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FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL YOUR ONLY SOURCE FOR REGIONAL BUSINESS NEWS | westfaironline.com

CHOPPED

BOB ROZYCKI

FCBJ this week

July 8, 2013 | VOL. 49, No. 27

HelicoPter manuFacturer Will laY oFF 200

a Shelton energy Firm has patented technology that enables companies to monitor individual employees’ electric consumption … 3

BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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CutS to eDuCation anD human ServiCeS ProgramS could hamper nonprofits’ ability to meet their clients’ needs, a government watchdog warned … 5

equestration, while less severe than anticipated, hit close to home as Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. confirmed plans to lay off about 200 employees, most of whom are based in Connecticut. Amid military budget cuts, rising costs and economic uncertainty, an official at the Stratford-based company said the workforce reductions were deemed necessary to keep the company in a competitive position. “Sikorsky continues to look to a promising future, but today we face difficult challenges,” Paul Jackson, company spokesman, said in a June 27 statement. “We must do all we can to protect

StarWooD hotelS anD SaCreD heart univerSity are partnering to help grow Stamford’s youth employment program … 7 a norWalk reSiDent hopes to ‘give back’ through a new nonprofit that matches health care executives with volunteer opportunities in Uganda … 9

» Chopped, page 6

MEDIA PARTNER

William C. Dudley, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York

DUDLEY CAUTIONS ON TAPER

Bond-BuYinG PullBacK tied to Pace oF recoverY

BY BILL FALLoN

BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

FeDeral reServe Bank oF neW york PreSiDent William C. DuDley said that the central bank may start to slow its buying of mortgage-backed securities and U.S. Treasury bonds sooner than expected. “We believe a very aggressive monetary policy today will generate stronger growth sooner,” Dudley told members of

the Business Council of Fairfield County July 1 at the Sheraton Stamford Hotel. “And that will allow us to lead to a normalization of monetary policy sooner than if we were to stop this policy now and raise short-term rates earlier.” In an attempt to improve labor market conditions in the context of price stability, the Fed’s Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) buys $40 billion in mortgage-backed securities and $45 bil» Bond-buying, page 8

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Gut check for health care

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thirty eXeCutiveS gathereD June 28 at Landmark Square in Stamford to hear Phil Boyle expound on details of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, including word that it’s not an exchange; it’s a marketplace. The proverbial elephant in the room was the absence of details on that marketplace — promised later this month. “It’s difficult to buy a car when you can’t kick the tires,” said Boyle, the business outreach manager for Access Health CT, which will manage the marketplace. As for the health exchange: “We dropped exchange for several reasons, one being it does not translate well into » health care, page 6


Alternate reality

Panelists discuss unconventional investment opportunities BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

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ntil the recent market pullback, global equities had soared with corporate profits and margins at record highs. As the economy stabilizes and the Federal Reserve looks to pull back on its bond-buying, financial experts have warned that the years of cheap borrowing and reliance on fixed-income investments are drawing to a close. With global financial markets in the midst of a readjustment, the Business Journal convened a number of experts in to discuss the viability of so-called alternative investments and what role they should serve in an individual’s portfolio. From art to real estate to gold — and equities too — panelists at the June 27 event “Roads Paved in Gold” delved into areas that could represent investment opportunities moving forward. The event, which was hosted by the Business Journals and Wag magazine, took place at the Audubon Center in Greenwich, with a discussion moderated by Nancy Murray Ozizmir. The following are excerpts from the ensuing talk:

“At the moment, contemporary art seems to be unstoppable in its market appreciation — Damien Hirst, Richard Prince — these guys are doing extraordinarily well. A market that hasn’t been doing so well, say, is … English furniture, for instance. Like with any market the art market is somewhat cyclical, so I would suggest that it’s a good opportunity right now to buy English furniture.” — David Sleeman

Director of business development, Winston Art Group

“From 2003 up until the present day, the art market in general has quadrupled. ... I’m speaking from auction statistics, which are the most transparent part of the art world. ... “Emerging markets … are now a part of our business. Their participation in our business is up to 40 percent, whereas in the past decade it’s been about 5 to 10 percent. ... What’s important to us if you’re thinking about estate tax considerations and thinking about managing your estate is making sure that

your valuations are as up to date as possible.” — Courtney Booth

Assistant vice president, Sotheby’s

“The big thing about a hedge fund is most of them have very broad mandates, and most importantly, they think about their objective as producing absolute returns. … They want to try to protect their downside risk and are trying to make a certain amount of money, but they’re really driven by protecting their downside risk and taking advantage of their expertise and where they see opportunity.” — Mark Silverstein

Chief investment officer, Endurance

“Just in this last month, (interest rates) for a 30-year residential (mortgage) have gone from 3 percent and now up to as high as 4.625 percent and maybe higher … so it has had some part of an impact. Having said that, these are still historic lows, so I don’t think it’s going to have as much of

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Courtney Booth, Caesar Bryan, Craig Harrigan, Pamela Pagnini, Mark Silverstein and David Sleeman, panelists at the June 27 event “Roads Paved in Gold.”

a negative impact as we may think. Here in Greenwich, we still find that the activity is higher because the inventory is low (and) people want to go in while they have the opportunity. Some of them see this as the bottoming out, so they want to be able to get the low prices as well as the low interest rates, even though they’re a bit higher than they were in the last year or so.” — Pamela Pagnani

Partner, Whitman Breed Abbott & Morgan

“Because … the adoption rate has been so high globally, manufacturing costs have dramatically dropped, so even over the last four years our costs to install solar have dropped by more than 50 percent across the board. Any resident or building owner can capture the incentives that are currently in place. Right now for solar you have a 30 percent federal tax credit on the total qualified costs of the system, so if the system is $10,000, it’s $3,000; if it’s $1 million, it’s $300,000. Business owners also have an acceler-

ated depreciation schedule, which they can (use to) write that off in as little as five years. And then Connecticut and New York themselves, on the state levels, have very, very terrific programs going on right now. Connecticut just unrolled theirs last year and it’s going gangbusters.” — Craig Harrigan

Director of commercial solar sales, Encon Solar

“At Gabelli, we view gold as money. JPMorgan said in 1913, ‘Gold is money, nothing else.’ It’s not an investment. It’s a store of value — it’s a form of savings. It’s the purest form of savings you can have because it maintains its purchasing power over time. We’re investors, so we’re interested in gold equities, which are investments which generate income and can provide growth, and after that tremendous decline recently, of course there’s a place for gold in a diversified investment portfolio, but we would stick to the gold equities.” — Caesar Bryan

Fund manager, GAMCO Investors Inc.


The Budderfly effect

sHelton enerGY-manaGement comPanY receives second Patent BY mARK LuNGARIELLo mlungariello@westfairinc.com

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ime is money. So is electricity. The appetite for energy is growing increasingly insatiable, with smartphones, tablets and laptops getting daily charges and businesses with even the most basic technology setups needing power for servers, backup servers and dozens of desktop computers. The ballooning cost of wattage makes being plugged in a costly addiction in corporate America. Budderfly L.L.C., a Shelton-based energy management company, offers technology for businesses to keep a keen eye — perhaps even an Orwellian eye — on how an office consumes power. Ken Buda, the company’s vice president of operations, said a granular understanding of how energy is being used isn’t a matter of Big Brother, but rather of big savings. “If you walk into your office and flip on your light switch, most people don’t know if it’s a dime or a dollar in cost,” Buda said. “We can give Ken a report and say, ‘last month, you used about $150

of energy in your office and these are things you can do to curtail that use.’” Many business management systems provide limited metrics and control of energy consumption, Buda said. Recently, he spoke with a representative from a Massachusetts university who told him there was one energy meter for the entire campus. In such cases, even motion-sensor or timed lighting would reduce consumption significantly, but it’s difficult to find a solution when you can’t even be sure what the problem is, or where it is originating from, he said. Budderfly, which received its second U.S. patent last week, has hardware fitted into specific light switches and power outlets that communicate with cloud-based software. Management can actually show an employee his or her monthly wattage consumption numbers and how they compare to those of other employees. It’s not a matter of being punitive, he said, but making people mindful of small behaviors: Sharing these statistics could mean employees begin to turn off their computer monitors during lunch or shut

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down their desktop computers when leaving for the day. A forward-thinking company, Buda suggested, might even tie a bonus to the largest reduction in energy consumption by an employee. For companies that use large amounts of energy, or which employ thousands of workers, small behavioral changes can have a large impact on the bottom line. “It’s the case of a little bit adding a lot,” he said. An energy management system, if used effectively, could reduce consumption by as much as 10 to 30 percent, Buda said. For each dollar spent in energy reduction, three dollars will be saved on energy generation, he said, which is to say nothing of the environmental benefits of limiting use. Budderfly’s hardware, which sells in the $50 range per unit, is unique in that it fits into existing light switches and power outlet settings. The company also manufactures a power strip, sold at a retail price of $80. Its devices communicate through existing building wiring and cloud technology and so do not require rewiring to operate properly. Using the company’s software and

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mobile apps, a user can not only monitor consumption but remotely turn off lights, which can account for as much as 30 percent of an office’s overall energy use. Users can also receive notifications when an office exceeds a kilowatt threshold. Using a per outlet setup, a user could even determine remotely if lobby televisions were left on overnight or turn off from home watercoolers that are still getting juice after hours. Budderfly launched in 2007. Its website is budderfly.com.

RAKOW FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013

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PERSPECTIVES

FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL

Legislative siphoning threatens commuter safety

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n January 1983, a tractor-trailer plowed into a line of cars at the Stratford toll plaza on Interstate 95, triggering an explosion that killed seven people. Six months later and 29 miles to the south on the highway, three people were killed when a 100-foot section of the Mianus River bridge in Cos Cob collapsed. That year, Gov. William O’Neill signed one law that phased out tolls and left Connecticut as one of the few East Coast states without any form of highway toll revenue, and a second law that established a Special Transportation Fund to pay for road and bridge projects. Three decades later, the relationship between the series of events and their collective impact on Connecticut transportation policy today is remarkable. Connecticut’s roads and bridges are in dire need of safety-related upgrades, to say nothing of traffic that likens Fairfield County to Los Angeles County. State transportation officials have identified $16 billion in unfunded road and bridge upgrades that will be needed in the next 20 years, and reports have identified 500 structurally deficient bridges statewide, including more than 100 in Fairfield County. Studies conducted in the last two decades that looked into widening I-95 to alleviate traffic issues pegged the cost of doing so at upward of $2 billion — a figure that surely would be higher today.

The problem? There’s not enough money left in the transportation fund to pay for it all — or so we are meant to believe. While the idea of reinstating tolls to replenish the fund was tossed around during the recent legislative session, the idea remains politically untenable for a number of reasons; namely, because it would likely add to the length of commutes, but also because of the legacy of the 1983 crash. So legislators, wary of commuters’ wrath, instead increased the gas taxes and fees collected by the state of Connecticut — a move unlikely to further congest I-95. To the chagrin of state Republican leaders, those increases took effect last week, and are projected to raise an extra $60 million in revenue over the coming year. But we fear little, if any of that revenue will ever hit the pavement. Precedent says dollars that flow into the state’s designated transportation fund will ultimately be transferred into the general fund, which pays for state agency expenditures and various staterun programs and services. Case in point: Under the state’s budget for the 2014 and 2015 fiscal years, a net of $110 million will be transferred out of the transportation fund and into the general fund. In May, Frank Fish, a planner who is working with the city of Stamford on its master plan upgrade, told the Business

Letter to the editor I was counsel to the estate of the young man that died as a result of the Mianus River Bridge collapse, which happened 30 years ago. In that case, the state of Connecticut was negligent when it failed to properly inspect and repair the Mianus River Bridge. Now, in part due to the recent Transportation for America study, it is clear that the state is on notice of the structurally deficient nature of 102 bridges in Fairfield County alone. Three of these bridges are specifically in the Greenwich/Stamford/Norwalk stretch of I-95. This is particularly important because more than 100,000 people a day drive over these bridges. It is imperative that the state move to repair these bridges now before another

tragedy happens, but how do we pay for the necessary funding? Halting the diversion of funds away from the maintenance of bridges is a necessary first step. Placing tolls on I-95 might increase revenue, but would cause colossal traffic backups. A solution, which would make sense at this particular time, is to have additional long-term state bonding. The interest rates on bonds right now are near an all-time low. Restoring our bridges to safety should be a first priority of the coming year’s legislative session. Richard A. Silver, Esq. Silver Golub & Teitell L.L.P. Stamford

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Journal that traffic is perhaps the biggest obstacle to economic growth in lower Fairfield County. When asked whether tolls could help pay for traffic alleviation measures, Fish said in all likelihood, no. “The basic question is what does Connecticut get out of tolls? What does the driver get out of it? If you can prove that you get something out of them, fine, but if tolls are going to go into the General Fund and not a dedicated fund, that’s a recipe for disaster.” In Fish’s response, “tolls” could easily be substituted for “gas taxes” — because it appears drivers will have little to show for the extra hit their wallets will take on a regular basis. Three decades ago, a burnt-out tractor-trailer and gurneys carrying crash victims served as powerful images for Connecticut lawmakers, leading to the abolishment of tolls. A bridge collapse and cars falling into the Mianus River created an equally stirring image. If the legislature doesn’t stop siphoning from the transportation fund, the latter history could repeat itself. We only hope that it doesn’t take such an event to remind the state government of its obligation to our transit ways.

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State’s fiscal woes put pressure on nonprofits BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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s state spending on education and human services continues to decrease, policy experts say nonprofits are going to need to gear up to meet the increased demand for human services. An analysis of state budgets by the Fiscal Policy Center at Connecticut Voices for Children, a government watchdog group, shows that there’s been a shift in priorities in terms of state spending over the past two decades. While state expenditures have remained relatively flat as a percentage of personal income since 1992, previous debts and liabilities are taking up a

“As the flow of government funding dries up, there is a very real threat that many residents may fall through the cracks.” — Elaine Mintz

larger portion of the state budget than in the past, said Wade Gibson, a CT Voices senior policy fellow. As the cost of Medicaid, employee health care and pension obligations rise, it’s coming at a fairly dramatic cost to human services and education, Gibson said June 27 in a presentation to Fairfield County Community Foundation (FCCF) members at Norwalk Community College. “These past obligations are eating up more and more and more,” Gibson said. “The easiest thing to cut, it turns out, is human services and education … I don’t think there’s a conscious trade-off, but there’s just not quite enough money to go around.” As a percentage of general fund

appropriations, education spending has decreased 5.7 percentage points since 1992, while human services spending has decreased 2.8 percentage points, Gibson said. To contrast, state spending on debt servicing and liabilities increased 4.9 percentage points over the same time period. Traditionally the government has been the provider of economic opportunity for low- and middle-class residents, but its resources are increasingly thin, Gibson said. “Increasing pressure on state and local budgets is leading to reductions in critical service programs, which have historically helped our county’s most atrisk residents,” said Elaine Mintz, director of the FCCF’s Center for Nonprofit Excellence. “As the flow of government funding dries up, there is a very real threat that many residents may fall through the cracks.” For nonprofits, that means many will need to take on the challenge of increased demand for services at a time when the economy doesn’t support growth, Mintz said. Nonprofits will need to become better advocates for the work they are doing to attract more money and resources to support their work, she said. They’ll need to scale up effective programs, replicate them to reach more people, and work with other nonprofits to increase their impact even further. “Fairfield County nonprofits need to explore how their work helps to grow our economy in the state,” Mintz said. “The public needs to be more aware of these roles and the economic impact it has on both our region and our state.” But while nonprofits may be able to pick up the state’s slack, Gibson said he worries about the state’s investment in its future, whether it’s for high-quality education or children’s health and dental work. The state has made some progress in its recent pre-K education initiatives and the $1.5 billion Next Generation initiative at the University of Connecticut, Gibson said. But it needs to make more investments like that, he said. “Fewer kids will be able to access opportunity and the state will have less ability to make that happen,” Gibson said. “Past decisions are crowding out those kinds of investments. We’re finding every year it’s getting harder and harder.”

Citrin Cooperman Corner

Inventory Management and Cash Flow BY AnthonY DeJesus, CPA Citrin CooPermAn Proper inventory management and its impact on cash flow are vital to the success of your business. If you invest too much, you may be vulnerable to cash shortfalls. Invest too little and you’ll suffer the consequences of lost orders. Understandably, for many business owners, their inventory is the single largest investment the business will have. At its most basic, the task of the business owner is to sell the inventory at a profit, within a reasonable period of time. Although this sounds simple in theory, in practice there are many pitfalls, and it can be fraught with complications. Business owners, by design, want to minimize their inventory. But they often set up a structure that is less than advantageous. It takes cash to buy or build inventory. This is cash that has to be spent before getting paid by customers. Typically, borrowings are incurred to acquire inventory. When the inventory is sold, it is converted into accounts receivable, which eventually is converted into cash. Interest costs are incurred during this cycle, along with selling, general and administrative costs. Consider, for example, if inventory turns four times per year (every 90 days), the average accounts receivable collection period is 45 days, and typical vendor terms are 30 days. In this example, interest and other carrying costs are being incurred for 105 days, or about 3 ½ months! There is a more efficient and profitable way to handle this. First off, the business must take positive steps to address issues of inventory control. Some of the areas that often need to be addressed are purchase orders, inventory receipts, sales orders, and shipments. Good inventory management software can provide detailed data that can be analyzed to help make better decisions about what to purchase, when and in what quantities. Previously considered best practices, such as periodic complete physical counts, may not be necessary. A better and less expensive practice may be the adoption of a cycle count program. Cycle counts eliminate the shutdown periods, provide early detection of inventory inaccuracy and allow for better planning and scheduling decisions due to accurate inventory balances. The next thing the business owner

should do with regard to inventory management is develop a forecast of inventory requirements. Existing inventory mix and sales projections are the key factors in developing this critical information. Customer and market demand, seasonality, competition, supplier pricing, and credit or equity availability are also significant factors that need to be considered. Once the forecast is properly planned and developed, actual results should be compared with forecasts and differences evaluated and corrective action taken when necessary. When a forecasting process is effectively implemented, business owners can make decisions knowing that the existing inventory balance is accurate and the forecasted usage of inventory has been subjected to a thorough and rigorous thought process. A few other considerations regarding inventory management are purchasing options and safety stock levels. Does buying in bulk make sense or does it raise the risk of obsolescence beyond acceptable limits? Are drop shipments an option? A drop shipment is when the supplier ships directly to the customer. Are suppliers willing to provide their inventory on consignment? In a consignment arrangement, inventory is not required to be purchased until the business sells or uses the inventory. Drop shipment and consignment arrangements both eliminate, or at least significantly reduce, carrying costs. Developing and implementing an effective inventory management system will lead to improved cash flows, higher business valuations, and ultimately a more profitable business. The next Citrin Cooperman Corner column focusing on exit strategies for business owners will appear on this page on August 5, 2013. About the author: Anthony DeJesus, a partner based in the Citrin Cooperman’s White Plains office, has more than 17 years of experience in public accounting. He focuses on providing clients with accounting, auditing, tax, and business consulting services. His main practice areas include real estate, not-for-profit, manufacturing, and distribution. He can be reached by phone at (914) 949-2990 or via email at: adejesus@citrincooperman.com. Citrin Cooperman is a full-service accounting and business consulting firm with offices in White Plains, NY; Norwalk, CT; New York City; Livingston, NJ; and Philadelphia.

A MESSAGE FROM CITRIN COOPERMAN FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013

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Health care — » From page 1

Spanish,” he said. If Boyle lacked specific rates at The Business Council of Fairfield County’s Center for Growth event, he offered rafts of known facts: Everyone must have medical insurance by Jan. 1 or face a penalty. Plans can be marketed through the Connecticut marketplace starting Oct. 1. Connecticut has already invested $140 million in federal funds to create its marketplace. Under current guidelines, pre-existing conditions — sometimes even allergies and pregnancies — may disqualify an individual from coverage. Under the Affordable Care Act that will end. And spouses are no longer considered dependents. A Boyle attention-getter was that businesses with more than 50 employees are not required to insure them. But if an employee of one of those businesses seeks coverage through Access Health CT, the $2,000 federal tax credit the marketplace offers him or her will be foisted upon their un-insuring employer — and it is not tax deductible for the company. Some companies, Boyle speculated, might opt not to insure and see how they fare. “But,” Boyle said, calling upon two decades in the health industry, “my experience is the vast majority of companies in this category already offer solid coverage.” One difference coming: Companies typically offer insurance beginning the first of the month beyond 90 days of employ; the new rule is a strict 90-day wait. Another coming difference: prevention. “A big part of this — underreported — is wellness,” Boyle said. “You’re already seeing more wellness programs. Now, when I go to the doctor, I’m told to drink more water, to walk more. It’s like somebody put out a memo.” Aetna, Anthem Blue Cross & Blue

Chopped — » From page 1

our competitiveness while continuing to invest in our future.” The layoffs will primarily impact the helicopter manufacturer’s Connecticut workforce, with others spread across Sikorsky facilities in eight states, Jackson said. “U.S. and international government budgets are shrinking, our costs to compete are increasing and many cus-

Shield, ConnectiCare and the nascent nonprofit Healthy CT will offer their competing products in the state marketplace. The private sector is expected to counter with its own health plans, which will not offer federal tax rebates. The state will employ in-person assistors from October to March 2014 and socalled “navigators” full-time beyond that to help businesses and individuals with enrollment. The Access Health CT website will offer a calculator to tabulate various offerings across carriers and levels of coverage. For small businesses with two to 50 employees, a separate Small Business

healthier citizens — “It will take some time to show itself” — and competition-fueled savings, Kedersha expressed interest less abstractly. “How is the program going to run?” he asked. “It’s important to remember it’s not your company alone. You may say, ‘I know my company and we’re doing fine.’ But it’s based on blocks. How is the entire block running?” Referencing the lack of quantifiable data, he said, “You can only be so pro-active when all the information is not out.” “The rates are filed, but you’d need a Ouija board to figure them out,” Boyle said. “Actuaries are reviewing them now

“You’re already seeing more wellness programs. now, when i go to the doctor, i’m told to drink more water, to walk more. it’s like somebody put out a memo.” — Phil Boyle

Health Options Program — or SHOP — marketplace is coming. Its competing vendors will be Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield, ConnectiCare, Healthy CT and UnitedHealthcare. Boyle said sole proprietors would probably get coverage in the individual marketplace. “We want to see a return on investment,” Boyle said. “Right now, we are all paying. Take all this away, we are all still paying. Are we lowering costs? Are we improving quality of life? Is this going to work? That’s the $64,000 question.” The Affordable Care Act was referred to by one invitee as “Obamacare,” but the presentation and its studious reception spoke of nonpartisanship, or perhaps of the practiced diplomacy of executives from the likes of Webster Bank, Cushman & Wakefield, Sikorsky and half-a-dozen each law and accounting firms. Rather, Michael Kedersha, senior account executive at Pierson & Smith in Norwalk, amicably jousted with Boyle, alternately underscoring and refuting what was reported. Where Boyle saw a hoped-for future of

for compliance — the providers’ actuaries and the state’s actuaries.” Kedersha drew a knowing laugh relating a discussion he had with an official on coverage changes and their tax implications: “I said this didn’t make any sense. And he told me if it does not make any sense it’s probably correct.” Boyle spoke of deadlines, with Oct. 1 — the day the marketplaces open — the big one for him. “After sequestration, an election, the Supreme Court … we’re here,” he said. Kedersha’s take was less certain: “Everyone is being told we’re on target for January 1,” he said. “They probably won’t know until late September they won’t meet the deadline.” He possesses “zero faith” in the IRS to ride herd on the health law questions. Even overturning the Defense of Marriage Act will factor, he said, noting the repeal’s tax implications begin immediately: “The IRS has to tackle gay marriage — New York and Connecticut allow it; it’s a mess to figure out. And the IRS has their own problems right now.”

tomers are delaying purchase decisions amid the economic uncertainty,” Jackson said. “Today we took the very difficult but necessary step of implementing a workforce reduction throughout the enterprise to lower costs in line with business requirements and resources.” The firm employs about 8,600 people in Connecticut. The layoffs represent about a 1 percent reduction of its total workforce. Following the automatic federal

budget cuts — known as the sequester — that took effect in March, officials at Sikorsky and its parent company, United Technologies Corp., had warned a decrease in military spending would lead to hundreds, if not thousands, of jobs lost. Military contracts make up 50 percent of Sikorsky’s contracts, with international and commercial sales making up the remaining half. The company has said it plans to decrease its reliance on military sales going forward.

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After saying there were no tires to kick, Boyle said. “It’s difficult to make decisions now because there are no products to look at.” No specific products, perhaps, but he outlined the larger bronze, silver, gold and platinum levels offered by four carriers on the state marketplace and their personal payment obligations. Bruce Blasnik, a partner at accounting firm O’Connor Davies Munns Dobbins, hosted the meeting for the business council. He said he was hearing of “20, 25, 30 percent increases in premiums — and we’ve had a bit of a reprieve of 7 percent (increases) the last couple of years.” Kedersha said that was steep: “A lot of the features that are being added that account for those big increases are already present in the Northeast; 3 to 5 to 8 percent is what we expect.” The invitees’ questions proved the complexity of the issue: “I have COBRA, but ...”; “A young man falls off his motorcycle, and ...”; “I have a New York company that does a lot of business in Connecticut, so ...” The questions taxed the 90-minute meeting time frame. Said Maura Carley, president and CEO of Shelton-based patient advocacy company Healthcare Navigation L.L.C., “It’s a reminder of how harsh our current system has been and is. So many are foisted off their coverage. The system we live with is so unjust. I hope this, with all of its flaws, will at least be more just.”

eDiTor’S noTe At press time, the Obama administration announced it would delay for one year a provision of the Affordable Care Act that requires businesses with 50 or more employees to provide health insurance to their workers or else face fines. The mandate will take effect in 2015, according to the Treasury Department.


Star power

Starwood Joins Stamford, Sacred Heart for student jobs program BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

S

tarwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide Inc. is teaming up with the city of Stamford’s youth employment program to urge high school students to explore possible careers — not necessarily in hospitality — but in digital media. Of the 1,100 employees working at the company’s Stamford headquarters, more than 400 either work in information technology or digital media, said Ken Siegel, Starwood’s chief administrative officer. And with another 80 positions in digital media to fill, Siegel said there’s a great need for more skilled workers to help improve the company’s growing digital platforms for reservations, websites and mobile devices. “We can’t find enough people to work for us in Stamford in IT and digital,” Siegel said. “So we decided one of the great ways to solve that would be to partner up with the mayor and Sacred Heart University to teach students about the digital world.” Stamford Mayor Michael A. Pavia launched the city’s youth employment program two years ago and has since more than doubled its class size. In 2011, about 35 students participated in the paid summer work program and this year 75 students will participate. Recognizing that in a down economy high school students and youth might be in competition with unemployed adults for many jobs, Pavia launched the youth employment program to ensure those students would still have work opportunities. The program matches high school juniors and seniors with summer jobs in fields they’re interested in and pays them about $10 an hour to work for six weeks. To entice students to consider careers in digital media, Starwood will employ about 20 of the students this summer after they’ve completed a three-week training course taught by instructors at Sacred Heart University. Adding to Stamford’s growing emphasis on digital media, Sacred Heart recently launched its new graduate center in downtown Stamford and will begin offering classes for its flagship digital marketing master’s degree program in August. “We’re going to give students a taste for what we do in a field that every major corporation is looking to staff,” Siegel said. “We think this is a big deal for the state. This is a key way to drive employment because we know everyone is look-

ing for these people.” Siegel said the company will likely hire students who go through the program after they graduate. He hopes that will inspire others to pursue advanced degrees in the field as well. If the program is a success, Siegel said Starwood plans to expand the program into other communities, possibly make it year-round and include more than just

high school students in the training. “You see these kids out there but you never know what their ambitions are unless you give them the opportunity,” Pavia said. “When they leave (the program) they’re different people: mature, confident, insightful and they have a clear impression of where they need to go in life and how to get there.” Reflecting on the long-term goals of

the program, Pavia said in every adolescent’s life, there is a fork in the road where he or she can either take the right or the wrong path. “When you have young, vulnerable kids, you want to be there to provide them something that is going to help them go in the right direction,” he said. “This clearly does that. It’s overwhelmingly successful in that regard.”

Straight up the hill and firm, Z. Yep. Got it.

Team McGladrey Golfer Zach Johnson and his caddie, Damon Green.

Power comes from being understood.SM When you trust the advice you’re getting, you know your next move is the right move. That’s what you can expect from McGladrey. That’s the power of being understood. Experience the power. Go to zachisunderstood.com or contact Tony Ceci at 203.328.7101.

© 2013 McGladrey LLP. All Rights Reserved.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013

7


Bond-buying — » From page 1

lion in treasury bonds every month. But as the economy continues to grow, FOMC predicts it might begin to reduce its asset purchases sooner and halt by the second half of 2014. Fairfield County is a part of the Second Federal Reserve District, served

by the New York Fed. Dudley addressed members of the Business Council as a part of a brief tour of the county, which included meetings with Stamford business leaders, Bridgeport Mayor Bill Finch and representatives of the Connecticut Housing Development Fund, Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. and workforce development group The WorkPlace Inc. Last month, U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke announced

William C. Dudley

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the FOMC would likely moderate the pace of asset purchases later this year, which already has triggered a chain reaction among bond traders and investors. However, Dudley stressed the tapering wasn’t hardwired to a calendar date and was subject to change. “If labor market conditions and the economy’s growth momentum were to be less favorable than in the FOMC’s outlook — and this is what has happened in recent years — I would expect that asset purchases would continue at a higher pace for longer,” he said. Dudley alluded to a similar situation in the late 1990s and early 2000s, when Japanese authorities had pulled back on monetary policy accommodations prematurely and as a consequence, were unable to escape the deflation dynamics on its debt. “So it is very important U.S. monetary authorities and government (representatives) work hard to get the U.S. economy to achieve escape velocity,” Dudley said. “So we don’t have to worry about falling back.” Nationwide, about three-quarters of all jobs have been recovered from the last economic downturn and several economic indicators, such as housing and employment, suggest a full recovery is on its way, Dudley said. But in Fairfield County, it’s not as clear. Only about 60 percent of the 36,000 jobs lost during the recession have been recovered, and less than half have been covered statewide. Connecticut was also the only state to see its economy shrink in 2012, as reported by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. As long as the FOMC continues to buy securities and bonds, even at a reduced rate, Dudley said the Fed would be adding monetary policy accommodation, not tightening it, putting downward pressure on longer-term interest rates. The rate at which the Fed will make its purchases, however, will all depend on the national economic recovery.


Bridge between worlds BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

F

rom a makeshift office in an alcove of his Norwalk home’s basement, Peter B. Korzenik is working to create opportunities for doctors and medical professionals to volunteer with clinics in Uganda and other underserved areas. Through the organization Give Back Global, Korzenik hopes to send volunteers with experience in all facets of the health care industry — from finance to human resources to marketing — to help hospitals and clinics in sub-Saharan Africa improve their operations and management structures. While there is a demonstrated need for such services across the sub-continent, it has taken Korzenik a significant amount of legwork, research and fine tuning to put Give Back Global in a position where it is able to compete for grants and charitable contributions from foundations and individual donors. “It has been a very challenging, very stressful, kind of lonely pursuit,” Korzenik said. Korzenik’s experience, which has taken place in an area chock-full of private equity funds, angel investors and successful startups, illustrates the challenges inherent in getting a nonprofit off the ground and running. Prior to founding the organization, which is seeking nonprofit certification, Korzenik worked for more than 14 years with International Executive Service Corps, a group devoted to sending senior-level business volunteers to assist with projects in developing countries. From 2003 to 2006, Korzenik served as IESC’s director of global program resources, but when the nonprofit moved its headquarters from Stamford to Washington, Korzenik chose to remain with his family in Norwalk. Later on, at a conference at Yale University, Korzenik heard a speaker discuss the management challenges facing health care providers in the developing world. “I was astonished to find this was a very underserved, niche market,” he said. But while Korzenik had worked for two decades in the international volunteer arena, he said he knew little of the global health care field. “So there was a steep learning curve.” Korzenik said he spent countless hours compiling databases that identify parts of the world where Give Back Global could assist, potential avenues for

fundraising and prospective volunteers, who he then reached out to on an individual basis. The job was made even more difficult by laws in many countries requiring their ministry of health’s approval to bring in volunteers. All the while, Korzenik took a handful of temporary positions just to keep generating income to pay the bills. “Financing is the big issue. There are grants that are out there” from foundations and individual donors, Korzenik said. “We just needed some field experience and a track record — a story to tell, if you will. ... There are people out there who are looking for the right opportunity and Give Back Global I think hits a nerve.”

Ernie Balasco, a former health care administrator from Exeter, R.I., was Give Back Global’s first volunteer. Balasco was in Uganda from mid April to mid May, when he worked with the head of a health care provider that oversees two dozen clinics. Korzenik said the project, in which Balasco worked with locals on strategic planning, performance improvement and leadership development, among other areas, was “very successful.” “I’m enormously grateful to Ernie,” Korzenik said. Balasco paid for both his airfare and the approximately $30 per day fee for housing while in Uganda. Korzenik said he is hoping to raise enough funds to support round-trip airfare for Give Back Global’s volunteers,

with the local sponsor of a volunteer project paying for room and board. Korzenik said he is in the early stages of recruiting for two follow-up projects in Uganda. One would involve management mentoring and operational involvement for a nonprofit in Kampala that serves the HIV/AIDS community, and the other would be to assist the Department of Medical Microbiology at Makerere University College of Health Sciences — Uganda’s largest university — with its data management. “There’s no shortage of volunteers out there,” Korzenik said. More information on Give Back Global can be found at givebackglobal.org and Korzenik can be reached at pkorzenik@givebackglobal. org.

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013

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FACES ‘roaD PaVeD in golD’ FoCuSeS on inVeSTMenTS More than 80 people gathered at the Audubon Center in Greenwich June 27 to hear experts with a wide range of backgrounds — from art, to real estate to solar technology — discuss opportunities in nontraditional forms of investments. The panel discussion “Roads Paved in Gold,” which was hosted by the Business Journals and Wag magazine, featured Courtney Booth of Sotheby’s, Caesar Bryan of GAMCO Investors, Craig Harrigan of Encon Solar, Pamela Pagnani of Whitman Breed Abbott & Morgan, Mark Silverstein of Endurance, David Sleeman of Winston Art Group and moderator Nancy Murray Ozizmir, a former advertising executive.

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Photos by Patrick Gallagher

1. Joe Corbalis and Corrine Stanton 2. Georgette Gouveia and Troy Ellen Dixon 3. Ilene Rose and Harold Rose 4. Christopher Cassese and Sylvia Spitalnick 5. Cathleen Stack and Pam Pagnani 6. Michael Caruso, Erika Ellis and Peter Marengo 7. John Frieberg and Lory Kelsey 8. Susan Marocco 9. Oscar Brizuela and Alan Schantz 10. Julia Moran

All photograph identifications are from left, unless otherwise noted.

10 Week of July 8, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal


asK andi

BY ANdI GRAY

Definitely need more sales sales is the big thing for us — we definitely need more clients, more business. i am very confident i can help customers, but sales is not something i’m confident about — feel a little bit uncomfortable doing it. up to now i’ve gotten all my clients through referrals and networks, which seems like a very different process. thoughtS oF the Day: If you’re worried about sales making you uncomfortable, think how uncomfortable you’ll be if there isn’t enough money coming in to make payroll. Networking and referrals are part of a plan to get leads, but only a part. Don’t go it alone — figure out who else in the company can help you work on sales. Assess your selling skills — they’re probably better than you think. Prioritize selling until you know the company can meet its goals for this year, next year and the year after that.

Sales is the lifeblood of any company. Without sales, there’s no need for a company to produce goods or services. Rarely do customers flock to a company because of the strength of what it offers. If that happens, it only lasts for so long, until competitors figure out where the opportunity lies and try to horn in. Then it’s back to building sales skills to protect and build market share. Many products or services get launched with a few select customers, a good reputation and a lot of referrals. The owner does some networking, gets introduced to a target market. Some prospects show interest, decide to buy, are happy with what they receive and tell others about the experience. The company is off and running. And that’s good enough for awhile. However, if the company is to continuously grow at a healthy rate of 10 percent to 20 percent annual increase in revenue, at some point it will take more than referrals and networking to get there. Also keep in mind that referrals from satisfied customers and a network of people who know your company are likely to move to closure faster and have a higher close

rate. Don’t get discouraged if cold leads take longer to close and appear to have a lower closing percentage. Contacts with prospects who may be in your target market, but who are not familiar with you or your company, need to learn about what it is that makes your company valuable and reliable. They need to evaluate the fit without the benefit of knowing someone who is like them and already doing business with your company. Be prepared to address the lack of familiarity with strong benefits and payoff statements, introductions to satisfied customers and persistence. Take a look at all of the people in your company. Who really knows your customers? Who knows your products or services inside and out? Think about what they can do with new prospects. Can they do informational webinars or seminars? Can they arrange groups of customers into which you can sprinkle new prospects? Can they figure out a trade-show strategy, where your target market is like to be on the lookout for new offerings? Evaluate your own skills in sales. What are you especially good at? What do you

need to push yourself to do? Across the entire company do the same evaluation. Figure out where the strengths and gaps are along the spectrum of sales, from initial introduction, to lead nurturing, to close. Consider hiring or training to fill in gaps in the sales spectrum. Rather than hiring the next operations or administration person, put your money into sales. Check on the profitability of what’s being sold. Emphasize the most profitable sales. Work to perfect profitability on the products that will become the future of the company. Keep in mind that more sales, at higher levels of profitability will bring in the money you need to add staff elsewhere in the organization. Looking for a good book? “Is It What It Is, or Is It…All About Business,” by Jeff Roziere & Cathy Snelgrove. Andi Gray is president of Strate�y Leaders Inc., strate�yleaders.com, a business consulting �irm that specializes in helping entrepreneurial �irms grow. She can be reached by phone at (877) 238-3535. Do you have a question for Andi? Please send it via email to AskAndi@ Strate�yLeaders.com. Visit AskAndi.com for an entire library of Ask Andi articles.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013 11


THE LIST

Ranked by number of rooms. Listed alphabetically in event of tie.

Hotels

Ranked by number of rooms. Listed alphabetically in event of tie. Name, address, phone number Area code: 203 (unless otherwise noted) Website

1

Stamford Marriott Hotel & Spa

2

Hilton Stamford Hotel & Executive Meeting Center

3

Sheraton Stamford

4

Omni New Haven Hotel at Yale

5

Crowne Plaza Danbury Hotel

6

Holiday Inn Bridgeport Trumbull Fairfield

7

Ethan Allen Hotel

8

Water's Edge Resort and Spa

9

Courtyard by Marriott

243 Tresser Blvd., Stamford 06901 357-9555 • stamfordmarriott.com

General manager Contact (bold) Email address Year hotel last renovated Year hotel established

Number of guest rooms

Number of meeting rooms

Guest suites

Total square footage of meeting areas

Joseph Kelly Peter Griffith pgriffith@stamfordmarriott.com 2011/1978

502 6

26 25,000

2

Full-service hotel a restaurant, health club and indoor/outdoor pool, located across the street from the Stamford Town Center Mall with more than 110 stores and restaurants

Foster Burnett Alexandra Delgado 2008/1984

484 10

30 45,000

1

Swimming pool and heated whirlpool, high-speed Internet access, audiovisual capabilities, climatecontrolled tent/pavilion for outdoor events, Senses Restaurant & Lounge, fitness facility by Precor, business center, local shuttle service, tennis courts, valet parking

Mike Bennett Mark Gagnier sales@sheratonstamford.com 2011/1983

379 3

16 20,000

1

379 updated guestrooms featuring Sheraton Sweet Sleeper bedding, Link@Sheraton business center with Link Café, newly expanded Sheraton fitness center programmed by Core Performance, complimentary local office shuttles, private on-site covered parking

Josh Heidenreich 2012/1998

306 7

22 22,000

1

Concierge service, state-of-the-art fitness center, same-day dry cleaning, 24-hour business center and in-room dining, complimentary turndown services upon request, full-service JoBella Salon & Spa, Wi-Fi, fitness center

Richard Blair Jennifer Birmele-Lama 2012/1979

242 2

19 23,000

2

Fusion Café, JAYS (a contemporary restaurant and lounge), newly renovated guest rooms featuring exclusive Sleep Advantage Program, 37" flat-screen televisions and IPod docking stations

Michelle Hudson Lorraine Scelfo info@hibridgeport.com 2010/1987

209 5

8 7,483

1

Full-service restaurant and lounge, complimentary Wi-Fi and hard-wired Internet in all guest rooms, 24-hour laundry machines, indoor/outdoor heated swimming pool, 24-hour fitness and business centers

Janice Perna-Nicholas Susan Scott sscott@ethanallenhotel.com 2001/1974

193 6

15 10,000

2

Conveniently located at Exit 4 off of I-84, rooms feature Ethan Allen bedding and décor, Keurig coffee maker in all guestrooms, free Wi-Fi access, business center, complimentary USA Today delivered Monday through Friday, daily dry cleaning service and 24-hour in-house guest laundry and gift shop, Fairfield's Restaurant and Lounge, room service daily until 10 p.m.

Chrisr Barstein Jessica Lavenburg jlavenburg@watersedgeresortandspa.com 2010/1985

168 14

10 12,000

3

Full-service spa, valet parking, indoor and outdoor pools, jacuzzi, fitness center, tennis courts, private beach, room service, coffee shop, gift shop

Kerry Lacey Valerie Molloy pboyle@sheltoncourtyard.com 2012/1987

161 12

9 6,200

1

Conveniently located off Route 8 and within proximity to I-95

John Fields Irene Dixon idixon@norwalkhilton.com 2009/2001

170 0

4 1,500

1

Wired and wireless Internet, secure printing to business center, 24-hour gym, indoor pool and whirlpool, Great American Grill & Bar serving breakfast, dinner and room service seven days a week, refrigerator and 32-inch TV in room, meeting space to accommodate up to 120 attendees, complimentary shuttle service to area restaurants

Judith Kalfon Anne Kane michael.ellman@heritagesouthbury.com 2011/1971

163 5

25 25,000

2

Health club, indoor and outdoor pools, golf tennis, spa, game room, business center, conference center

Jeffrey Hoess Brooks Jeffrey Hoess Brooks sales@avonoldfarmshotel.com 2012/1955

157 2

6 5,000

1

Complimentary Wi-Fi in guest rooms and meeting space, continental breakfast and on-site parking, fitness center and sauna, outdoor pool and snack bar, hotel bar

Brian Skene Mary Elizabeth Salame gm@maronhotel.com or sales@maronhotel.com 2008/1998

87 64

5 5,000

1

Full-service hotel located across from Western Connecticut State University, Ives Concert Park, O'Neill Center, Candlewood Lake and Ridgefield Playhouse; VIVO! Bar & Grill located on-site for all restaurant and catering needs, provided by executive chef Larry Baccoli, indoor parking, complimentary Wi-Fi, continental breakfast, USA Today, fitness center, business center

Linda Holmes-Hannon Clare Pusateri clare.pusateri@hilton.com 2010/2002

135 (all suites)

2 1,375

WND

Anthony Covino Anthony Covino acovino@whghotels.com 2008/1988

127 6

2 1,008

1

Jason Wade Karen Finkler 2010

94 33

2 1,500

WND

Todd Lindvall Todd Lindvall 2011/2005

115 10

2 9,000

2

Convenient location in downtown Stamford, surrounded by more than 70 restaurants and lounges; small boutique hotel with classical ambiance

Fernando Solis Fernando Solis 2007

125

1 500

0

Free wired and wireless Internet access, on-the-house hot breakfast, heated indoor pool and twostory water slide and 24-hour fitness center,

Lance Herman 2005/1973

114 11

5 2,880

1

Complimentary Wi-Fi, business center, fitness center, outdoor pool, on-site guest laundry, evening room service, restaurant, bar and lounge

Brian Wells Joyce Bennett joyce.bennett@interstatehotels.com 2012/2003

98 NA

5 5,400

2

Full-service hotel, pool, hot tub and workout facility, home to The Blue Oak Restaurant and True Blue Tavern

Ramze Zakka Owner Mia Schipani mschipani@hotelzerodegrees.com 2013

96

Ballroom divisible into 3 meeting rooms 1,875

1

Rooftop terrace, state-of-the-art fitness center, high-speed Internet access, warm breakfast buffet, concierge services

Kevin Bousquet Dan Bolognani info@interlakeninn.com 2012/1892

86 8

6 5,500

1

Full-service conference staff, dedicated meeting space, on-site team building programs, all audiovideo equipment included in meeting package, free high-speed Wi-Fi, complete meeting package available with accommodations for 5 to 125 people

Daniel Coggins Cristina Kelleher info@thedelamar.com 2002

82 8

3 2,400

1

Waterfront meeting rooms with private terraces, Elemis spa, complimentary continental breakfast, complimentary shuttle within a three-mile radius, complimentary weekend harbor cruises, 500-foot private dock space

Todd C. Howe Todd C. Howe todd@theamberroom.net 2011/1979

0 2

4 13,000

0

Full-service corporate conference and meeting center, event production and audiovisual support available, business lunch and corporate meetings, conferences, holiday parties

1 First Stamford Place, Stamford 06902 967-2222 • hiltonstamfordhotel.com 700 E. Main St., Stamford 06901 358-8400 • sheratonstamford.com 155 Temple St., New Haven 06510 772-6664 • omninewhaven.com 18 Old Ridgebury Road, Danbury 06810 794-0600 • crowneplazadanbury.com 1070 Main St., Bridgeport 06604 334-1234 • hibridgeport.com

21 Lake Avenue Extension, Danbury 06811 (800) 742-1776 • ethanallenhotel.com

1525 Boston Post Road, Westbrook 06498 (860) 399-5901 • watersedgeresortandspa.com

780 Bridgeport Ave., Shelton 06484 929-1500 • sheltoncourtyard.com

10

Hilton Garden Inn Norwalk

11

The Heritage Hotel

12

Avon Old Farms Hotel

13

Maron Hotel and Suites

14

Homewood Suites by Hilton Stratford

15

Four Points by Sheraton

16

Hyatt House

17

Courtyard by Marriott Stamford Downtown

560 Main Ave., Norwalk 06851 523-4000 • norwalkhilton.com

522 Heritage Road, Southbury 06488 (800) 932-3466 • heritagesouthbury.com

279 Avon Mountain Road, Avon 06001 (860) 677-1651 • avonoldfarmshotel.com

42 Lake Avenue Extension, Danbury 06811 791-2200 • maronhotel.com

6905 Main St., Stratford 06614 377-3322 • stratford.homewoodsuites.com

426 Main Ave., Norwalk 06851 849-9828 • fourpoints.com/norwalk

830 Bridgeport Ave., Shelton 06484 225-0700 • hyatthouseshelton.com 275 Summer St., Stamford 06901 358-8822 • marriott.com/stfcy

Hampton Inn Shelton - Trumbull 695 Bridgeport Ave., Shelton 06484 925-5900 • hamptoninnshelton.com

Holiday Inn Danbury 80 Newton Road, Danbury 06810 792-4000 • danbury-hi.com

18

Nathan Hale Inn

19

Hotel Zero Degrees Norwalk

20

Interlaken Inn

21

Delamar Greenwich Harbor

22

Amber Room Colonnade

855 Bolton Road, Storrs 06269 (860) 427-7888 • nathanhaleinn.com

353 Main Ave., Norwalk 06851 750-9800 • hotelzerodegrees.com

74 Interlaken Road, Lakeville 06039 (800) 222-2909 • interlakeninn.com

500 Steamboat Road, Greenwich 06830 661-9800 • delamargreenwich.com

1 Stacey Road, Junction Route 37, Danbury 06811 748-3800 • theamberroom.net

Fairfield County

Largest Hotels

Note: This list has been shortened due to space limitations. For inclusion on our digital expanded list, please email afrey@westfairinc.com. NA Not available. WND Would not disclose.

12 Week of July 8, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Number of restaurants

Amenities and guest services

Complimentary Suite Start breakfast seven days a week, complimentary Welcome Home reception Monday through Thursday, indoor pool and whirlpool, 24-hour fitness center, HDTV, flat-screen TVs, complimentary business center and Wi-Fi Complimentary wireless Internet and bottled water, exercise facility, full-service restaurant and lounge, room service, executive level

Spacious suites and guestrooms featuring full kitchens, indoor pool and whirlpool, complimentary breakfast with made-to-order omelets


SPECIAL REPORT

BANKING AND INVESTMENTS

Banking vet leads rebranding effort Bnc Financial to Be renamed BanKWell

BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

I

f nothing else, Peyton R. Patterson knows how to make an entrance — and then some. Since Patterson became CEO of BNC Financial Group Inc. last September, the New Canaan firm — which includes The Bank of New Canaan, The Bank of Fairfield and Stamford First Bank and their five collective branches — has launched new mobile and web applications, set a quarterly earnings record, announced plans to acquire The Wilton Bank and unveiled an ambitious rebranding and expansion project. Come September, BNC will be renamed Bankwell Financial Group, with the bank’s five branches following suit as the company looks to establish a stronger regional identity. The name Bankwell was announced at BNC’s June 26 annual shareholders meeting. “This gets down to things like changing forms, business cards, websites — everything about ourselves — and so we need to undertake all that but it needs to appear seamless to our clients,” Patterson told the Business Journal. “They have to enjoy the launch of the

brand. It’s all about execution. I believe strongly that I have the team in place to pull it off.” Patterson said the bank’s five-year strategic plan calls for a diversification of its business lines and expansion in the breadth of services it offers to clients, increased efficiency across its branch network and an expanded footprint, which she said she hopes to accomplish both through organic growth and select acquisitions in the directions of New Haven and Westchester County, N.Y. The current project includes the relocation of the bank’s two Fairfield branches by the fourth quarter of 2013 in the name of increased visibility, and the launch of two branches — one in Norwalk and one in Stamford — in the first and second quarters of 2014, respectively. The bank recently opened a loan production office in Bridgeport, and in the fall will add a wealth management unit within its bank branches. BNC’s acquisition of The Wilton Bank for $5 million, which was first announced in mid June, is expected to close in the fourth quarter of this year. The transaction, which has been » Banking, page 14 Peyton R. Patterson. Photo courtesy of BNC Financial Group.

No free lunches here

WindoW For cHeaP BorroWinG is closinG BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

muniCiPal BonDS are a vital way state and municipal entities finance infrastructure improvement projects related to roads, bridges, schools and more. And while borrowers have enjoyed low interest rates on bond financing during the economic recovery, the days of cheap borrowing are slowing coming to a close. Just as the economy is starting to pick up, so too are bond interest rates. The Fairfield County Business Journal recently asked Peter Chieco, a senior

vice president of Morgan Stanley Wealth Management, to explain what the rising interest rates mean for investors, municipalities and taxpayers. FCBJ: intereSt rateS everyWhere are inCreaSing, inCluDing the muniCiPal BonD market. What DoeS thiS mean For State anD loCal governmentS in ConneCtiCut? Peter ChieCo: “When interest rates increase, the price of bonds tends to decline. This can be good for buyers of bonds, but for issuers of bonds, like the state of Connecticut and local govern-

ments, higher interest rates can increase borrowing costs. The short-term impact is somewhat muted though, since most of the current debt outstanding is already locked in at low interest rates for a number of years. The real impact is primarily on new borrowing and refinancing. Given the still very low interest rate climate, the recent rise in interest rates is worth monitoring, but likely to have little impact on municipality funding costs. A much larger and sustained increase in interest rates would be more worrisome.” » no free, page 16

Peter Chieco of Morgan Stanley Wealth Management

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013 13


Banking — » » From page 13

unanimously approved by the boards of directors of both firms, is expected to bring BNC about $75.1 million in new assets. Once the purchase is finalized, The Wilton Bank will also be renamed Bankwell. “We feel like we’ve got the wind at our backs and we’re being very disciplined and we’ve got strong momentum,” Patterson said. “We didn’t go into this exercise lightly — to change a name is a pretty tricky thing. … We wanted to find something that would feel additive, that would make people feel good, that would be a testament to who we are.” In early June BNC reported firstquarter net income of $1 million, falling just shy of the bank’s $1.2 million in earnings for the entirety of 2012, with a 4.16 percent quarterly margin. For the year ending March 31, assets grew 25 percent to $631 million and loans were up 34 percent. Patterson said deposits have grown at a 26 per-

cent annual rate, “which is completely outperforming any of our competitors, large and small.” While Fairfield County is often described as oversaturated from a banking perspective, Patterson said the future Bankwell would be well posi-

tion of strength” from a credit or talent standpoint, “so we believe this is kind of a unique opportunity for a bank like us.” Patterson may be new to BNC but she is far from a stranger to the local market.

tioned relative to its competitors. “I think the way we approach the market versus a lot of our competitors is unique,” Patterson said. “While there may be a lot of banks in Fairfield County, not all of them are in a posi-

The veteran of nearly three decades in banking pioneered the conversion of New Haven Savings Bank from a mutual company to a publicly owned firm in 2004, simultaneously engineering the acquisitions of Connecticut Bancshares

Our NEWS @ NOON is free, Sign up now at westfaironline.com 14 Week of July 8, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

and Alliance Bancorp of New England. The resulting bank, NewAlliance Bancshares, recorded consistently strong growth with Patterson as its chairman and CEO, leading to a $1.5 billion acquisition by First Niagara Financial Group that was announced in August 2010. She said the same principles that guided her then hold true in the case of BNC’s transformation. “I think that for any company to be successful it has to have a strategy with runways: in terms of, how are you going to continue to build and sustain your profitability (and) how are you going to continue reinventing yourself so you resonate with clients,” she said. “I tend to jump feet-first into what I do, and I guess that is what I saw as the opportunity here because of where the company was positioned and the success they have had,” Patterson continued. “I saw this as the little crown jewel that just needed to reinvent itself. … I just needed to make sure we were able to execute on that strategy.”


Wealth management’s double-digit surge By Bill Fallon bfallon@westfairinc.com

J

PMorgan Chase & Co.’s books are the stuff of nationhood — measured in the trillions. Within that giant, JPMorgan Private Bank in Greenwich is among its top 10 wealth-management offices. If there’s a No. 1, the Greenwich office’s managing directors weren’t saying on a recent afternoon in their 100 W. Putnam Ave. offices. The clientele appear satisfied with the service, No. 1 status notwithstanding, notching double-digit client and revenue gains across the last five years. Its clients are most often first- and second-generation holders of at least $5 million in liquidity. “It pretty much shoots the image of money remaining in families across many generations,” said Townsend C. Smith, managing director. “We represent many successful business owners and entities: asset managers, private equity, small brokers, brickand-mortar businesses, shipping, widgets, distribution. Westchester is similar to Connecticut, but Connecticut has a preponderance of hedge funds.” The office inevitably benefits from proximity to 30 percent of the world’s hedge funds, but it’s a tough audience to please — “super-sophisticated” was the term used by Caroline Brecker, managing director. Farther north toward Hartford, she sees “a more Midwest style, salt-of-the-earth, manufacturingbased” clientele. And across the border in Westchester County, again, “supersophisticated.” JPMorgan staffs an “advice lab” in Manhattan to chart regulations and laws. “They produce a lot of white papers and they host breakfasts with intermediaries — CPAs, lawyers, advisers — on the changes,” Smith said. “They in turn take it to our clients.” “It’s a very knowledgeable clientele,” said Brecker. “High touch, quick followups, a premium on time. We are their translator for what has become a more complex asset management environment.” It is also, Brecker said, a new world where women have gained trillions relative to men in recent years — the result of achievement, divorce settlements and living longer. “Stylistically, they manage their finances differently,” she said. “We have senior women here who recognize that.” Brecker herself has 16 years with the company (Smith has 21 years). She noted a female, Mary Erdoes, is CEO of

JPMorgan’s Asset Management Division, based in Manhattan. Change has come in another arena, too: philanthropy. Brecker said the desire to give “remains strong in people.” But: “They want to see where the money goes, to know what it does. And if it is not bringing results, they want it out of there.” Medical and education causes are the two largest recipients of largesse. Smith parsed the richer-than-thou differences between leafy Westchester and modestly leafier Greenwich: “A few more billionaires in Connecticut.” And he noted via diagram that no matter how eagerly a wealthy person spends, “even the superwealthy,” he or she likely » » Wealth, page 16

Caroline Brecker and Townsend “Tad” Smith, managing directors, JP Morgan Private Bank.

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No free — » From page 13

What’S Driving intereSt rateS? “Interest rates are primarily driven by the outlook for the economy. As an example, a stronger economy is usually accompanied by rising interest rates. We are however in a very interesting period in our country’s history. While Federal Reserve policy has frequently lowered short-term interest rates in the past to stimulate the economy, Chairman Bernanke also has embarked on quantitative easing, which is unprecedented. Quantitative easing is the action of the Federal Reserve to purchase longer term bonds to keep interest rates low. This is the first time in history that the fed is directly stimulating the whole interest rate yield curve. The recent decline in bond prices is the result of the fed alerting the markets to their eventual end of quantitative easing.” have you Seen a lot oF aCtivity in muniCiPal BonD traDing lately? “During the month of June in particular, trading activity for all bonds, including municipal bonds, was very elevated. If we look at the absolute level of interest rates on very high quality municipal bonds and

compare them to U.S. Treasury bonds, municipal bonds pay a higher rate of interest and are usually tax free. This creates an additional incentive for nontraditional buyers of tax free bonds to enter the market. In other words, hedge funds and pensions purchased tax free, in addition to the traditional core of individual buyers. Many of these nontraditional buyers sold down their holdings last month, raising the trading volume. Individual investors were generally not sellers last month. The rising rates though will impact their portfolio values as their bonds will have declined in price.” What DoeS thiS mean For taXPayerS anD the State’S eConomy? “The state’s overall economic health is the ultimate driver of the need and use of municipal bond financing. The lowering of interest rates over the past four years has allowed for a reduction in financing costs, as old bonds were refinanced and new bonds were issued. This helped cushion the recession’s decline in income tax and real estate revenue to the state. As the economy improves, municipalities should be able to benefit from increased revenue and lower borrowing costs for a number of years. Generally speaking the burden on taxpayers could lessen, but we must remember that Connecticut has a high debt load.”

BEWARE Outside companies are soliciting BUSINESS JOURNAL readers for plaques and other reproductions of newspaper content without our consent. If you or your firm is interested in framing an article or award from our newspaper or obtaining a reprint of a particular story. Please contact

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16 Week of July 8, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

Wealth — » From page 15

reaches a point where buying is not the point. Smith and Brecker and their team of 76, 45 of whom work face-to-face as client advisers, engage such customers in a highly customized effort to spread the wealth laterally and into the future, with the IRS playing the diagram’s financial antagonist. Some clients keep a heavy hand in their portfolio. Some are hands-off. Some are hands-on and hands-off at the same time, managing higher-yield portfolios day-to-day and socking away for the future in long-term, hands-off products. Yet for all the high-touch, custom service, if there is a rising tide all ships should be ready to rise. So the company

prepares a “tactical asset allocations” report weekly. “Our clients want the views of JPMorgan,” Smith said. “They don’t want to be in a lottery of different advisers all offering different advice. It reduces risk. It’s another set of eyes.” Internally updated reports offer high-, moderate-, and conservative-yield portfolio data. From there, some rely on JPMorgan’s discretion; others use the company as a broker to execute trades of their own design. The bank allows the client to take a hand assembling his or her own management team. “Investment relationships develop,” Smith said. “A client might say, ‘I want complete control, but with input from this or that adviser.’” Smith counted several examples of JPMorgan presaging a market move, the sort of foresight that leads to doubledigit growth through tough times. “It’s nice to be at a firm at the forefront of a trend,” he said.


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Unplug and explore Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo celebrating its 91st birthday this year, connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo invites everyone to turn off the technology and explore the great outdoors. take advantage of a wonderfully wild experience for families and kids of all ages and enjoy dynamic and interactive programming that incorporates education, conservation, research and recreation. While the zoo is open all year round and welcomes over a quarter of a million visitors annually, its famous for offering special summer programming. this year, two kissable camels will call connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo home through labor day. named toby and Goliath, these single hump camels are available for rides and visitors may take photos with them as well. in addition, the zoo is opening two new exhibits. the first will house rare mexican wolves. mexican wolves are a critically endangered species, with fewer than 100 left in the wild and only 300 in captivity. the three female wolves, all 6 years old, will be on exhibit in the former timber wolf yard, located near the Wolf observation learning Facility (WolF) building. the second new exhibit features sofiya, an incredibly rare female amur leopard. like mexican wolves, amur leopards are critically endangered, with only 30 to 40 animals left in the wild and only 176 in captivity worldwide. sofiya’s new exhibit features rock outcroppings that will enable her to explore her surroundings at ground level. it also includes areas as high as 10 feet off the ground to enable her to view her domain from a different level. this exhibit would not have been possible without the support of the city of Bridgeport and the connecticut Zoological society and through the generous donations of zoo patrons. and for those who can’t come to us, we are bringing the zoo to communities across connecticut in July and august. look for our Zoomobile, which will entertain and educate audiences at state parks and nature centers with programs such as “sssensational snakes” and “Hot reptiles: cool nights.” these programs are presented in partnership with connecticut’s department of energy and environmental Protection (deeP), the sherwood island state Park nature center and the Kellogg nature center. there’s always something new at connecticut’s only zoo so stay tuned for more updates. Gregg Dancho executive director connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo member of the cultural alliance of Fairfield county The mission of the Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County is to support cultural organizations, artists and creative businesses by providing promotion, services and advocacy. For more information, visit CulturalAllianceFC.org or email infoCulturalAllianceFC.org or call 256-2329. For events lists, visit FCBuzz.org.

FCBUZZ

Arts & Culture of Fairfield County

ROCKWELL ART AND FRAMING GOES INTO AFRICA

“Zebra” by Gayle Gleckler

rockwell art and Framing in ridgefield is going on safari, and you’re invited. For its “out of africa” show, opening with a reception July 12, rockwell welcomes the artistic collaboration of painter Gayle Gleckler and monoprint artist tony Woolner, back from a successful hunt of inspiring new images from their adventures in africa. the collection captures textures of terrain, people and vignettes of endearing wildlife from this untamed, majestic continent. this show, running through sept. 6, is Gleckler and Woolner’s fifth collaboration of colorful paintings and monoprints demonstrating alternative vantage points from the same subject.

Woolner, a professional architect who graduated from rhode island school of design, did his graduate work in architecture at Harvard university. He has won awards for his contemporary home designs that have been featured in World residential design, architectural digest, casa vogue, the new York times, l’architecttura, House Beautiful, “architects own Houses of the World” and “Houses architects live in.” as an artist, Woolner has evolved an original monoprint technique over the years, using a blend of media to achieve his result. His monoprint “Pawling” was featured in the 34th annual juried ridgefield Guild of artists’ show in september 2011. Gleckler has had a successful career in advertising, beginning as an art director at Young & rubicam, and eventually becoming executive vice president, creative director at Foote, cone and Belding. she created many award-winning campaigns, the most well-known being “i’m Gonna Wash that Gray right outta my Hair” for clairol. she then opened her own advertising agency, Gleckler and Partners. along the way she also co-wrote, produced and cast “the lords of Flatbush,” sylvester stallone and Henry Winkler’s first movie. most recently she was one of the nine artists juried in for Westport arts center’s “solos sHoW 2011,” where she exhibited five of her figure paintings. she won first place in the silvermine art student’s show for painting in 2007 and 2010. rockwell is located at 470 main st. For more, visit rockwellartandframing.com.

FUN IS UP AT BAT IN EASTON EVENT Play ball: the Historical society of easton and easton’s department of Parks and recreation welcome you to a celebration of our national pastime with vintage baseball games on the fi eld at veteran’s Park, July 13.(rain date: July 20). the Friends of vintage Baseball, a reenactment group, will hold two exhibition games in easton on the fi eld behind the easton community center for all to enjoy. this group promotes living history by bringing the 19th century to life through baseball events that use the rules, costumes, equipment and culture of the 1860s to 1880s. the games provide enjoyment for all ages. Between the games, children will be invited onto the fi eld to learn the

rules of the 19th century baseball game. the fi rst game starts at 11 a.m. and the second follows at approximately 12:30 p.m. each game will follow different rules based on the many changes that occurred during the 19th century as baseball captured america’s imagination. there is limited bleacher seating, so bring a lawn chair. there are concession stands and restroom facilities, and handicapped parking is available. admission is $5 for anyone over age 5, $20 for families of four or more. veteran’s Park is located at Helen Keller middle school, 366 sport Hill road. For more, call the Historical society of easton at 261-2090 or email hseastonct@gmail.com. You may also visit historicalsocietyofeastonct.org .

Visit FCBuzz.org for more information on events and how to get listed. 18 Week of July 8, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

Presented by: Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County


FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL ATTACHmENTSFILEd LaPrimera Grocery L.L.C., Bridgeport and Ahmad Mounajed, et al., Stratford. $20,000, in favor of Manchester Tobacco and Candy Co., Manchester. Property: 445 E. Main St., Stratford. Filed June 17.

ATTACHmENTSRELEASEd Bailey-Dillon, Molly and John T. Dillon, Stratford. $175,000, in favor of Edwin Martin. Property: 553 King St., Stratford. Filed June 18.

BuILdING PERmITS

COMMERCIAL 20 Elm Street L.L.C., Riverside. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, 20 E. Elm St., Riverside. Estimated cost: $50,000. Filed June 11. A Pappajohn Co., Norwalk, contractor for Wilton 50 L.L.C. Perform additions and alterations at an existing commercial building, 50 Danbury Road, Wilton. Estimated cost: $40,000. Filed June 18. A Pappajohn Co., Norwalk, contractor for Davis Marcus Management Inc. Perform additions and alterations at an existing commercial building, 187 Danbury Road, Wilton. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed June 19.

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Bob Rozycki c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 3 Gannett Drive, Suite G7 White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: (914)694-3600 Fax: (914)694-3680

A Pappajohn Co., Norwalk, contractor for Davis Marcus Management Inc. Perform additions and alterations at an existing commercial building, 187 Danbury Road, Wilton. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed June 19.

Brindisi & Taroscak L.L.C., Darien, contractor for Sara and Edward Keller. Perform renovations at an existing single-family residence, 104 Cedar Cliff Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $185,567. Filed June 17.

American Solar and Alternative Power L.L.C., New Milford, contractor for Temple Beth El. Install solar panels at an existing commercial building, 350 Roxbury Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $76,500. Filed June 17.

BRT Services L.L.C., Greenwich, contractor for Kaihan Krippendorff. Perform renovations at an existing single-family residence, 40 Hawthorne Street North, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $26,000. Filed June 14.

AT Construction, Stamford, contractor for Osada L.L.C. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, 56 Manor St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $82,560. Filed June 17.

Canaan Construction, Wilton, contractor for Dina J. Levi. Perform additions and alterations at an existing single-family residence, 135 Olmstead Hill Road, Wilton. Estimated cost: $70,000. Filed June 18.

Cardorelli Design, White Plains, N.Y., contractor for Boston HP L.L.C. Fitout an existing commercial building for tenant, 1281 E. Main St., First floor, Stamford. Estimated cost: $15,600. Filed June 18. Cardorelli Design, White Plains, N.Y., contractor for Boston HP L.L.C. Fit-out an existing commercial building for Health Pass, 1281 E. Main St., First floor, Stamford. Estimated cost: $321,000. Filed June 18.

RESIDENTIAL Amgine L.L.C., Wilton, contractor for Alexandra L. and John W. DeMarino. Perform interior renovations and construct a new accessory building at a single-family residence, 27 Brooks Road, New Canaan. Estimated cost: $190,000. Filed June 18. Atlantic Management Group, Middletown, R.I., contractor for First Sterling Greenwich Condo. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 195 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $62,000. Filed June 11.

Cardinal Construction, New Canaan, contractor for Mary and Christopher O’Connor. Construct a new singlefamily residence, 19 Parade Lane, New Canaan. Estimated cost: $1.5 million. Filed June 11.

CouRT CASES

BRIDGEPORT DISTRICT COURT The Bridge Partnership L.L.C., et al., Fairfield. Filed by Lisa Gold, Stratford. Plaintiff’s attorney: George W. Ganim Jr., Milford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay agreed-upon wages. Filed June 21. Case no. 6036150. The Silva Law Group L.L.C., Stamford. Filed by Reed Elsevier Inc., Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Steven A. Sugarmann, New Haven. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to make payment for listing services provided. Filed June 21. Case no. 6036149.

Bailey, James, Stamford. Perform additions to a single-family residence, 30 Meadow Avenue East, Stamford. Estimated cost: $86,000. Filed June 21.

DANBURY DISTRICT COURT

Banks Brothers Services, Cos Cob, contractor for Greenwich Place Acquisitions. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 100 Putnam Green, Unit 3E, Cos Cob. Estimated cost: $58,500. Filed June 12.

Crown Hospitality L.L.C., et al., Westport. Filed by SFB Holdings L.L.C., New York City. Plaintiff’s attorney: Robert LaPlaca, Westport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breachof-contract suit against the defendant for defaulting on a promissory note. Filed June 24. Case no. 6012922.

Bridean, John, Bridgeport, contractor for Joan Reidenbach. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 108 Wilson St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $11,000. Filed June 18.

Spath Construction Co. Inc., et al., Newtown. Filed by Newtown Savings Bank, Newtown. Plaintiff’s attorney: Lucas B. Rocklin, New Haven. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breachof-contract suit against the defendant for defaulting on a promissory note. Filed June 24. Case no. 6012828. United Cleaning and Restoration L.L.C., Middlefield. Filed by Elizabeth Lewis, Bethel. Plaintiff’s attorney: Joseph J. Taborsak, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-ofcontract suit against the defendant for failing to perform construction duties. Filed June 24. Case no. 6012827.

STAMFORD DISTRICT COURT Enhanced View Services Inc., Miami, Fla. Filed by SCG Capital Corp., Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Christine D. Salmon, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the plaintiff for failing to pay for goods in the amount of $17,879. Filed June 25. Case no. 6018901.

dEEdS

Devils Water L.L.C., Norwalk. Seller: Cheryl Carlesimo and John McCally, Westport. Property: 4 Sylvan Road South, Westport. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed June 19.

Addeo, Lala and Craig M. Addeo, Riverside. Seller: Whitney M. Keyes, Greenwich. Property: 62 Wesskum Wood Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2.3 million. Filed June 17.

JCS 25 Lewis Street L.L.C., Stamford. Seller: CPP 25 Lewis Street L.L.C., Stamford. Property: 23 to 25 Lewis St., Greenwich. Amount: $3.2 million. Filed June 20.

Ahrens, Mary D., Wilton. Seller: Jill and Chad Brady, Wilton. Property: 12 Thunder Lake Road, Wilton. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed June 18.

McDonald, Linda and Martin McCann, Co-Trustees, Westport. Seller: JJDP L.L.C., Westport. Property: 1421 Unquowa Road, Westport. Amount: $590,000. Filed June 18. TR&Z USA Trading Corp., Stratford. Seller: Michael Miller Real Estate L.L.C., Stratford. Property: 1370 Honeyspot Road, Unit B, Stratford. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed June 17.

QUIT CLAIM Post Road NB Co-Invest L.L.C., Westport. Seller: People’s United Bank, N.A., Bridgeport. Property: 41 Jennie Lane, Westport. Amount: $955,000. Filed June 17.

RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL 316 Federal Road L.L.C., Brookfield. Seller: Three Wheels L.L.C., Brookfield. Property: 316 Federal Road, Brookfield. Amount: $450,000. Filed June 17. 62 Sound View L.L.C., Greenwich. Seller: Arch Stone I L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: 62 Sound View Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $3.4 million. Filed June 21. 68 Sound View L.L.C., Greenwich. Seller: Arch Stone I L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: 68 Sound View Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $3.4 million. Filed June 21. 85 Indian Head Road L.L.C., Greenwood Village, Colo. Seller: Dana and Bradley Gordon, Greenwich. Property: 85 Indian Head Road, Greenwich. Amount: $3.1 million. Filed June 20. A&S Realty Services L.L.C., Stamford. Seller: Fareed Almotawa, Qatar. Property: 60 Strawberry Hill Ave., Unit 518, Stamford. Amount;. $160,000. Filed June 14.

108 Seth Low Mountain Road L.L.C., New Canaan. Seller: Sharon A. and Brian J. Stockmoe, Castle Rock, Colo. Property: 108 Seth Low Mountain Road, Ridgefield. Amount: $500,000. Filed June 21. 123 Ellsworth Street L.L.C., Bridgeport. Seller: Linda A. and David O. Schoennagel, Bridgeport. Property: 123 Ellsworth St., Bridgeport. Amount: $315,000. Filed June 17. 3739 Tremont Street L.L.C., Hartford. Seller: Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C. Property: 356 Garibaldi Ave., Stratford. Amount: $58,100. Filed June 17. 6 Booth Court L.L.C., New York City. Seller: Amedeo M. Cannone, Greenwich. Property: 6 Booth Court, Greenwich. Amount: $610,000. Filed June 20. 630 Hope Street L.L.C., Stamford. Seller: Robert Szalskay, Stamford. Property: 52 Briarwood Lane, Stamford. Amount: $275,000. Filed June 18.

Aktim, Islam, Rocky Hill. Seller: Grace and Armand Onorato, Stratford. Property: 85 Bear Paw Road, Stratford. Amount: $265,000. Filed June 17. Allgood, Stephanie Lynn and Stephen Vincent Dryer, Norwalk. Seller: Elizabeth A. Toner, Langdon, N.H. Property: 296 Belden Hill Road, Wilton. Amount: $400,000. Filed June 21. Ambrose, Catherine I. and Martin Kahn, Wilton. Seller: Jennifer T. and Michael J. Reese, Wilton. Property: 35 Marvin Ridge Place, Wilton. Amount: $1.04 million. Filed June 21. Aristizabal, William, Darien. Seller: Mary Ellen Haberny, Stamford. Property: 68 Alexandra Drive, Stamford. Amount: $628,500. Filed June 17. Azzopardi, Jodie and Steven M. Azzopardi, Hoboken, N.J. Seller: Barrington Homes 28 L.L.C., Westport. Property: 28 Fairty Drive, New Canaan. Amount: $2.3 million. Filed June 21. Barcia, Margaret and Rosalie Barcia Trust, Stratford. Seller: Jason Wojnarowski, Stratford. Property: 50 Birdseye St., Unit 108A, Stratford. Amount: $185,000. Filed June 18. Bates, Kristen and Jeffrey Bates, Stamford. Seller: Sumbo Alli, Stratford. Property: 90 Rugby Lane, Stratford. Amount: $305,000. Filed June 19. Bauer, Nancy, Danbury. Seller: Anna Okula, Bethel. Property: 18 Wolfpits Road, Bethel. Amount: $525,000. Filed June 21. Borelli, Patricia Tibyrica and Paulo Borelli, Greenwich. Seller: David V.G. Loble, Greenwich. Property: 72 Greenwich Hills Drive, Unit 72, Greenwich. Amount: $635,000. Filed June 21. Brookfield Relocation Inc., Scottsdale, Ariz. Seller: Alana and Franck Manyong, Stamford. Property: 13 Paragon Lane, Stamford. Amount: $370,000. Filed June 14.

THE RECORDS SECTION IS NOW AVAILABLE BY DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION. Go to westfaironline.com/buy/records-section/ for more information and to view a sample.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013 19


on the record Boost for education law at Pullman & Comely Pullman & Comley L.L.C., with offices in Bridgeport, Stamford, Waterbury, Hartford and White Plains, N.Y., has added six new attorneys, all formerly of Hartford-based Sullivan, Schoen, Campane & Connon L.L.C. The new attorneys will expand services devoted to representing school boards and providing legal guidance on the full spectrum of education law and public sector labor and employment issues.

Mark DeCruccio

of Goshen, senior vice president with U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management in Westport, was elected to a new three-year term on the board. DeCruccio, is a senior vice president and private client adviser with U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management in Westport. 

Darien’s got (musical) talent More than 75 contestants auditioned during a two-day period for the Darien Arts Center’s fundraiser, “Darien’s Got Talent.” The field was narrowed down to 21 finalists, with three performances judged “best of the best” recently at the Darien High School auditorium. First-place was awarded to Collective Jazz Project for their rendition of the 1960s classic, “Sunny.” Band members include: Jordan Darefsky, Eli Koskoff, Andrew DeNicola, and Will Trautmann. Jeanette Vecchione took home second place for her performance of Leonard Bernstein’s “Glitter and Be Gay” from “Candide.” And Henry Thomas took third place for his original composition drum solo “Less is More.” The evening’s executive producers Patty Mozingo and Catherine McNear gave out the awards.

William R. Connon has more than 36 years of experience advising and representing local and regional boards of education in a wide range of education law and special education law matters.  After being nominated by Gov. Dannel P. Malloy this year, he was approved by the Legislature to be one of the management attorneys who serve on the Department of Education’s interest arbitration panel to represent local and regional boards of education.   

Michael P. McKeon Ashkar honored John Ashkar, a Danbury resident and sales associate with the Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office in Danbury, recently received the status of “Realtor Emeritus” from the National Association of Realtors. The award is given to a real estate professional who has held membership in the National Association of Realtors for 40 years. It was presented to Ashkar in recognition of his lasting contribution to the real estate profession in the Danbury region. “John has been a role model for Realtors throughout the Greater Danbury region,” said Matthew Day, sales manager of the Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office in Danbury. “He is a dedicated professional who has been recognized for his sales accomplishments numerous times throughout his distinguished career, and I am very proud to have him on my team.”

Hospital takes the gold Stamford Hospital’s Women’s Breast Center recently was named 2013 Gold Prize Recipient of the Connecticut Quality Improvement Award. The Women’s Breast Center received the award for integrating 3D Tomography for all screening mammography patients into both of its breast imaging center locations (in Darien and Stamford). The technology yields a significantly higher level of accuracy of breast imaging, finding more cancers with fewer mammogram pictures, thereby saving time and decreasing unnecessary imaging and radiation doses.

Pascal to head Commonfund Capital Commonfund has announced the promotion of Donald T. Pascal to president of Commonfund Capital Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Wilton-based Commonfund focused on private equity, venture capital and natural resources investing. Pascal succeeds Susan J. Carter, who will retain her role as CEO of Commonfund Capital. Carter will retain overall strategic leadership and will continue to be engaged with investors and managers. Pascal has 30 years of direct private capital and multi-manager investment experience, including sourcing, negotiating, and monitoring direct investments. He is a member of the advisory boards of several leading private capital limited partnerships and is a member of the investment committee for The Hotchkiss School. “Don and I have worked closely together for the last 15 years, and I am confident that Commonfund Capital will rise to even greater heights with Don’s leadership,” said Carter.

has been an attorney for more than 25 years. He represents boards of education, municipalities and private-sector employers across Connecticut in both federal and state courts on both the trial and appellate levels, as well as before federal and state boards and commissions.

John P. Shea

has represented public and private employers in labor and employment matters for nearly 20 years. He also performs general municipal and board of education work. He represents public entities in employment litigation, including the defense of claims alleging: discrimination, retaliation and harassment; whistleblower retaliation; wage and hour violations; constitutional violations against public employers and their employees; infliction of emotional distress; and breach of contract. 

Mark J. Sommaruga

has provided legal counsel to Connecticut municipalities and school boards, other public sector clients, and private sector clients for more than 20 years. His extensive experience with these clients Kennedy Center fills includes labor, employment, education, civil rights, special education, municipal law, construction law, tort matters, workers’ leadership posts compensation, and other litigation in the state and federal courts on both the trial and appellate court levels, as well as before various The Kennedy Center, headquar- state and federal agencies. tered in Trumbull, recently announced the election of its new officers and one new board member. Pictured left, Daniel Long of Zachary D. Schurin Cheshire is the center’s new vice represents school boards, municipalities and other public sector chairman and also senior vice presi- clients across Connecticut on a broad spectrum of labor, employdent of strategic planning and mar- ment, and education law issues. He is an associate in the school law keting director of Newtown Savings section of the state Labor, Employment Law and Employee BenBank; and Stephen A. Smith of efits Department. Shelton is new chairman and also president of Smith & Company, L.L.C., marketing consultants in Shelton. Not pictured, Michael Lynch of Stratford is the new treasurer and also a senior financial planner at Barnum Financial Group, an office of MetLife Securities Inc. in Shelton; and Mary G. Brown of Bridgeport, secretary, who is a retired Bridgeport Central High School math teacher. 

20 Week of July 8, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal


on the record oN THE Go

SuSan l. SCoTT

focuses on school law, labor and employment. She represents public sector employers in collective bargaining, arbitration and complaints before the state Board of Labor Relations. She has experience as general counsel to boards of education, serving as board procedural advisor in transportation, residency and expulsion hearings, conducting comprehensive policy and handbook reviews, and advising on matters involving labor relations, student discipline, civil rights, special education, contracts and compliance with state and federal laws.

SounD PoWer in norWalk

Norwalk’s Third Taxing District hosts a 100th anniversary celebration called “Power on the Sound” July 27, noon-10 p.m., at Calf Pasture Beach, Norwalk. Several officials are expected for the noon kickoff. The free event will feature Touch-a-Truck, performances by Norwalk Academy of Dance, Suzuki School, musical performances by Tracey Del Lucia, and the bands The Suit, Ty & Thurrsty and Déjà Vu. There will also be local business demonstrations and exhibits, and food available for purchase.

hanDS-on MarkeTing 

Join a small group of business owners in this four-session program sponsored by the Women’s Business Development Council. A marketing professional will teach fundamentals of marketing; developing, positioning and branding; and putQuinniPiaC’S neW BookkeePer Mark Varholak has been promoted to ting together an ideal communications mix. Attendees must be in business a minimum of one year with a record of tracked the newly created position of associate vice sales. An application and in-person interview are required. Class size is limited. The classes are Mondays, July 8, 15, 29 and president for budget and financial plan- Aug. 5, 4-7 p.m., at the WBDC office, 184 Bedford St., Stamford. Contact Anne DiFrancesco for an application at 585-7422. ning at Quinnipiac University in Hamden. Varholak will serve as Quinnipiac’s chief budgeting and financial planning officer. He joined Quinnipiac as assistant controlWBDC’S launCh PaD Plan ler in 2003 and was promoted to associate To learn how to take a great idea and explore its potential to be a great business, the Women’s Business Development Council’s Launch controller in 2009. Pad business plan is a solid first step toward actual development. Classes are at the Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce, 10 Progress Drive in Shelton, Thursday, July 11, 6- 8 p.m.; and Tuesday, Aug. 6. At the WBDC, 184 Bedford St., Stamford. Preregistration is required, but there is no fee. Information for these features has been provided by the subjects or their delegates

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kerS neWSSMlaeTTer W ne

Get all the executive promotions and moves, awards and snapshots we publish in the Business Journals delivered to your inbox on Monday mornings. SUBSCRIBE AT WeStFaironline.Com/home/Breaking-neWS/ FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013 21


on the record Calabretta, Michelle and Matthew D’Auria, Westport. Seller: Mary P. and Simon Moody, Westport. Property: 96 Myrtle Ave., Westport. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed June 18.

Diggin, Maureen T. and John J. Segreti, St. John’s, Fla. Seller: Aurora Z. Zhou and Nathan K.Yee, Danbury. Property: 17 Huntington Drive, Danbury. Amount: $460,000. Filed June 17.

Fralley, Elizabeth A. and Drew G. Fralley, Waldwick, N.J. Seller: Irene T. and Michael K. Fitzsimmons, Newtown. Property: 7 Old Castle Drive, Newtown. Amount: $1.09 million. Filed June 14.

Gray, Vicky G. and McChesney P. Gray, Stamford. Seller: Lauren M. and Christopher M. Kelly, Stamford. Property: Home Site 7F, The Villages at River’s Edge, Stamford. Amount: $432,000. Filed June 18.

Carbonaro, Tara A. and Salvatore Carbonaro, Wilton. Seller: Margaret M. and Harold K. Somerdyk, Wilton. Property: 381 Sturges Ridge Road, Wilton. Amount: $1.03 million. Filed June 21.

Dillon, Norann and Edward Joseph Dillon III, Plymouth, Minn. Seller: Gale and James G. Gustavson, Brookfield. Property: 3 Fairview Road, Brookfield. Amount: $509,000. Filed June 21.

Francillon, Marlene and Pierre R. Francillon, Brooklyn, N.Y. Seller: LARJON L.L.C., Trumbull. Property: 423 to 425 Wells St., Bridgeport. Amount: $635,000. Filed June 17.

Greely, Jennifer and David Greely, South Orange, N.J. Seller: Kathleen G. Wootton, Westport. Property: 7 Caccamo Lane Extension, Westport. Amount: $2.3 million. Filed June 21.

Cohen, Alyssa C. and Matthew S. Cohen, Stamford. Seller: Carrie Construction Co. Inc., Fairfield. Property: 12 Stoneboat Road, Westport. Amount: $1.7 million. Filed June 18.

Doufekias, Spyridoula and James P. Adanuncio, Danbury. Seller: Stacey E. and Michael J. Iapaluccio Jr., Bethel. Property: 38 Golden Hill Road, Danbury. Amount: $529,000. Filed June 18.

Frascella, Katherine J. and Christopher J. Frascella, Stamford. Seller: Francis and Ernie Grevers, Westport. Property: 40 Rayfield Road, Westport. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed June 17.

Gupta, Dina T., Stamford. Seller: Erskine Partners L.L.C., Stamford. Property: 373 Erskine Road, Stamford. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed June 18.

Colman, Michelle and Tyler Colman, Waccabuc, N.Y. Seller: Charlotte N. and David A. Ackert, Weston. Property: 36 Broad St., Weston. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed June 18.

Eckelman, Janice H. and Arnold J. Eckelman, New Fairfield. Seller: Roberta H. and Lyman C. Aldrich, West Chester, Pa. Property: 16 Lakeshore South, New Fairfield. Amount: $265,000. Filed June 18.

Friday, Lesley and Paul R. Friday, Greenwich. Seller: Natalia Garcia Lopez and Horacio Martin Robredo, Greenwich. Property: 41 Harding Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $2.08 million. Filed June 17.

Cordova, Marie A. and Braulio R. Cardova, Stamford. Seller: U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Stamford. Property: 225 Little Drive, Stamford. Amount: $541,500. Filed June 13. Corner, Charles E., Stratford. Seller: Wendy C. Wipprecht and Mark J. Aldrich, Newtown. Property: 4 Longview Terrace, Sandy Hook. Amount: $218,000. Filed June 17. Crane, Noelle C. and Jay Sideropoulos, Stamford. Seller: Margaret Berry Levy and Bernhard Levy, Stamford. Property: 157 Wood Ridge Drive South, Stamford. Amount: $592,500. Filed June 14.

Fabian, Lori J. and Volker Fabian, Westport. Seller: Tomas Brothers L.L.C., Wilton. Property: 66 Hillandale Road, Westport. Amount: $2.5 million. Filed June 17. Falconieri, Anne Marie and Ryan L. Lewis, Danbury. Seller: Home Renewers L.L.C., Bethel. Property: 95 S. King St., Danbury. Amount: $310,000. Filed June 20.

Fusaro, Dearta L. and Justin R. Fusaro, Wilton. Seller: Carol G. and August A. Strandberg, Pompano Beach, Fla. Property: 40 Cobbs Mill Road, Wilton. Amount: $547,251. Filed June 14.

Family Builders L.L.C., Brookfield. Seller: James Lavelle, The Villages, Fla. Property: 165 Vail Road, Brookfield. Amount: $80,200. Filed June 14.

Galizi, Monserrat M. and Vincent Galizi, Greenwich. Seller: James Lee Fletcher, Greenwich. Property: 10 Rockland Place, Greenwich. Amount: $539,000. Filed June 19.

Crisci, Karen K., Roxbury. Seller: Philip D. Pacchiana, Danbury. Property: 8 Siboney Terrace, Danbury. Amount: $517,500. Filed June 17.

Farasciano, Christine Nancy and Frank Anthony Pollifrone Jr., Stratford. Seller: Joseph G. Bucko, Stratford. Property: 51 Belvidere Drive, Stratford. Amount: $229,900. Filed June 18.

Danchise, Lorraine and Patricia A. Garrett, Westport. Seller: Bronwyn M. Leone, Dartmouth, Mass. Property: 1 Lambert Common, Wilton. Amount: $480,000. Filed June 11.

Feldman, Mariya, Stamford. Seller: Theresa F. O’Rourke, Stamford. Property: 65 Glenbrook Road, Unit 4A, Stamford. Amount: $200,250. Filed June 18.

Davis, Loreen A. and Sean P. Davis, Glen Ellen, Ill. Seller: Rebecca B. and James S. McRae, Fernandina Beach, Fla. Property: 6 Indian Cave Road, Ridgefield. Amount: $792,500. Filed June 19.

Feng, Shengying, Wilton. Seller: Jacqueline and Ronald Shaw Gulick, Wilton. Property: 4 Musket Ridge Road, Wilton. Amount: $520,000. Filed June 21.

De Galea Stiegler, Ariane and Timothy P. Raimer, Co-Trustees, Westport. Seller: Robert S. Roath, Jupiter, Fla. Property: 16 Surf Road, Westport. Amount: $3.2 million. Filed June 21. DeShay, Joyce B. and Bruce J. DeShay, White Plains, N.Y. Seller: Toll CT II L.P., Bethel. Property: 54 Great Hill Drive, Unit 132, Bethel. Amount: $440,961. Filed June 17. Dewey, Joanna and Christopher M. Dewey, New Fairfield. Seller: Shirley C. and Richard C. Lapine, Bethel. Property: 9 Pound Sweet Hill, Bethel. Amount: $318,000. Filed June 18.

Fritsche, Jennifer and Daniel Ryan, Newtown. Seller: Susan M. and Christopher M. Jacozzi, Newtown. Property: 11 Green Knolls Lane, Newtown. Amount: $319,000. Filed June 17.

Fierro, Melinda and Jonathan P. Fierro, Weston. Seller: Shelby C. and Sloan J. Baxter, Weston. Property: 23 Covenant Lane, Weston. Amount: $735,000. Filed June 11. Fogel, Angela, Westport. Seller: Laureen Vellante, Westport. Property: 53 Bermuda Road, Westport. Amount: $1.5 million. Filed June 19. Forero, Edilson, Newtown. Seller: Cecilia M. Fradet, Weston. Property: 24 Tannery Lane North, Weston. Amount: $950,000. Filed June 11.

Garcia Muriel, Monica Rivero and Jose Martinez Madero, Riverside. Seller: Melanie Ann and Spencer L. Harrison, Greenwich. Property: 31 Lockwood Road, Riverside. Amount: $2.1 million. Filed June 19. Glick, Jody Rachel Trust, Astoria, N.Y. Seller: Soraya A. Kurban, Danbury. Property: 12 Lake Ave., Danbury. Amount: $350,000. Filed June 19. Godfish Hill Construction L.L.C., Bethel. Seller: 75 Greenwood Avenue Realty Corp., Fairfield. Property: 75 Greenwood Ave., Bethel. Amount: $88,000. Filed June 19. Goldstein, Melissa Klein and Glenn Jordan Goldstein, New York City. Seller: Anita and John Bausman, Greenwich. Property: 73 Summit Road, Greenwich. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed June 18. Gorbachevskiy, Igor, Stamford. Seller: Shadyra E. Santiana, Stamford. Property: 1437 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Amount: $360,000. Filed June 17. Govan, Erika N. and Dwayne J. Ward, Stamford. Seller: Rosario V. LaSelva, Bethel. Property: 5 Fairview Drive, Bethel. Amount: $305,000. Filed June 20.

22 Week of July 8, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Haliskoe, Michael J., Danbury. Seller: Blackstone Estates L.L.C., Brookfield. Property: 4 Blackstone Court, Danbury. Amount: $439,900. Filed June 17. Harewood, Lanese, Norwalk. Seller: Grace and Thomas L. Brennan, Danbury. Property: 15 Aspen Way, Danbury. Amount: $270,000. Filed June 17. Hill, Eileen and John Hill, New Canaan. Seller: Patricia L. and Michael P. Svagdis, New Canaan. Property: 401 South Ave., New Canaan. Amount: $2.5 million. Filed June 13. Hirsch, Gary, Rye, N.Y. Seller: Bonnie E. Gilrane, Greenwich. Property: Map 4138, Greenwich. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed June 20. Holland, Jennifer M. and John P. Holland, Fairfield. Seller: Conyers Group Residential Construction L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: 76 Dogwood Lane, New Canaan. Amount: $2.5 million. Filed June 21. Hotchkiss, Hilary and Winchester F. Hotchkiss Jr., New Canaan. Seller: Sharon J. and Jeffrey J. Collinson, Hobe Sound, Fla. Property: 191 Main St., Unit 4, New Canaan. Amount: $980,000. Filed June 13. Ingraham, Robert S., New Canaan. Seller: Barbara Capelle, New Canaan. Property: 458 White Oak Shade Road, New Canaan. Amount: $600,000. Filed June 14. Jaffe, Sharon E. and James I. Glasser, Weston. Seller: Ann R. Klee and John A. McLeod, Weston. Property: 33 Glenwood Road, Weston. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed June 12. Jahn, Danielle and Daniel C. Jahn, Brooklyn, N.Y. Seller: Katherine and Christopher Frascella, Stamford. Property: 75 Skymeadow Drive, Stamford. Amount: $727,500. Filed June 14. James, Samantha and Paul Anthony James, Greenwich. Seller: Megan S. and Ulric T. Sullivan, Old Greenwich. Property: 312 Sound Beach Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $1.7 million. Filed June 21.

Jania, Wendy and Gregory Jania, Orland Park, Ill. Seller: Robyn A. and Paul J. Bova, Stamford. Property: 63 Thornwood Road, Stamford. Amount;. $1.2 million. Filed June 18.

Lampe Onneud, Christina and Tord Per J. Onneud, Wilton. Seller: Deborah S. and David A. Finkel, Wilton. Property: 286 Millstone Road, Wilton. Amount: $1.9 million. Filed June 17.

Jarrett, Kristine L. and Jeffrey W. Jarrett, Cincinatti, Ohio. Seller: Laura Weyher Hall and Gordon B. Hall III, Wilton. Property: 69 Catalpa Road, Wilton. Amount: $910,000. Filed June 14.

Lavyne, Jennie and Andrew Lavyne, Brooklyn, N.Y. Seller: Jacqueline M. and Michael S. Adams, New Canaan. Property: 20 Jeliff Mill Road, New Canaan. Amount: $800,000. Filed June 13.

Jindal, Nitin, Greenwich. Seller: Mary L. and John C. Lee, Key Largo, Fla. Property: 188 Field Point Road, Unit 6A, Greenwich. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed June 20.

Leahy, Brendan, Wilton. Seller: Compass Bank, New York City. Property: 181 Deer Run Road, Wilton. Amount: $485,000. Filed June 19.

Jonusz, Valerie S. and Michael S. Jonusz III, Stratford. Seller: Keri and Ryan Jockers, Stratford. Property: 46 Lobdell Drive, Stratford. Amount: $245,000. Filed June 18. Keeler, Holly C. and Kenneth M. Keeler, New Fairfield. Seller: Susan Goff, New Fairfield. Property: 182 Pine Hill Road, New Fairfield. Amount: $262,000. Filed June 18. Kingery, Fiona Dembrosky and James M. Kingery, Greenwich. Seller: Marjorie R. and Robert W. Pettinato Jr., Greenwich. Property: 19 Stony Wylde Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $2.9 million. Filed June 17. Kitchen Impressions L.L.C., Hopewell Junction, N.Y. Seller: John Koperno, Danbury. Property: 1 Staples St., Danbury. Amount: $62,500. Filed June 19. Kloos, Sarah E. and Bryan T. Kloos, Reading, Mass. Seller: Sigrid and Marc Luchansky, Weston. Property: 1 Trout Brook Lane, Weston. Amount: $839,000. Filed June 17. Kowal, Genevieve and Michael Kowal, Norwalk. Seller: Pamela M. Numme, Greenwich. Property: 74 Clapboard Ridge Road, Danbury. Amount: $398,000. Filed June 17. Kreussling, William C., Stamford. Seller: Julie Pinard, Stamford. Property: 180 Turn of River Road, Unit 11C, Stamford. Amount;. $550,000. Filed June 17. Kurtz, Carrie and Daniel Chandra, New Canaan. Seller: Nicole and Michael Cudzil, Irvine, Calif. Property: 437 Brookside Road, New Canaan. Amount: $4.5 million. Filed June 21.

Lekaj, Ilir and Petrit Lekaj, Sherman. Seller: Ryan Domack, Fargo, N.D. Property: 60 Padanaram Road, Unit 37, Danbury. Amount: $153,000. Filed June 18. Lesser, Robert D., Stamford. Seller: Liberty Development Group L.L.C., Stamford. Property: 59 Liberty St., Unit 34, Stamford. Amount: $357,500. Filed June 14. Lopes Silva, Rogerio, Greenwich. Seller: Kathleen Metinko, Greenwich. Property: 37 Ettl Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed June 19. Lopez-May, Luciano, Greenwich. Seller: Network Development Co. L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: 3 Elizabeth Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $1.8 million. Filed June 21. Lopez, Natalia Garcia and Horacio Martin Robredo, Greenwich. Seller: Steven W. Russo Trust, Greenwich. Property: 154 Stanwich Road, Greenwich. Amount: $3.6 million. Filed June 17. Lubin, Marie and Benjamin Lubin, Greenwich. Seller: Bedford Investment Co. L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: Map 5712, Greenwich. Amount: $1.9 million. Filed June 17. Luedee, Richelle J., Redding. Seller: Laura C. and Robert W. Nelson, Redding. Property: 19 Olmstead Road, Redding. Amount: $255,000. Filed June 18. Lynch, Joan and Marc W. Wolpers, Old Greenwich. Seller: Lori S. and Conan M. Curley, Delray Beach, Fla. Property: 11 Pleasant View Place, Old Greenwich. Amount: $2.3 million. Filed June 21.

Kwok, Chun Yin, Bridgeport. Seller: CP-SRMOF II 2012, Bridgeport. Property: 800 Ellsworth St., Bridgeport. Amount: $137,500. Filed June 17.

Madigan, Veronica H. and Roger O. Madigan, Stamford. Seller: Hollis K. and Robert D. Lesser, Stamford. Property: 84 Cross Country Trail, Stamford. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed June 17.

Kyle, Ann L. and Michael L. Kyle, Chicago, Ill. Seller: Marianne and Robert P. Muzzucco, Weston. Property: 10 November Trail, Weston. Amount: $776,000. Filed June 17.

Maietta, Barbara and Dominic Maietta, Stamford. Seller: Valerie Flynn, Stamford. Property: 64 Tupper Drive, Stamford. Amount: $500,000. Filed June 14.


on the record Mangan, Noreen A. and David D. Ruggiero, Danbury. Seller: Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C. Property: 37 Cambridge Drive, Danbury. Amount: $344,900. Filed June 17. Maragh, Georgette A. and Ruth A. Maragh, Bridgeport. Seller: Chuck A. Bond, Bridgeport. Property: 67 Chamberlain Place, Bridgeport. Amount: $245,750. Filed June 17. Markosky, Arline and Anthony J. Markosky, Weston. Seller: Nancy B. Kennedy, Newtown. Property: 139 Boggs Hill Road, Newtown. Amount: $410,000. Filed June 14. Marsili, Federico D., Ohn, United Kingdom. Seller: Savyona and Mordechai Abel, New Canaan. Property: 21 Rilling Ridge, New Canaan. Amount: $2.9 million. Filed June 17. Marth, Linda K. and John G. Marth, Weston. Seller: Karen and Simon Proctor, Weston. Property: 45 Kettle Creek Road, Weston. Amount: $1.5 million. Filed June 20. Martinez, Amy and Michael Martinez, Mahopac, N.Y. Seller: Barbara J. Love, Danbury. Property: 82 Deer Hill Ave., Danbury. Amount: $398,000. Filed June 17. Mathias, Tamar B. and Marcus J. Mathias, Ridgefield. Seller: Melissa B. and Seth Davis, Manhattan Beach, Calif. Property: 46 Mimosa Circle, Ridgefield. Amount: $635,000. Filed June 18. Mathur, Shushant R. and Komal Mathur, Clarksburg, Md. Seller: Michelle M. and Curt Pinto, Fairfield. Property: 32 Highland Road, Unit 19, Stamford. Amount: $508,000. Filed June 13. Matsuo, Miyoko and Dean Nguyen, Greenwich. Seller: Frank V. Forte Jr., Joseph D. Forte and William M. Forte, Greenwich. Property: 18 Robertson Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $661,500. Filed June 18. Mauri, Julie and Robert Mauri, Oxford. Seller: Grace Andry-Lee and Jeffrey William Lee, Newtown. Property: 17 Saddle Ridge Road, Newtown. Amount: $605,000. Filed June 14. McCain, Theresa and Chad McCain, Norwalk. Seller: Kimberly A. and John P. Grogan, Weston. Property: 128 Georgetown Road, Weston. Amount: $593,000. Filed June 17. McCall, Sarah L. and David J. McCall, Wilton. Seller: Rosa D. Carbone and Edward R. Gillette, Norwalk. Property: 33 Old Wagon Road, Wilton. Amount: $850,000. Filed June 11.

McCreight, Laura A. and Andrew J. Buonaiuto, Sandy Hook. Seller: Julia W. Person, Newtown. Property: 1 Vinning Road, Newtown. Amount: $207,910. Filed June 14.

Mui, Jule and Sheldon Mui, Stamford. Seller: Angela R. and Brian V. Butler, Stamford. Property: 4 Rosano Road, Stamford. Amount: $765,000. Filed June 17.

Pesok, Maya and John E. Turey, Norwalk. Seller: Marianne B. and Randolph B. Frankel, Weston. Property: 67 Greenfield Drive, Weston. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed June 11.

McDermott, Richard J., Danbury. Seller: Johannes Huseby, Boulder, Colo. Property: 8 Jefferson Ave., Danbury. Amount: $250,000. Filed June 13.

Munoz, Marely M. and Paul T. Griffin, New York City. Seller: June and Rolf B. Rosenthal, Stamford. Property: 65 Windward Lane, Stamford. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed June 18.

Philemon, Christian, Stamford. Seller: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., McLean, Va. Property: 223 Cold Spring Road, Stamford. Amount;. $325,000. Filed June 17.

Murray, Dana and Daniel Murray, New Fairfield. Seller: Joseph Biraglia, New Fairfield. Property: 18 Woodridge Lane, New Fairfield. Amount: $600,000. Filed June 21.

Pinard, Julie, Stamford. Seller: Tracy Carroll and Marcus White, Ridgefield. Property: 41 Fieldcrest Drive, Ridgefield. Amount: $550,000. Filed June 18.

McDonald, Kyle, Altedena, Calif. Seller: Gerry and Burt R. Kelman, Stratford. Property: 355 Rosebrook Drive, Stratford. Amount: $380,000. Filed June 17. McElhinney, George, Danbury. Seller: Dorothy Gaboardi and Betty L. Stoorza, Danbury. Property: 25 Myrtle Ave., Danbury. Amount: $140,000. Filed June 17. McGuinness, Brian J., Redding. Seller: Darryl Murphy, New York City. Property: 36 Chestnut Woods Road, Redding. Amount: $400,000. Filed June 18. Messina, Meredith and Michael Messina, Stamford. Seller: Lyn F. and Sean T. Fox, Stamford. Property: 45 Mountain Wood Road, Stamford. Amount: $624,900. Filed June 13. Mihalchik, Corina and Christopher Renak, Danbury. Seller: Jean Ahn and Jonathan Han, Sandy Hook. Property: 87 Marlin Road, Newtown. Amount: $485,500. Filed June 17. Miner, Robin and Robert Miner, New Canaan. Seller: Teresa M. and Philip D. Ameen, New Canaan. Property: 1325 Smith Ridge Road, New Canaan. Amount: $2.5 million. Filed June 10. Minter, Michael A., Newtown. Seller: NormaJean M. and Thomas E. Oberst, Newtown. Property: 6 Kelley Court, Newtown. Amount: $479,000. Filed June 18. Monette, Michelle Y. and Tobias Breuing, Prospect. Seller: Erica Leonard, Newtown. Property: 13 Pebble Road, Newtown. Amount: $329,900. Filed June 20. Moosbrugger, Mackenzie, Stratford. Seller: Patricia Flynn, Danbury and Arthur Delally, Bridgeport. Property: 451 Wakelee Ave., Stratford. Amount: $185,000. Filed June 21. Moran, Elise J. and Kevin Hughes, Danbury. Seller: Timothy H. Gonsnowski, Danbury. Property: 5 Fairfield Court, Danbury. Amount: $365,000. Filed June 17.

Murray, Kim E. and James M. Murray, Brookfield. Seller: Edythe Dickson, New York City. Property: 33 to 35 Lakeview Road, Brookfield. Amount: $737,500. Filed June 14. Murray, Shanon A. and James D. Miles, Stratford. Seller: Eileen B. and Gary P. Guodance, Stratford. Property: 1280 Huntington Road, Stratford. Amount: $330,000. Filed June 18. Nissen, Victoria and Patrick A. Ryan, Brookfield. Seller: Cynthia and Baltazar Almeida, Brookfield. Property: 28 Obtuse Rocks Road, Brookfield. Amount: $465,000. Filed June 19. O’Brien, Fanella C. and William A. O’Brien III, Atlanta, Ga. Seller: Jodyi Lynn and Bryan Dominic Luizzi, Brookfield. Property: 41 High Ridge Road, Brookfield. Amount: $410,000. Filed June 20. O’Connor, Maryann P. and Frederic H. Child, Newtown. Seller: Elaine R. and William F. McClure Jr., Newtown. Property: 32 Ashford Lane, Newtown. Amount: $635,000. Filed June 14. Olsen, John, Redding. Seller: U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 89 Sport Hill Road, Redding. Amount: $280,000. Filed June 20. Ordonez, Marcela E., Danbury. Seller: William P. Aker, Danbury. Property: 8 Parker St., Unit D4, Danbury. Amount: $120,000. Filed June 17. Paragon Associates Realty Inc., Stamford. Seller: Brookfield Relocation Inc., Scottsdale, Ariz. Property: 13 Paragon Lane, Stamford. Amount;. $370,000. Filed June 14. Paris, Kimberly Glaser and Chandler L. Paris, Westport. Seller: Elizabeth W. Love, Westport. Property: 15 Pumpkin Hill Road, Westport. Amount: $414,950. Filed June 17.

Pitol Do Carmo, Fernanda P. and Wanderley Do Carmo, Danbury. Seller: General Real Estate Holdings L.L.C., Danbury. Property: 23 Scuppo Road, Building 3, Unit 10, Danbury. Amount: $125,000. Filed June 17. Pizzolato, Linda A. and Gene J. Pizzolato, Stamford. Seller: Pamela and Dennis Humbert, Woodland Hills, Calif. Property: 352 Bayberry Drive, Stamford. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed June 17.

Richter Bernstein, Jennifer and Robert B. Bernstein, Westport. Seller: Heather B. and Robert B. Simmons, Westport. Property: 8 Dexter Road, Westport. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed June 21. Ridolfi, Nicole and Robert Paternostro, Westport. Seller: Ryan M. Oliver, Westport. Property: 403 Bradley Lane, Westport. Amount: $625,000. Filed June 19. Robins-Brady, Joan and James M. Brady and Harry T. Robins, Bridgeport. Seller: Judith M. Rifkin Revocable Trust, Bridgeport. Property: 3200 Park Ave., Unit 9C2, Bridgeport. Amount: $207,000. Filed June 17. Rodrigues, Minerva, Wilton. Seller: Hillary and Benjamin R. Jackson, Wilton. Property: 131 Old Kings Highway, Wilton. Amount: $888,750. Filed June 17. Rodriguez, Ruby R., Danbury. Seller: Gail T. and Bobby L. James, Danbury. Property: 22 to 24 Fairview Ave., Danbury. Amount: $205,000. Filed June 19.

Pollard, Kimberly and Justin C. Hillyer, Danbury. Seller: Susan M. and Stephen A. White, Sandy Hook. Property: 69 Charter Ridge Drive, Newtown. Amount: $657,000. Filed June 14.

Rogers, Catherine, Westport. Seller: Sharon A. Van Baaren and Michael R. Gness, 48 Edgewater Commons Lane, Westport. Amount: $530,000. Filed June 18.

Prue, Valerie L., Waterbury. Seller: Sarah and Scott Munsie, Bethel. Property: 4 Deer Run, Unit 74, Bethel. Amount: $220,000. Filed June 18.

Roth, Kate and Erik Roth, Redding. Seller: Cathleen M. and Timothy V. Roby, Kansas City, Mo. Property: 249 Chestnut Hill Road, Wilton. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed June 19.

Pyramid Asset Management Corp., Milford. Seller: Riseley L.L.C., Stratford. Property: 2428 Main St., Stratford. Amount: $400,000. Filed June 21. Raine, Kendra O. and William J. Raine, Greenwich. Seller: Maura F. and Mark J. Shapiro, Greenwich. Property: 59 Upland Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $2.9 million. Filed June 17. Regney, Matthieu L., Stamford. Seller: Robert Macari, Stamford. Property: 120 Culloden Road, Stamford. Amount: $378,000. Filed June 14. Reid, Andrea A. and Dustin T. Reid, New York City. Seller: Cheryl M. and Gerald I. Katz, New Canaan. Property: 979 South Ave., New Canaan. Amount: $1.09 million. Filed June 10. Reid, Deborah, Danbury. Seller: Allison Wright, Danbury. Property: 54 Warrington Round, Danbury. Amount: $365,000. Filed June 18. Reilly, Maria and John Reilly, Weston. Seller: Carol A. and John P. Davis, Weston. Property: 12 Winthrop Hill, Weston. Amount: $1.4 million. Filed June 17.

Ruggieri, Diane and Erik Ruggieri, Norwalk. Seller: Allison and Jason Wolter, New Canaan. Property: 17 Journey’s End, New Canaan. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed June 21. Rus, Grzegorz, Stamford. Seller: Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C. Property: 46 Taylor St., Unit 102, Stamford. Amount: $132,000. Filed June 17. Sabag, Richard P., New Canaan. Seller: Robert Burmann, Bridgewater. Property: 7 Candlewood Birches, Brookfield. Amount: $224,000. Filed June 21. Salinas, Ana M., Bridgeport. Seller: Elaine Babey, Milford. Property: 250 N. Bishop Ave., Unit 26, Bridgeport. Amount: $18,000. Filed June 17. Salomone, Megan and Kory Salomone, Norwalk. Seller: Frank J. LoCastro, Ridgefield. Property: 89 Old West Mountain Road, Ridgefield. Amount: $653,000. Filed June 19.

San Pedro, Manuel Rodriguez, Riverside. Seller: Marcie M. Tennen and Seth D. Petok, Greenwich. Property: 5 Dorchester Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $2.09 million. Filed June 17. Sanon, Denise and Jean Robert Sanon, Norwalk. Seller: Vimalarani Suresh and Suresh Rangasamy, Stamford. Property: 24 Cody Drive, Stamford. Amount: $560,000. Filed June 14. Schermerhorn, Jaime E. and Peter S. Schermerhorn, Greenwich. Seller: Sheila P. and Richard W. May, Greenwich. Property: 130 Woodside Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed June 21. Schwartz, Christina L. and Brian M. Schwartz, New Canaan. Seller: Nordic Builders Inc., Ridgefield. Property: 76 Country Club Road, New Canaan. Amount: $3.7 million. Filed June 21. Serebreny Neufeld, Brenda, Trumbull. Seller: Rose O. Stone, Bridgeport. Property: 304B South Trail, Stratford. Amount: $132,500. Filed June 18. Singher, Elena and Thomas C. Shipilova, Stamford. Seller: Charles R. Hogen Jr., Norwalk. Property: 43 Verplank Ave., Stamford. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed June 18. Spierer, Abby and Abraham Spierer, Cross River, N.Y. Seller: Brigitte and Michael Capobianco, Rapid City, S.D. Property: 96 Deer Hill Drive, Ridgefield. Amount: $595,000. Filed June 21. Stetson, Jill M. and Benjamin J. Miller, Stratford. Seller: Gary Tenk, Stratford. Property: 85 Airway Drive, Stratford. Amount: $364,000. Filed June 20. Stewart, Meredith C. and Brian C. Stewart, Weston. Seller: Allison C. and John W. Peyton, Weston. Property: 14 Saugatuck River Road, Weston. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed June 14. Stewart, Terri L. and Michael S. Stewart, New Canaan. Seller: Barbara B. Pierson, New Canaan/Wilton. Property: 53 Journey’s End, New Canaan/Wilton. Amount: $553,700. Filed June 21. Subramanian, Subha and Ramachandran Subramian, Norwalk. Seller: Karen L. Marsillo, Wilton. Property: 71 Glen Hill Road, Wilton. Amount: $575,500. Filed June 17. Suri, Anu and Pranav Suri, Stamford. Seller: Robert L. Petty, Haymarket, Va. Property: 9 Wakefield Road, Wilton. Amount: $510,000. Filed June 13.

THE RECORDS SECTION IS NOW AVAILABLE BY DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION. Go to westfaironline.com/buy/records-section/ for more information and to view a sample.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013 23


on the record Tartarone, Theresa and Stephen Urciuoli, Weston. Seller: Megan D. and Stephen T. Eckenberger, Weston. Property: 31 Bernhard Drive, Weston. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed June 11.

Wells, Lawrence A., Stratford. Seller: Priscilla Sopek, Bridgeport and Joyce Tuliano, Stratford. Property: 35 Cedar St., Stratford. Amount: $180,000. Filed June 21.

Fanning, Agnes and William James Fanning. Creditor: OneWest Bank F.S.B., Pasadena, Calif. Property: 36 Signal Hill Road, Wilton. Mortgage default. Filed June 11.

Ceglio Tresca, Susan M. and Joseph Tresca, Bethel. $19,289.75, in favor of Canterbury School Inc., Kent, by Denise M. Cloutier, Litchfield. Property: 21 Partridge Drive, Bethel. Filed June 19.

Hausm, Lindsay, Brookfield. $2,246.42, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 3 Carlins Way, Brookfield. Filed June 19.

Morey, Sandra, Danbury. $1,138.80, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 25 Taagan Point Road, Danbury. Filed June 17.

Thibodeaux, Stacy Ann and James Matthew Thibodeaux, Ridgefield. Seller: Karen L. and Edward J. Reynolds, Ridgefield. Property: 183 Wilton Road East, Ridgefield. Amount: $982,000. Filed June 18.

Whelan Homes L.L.C., Newtown. Seller: Beverly L. Liggins, Newtown. Property: 43 Pine Tree Hill Road, Newtown. Amount: $160,000. Filed June 17.

Kresl, James J., et al. Creditor: BAC Home Loans Servicing L.P., Horsham, Pa. Property: 24 Mountain View Drive, Brookfield. Mortgage default. Filed June 17.

D’Arinzo, Ralph, Stamford. $301,194.27, in favor of Stephen Osman, by James F. Simon, Stamford. Property: 2020 Long Ridge Road, Stamford. Filed June 13.

Horan, Thomas, Newtown. $433.69, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 94 Riverside Road, Sandy Hook. Filed June 21.

Morin, David, Brookfield. $1,237.31, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, East Syracuse, N.Y., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 4 Jackson Drive, Brookfield. Filed June 17.

Thompson, Kathryn and Ryan V. Thompson, Wilton. Seller: Leslie H. Case and Andrew Hartmann, 201 Rivergate Drive, Wilton. Amount: $665,000. Filed June 18.

Whitelock, Katherine and Jeremy Whitelock, Newtown. Seller: Carol and James Gehrman, Newtown. Property: Lot 34, Map 6643 Loan Oak Meadows, Newtown. Amount: $470,000. Filed June 14.

Methayer, Marie Marthe and Nancy Methayer, et al. Creditor: CitiMortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 50 Glenbrook Road, Unit 4E, Stamford. Mortgage default. Filed June 17.

Dellaventura, Catherine, Bethel. $1,473.35, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 150B Grassy Plain St., Bethel. Filed June 21.

Jaeger, Debra, Danbury. $641.51, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 6 Evergreen Road, Danbury. Filed June 13.

Morits, Rebecca and Sean J. Morits. Creditor: American Home Mortgage Servicing Inc., West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 4 Castle Hill Road, Newtown. Mortgage default. Filed June 17.

Denninger, Christopher, Bethel. $490.95, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 99 Putnam Park Road, Bethel. Filed June 21.

Jeruss, Melinda, Bethel. $1,363, in favor of Charles Rogers DDS P.C., Danbury, by Randall J. Carreira, Bridgewater. Property: 78 Codfish Hill Road, Bethel. Filed June 17.

Parnas, David S. Creditor: DIJ Mortgage Capital Inc., New York City. Property: 40 Old Farm Road, Weston. Mortgage default. Filed June 12.

Durham, James R., Danbury. $2,310, in favor of Charles Rogers DDS P.C., Danbury, by Randall J. Carreira, Bridgewater. Property: 83 Deer Hill Ave., Danbury. Filed June 17.

Keough, Kimberly, Bethel. $528.30, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 30 Reservoir St., Bethel. Filed June 21.

Dutan Degonzalez, Blanca, Danbury. $550.76, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 11 Harmony St., Danbury. Filed June 20.

Khuon, Sokhom, Bethel. $1,017.54, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 7 Saxon Road, Bethel. Filed June 21.

Elliott, Janet L., Stratford. $708.62, in favor of Advanced Radiology Consultants L.L.C., Trumbull, by Richard Terry, Hamden. Property: 1371 South Ave., Stratford. Filed June 17.

Kingsley, Cari S., Weston. $7,731.39, in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 107 Eleven O’Clock Road, Weston. Filed June 13.

Enright, Roy, Danbury. $404.19, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, East Syracuse, N.Y., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 35-3 Fairview Drive, Danbury. Filed June 17.

Lapaix, Berlitz, Danbury. $401.83, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 59 Maple Ave., Unit 1, Danbury. Filed June 13.

Todd, Ashley S. and Michael U. Todd, Cincinatti, Ohio. Seller: Pauline Monteleone, Wilton. Property: 53 Branch Brook Road, Wilton. Amount: $975,000. Filed June 18. Trepkau, Margaret, Stratford. Seller: Elizabeth B. Seltzer and Matthew R. Harrigan, Stratford. Property: 2140 Elm St., Stratford. Amount: $260,000. Filed June 19. Tsoi, Andrea, Stamford. Seller: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., McLean, Va. Property: 120 Columbus Place, Unit 3, Stamford. Amount: $168,000. Filed June 18. Vanes, Michiel, Antwerp, Belgium. Seller: Dogwood Management S.A., Zurich, Switzerland. Property: 36 Bermuda Road, Westport. Amount: $4.02 million. Filed June 19.

Wiemken, Holly B. and James M. Wiemken, Surrey, United Kingdom. Seller: Joyce A. and Brian C. Rogers, Weston. Property: 11 Winthrop Hill, Weston. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed June 17. Wu, Yanfeng Shen, Stamford. Seller: Rosemarie Avery and Vincent Pocograno, Stamford. Property: 33 Greenleaf Drive, Stamford. Amount: $522,500. Filed June 18. Wyker, Jane Trust, White Plains, N.Y. Seller: 1 East Lyon Farm Drive L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: 1 E. Lyon Farm Drive, Unit 1, Greenwich. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed June 18. Young, Rena and Steve W. Young, Greenwich. Seller: FCOF SNPWL REO L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: 592 North St., Greenwich. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed June 19.

Vargas, Teresa and Pedro Giron, Stratford. Seller: Sandra Rosales, Fairfield. Property: 166 Woodend Road, Stratford. Amount: $123,000. Filed June 21.

Younkin, Christine L., White Plains, N.Y. Seller: Yong Ying, Stamford. Property: 59 Woodway Road, Unit 7, Stamford. Amount: $344,000. Filed June 17.

Vartuli, Nicole T. and Michael Vartuli, Stamford. Seller: Patricia A. and James R. Tompkins, Stamford. Property: 53 Sachem Place, Stamford. Amount: $460,000. Filed June 17.

Zerman, Susan and Hal Zerman, Stamford. Seller: Palmer Hill Partners L.L.C., Stamford. Property: 77 Havemeyer Lane, Unit 66, Stamford. Amount: $1.4 million. Filed June 18.

Vendig, Robert A., Stamford. Seller: Phyllis E. and Gary R. Peterson, Stamford. Property: 132 Hope St., Unit J, Stamford. Amount: $432,000. Filed June 14.

Zhang, Yiging and James Ni, Ridgefield. Seller: Nicole M. and Patrick J. Shima, Ridgefield. Property: 6 Titus Place, Ridgefield. Amount: $620,000. Filed June 21.

Vitti, Camille G. and Ralph V. Vitti, Stamford. Seller: James Basch, Stamford. Property: 25 Albin Road, Stamford. Amount: $405,000. Filed June 14.

Zielniski, Christina M. and Steve Rodriguez, Stamford. Seller: Sylvia S. and Robert P. Weitzman, Stamford. Property: 65 Highland Road, Unit 65, Stamford. Amount: $391,000. Filed June 18.

Voytek, Thomas J. III, Watertown. Seller: Louise and Thomas Fonabaio, Brookfield. Property: 16 Patricia Lane, Brookfield. Amount: $271,000. Filed June 17.

FORECLOSURES

Warren, Robin, Torrington. Seller: Marissa and Jeffrey Juliano, Newtown. Property: 32 Sugar St., Newtown. Amount: $240,000. Filed June 17.

Charris, Ana and Roberto Charris, et al. Creditor: CitiMortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 2 Watson Drive, Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed June 18. Dragani, Karen a.k.a. Karen Lehn, et al. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., San Diego, Calif. Property: 14 Derby Court, Unit 2B, Brookfield. Mortgage default. Filed June 17.

Schlesinger, Brenda M. and Joseph D. Schlesinger, et al. Creditor: CitiMortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 19 Saw Mill Road, Newtown. Mortgage default. Filed June 17. Shearer, Robyn and Robert Shearer, et al. Creditor: GMAC Mortgage L.L.C., Fort Washington, Pa. Property: 25 Padanaram Road, Unit 74, Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed June 17.

FORECLOSURES BY SALE Radman, Daniel, New Canaan. Appointed Committee: Jonathan J. Kelson, New Canaan. Property: 912 Weed St., New Canaan. Amount: $975,000. Docket no. FST 12cv6015450. Filed June 18.

JUDGMENTS Almeida, Jeffrey, Brookfield. $28,511.85, in favor of United Rentals North America Inc., Savannah, Ga., by Neil Paul, West Hartford. Property: 41 Pocono Ridge Road, Brookfield. Filed June 19. Alvero, Samuel, Stratford. $3,965.42, in favor of Cach L.L.C., Denver, Colo., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 193 Roosevelt Ave., Stratford. Filed June 17. Bagley, Raymond, Bethel. $1,116.78, in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 12 Briarcliff Manor, Bethel. Filed June 17. Berry, Kathleen E., Danbury. $1,023.89, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, East Syracuse, N.Y., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 166 Old Brookfield Road, Unit 34-6, Danbury. Filed June 17.

24 Week of July 8, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Ferreira, Luiz C., Brookfield. $8,140.25, in favor of Discover Bank, Salem, N.H., by Raymond G. LeFoll, Rocky Hill. Property: 67 Long Meadow Hill Road, Brookfield. Filed June 20. Fournier, Palma, Bethel. $387, in favor of Northeast Radiology, Brewster, N.Y., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 6 Cedar Drive, Bethel. Filed June 21. George-Samuel, Sharon J., Stratford. $4,581.99, in favor of Cach L.L.C., Denver, Col., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 330 Oceanview Terrace, Stratford. Filed June 17. Goulbourne, Devon, Danbury. $992.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 20 Oakland Ave., Unit 4C, Danbury. Filed June 17. Grillo, Carol A., Bethel. $481.39, in favor of Women’s Health Care of N.E., Norwalk, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 43 Fairchild Drive, Bethel. Filed June 17.

Lewis, Alma Jean, Danbury. $2,598.37, in favor of Connecticut Light and Power Co., Berlin, by Nair & Levin P.C., Bloomfield. Property: 136 Deer Hill Ave., Danbury. Filed June 13. Light, Deborah M., Bethel. $649.08, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 7 Mountain Orchard Road, Bethel. Filed June 21. Lynch, Sean, Danbury. $1,933.48, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 31 Lawncrest Road, Danbury. Filed June 13. Machado, Manuel Jr., Ontorio, Calif. $198,622, in favor of Virginia S. Devlin, Bethlehem, by Matthew P. Jasinski, Hartford. Property: 3 Skyline Drive, Danbury. Filed June 17. Manzano, Francisca, Danbury. $2,732.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 14A Abbott Ave., Danbury. Filed June 17.

Mota, Roman, Danbury. $374, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 58 Balmforth Ave., Danbury. Filed June 13. Oboy, Susan, Bethel. $972.39, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 10 Pell Mell Drive, Bethel. Filed June 17. Ozimkoski, Lisa, Bethel. $26,567.67, in favor of Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls, S.D., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 12 Benedict Road, Bethel. Filed June 21. Paynter, Janice L., Newtown. $86,666.58, in favor of Pride Acquisitions L.L.C., Bridgeport, by Gregory N. Bachand, Bridgeport. Property: 24 Palestine Road, Newtown. Filed June 17. Purcell, Lawrence, Westport. $3,630.16, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 7 Brookside Place, Westport. Filed June 17. Rivas, Ramona, Danbury. $994.75, in favor of the Danbury Office of Physician Services P.C., Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 20 Briarwood Drive, Danbury. Filed June 19. Rodrigues, Jonnie L., Danbury. $1,107.05, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 10 Shannon Ridge Road, Danbury. Filed June 17. Schoenauer, Eleanor M. a.k.a. Eleanor Adkins, Danbury. $12,629.96, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 13 Noteworthy Drive, Danbury. Filed June 17. Smith, Merilyn, Weston. $9,149.61, in favor of American Express Bank F.S.B., New York City, by Sara M. Gould, Stamford. Property: 73 Lyons Plain Road, Weston. Filed June 14. Stone, George, Danbury. $420.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 8A Judith Drive, Danbury. Filed June 17. Tapia, Maria, Danbury. $823.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 56 E. Starrs Plain Road, Danbury. Filed June 17.


on the record Valladolid, Jorge, Danbury. $3,222.45, in favor of American Express Bank, F.S.B., Horsham, Pa., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 163 South St., Unit 37, Danbury. Filed June 17. Vizi, Martin, Bethel. $854, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 13 Ravencrest Drive, Bethel. Filed June 21. Waldo, Robert C., Brookfield. $2,037.11, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Nathan G. Johnson, Pawtucket, R.I. Property: 175 Meadow Hill Road, Brookfield. Filed June 19. Wirth, Nellie, Stratford. $12,433.45, in favor of Discover Bank, Andover, Mass., by Nathan G. Johnson, Pawtucket, R.I. Property: 109 Creek Lane, Unit B, Stratford. Filed June 19.

LIENS

FEDERAL TAX LIENSFILED Cross, Roderic M. III, 50 Laurel Hill Road, Ridgefield. $3,206.23, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 21. Duffy, Dana A. (Estate), 31 Tall Pines drive, Weston. $113,764.59, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17. Giannitti, Ellen and Salvatore Giannitti Jr., 10 Christopher Hill Road, Weston. $102,732.73, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 21. Hettinger Welding L.L.C., 1445 E. Putnam Ave., Old Greenwich. $3.2 million, payroll taxes. Filed June 21.

Shaw, Eric, 27 Westfair Drive, Westport. $75,641.95, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 21. Thornton, Leona and Thomas Thornton, 341 Shore Road, Greenwich. $179,170.59, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 21. Top Transportation L.L.C., 28 Bungalow Park, Stamford. $8,413.93, payroll taxes. Filed June 18. Topilnycky, Adele A., 24 Spring St., Unit 26, Stamford. $21,684.23, trust fund recovery penalty and/or excise taxes imposed. Filed June 18. Topilnycky, Nicholas, 28 Bungalow Park, Stamford. $21,684.23, trust fund recovery penalty and/or excise taxes imposed. Filed June 18.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSPARTIAL RELEASE Butler, Janice N., 78 Waterview Drive, Sandy Hook. $8,336.97, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSRELEASED Barron, Antonio, 37 Waterbury Ave., Apt. 1, Stamford. $11,961.37, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 18. Colon, Luis D., 112 Cove Road, Stamford. $5,677.75, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 18. Demici, Mary Lou, 14 Raymond Place, Danbury. $10,984.50, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17.

Hipp, Christine A. and Louis M. Hipp III, 30 Chapel Lane, Riverside. $57,051.40, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17.

Duggan, James, 153 Weed Hill Ave., Stamford. $41,909.82, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 18.

Kaoud Brothers, 27B Danbury Road, Wilton. $6,862.68, payroll taxes. Filed June 17.

Duggan, James, 153 Weed Hill Ave., Stamford. $24,051.08, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 18.

Kosan, E. Michael, 38 Beach Road, Jamesport, N.Y. $37,157.92, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 21. Linticum, Wiliam E., 59 Lancer Road, Riverside. $27,749.54, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17. Ramos, Helio, 21 Rowan Street Extension, Danbury. $47,452.39, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17. Razzaia, Frank A. Sr., 17 Ridge Road, Bethel. $19,086.83, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17.

Goldstone, Theresa A. and David M. Goldstone, 128 Fairview Ave., Stamford. $138,870.72, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 18. Grau, John, 501 Brookside Drive, New Canaan. $112,097.67, trust fund recovery penalty and/or excise taxes imposed. Filed June 10. Harris, Kathy and Julian Markby, 366 Stanwich Road, Greenwich. $106,299.67, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17.

Harris, Kathy and Julian Markby, 366 Stanwich Road, Greenwich. $10,582, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17. Hernandez, Urania D. and Jose Palacios, 58 Whippoorwill Road, Bethel. $9,851.73, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17. Hopley, John, P.O. Box 5177, Greenwich. $116,035.78, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17. Islam, Jumara B. and Mohammad Mamun, 63 Scoffield Ave., Stamford. $11,054.28, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 18. J&N Bischof Hardwood Flooring L.L.C., 4 Sandcut Road, Unit 3, Brookfield. $1,602, return of partnership income. Filed June 19. JHW Greentree Capital L.P., 130 Main St., New Canaan. $11,200, return of partnership income. Filed June 10. Kobrin, Jennifer A., 3 Charlottes Way, Danbury. $16,026.91, trust fund recovery penalty and/or excise taxes imposed. Filed June 19. Kobrin, Jennifer A. and Stephen Kobrin, 3 Charlottes Way, Danbury. $8,584.99, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 19. Rippel, Melissa M., 5 Arthur St., Greenwich. $11,668.69, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17. Vaughn, Mary Frances E. and Michael J. Vaughn, 54 Taylor Road, Bethel. $18,504.97, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17. Verboven, Barbara C., 46 Havemeyer Lane, Old Greenwich. $16,734.39, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 17.

MECHANIC’S LIENSFILED 20 Gutzon Borglum Road L.L.C. and Chenango Excavation Inc., Stamford. Filed by D.W. Transport and Leasing Inc., Montville, by David Waddington. Property: 20 Gutzon Borglum Road, Stamford. Amount: $8,720. Filed June 14. BLT Reserve, Stamford. Filed by Men of Steel Rebar Fabricators, Edgewater Park, N.J. Property: 55 Abbey Lane, Danbury. Amount: $45,153.55. Filed June 19.

Dietz, Debra L., Stamford. Filed by Western CT Craftsmen L.L.C., New Fairfield, by Anthony N. Kaplanis. Property: 1 Ocean View Drive, Stamford. Amount: $8,170. Filed June 13. Milkey, Charlene, Stamford. Filed by Rocco Lombardi (HIC), Stamford. Property: 143 Hoyt St., Unit 4B, Stamford. Amount: $14,400. Filed June 13. Shindler, Karen R. and Steven B. Shindler, Stamford. Filed by Prizio Roofing and Siding Co. Inc., Stamford, by John Prizio. Property: 45 Laurel Ledge Court, Stamford. Amount: $8,000. Filed June 13.

MECHANIC’S LIENSRELEASED 327 West Avenue L.L.C. and JFS Inc., Stamford. Filed by Pat Munger Construction Co. Inc., Branford. Property: 327 West Ave., Stamford. Amount: $42,890.45. Filed June 18. B Stamford L.L.C.; Locals 8 L.L.C. and Local 8 Restaurant Group, Stamford. Filed by DL Poulin Inc., Brunswick, Maine, by David L. Poulin. Property: 100 Greyrock Place, Suite H008, Stamford. Amount: $288,996.66. Filed June 13. McMinn, Louise B., Greenwich. Filed by Gabriele Construction Inc., Stamford, by James Rapaport. Property: 59 S. Water St., Greenwich. Amount: $11,000. Filed June 18.

Brillon, Celaine and Erik Brillon, et al., Bethel. Filed by Anne R. Hoyt, Hartford, for The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 4 Saxon Road, Bethel. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $385,000, dated October 2005. Filed June 19.

Contreras, Jorge A., Stratford. Filed by Jessica L. Braus, Fairfield, for HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 81 High Park Ave., Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $240,000, dated December 2006. Filed June 19.

Camacho, Elidia and Maximino Camacho, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jason E. Brooks, Stamford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 390 Lakeside Drive, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $217,000, dated August 2005. Filed June 17.

Cunningham, Debra P. and Joseph K. Cunningham, et al., Brookfield. Filed by Andrew J. Buzzi Jr., Danbury, for Rollingwood Condominium Association III Inc., Brookfield. Property: 38 Rollingwood Drive, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed June 19.

Campana, Margaret A. and Daniel Campana, et al., Stamford. Filed by Amanda Tiernan, West Warwick, R.I., for Pennymac Mortgage Investment Trust Holdings I L.L.C., Moorpark, Calif. Property: 51 Schuyler Ave., Third floor, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $227,000, dated November 2006. Filed June 13. Caporale, Patricia L. and Ronald J. Caporale, et al., Bethel. Filed by Jessica L. Braus, Fairfield, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 34 Midway Drive, Bethel. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $248,000, dated June 2005. Filed June 19.

LIS PENDENS

Caruso, Dawn and Thomas Caruso, Greenwich. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 18 Ridge St., Greenwich. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $565,000, dated May 2005. Filed June 17.

941 Associates L.L.C. and Edward J. McCarthy, Wilton. Filed by Robert E. Grady, Wethersfield, for CSFB 2002 CKP1 941 Danbury L.L.C., Danbury. Property: 941 Danbury Road, Wilton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $850,000, dated July 2003. Filed June 17.

Chan, Gene, et al., Danbury. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 260 Middle River Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $294,400, dated December 2006. Filed June 17.

Aguirre, Matilde R. and Juan C. Guaman, et al., Danbury. Filed by Sonja J. Straub, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 17 to 17 1/2 McDermott St., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $500,000, dated June 2007. Filed June 17. Alexandre, Nahomie and Wegums Alexandre, et al., Stratford. Filed by James W. Donohue, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 175 Hollywood Ave., Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $282,565, dated July 2008. Filed June 21.

Concordia, Luigi, New Canaan. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 61 Juniper Road, New Canaan. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $1 million, dated April 2006. Filed June 13. Conte, Maria P., et al., Danbury. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for M&T Bank, New York City. Property: 20 Harwood Drive, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $205,000, dated December 2002. Filed June 13.

Damaso, Mary Jean, et al., Danbury. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for Citimortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 29 Town Hill Ave., Unit 5, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $262,000, dated August 2006. Filed June 13. Darling, Brenda, Brookfield. Filed by Andrew J. Buzzi Jr., Danbury, for Rollingwood Condominium Association III Inc., Brookfield. Property: 13 Eden Court, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed June 19. De Oliveira, Junia, et al., Stratford. Filed by Erik Loftus, East Hartford, for Hudson City Savings Bank, Yonkers, N.Y. Property: 298 to 300 Boston Ave., Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $247,000, dated January 2007. Filed June 20. DeFrancesco, Gina, Greenwich. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 30 Windy Knolls, Unit B, Greenwich. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $417,000, dated February 2008. Filed June 17. Defreitas, Ana P., et al., Danbury. Filed by Alan P. Rosenberg, West Hartford, for Birchwood Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 27 Crows Nest Lane, Unit 14A, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed June 13. Diperna, Joanne and Kathleen G. Beck and Brian R. and Ronald Beck, Brookfield. Filed by Andrew J. Buzzi Jr., Danbury, for Rollingwood Condominium Association III Inc., Brookfield. Property: 28 Andover Court, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed June 19.

THE RECORDS SECTION IS NOW AVAILABLE BY DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION. Go to westfaironline.com/buy/records-section/ for more information and to view a sample.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013 25


on the record Dixon, Winefred, et al., Danbury. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 27 Briarwood Drive, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $145,100, dated September 1995. Filed June 20. Estiverne, Philomene L. and Pierre U. Ulysse, et al., Stamford. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for CitiMortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 5 Dryden St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $285,384, dated January 2008. Filed June 17. Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C.. Filed by Alan P. Rosenberg, West Hartford, for 95 Park Manor Condominium Association Inc., Danbury, 95 Park Manor, Unit 12, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed June 13. Fox, Sandra I. and Irving M. Fox, et al., Danbury. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 58 Wedgewood Drive, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $360,000, dated May 2003. Filed June 13. Gole, Subodh N., et al., Danbury. Filed by Gregg A. Brauneisen, Danbury, for Camelot Court Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 11 Mannion’s Lane, Unit 24, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed June 18. Gomez, Marcia and Gustavo Gomez, Bridgeport. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 210 Hillside Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $162,807, dated June 2010. Filed June 17. Grubb, Michael L., et al., Danbury. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 3 Mendes Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $272,000, dated December 2004. Filed June 17. Haley-Banez, Arianne H. and Lynn M. Haley-Banez, Stratford. Filed by Amanda Tiernan, West Warwick, R.I, for Pennymac Mortgage Investment Trust Holdings L.L.C., Moorpark, Calif. Property: 740 Wilcoxson Ave., Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $305,800, dated October 2006. Filed June 19. Haliano, Jill and Peter Haliano, Stamford. Filed by Valerie A. Finney, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 86 Diamond Crest Lane, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $661,013, dated June 2009. Filed June 18.

Hart, Alicia K. and Douglas B. Hart, et al., New Canaan. Filed by Valerie A. Finney, Farmington, for HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 540 Frogtown Road, New Canaan. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $1.2 million, dated April 2007. Filed June 18. Hennig, Georgyann and Jeffrey W. Hennig, et al., Danbury. Filed by Valerie A. Finney, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 18 Homestead Ave., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $243,400, dated February 2006. Filed June 17. Hilario-Duran, Maria L., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Valerie A. Finney, Farmington, for Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C. Property: 243 Jefferson Road, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $108,000, dated November 2008. Filed June 17. Janush, Ellen and Donald Janush, et al., Stamford. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 168 to 172 Colonial Road, Unit 9, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $333,700, dated October 2004. Filed June 17. Kom, Phonesavanh and Sanmeang N. Kom, et al., Danbury. Filed by Anne R. Hoyt, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 8 Parker St., Unit J10, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $169,600, dated November 2005. Filed June 17. Lashkari, Homayoun and Soudabeh Ghaffari, et al., Stamford. Filed by Erik Loftus, East Hartford, for HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 56 Four Brooks Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $582,400, dated June 2007. Filed June 18. Matschke, Michelle Elise and Rick A. Matschke and Estate of Marilyn L. Matschke, Newtown. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 39 Bears Hill Road, Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $260,000, dated July 2006. Filed June 20. Metwally, Abdel H., et al., Stamford. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for CitiMortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 444 Bedford St., Unit 75, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $217,000, dated March 2006. Filed June 13.

Murphy, Michael L., et al., Brookfield. Filed by Andrew J. Buzzi Jr., Danbury, for Rollingwood Condominium Association III Inc., Brookfield. Property: 4 Chatham Court, Unit 19D, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed June 19. Navarra, Tanya Marie and Michael T. Navarra III, et al., Danbury. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 10 Concord Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $292,000, dated January 2011. Filed June 20. Nguyen, Lynn Tuyet and Thang Quang Nguyen, et al., Danbury. Filed by Sonja J. Straub, Farmington, for Amalgamated Bank, New York City. Property: 28 Tobins Court, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $480,000, dated January 2007. Filed June 19. Pang, Hong Chang and Sheldon Pang, et al., Greenwich. Filed by Michael J. Barnaby, Greenwich, for Line Design L.L.C. Property: 18 Stanwich Road, Greenwich. Action: to foreclose on a mechanic’s lien. Filed June 18. Pileggi, Barbara, et al., Danbury. Filed by Mario Arena, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 86 E. Pembroke Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $250,000, dated February 2004. Filed June 17. Porzio, Anita E. and Michael Porzio, et al., Weston. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 12 Windslow Road, Weston. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $975,000, dated September 2004. Filed June 14. Ramirez, Emily A. and David A. Ramirez, et al., Danbury. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 2 Beverly Drive, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $310,500, dated April 2005. Filed June 17. Rayher, Jennifer R. and Jason R. Rayher, et al., New Canaan. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 119 Parade Hill Road, New Canaan. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $368,000, dated January 2007. Filed June 12. Rodriguez, Efigenia and Luis A. Rodriguez, et al., Stamford. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for Prospect Mortgage L.L.C., Garfield, N.J. Property: 95 Liberty St., Unit B1, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $171,920, dated March 2011. Filed June 14.

26 Week of July 8, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

Rosenbaum, Elizabeth B. and Maury E. Rosenbaum, et al., Stamford. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for CitiMortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 26 Chester St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $385,000, dated March 2004. Filed June 14. Salemne, Jean, et al., Danbury. Filed by Gregg A. Brauneisen, Danbury, for Eastridge Association of Danbury Inc., Danbury. Property: 5 Nabby Road, Unit A48, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed June 18. Scanlon, Guadalupe P., et al., Stamford. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for M&T Bank, New York City. Property: 221 Culloden Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $332,000, dated July 2005. Filed June 13. Szczpanska, Elzbieta, Stratford. Filed by Max L. Rosenberg, Stratford, for Success Village Apartments Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 89 Canaan Court, Building 80, Apt. 17, Stratford. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed June 17. Tenesaca, Edgar, et al., Danbury. Filed by Bendett and McHugh P.C., Farmington, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 33 Homestead Ave., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $332,000, dated December 2005. Filed June 20. Thomas, June A., et al., Stratford. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 625A Onondaga Lane, Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $203,000, dated September 2008. Filed June 20. Verdock, Charlette J. and Thomas K. Verdock, et al., Stratford. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 110 Diane Terrace, Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $250,000, dated June 2003. Filed June 20. Vos-Laborie, Linda and Philip Laborie, Weston. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 269 Lyons Plain Road, Weston. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $417,000, dated May 2009. Filed June 13. Walston, Kevin L., et al., Stamford. Filed by Amy L. Harrison, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 25 Forest St., Unit 6A, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $417,000, dated July 2010. Filed June 17.

moRTGAGES

COMMERCIAL 62 Sound View L.L.C., Greenwich, by Brandon Lacoff. Lender: Strategic Partners Value Enhancement Fund L.P., Indianapolis, Ind. Property: 62 Sound View Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1.8 million. Filed June 21. 68 Sound View L.L.C., Greenwich, by Brandon Lacoff. Lender: Strategic Partners Value Enhancement Fund L.P., Indianapolis, Ind. Property: 68 Sound View Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1.8 million. Filed June 21. JCS 25 Lewis Street L.L.C., Stamford, by Justin Shaw. Lender: Stamford First Bank, Stamford. Property: 23 to 25 Lewis St., Greenwich. Amount: $2 million. Filed June 20. Lamp Realty L.L.C., Stratford, by Philip Nizzardo Jr. Lender: People’s United Bank N.A., Bridgeport. Property: 120 Allen St., Stratford. Amount: $840,000. Filed June 19. Morgan Avenue L.L.C., Greenwich, by Camille Sprio Giblin. Lender: Capital One N.A., Melville, N.Y. Property: 2 Morgan Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $825,000. Filed June 20.

NEw BuSINESSES ABLA, 157 Shelter Rock Road, Danbury 06810, c/o Anna Bronowicz. Filed June 18. Allan Enterprises L.L.C., 1919 High Ridge Road, Stamford 06903, c/o Alla Kharevska and Andriy Kharevskyy. Filed June 21. Amigos Liquor Store, 128 West St., Danbury 06810, c/o 128 West Street L.L.C. Filed June 19. Arias General Contracting, 93 Spruce St., Apt. 3, Stamford 06902, c/o Rodrigo Arias. Filed June 19. Atlantic City Caribbean Beach Festival, 53 Sandpit Road, Unit 5132, Danbury 06810, c/o Rheba Escalera. Filed June 13. Campbell Auto Center, 66 Soundview Ave., Stamford 06902, c/o Victor A Jaquez. Filed June 17.

NEw LIQuoR LICENSES Ancona’s Winers and Liquors, 720 Branchville Road, Ridgefield 06877, c/o Mitchell N. Ancona. Filed June 19. Shake Shack, 1849 Post Road East, Westport 06880, c/o Shake Shack Westport L.L.C. Filed June 21. Town Line Fine Wine Spirits and Beer, 345 Hawley Lane, Stratford 06614, c/o Steven A. Toccogna. Filed June 19.

PATENTS Automatic capture and management of images. Patent no. 8,466,987 issued to Jay S. Walker, Ridgefield; James A. Jorasch, New York City, NY; and Russell P. Sammon, San Francisco, Calif. Assigned to Walker Digital L.L.C., Stamford. Oxygen separation assembly and method. Patent no. 8,465,630 issued to David M. Reed, East Amherst, N.Y.; David Suggs, Eggertsville, N.Y.; Michael J. Collins, Lockport, N.Y.; Richard Kelly, Buffalo, N.Y.; and Gervase Christie, Williamsville, N.Y. Assigned to Praxair Technology Inc., Danbury. Sound processing system for configuration of audio signals in a vehicle. Patent no. 8,472,638 issued to Kenneth Carl Furge, Howell, Mich.; Bradley F. Eid, Greenwood, Ind.; and Roger E. Shively, Greenwood, Ind. Assigned to Harman International Industries, Inc., Stamford. Suppression of diffusion in epitaxial buried plate for deep trenches. Patent no. 8,470,684 issued to Chengwen Pei, Danbury; and Geng Wang, Stormville, N.Y. Assigned to International Business Machines Corp., Armonk, N.Y. System to provide price adjustments based on indicated product interest. Patent no. 8,473,341 issued to Jay S. Walker, Ridgefield; Keith Bemer, New York City, N.Y.; Russell P. Sammon, Stamford; and Timothy A. Palmer, Stamford. Assigned to Walker Digital L.L.C., Stamford.

+thiS Week’S

eleCtroniC reCorDS SeCtion ContainS:

DiLillo Realty Group, 1A Kingswood Drive, Bethel 06801, c/o James V. DiLillo. Filed June 17.

15 more Commercial Building Permits on Westfaironline.com.

Dockside Enterprises L.L.C. d.b.a. Dockside Cleaners, 340 E. Main St., Stratford 06615, c/o Linda P. Mitchell and Susan Rotunda. Filed June 18.

50 more Residential Building Permits on Westfaironline.com.

Elite Home Solutions, 21 Douglas Ave., Stamford 06906, c/o Matthew J. Hall. Filed June 18.

25 more New Business on Westfaironline.com.


Business ConneCtions Issues & PolIcIes

Human ResouRces

State ‘Long Overdue’ for Regulatory Reform

C

onnecticut is long overdue for what the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection calls a “21st century regulatory model”—one that abandons outdated processes and focuses on incentives for businesses. That was the overarching message DEEP Commissioner Dan Esty [pictured, right] delivered to more than 200 business leaders at CBIA’s Annual Environmental & Energy Conference in Waterbury. “One of the stories that wasn’t told [during the 2013 Connecticut General Assembly session], ”he noted, “was the great bipartisanship in the legislative and executive committees…partnerships we saw in constructively developing an [environmental and energy] agenda” and “a platform of legislative accomplishments that we have to build on.” This spirit of cooperation, he says, “presents a model for how we are going to do business in a time of limited budgets.” Acknowledging that progress in some areas of regulatory reform has been “slower than we would like,” Esty

HealtHcaRe 2014

Fact vs Fiction Do I have to buy health insurance through the state exchange? No. Exchanges (or marketplaces) are simply an alternative for individuals and small businesses to purchase insurance. Beginning in 2014, Connecticut’s state insurance exchanges will serve primarily individuals buying insurance on their own and small businesses with up to 50 employees. Insurance coverage will still be available in the private insurance marketplace. In fact, the private insurance marketplace, which includes the CBIA Health Connections program—a private exchange for small business—is expected to provide a far greater array of choices for consumers.

HR Hotline We’re looking at a temporary decline in business and have to decide whether to lay off several employees or reduce hours. If we reduce hours such that employees are working eight to 10 fewer hours each week, will those employees be able to collect unemployment? The state Department of Labor (DOL) has a Shared Work Program that provides an alternative to layoffs and could be what you need right now. Rather than laying off a percentage of their workforce, employers may reduce the hours and wages of all employees or a particular group of employees.

pointed out his agency’s early success in revamping the permitting system, “mapping out the current process and re-engineering it so that it’s faster, lighter, more efficient, and more economical,” “stripping out many duplicative and unnecessary laws” and “getting these off the books.” He cited DEEP’s new streamflow regulations and a pilot return-to-compliance process for small businesses that waives penalties for first-time violators of RCRA. He also pledged to continue leaning processes and “focus limited DEEP staff and resources on areas of highest risk.” In his keynote address, Esty also summarized DEEP’s near-term energy priorities for the state, which include: f Lower, more stable energy costs f Resiliency, in particular with microgrids f Multimodal mobility, including the development of walkable, bikeable communities f Expanding the framework of electric vehicle (EV) charging stations, creating a baseline infrastructure that eliminates consumers’ “range anxiety,” or concerns about a lack of charging stations. f Minimizing the impact of power outages

The employees whose hours and wages are reduced can receive partial unemployment insurance benefits to supplement their lost wages. These partial benefits are made possible through special eligibility regulations governing the Shared Work Program. Among the program’s requirements: f The employer must have four or more full-time employees participating in the shared work plan. f The employees must have a reduction in hours and a corresponding reduction in wages of not less than 20% and no more than 40% of the full-time norm. f The employees’ fringe benefits may not be reduced or eliminated during the time the plan is in effect. f All participating employees must be identified by name and Social Security number.

f Scaling up Canadian hydropower, which Esty said “presents an extraordinary opportunity for New England to obtain cheaper, cleaner, more reliable energy”

f The program must be in lieu of a layoff of an equivalent percentage of employees.

f Low-cost loans, longer payback periods, and green banks to attract capital for business projects involving clean energy and energy efficiency

f No employee may receive a combination of shared work benefits and regular unemployment comp benefits that exceeds the maximum total benefits payable to the claimant during the course of his or her benefit year.

f Increased access to natural gas to a potential 300,000 customers

➤ Learn more at cbia.com/healthcare2014 Read more at gov.cbia.com

f Employees must be eligible for regular unemployment compensation.

➤ Learn more at cbia.com/hr

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of July 8, 2013 27


CALL FOR NOMINATIONS CRITERIA

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n its second year, this popular award is open to any CFO who has worked a minimum of two years for a company in Fairfield County. Three winners will be chosen by a distinguished panel of judges; one from a company with fewer than 100 employees, another from a company with 101 to 500 employees and the third from a company with more than 500 employees.

NOMINATIONS ACCESSIBLE AT WESTFAIRONLINE.COM/CFO-AWARDS, NOMINATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED FROM NOW THROUGH JULY 10.

AWARDS CELEBRATION SAVE THE DATE, MEET THE CANDIDATES AND CELEBRATE THE 2013 FAIRFIELD COUNTY CFO OF THE YEAR WINNERS WITH GUESTS AND COLLEAGUES.

DATE/TIME + LOCATION OCTOBER 2 | 5:30 P.M. HOTEL ZERO DEGREES 353 MAIN AVE., NORWALK

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