgefield. Property: 691 Westover Road, Stamford. Amount: $764,000. Filed Feb. 8. Wang, Xing Hui, Stamford, by James C. Tsui. Lender: Finance of America Mortgage LLC, 300 Welsh Road, Building 5, Suite A, Horsham, Pennsylvania. Property: 74 Virgil St., Stamford. Amount: $468,000. Filed Feb. 9.

Yadaicela Luis E., Stamford, by Daniel P. Weiner. Lender: Loandepot.com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 183 Lawn Ave., Stamford. Amount: $586,950. Filed Feb. 8.

NEW BUSINESSES Boteco Gaucho, 78 W. Park Place, Stamford 06901, c/o Yuniny Rosales. Filed Feb. 9. Damage Recovery Unit, 745 E. Main St., Stamford 06902, c/o Ean Services LLC. Filed Feb. 26. Medical Arts Pharmacy-2, 802 E. Main St., Stamford 06902, c/o Lakshmi P. Grandhi. Filed Feb. 9. Oak Crest Painting LLC, 44 North St., Apt. 1, Stamford 06902, c/o Ismael Martinez Agustin. Filed Feb. 9. Shippan Professional Cleaners, 195 Shippan Ave., Stamford 06906, c/o Spiritual Touch Cleaners LLC. Filed Feb. 22. The Kubb Game, 1253 High Ridge Road, Stamford 06903, c/o Iram Vilsaint. Filed Feb. 12. Wendy’s, 1938 W. Main St., Stamford 06902, c/o Wenconn of Stamford LLC. Filed Feb. 24.

FAIR PATENTS Systems and methods for starting an engine. Patent no. 10,961,915 issued to Joseph Simonetti, et al. Assigned to Sikorsky Aircraft, Stratford.

Long-term memory networks for knowledge extraction from text and publications. Patent no. 10,963,789 issued to Fenglong Ma, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Method and device for adjusting audio signal and audio system. Patent no. 10,965,265 issued to Guilin Ma, et al. Assigned to Harman International, Stamford. Methods and systems for print jobs transfer via an external storage device. Patent no. 10,965,824 issued to Sathish Annamalai Thangaraj, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Systems and methods for printing of removable and permanent images on an object. Patent no. 10,960,698 issued to Minette Beabes, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk.

VP, Digital Measurement Analytics, Synchrony Bank, Stamford, CT. Digital Insights Analyst responsible to showcase value of key digital strategies by developing actionable insights & analysis/reports. Req. Bach’s deg or foreign equiv in STEM field + 8 yrs of post-bach, progrssv exp in digital analytics role for credit card or consumer bus industry. Up to 10% travel required. Telecommuting permitted. To apply, email resume to HR Manager referencing job code CT0019 in subject line to: kristine.mackey@syf.com

Associate, Site Reliability Engineering (Greenwich, CT): Develop software applications, support technical users & answer complex questions on system function & usage. Improve current software releases, as well as log, research & accurately resolve complex customer inquiries & problems with software applications in a timely manner. Req’s Master’s degr plus knowledge or experience in the following must have been gained through academic research and/or coursework: Java, Python & SQL Server; working in a Linux & Windows environment; configuring, deploying, monitoring & supporting Java & Python applications in a service-oriented architecture; & leveraging GIT as source code control & part of a deployment pipeline. Mail resume to: AQR Capital Management, LLC, ATTN: S. Rao, 2 Greenwich Plaza, Greenwich, CT 06830. Must Ref: DR-AQR-008. AQR is an Equal Opportunity Employer. EEO/VET/DISABILITY

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WCBJ


LEGAL NOTICES LHDVM, LLC. Filed 10/9/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 709 Bedford Road, Bedford Hills, NY 10507 Purpose: All lawful #62800 Brown Ave LLC. Filed 11/10/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 14 Brown Avenue, Rye, NY 10580 Purpose: All lawful #62801 68 Sherwood Drive Associates, LLC. Filed 9/16/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 399 Knollwood Road, Suite 318, White Plains, NY 10603 Purpose: All lawful #62802 37 Lamplight Street Associates, LLC. Filed 10/20/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 399 Knollwood Road, Suite 318, White Plains, NY 10603 Purpose: All lawful #62803 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC. NAME: BIANCA'S SUNSHINE LLC Articles of Organization were filed with NY Secy. Of State on 12/24/20 with existence on 12/28/20. Office location Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to Theodore Mottola, 6 Saldi Lane, Valhalla, NY 10595, principal business location. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62804 Notice of Formation of TRAVEL TOGETHER WITH LIZ LLC, Art. of Org. filed with SSNY on 2/12/21. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC: 44a Black Spring Road, Pound Ridge, 10576. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. #62805

Taylor and Taylor Financial Services USA LLC, Appl for Auth filed with SSNY 1/21/2021. Office location: Westchester County. LLC formed in DE 4/28/17. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 411 Theodore Fremd Ave., Ste 206, Rye, NY 10580. DE address of LLC is c/o Capitol Services, Inc., 1675 S. State St., Ste. B, Dover, DE 19901. A copy of the Cert. of Form. on file with State of DE, Div.of Corp., 401 Federal St., Ste. 3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62806 Francesca's Property Management LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 2/9/2021. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 49 Fletcher Ave., Mt. Vernon, NY 10552. General Purpose #62807 Babaloo LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 12/3/2020. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 610 Esplanade, Pelham Manor, NY 10803. General Purpose #62808 Notice of Formation of SoTo Martinez Recoleta LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 01/20/2021. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. & shall mail process to 3 Oval Ct., Bronxville, NY 10708. Purpose: All lawful #62809 Notice of Formation of 1 Linkmusicgroup, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 2/23/21. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 1 Linkmusicgroup LLC, 243 So. 3rd Ave., #1A, Mt. Vernon, New York 10550. Purpose: any lawful Purpose. #62810

Notice of Formation of Omni Business Enterprises, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/03/2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the principal business location of the LLC: 355 Old Tarrytown Rd. Unit #608, White Plains, N.Y.10603. Purpose: any lawful business activity. #62812 Notice of Formation of Unlimited Possibilities Defined, LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/27/2020. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 9 Loring Avenue, Yonkers, New York 10704. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62814 Notice of Formation of TRHACKETT LLC. Art. of Org. filed with Secy of State (SSNY) on 3/4/2021. Office: Westchester Cty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 343 Trenor Dr New Rochelle NY 10804. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62815 Notice of Formation of AngeliComm, LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 1/6/21. Offc. Loc: White Plains. SSNY desig. Cara Angelico as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Pinebrook Dr, White Plains, NY 10605 10598. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62816 Notice of Formation of SDGB Enterprize LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 12/24/2000. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail the process to SDGB Enterprize LLC, 455 Tarrytown Road, Ste 1040, White Plains NY 10607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62817

Notice of Formation of Zamenhof Law LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 3/8/21. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Melanie Zamenhof, 51 Lincoln Avenue, Ossining, New York 10562. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62818 Larry O. Consulting LLC: filed with NY Secretary of State 11/23/20. Principal office location: Westchester County, NY. Secretary of State designated as agent of LLC upon which process against it may be served. Secretary of State shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Larry O. Consulting LLC, 1 Harbor Point Road, Stamford, CT 08902 (temporary location), attention: Larry Orell. Purpose: any lawful activity. #62819 Notice of Formation of Evermax, LLC filed with SSNY on 2/15/21. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 104 Forest Dr., Mt. Kisco, NY 10549. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62820 Notice of Formation of MLBD LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on March 10, 2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 35 Mark Mead Road, Cross River, NY 10518. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62821 Notice of Formation of Hibbert RE 1 LLC Articles Of Organization filed with SSNY on 3/03/2021. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1646 Castle Lawn Court, Naperville, Illinois 60565. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62822

VIRGINIA ROAD HOLDINGS LLC. Filed 3/12/2021. Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as for process & shall mail copy to: 2055 Flatbush Ave, Bklyn, NY 11234. Purpose: General. #62823 Notice of formation of Hartsbrook Consulting LLC. Arts. Of Org. Filed NY Sec. of State 1/20/2021. Princ. Office: Westchester Cty. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Sec. of State shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC, 55 Fieldstone Dr., No. 25, Hartsdale, NY 10530. Purpose: any lawful activity. #62824 61 Seminary LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 11/4/2020. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 2545 Dunning Dr., Yorktown Heights, NY 10598. General Purpose #62825 Anita Greenwald, LLC. Filed 3/3/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 13 Greenbriar Circle, Armonk, NY 10504 Purpose: All lawful #62826 Notice of Formation of KVBridge LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 3/18/2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY is designated as LLC's agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 1051 The Parkway, Mamaroneck, NY 10543. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62827

FCBJ

Notice of Formation of CTCS Capital LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 2/22/21. Office Location: Westchester County. Bruno Oliveto designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Bruno Oliveto, 26 1st Street 8022, Pelham, NY 10803. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62832

Notice of Formation of Honey Badger Advisors, LLC Articles of Organization filed with SSNY on 02/24/2021. Office Location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 125 Central Avenue / B9, Rye, NY 10580. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62828 CHIzube Executive Functions filed NY Sec. of State 03/18/2021. Princ. off. loc.: Westchester Cty. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Sec. of State shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Priscilla Ambrose, 40 Brandt Terrace, Yonkers, NY 10710. Attn: Priscilla Ambrose. Purpose: any lawful activity #62829 Notice of Formation of MKD NOTARY SERVICES LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 03/24/2021. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, PO BOX 80, ARDSLEY, NY 10502 #62830 Notice of Formation of: MLucia Designs LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/08/2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 165 Oakland Ave, Eastchester, NY 10709. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62831

WCBJ

Latafood LLC Art of Org. filed with the SSNY on 03/04/2021 Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, Adam Dreksler 700 Broadway, New York, NY 10003 Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62833 Agovino Management LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 3/23/2021. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 909 Midland Ave., Yonkers, NY 10704. General Purpose #62834 Notice of Formation of 153 Southside Holdings LLC: Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 03/19/2021. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 153 Southside Ave, Hastings on Hudson, NY 10706. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62835

APRIL 5, 2021

33


A NAtioNAlly RecogNized

iN sAfety During these times, safety is more important than ever. For the fourth time in a row, White Plains Hospital’s dedication to the highest level of patient care and safety earned it an “A” from the Leapfrog Group – making White Plains Hospital the only hospital in Westchester County, and just one of 29 hospitals nationwide, to be recognized as a Top Hospital.

To find out more visit wphospital.org/awards

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The Business Journals - Week of April 5  

The Business Journals - Week of April 5  

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