__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2020

The ARTS Issue J U LY 2 0 2 0

+ A SPECIAL GIVING SECTION

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

1


BITTNERS

.c o m


Sponsored Content

Cherokee Triangle Treasure 2433 Ransdell Avenue $830,000

T

TERRI BASS TEAM Terri Bass + Shelly Bringardner Lenihan Sotheby’s International Realty 4

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

For your private showing, please contact Terri Bass Team at 502.424.8463 or tbass@lsir.com.

his graceful clapboard Highlands home may be over a century old, but careful renovations and recent updates have created a current feel and desirable floor plan. The first floor rooms are spacious and recently updated with refinished floors, new paint, trim and light fixtures. The kitchen offers new stainless appliances, updated cabinetry, stone countertops, sink and fixtures. You have several options for gracious entertaining here, either in the adjoining sunroom, large dining room or on the deck overlooking the recently planted gardens. The spacious backyard has mature trees, newly planted perennials, new invisible fencing and access to the twocar garage. It can also be accessed from the alley. On the second floor, the primary bedroom suite has been reconfigured to make better use of space. You’ll find a separate sitting room, fireplace, custom closets and updated bath with dual marble-topped vanity, soaking tub and shower. Two cozy bedrooms and a bath are also on this floor and two additional bedrooms and bath are on the third floor. All are light-filled and perfect for a home office as well. A new half bath has been added in the basement and renovations on the floor, walls and ceiling have created a space you’ll want to use, possibly for a playroom, family room or workout room. This is a wonderful home in an outstanding location. NOVEMBER 2020


TERRI BASS TEAM Terri Bass + Shelly Bringardner 502.424.8463 / 502.551.4552 tbass@lsir.com • sbringardner@lsir.com

387 Mockingbird Valley Road | Mockingbird Valley 2.33 Acres | $2,400,000

211 Mockingbird Gardens Drive $1,275,000

$2,350,000

551 Fairfield Dr | Cherokee Gardens $1,095,000

5222 Indian Woods Dr, Unit 301,302 | Indian Hills $1,250,000

5803 Orion Road | Glenview

4300 Hill Top Road

$755,000

19 Brownsboro Hill Road | Bonniewood $825,000

© MMXX Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Each office is independently owned and operated. An Equal Opportunity Company, Equal Housing Opportunity. Lenihan Sotheby’s International Realty | 3803 Brownsboro Road | Louisville, Kentucky 40207 | 502.899.2129 © MMXX Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered)

service marks used with permission. Each office is independently owned and operated. An Equal Opportunity Company, Equal Housing Opportunity. Lenihan Sotheby’s International Realty | 3803 Brownsboro Road | Louisville, Kentucky 40207 | 502.899.2129


Eat

Yo u r

B o u r b o n

M ar ke t p lac e

Lunch & Dinner • Grab & Go • Cocktails & Cof fee 2 7 0 8 F r a n k f o r t Av e n u e | L o u i s v i l l e , K y 4 0 2 0 6 Menu Online at EatYourBourbonMarketplace.com


The Porsche Macan Puristic, expressive, timeless.

Blue Grass MOTORSPORT 4720 Bowling Blvd. Louisville, KY 40207 502-894-3428 porschelouisville.com


VO L . 3 4 • N O . 1 1

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . CO M

JANICE CARTER LEVITCH PUBLISHER

EDITORIAL LIZ BINGHAM EDITOR IN CHIEF

SAR AH LEVITCH STAFF WRITER

LIZ GASTIGER • STEVE HUMPHREY JOE KIRVEN • JOSH MILLER • MIR ANDA MCDONALD CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

ELIZABETH SCINTA EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

ART BRITANY BAKER ART DIRECTOR

LANE LEVITCH ADVERTISING DESIGNER

K ATHRYN HARRINGTON • ANDREA HUTCHINSON STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS

JOHN H. HARR ALSON JR. CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

ADVERTISING MARSHA BLACKER • JULIE KOENIG K AREN PIERCE • LAUREN SHARP ANDERSON ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

LAUR A SNYDER RED PIN MEDIA CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER

The Voice-Tribune (ISSN 1076-7398) is published monthly by Red Pin Media, 974 Breckenridge Lane #170, Louisville, KY 40207. Subscription rate: $39/year. Call 502.895.9770 to subscribe.

A R E D PI N M E D I A COM PA N Y

8

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


FEATURES 20 The CommUNITY Batch

80 A Family Business That Cares

Maker’s Mark creates a special bourbon with all proceeds going to The LEE Initiative

How Huber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards and Starlight Distillery supported their community during quarantine

26 The Show Must Go On

86 A Note of Confidence

How the performing arts are embracing the virtual stage for the fall 2020 season

How AMPED Louisville is connecting the community through music

32 The It List

90 Home Couture

The ultimate holiday gift guide for everyone on your list featuring all local items

A fashion editorial dedicated to what to wear to an at-home virtual gala

42 The Day That Kept On Giving

100 Don’t Ever Let Anyone Tell You Kentucky Ain’t Cool

How the Community Foundation’s annual day of giving hit record numbers despite the pandemic

46 Art For All, Forever

Speed Museum Director Stephen Reily reflects on his milestones and the future of the museum

50 A Beautiful Retreat

How a home was transformed before a quarantine no one expected

60 A Helping Hand A listing of nonprofit organizations in Louisville that need your help now 10

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

A new Frazier History Museum exhibit shows off everything “cool” about Kentucky

104 Nostalgia from A to Y

Reflections on the life of murder mystery novelist Sue Grafton

108 We All Declare For Liberty

Quappi Projects opens a new exhibit that focuses on the future of American Citizenship

112 A Chef Knows Best How to avoid isolation through a delicious recipe meant to share | VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

114 Five Ways to De-Stress for the Holidays

Healthy and helpful tips to keep you in shape all season long

OCCASIONS 118 Introducing Matt Winn’s Steakhouse at Churchill Downs Racetrack 120 Waterfront Botanical Gardens Annual Gala 122 Joyce Meyer Hosts October Issue Launch Party 124 Quappi Projects “We All Declare for Liberty” Exhibit Opening 126 St. Francis School’s (re) Imagine! Auction & Fundraiser 127 The Kentucky Derby Museum’s Ladies in Leadership Breakfast 128 Oxmoor Farm Hosts NouLou Chamber Players

ESSENTIALS 14 Letter from the Publisher 16 Letter from the Editor

On the Cover: Speed Museum Director Stephen Reily. Photo by Kathryn Harrington. NOVEMBER 2020


CONTENTS

KAOS jumpsuit, $68, available at Sassy Fox Upscale Consignment, A+O Clade Grommet booties, $159, available at Belle Monde Boutique. Pear-shaped emerald and diamond ring, $13,400; 14kt white gold coral and diamond ring, $11,500; 18kt white gold, 18-inch diamond necklace, $35,000; 18kt white gold drop earrings, $6,990; 14kt white gold diamond bracelet, $65,000; 7-inch 14kt white gold diamond tennis bracelet, $19,475; 19kt white gold diamond bracelet, $32,000; 7-inch filigree platinum diamond bracelet, $14,500; 18kt white gold filigree diamond bracelet, $11,700, available at Aesthetics In Jewelry. NOVEMBER 2020

Nicole Miller leopard dress, $385; 5 Ă 7 jacket, $695, available at Rodeo Drive. Christian Louboutin heels, $795; Yves Saint Laurent purse, $2,450, available at Rodes For Her. William Goldberg platinum diamond fringe necklace, $75,000; 14kt white gold amethyst and diamond ring, $4,500; Platinum and diamond filigree bracelet, $30,000; 14kt white gold pear-shape kunzite and diamond ring, $4,600; 14kt white gold diamond drop earrings, $11,550, available at Aesthetics In Jewelry. VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

Byron black tuxedo, $1,095; Eton black shirt, $265; Robert Jensen black tie, $175, available at Rodes For Him.

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

11


GREAT STUFF FOR REALLY GOOD DOGS! DOG SUPPLIES • FOOD • TREATS • SUPPLEMENTS

We are a locally owned and operated full service pet store just for dogs. We have an allnatural bakery inside where we bake fresh dog treats every day. Our dog food is an ultra-premium food designed especially for us. We even have products for special needs dogs. We always look for new and exciting items that are not only dog safe, but designed to blow their little furry minds with goodness! At Gangsta Dog, it’s not just about having terrific products, but about having a fun and unique experience whenever you step in the door.

For each $50 Gift Card you buy, get a $10 Gift Card FREE! (In-store only. Now through December 31, 2020)

2400 LIME KILN LN, STE. A-1, LOUISVILLE, KY 40222 • (502) 694-3644 • GANGSTADOG.COM


fashion forward without spending a fortune shopsassyfoxconsign.com

New Hours Tue–Fri 11–5 pm Sat 10–4 pm

502.895.3711 150 Chenoweth Lane


Christian Siriano gown, price upon request, available at Glasscock Women’s Boutique. Photos by J. Edward Brown.

the Letter from Publisher “I know now that real contentment comes from the ability to manifest your dreams.” — Lucille Carloftis

O

ur own backyard is the place that has become obvious to us, to you, in the past few months as the place that matters most, our homes. For this issue, we started reaching out and actually leaving the shelter of our homes to bring you inspiring stories that keep you connected to our community. For some of us, this was the first time in months we allowed our adventurous nature to feel safe and discover that we can get out and about, bringing with us our day-today travel paraphernalia that consists of a mask, hand sanitizer and possibly a pair of gloves. For most of us, our typical day in the past consisted of waking up at the crack of dawn, rushing through breakfast and

14

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

out the door to battle the morning traffic on the way to the office. Life has slowed down a bit and helped all of us recognize the moments that we can savor to the fullest. Luckily, months before the pandemic found its way into our world, I had taken the time to set up a home office, not knowing how important this space would become. In my new office environment, the challenge of learning how to conduct meetings virtually has actually heightened my sense of language and listening skills. I hope you too have been able to discover what can be gained by simply exploring your own backyard. Gala season is upon us, the virtual gala season that is. So, I thought I should dress up in a flouncy party gown in black, of course. Even though I was going to enjoy a pocket of time in my own backyard, the simple ritual of changing out of casual wear into clothing that had been moved to the back of the closet and needed the dust knocked off of it was exciting. It was about the simple joy of a garment that requires zipping up and buttoning as opposed to an elastic waistband. I have a childhood memory of my family and neighbors dressing up, stringing lights around their outdoor patios, playing guitars, singing together and dancing under the moonlight. It taught me that style emanates from within, cultivated from the simplest of evocative moments. Whether you’re in an isolated cabin in the countryside or a home in the suburbs, you can create your moments with the finest of details that can soothe your soul. All of us at The Voice would like to thank our advertisers and loyal supporters because without you we cannot do what we do so well. As the iconic local publication for over 70 years, my finest hope is that the words and images in these pages will continue to inspire you to see the treasures in your own backyard. With gratitude,

Janice Carter Levitch Publisher NOVEMBER 2020


Outfit: Douglas Hannant blouse, $2,010; Marc Jacobs jacket, $4,500; Carolina Herrera shorts, $990, available at Glasscock Women’s Boutique. Gucci horse bit boots, $500; Chanel earrings, $899, available at Belle Monde Boutique. Chanel tights from Liz’s personal collection.

Letter from the Editor

T

he November issue, our Arts issue with a special Giving section, is one that is usually bursting with gala and fundraiser event photos with everyone excited to see if they made it on the pages in their black-tie best. This year, however, due to the pandemic — as we all keep saying — just like everything else, they have gone virtual. You will, however, find an increase in event photos this month in our “Occasions” section, so don’t give up on finding your photo just yet! Our fashion editorial was my first inspiration for this issue, attempting to portray and rethink what a virtual gala meant and how we gala-goers can still have fun with it. It includes an array of at-home formal looks that I hope will inspire you to also have some fun with fashion again and get dressed up just because. Take my Editor’s photo, for example. Not my typical look as I’m sure you noticed, but it’s the Arts issue and I kind of look like an orchestra conductor (or a pirate or a Shakespearean actor according to a coworker). But the point is, I had fun with it and I hope you can laugh along with me. To honor the Arts community in Louisville — aside from my silly outfit — we featured a story, written by Sarah Levitch, on how Actors Theatre, the Ballet, the Opera and the Orchestra are pivoting their typical performance methods to continue to provide us with the enjoyment of their highly-skilled talents. Josh Miller visited the NuLu art gallery Quappi Projects to cover its new exhibition, “We All Declare For Liberty: 2020 and the Future of American Citizenship.” We interviewed Speed Museum Director Stephen Reily and his team about Reily leaving his position in March 2021 and what that means for the team and museum going forward. Elizabeth Scinta checked in with the Frazier History Museum to learn about its new exhibit, “Cool Kentucky,” that includes items from the local and internationally known murder mystery novelist, Sue Grafton, who Steve Humphrey took a break from writing about science to reflect on their history together. To recognize the nonprofits in our community that need our help now more than ever, we dedicated an entire section to local nonprofit organizations in the hopes that you too can lend a helping hand. We featured one such organization, AMPED, located in the West End, that was written by Miranda McDonald and also the Community Foundation of Louisville who just had a record-breaking Give For Good Day in both money raised and donors. We interviewed the Huber family who has been giving back through their Orchard, Winery & Vineyards and Starlight Distillery, and Maker’s Mark who is releasing the limited edition CommUNITY Batch bottle with all proceeds benefitting the LEE Initiative. Our Tastes writer, Liz Gastiger, shared a delicious chocolate cake recipe that is meant to bring people together and our Health writer this month, Joe Kirven from Milestone, shared five ways to de-stress for the holidays. Speaking of the holidays, we also have a 60+ item Gift Guide that is sure to have something for everyone on your list, all available locally, and a beautiful home designed by Leslie Lewis Sheets to inspire you to get your home holiday-ready. I hope you enjoy this issue and that it inspires you to bring some fun back into your life and to honor the arts and nonprofit community of our great city of Louisville. Sincerely yours,

Photo by Andrea Hutchinson. 16

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

Liz Bingham Editor in Chief NOVEMBER 2020


At our table, everyone is welcome. Maker’s Mark is proud to partner with The LEE Initiative, a nonprofit organization co-founded by Chef Edward Lee and Lindsey Ofcacek. An acronym for Let’s Empower Employment, The LEE Initiative strives to create more diversity and equality in the restaurant industry through small, impactful programs that help shape the next generation of industry professionals, including its Women Chefs Program launched in 2018 and its Restaurant Workers Relief Program created to support hospitality workers impacted by COVID-19. Please join us and donate what you can at leeinitiative.org.

WE MAKE OUR BOURBON CAREFULLY. PLEASE ENJOY IT THAT WAY. Maker’s Mark® Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whisky, 45% Alc./Vol. ©2020 Maker’s Mark Distillery, Inc. Loretto, KY All trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

makersmark.com


THE

2020 Maserati Ghibli MASERATI LOUISVILLE | 4710 Bowling Blvd., Louisville, KY 40207 | Sales: (502) 894-3429 | maseratilouisville.com


We treat varicose and spider veins so you can have

Healthy Beautiful Legs Again!

Radiofrequency Ablation Venaseal Ultrasound Guided Foam Sclerotherapy Varithena Sclerotherapy

Dr. Steve Samuel Member: American College of Surgeons American Vein and Lymphatic Society

Comprehensive Vein Care (502) 583-7741 | 141 Quartermaster Court | Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130 | ComprehensiveVeinCare.net


Nonprofit Profile

The CommUNITY Batch Maker’s Mark creates a special bourbon with all proceeds going to The LEE Initiative By SARAH LEVITCH Left to Right: Lindsey Ofcacek and Valerie Netherton. Photo by Kathryn Harrington. 20

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

|

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


E

xpanding upon the success of the Restaurant Relief and Reboot program, Maker’s Mark and the LEE Initiative have joined forces again to create a liquid reflective of the people. The LEE Initiative, originally founded for the Women Chefs Program, encountered tremendous growth and influence over the past few months as its Relief and Reboot program supports members of the hospitality industry who have struggled in the face of COVID-19. Now, with relief centers in 19 cities and aiding the reboot of around 55 farms and 75 restaurants throughout 11 cities, their next venture aspires to fund the next class of women chefs and, if necessary, more relief for the hospitality industry. Now encompassing Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana, the Women Chefs Program provides young, aspiring women chefs an opportunity to learn and be mentored by women who have risen from line cook to chef and owner. Lindsey Ofcacek, co-founder and managing director of the LEE Initiative, explained how they pay all of their mentees through their mentorship. Ofcacek said, “Anytime they’re away from their restaurant, we pay their wages so they can expand their education without worrying. At the end of every class, they cook a five-course dinner at the James Beard House, which is an honor for a chef at any stage of their career, but especially for a young woman.” Getting to also make their own Maker’s Mark Private Select bourbon and flavor of Jeni’s ice cream, the program offers rare opportunities for participants to make professional connections and explore their own creative culinary palette. In true Kentucky fashion, Valerie Netherton, head of Maker’s Mark and the LEE Initiative partnership, decided that Maker’s Mark, rather than simply donating money, would create a new, limited bourbon to raise half a million dollars for the LEE Initiative. The mashbill stems from their Private Select Program, where retail and restaurant partners are invited to construct their own expression of Maker’s Mark, adding wood staves for the last nine weeks of the aging process in their limestone cellar. Netherton explained, “We combined the recipes of 37 private select customers across the country, customers that, like Maker’s Mark, think giving back to the community is important.” Rather than simply blending all the different liquids together, Jane Bowie, director of innovation, recommended a process called barrel vatting. Bowie

NOVEMBER 2020

mkjewelers.com

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

21


Edward Lee. Photo by Jolea Brown.

explained, “Barrel vatting isn’t about getting more age or flavor, it’s about the barrel as the vessel for the whiskey to come together in a more cohesive way.” The process involved blending the 37 private select recipes in a tank, taking the wood-finishing staves out of the private select barrels and then putting the blended whiskey back in those barrels for five weeks in the limestone cellar. A unique, unusual process yields a one-of-a-kind bourbon. Bowie noted the CommUNITY Batch is truly its own bourbon, describing, “The nose is in the fig, prune and raisin camp. The taste is really creamy, dark, rich and dry. There’s definitely some backbone and stability. For me, it has some semisweet chocolate and raisin flavor, with nice rickhouse characteristics. For people who like Maker’s 46, the darkness and sharpness of it, this is a step further, rounder and fuller.”

22

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

The process represents more than just a special way to blend bourbon. Netherton expounded upon the metaphor. “We’re calling this the CommUNITY Batch because it’s so symbolic of community,” said Netherton. “We have 37 different barrels and flavor profiles, and we brought them together. At first, they were a little awkward, but as they sat and rested in the barrel vatting process, the flavors enhanced and came together, symbolic of a community. People come together from different backgrounds with different ideas, and it’s a little awkward at first, but as they build and live in a community together, the hope is the community gets better.” Available for purchase only on the LEE Initiative’s website, the CommUNITY Batch will yield 7,200 bottles, a truly limited bourbon, and 100% of the sale of the bottle will go to the LEE

NOVEMBER 2020


Initiative. Maker’s Mark and the LEE Initiative will host various events across the country where people can come pick up their bottles, most occurring on Giving Tuesday. Ofcacek concluded, “The growth the LEE Initiative has had during COVID, and the way we’ve been able to support the industry, has been incredible. We’re so fortunate that we never had to feel helpless. When all of the restaurants shut down across the country, we were so grateful that we could help feed our community while keeping some line cooks employed. For us, it’s hope. We’re so grateful that through the sales of these bottles, we’ll be able to help in the next crisis.” V The CommUNITY Batch bourbon will be in a 750 ml bottle at cask strength, 107.7 proof. To buy a CommUNITY Batch bottle and for more information visit leeinitiative.org

mkjewelers.com NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

23


For your moments of bliss

3605 Glenview Avenue Jon Mand, 417.2837 | $2,595,000

28 ACRES

NEW PRICE

5251 Old Sligo Road | L’Esprit

6712 Elmcroft Circle | Elmcroft

18717 Weatherford Circle | Locust Creek

5216 Moccasin Trail | Indian Hills

Nell Pearce Bradley, 338.2499 | $1,195,000

Alex Holloway, 681.7474 | $699,995

Rick Walters, 649.9410 | $1,049,000

Brandon Jones, 718.0044 | $549,900

SALE PENDING

2421 Blackiston Mill Road | Clarksville Jason Farabee, 649.5181 | $450,000

3928 Stonyrun Drive | Brookhollow Melissa Fleck, 767.9901 | $325,000

©MMXX Lenihan Real Estate, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® and the Sotheby’s International Realty Logo are service marks licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC and used with permission. Lenihan Real Estate, LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each franchise is independently owned and operated. Any services or products provided by independently owned and operated franchisees are not provided by, affiliated with or related to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC nor any of its affiliated companies.


RIVERFRONT

UNDER CONTRACT

2404 Belknap Beach Road

11929 Creel Lodge Drive | Anchorage

19 Brownsboro Hill Road | Bonniewood

5750 Captains Quarters Road

6332 Mistflower Circle | Norton Commons

5506 Rock Valley Way | Rock Springs

Cara King, 418.2882 | $1,495,000

Melanie Galloway, 291.9210 | $1,299,000

Terri Bass Team, 424.8463 | $825,000

Bob Parks, 445.5265 | $525,000

Lynette Masterson, 643.4445 | $779,000

Julie Beam, 905.0599 | $525,000

NEW PRICE

1229 Payne Street | Irish Hill Laura Rice, 593.3366 | $319,000

2111 Boulevard Napoleon, Unit 4 | Highlands Marty Mudd, 550.1826 | $194,900

FIND YOUR BLISS AT LSIR.COM

Lenihan Sotheby’s International Realty | 3803 Brownsboro Road, Louisville, Kentucky 40207 | 502.899.2129 | lsir.com


Arts & Entertainment

The Louisville Ballet

SHOW MUST GO ON

THE

How the performing arts are embracing the virtual stage for the fall 2020 season

I

By SARAH LEVITCH

once read somewhere that the Earth without “art” is just “eh.” Possessed with a poignant ability to connect people of different beliefs or languages, art persists in society as an instigator, uniter and healer. Art constructs another dimension of human understanding, one where words disperse into our subconscious and intuitive sentiments arise. As this year reveals what has been hiding in the cracks, exposing our strengths and our weaknesses, we’ve been called upon by the Earth to examine our lives and let go of old habits or beliefs that are no longer serving us for the better. Moving through a time of darkness and uncertainty, the performing arts offer a guiding light towards the year’s end, refusing to be the ones let go of. These

26

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

trying times have been a testament to the dynamic talent and passion behind the performing arts organizations in Louisville. After speaking with the Kentucky Opera, Louisville Orchestra, Louisville Ballet and Actors Theatre, I discovered that the coming season of arts reflects and serves our community like never before. Embracing the virtual challenge, original and classic pieces take to the digital stage with the belief that art has transformative powers. Despite all we’ve endured this year, there is still hope. We are far from perfect, but with each step, we learn more about ourselves, adapting to a more equitable and sustainable society. Open your heart, eyes and ears, and breathe in the crisp creativity of the Louisville performing arts. Here’s a sneak preview into what the season looks like.

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

presents their “Season of Illumination” through cinematic dances in partnership with Kertis Creative and a continuation of educational programs. Their opening show “Kentucky! Volume 1” casts a spotlight on our city as an original dance tracing the history of four fictional families in Louisville. Brandon Ragland, dancer and choreographer, teased, “You’ll get to see how four families migrated to Kentucky to start their own families, and how they’re all interconnected toward my character’s story.” Artistic and Executive Director Robert Curran added, “We are creating something brand new that’s made by and with Kentucky artists, about Kentucky, for Kentucky.” Also in this season, the Ballet launches its new Ballet Bound Program. Curran explained, “We are offering an experience for 15 youths from underprivileged communities, Title I schools, to come into the ballet downtown and take classes. At the end of each program year, two to three of those 15 will be offered a full scholarship to the Louisville Ballet School. The intent is, each year, two to three students will join the school and, hopefully, the company at the end of their training.” All other outreach and community engagement programs will continue in the digital world as well. Curran concluded, “We are striking a balance between thinking globally but acting locally. We want to make sure the stories we tell are relevant to our community, but we also want to make sure they are featuring our world-class standards, whether that’s production value, the quality of the dances or the depths of the material we are putting into each of these films. If we can take your mind and heart away from the every day, just for a few minutes, we will have done our work and served our community in the way we do best.” The Ballet will announce the shows as the season progresses via louisvilleballet.org or @louballet on social media.

NOVEMBER 2020


Left to Right: Brett Marshall, Brandon Ragland, Natalia Ashikhmina, Robert Curran.

The Louisville Orchestra presents their season of filmed concerts and an online series of smaller performances around the idea of music for all. Teddy Abrams, conductor of the Orchestra, noted, “The entire concept of the season is built around public service, community service and giving as opposed to asking anyone to give to us.” Each concert will be filmed at Paristown

Hall and presented virtually, as well as for free at the Sauerback Family Drive-In. Although a digital concert shifts the paradigm, Abrams and the Orchestra chose to lean into this new medium. “We spent a lot of time thinking about how our concerts look and feel not just in terms of what happens on the stage, but also of how we capture it,” said Abrams. “If you’re going to make something that’s cinematic, you have to embrace the cinema of it.”

Having a concert available virtually invites people from around the world to tune in. Whether they’re fans of the legendary bluegrass musician Sam Bush performing in early November or the classic sound of Soul, Motown and Funk to be played free for everyone in late November, there’s a little something for everyone. Abrams also spoke of an expansion of their education programming saying, “We have a very comprehensive collaboration

Left to Right: Kathryn S. Ohkubo, Teddy Abrams.

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

27


with JCPS. This year, we can reach a lot more kids digitally. Development has increased because we can teach and coach students from all kinds of backgrounds who’ve never had access to individual lessons.” Abrams continued, “This is about using music as the ultimate bridge. I am absolutely, 100% focused on using the Orchestra’s capabilities as artists, musicians and communicators, to bridge those divides and get our city to realize we can all believe in something and show the rest of the world that’s who we are.” Boutique Public Relations + Concierge Communications

The Orchestra will announce events and performances as the season progresses via louisvilleorchestra.org or @ louisvilleorchestra on social media. Barbara Jamison.

Thank you for choosing DLG as Best Public Relations Firm. Your vote means so much to our small business! We love living in Louisville and sharing stories about those who make the Derby City so incredibly special.

KENTUCKY PROUD. NATIONALLY KNOWN. ALL EYES ON YOU.

DebraLockerGroup.com

presents their season “Amplify Your Voice” through mini-webisodes online and on social media, rather than full-length operas, exploring three themes: faith, justice and family. Calling upon the community to share their stories, Director Barbara Jamison commented, “We thought we’d use these three themes that appear quite frequently in opera, and ask the community what their perspectives and stories are. We will connect those stories to the existing repertoire and create our own interpretation of that operatic repertoire.” Through the website, you can share any photos, videos, photographs, letters, etc. that reflect your experience with these themes. With hopes to gather safely in the spring of 2021, the Opera aims to present three live performances, a mix of original and existing pieces, each surrounding one of the themes and a possible black-tie fundraiser with KORE Gallery. Despite an uncertain next few months, the Kentucky Opera is committed to returning to the stage when safe, with intentions to continue collecting stories and tying it back into the Opera. “Operas are stories set to music,” Jamison reflected, “and the music elevates the story and helps us feel more deeply. When we do it well, it engages our minds in thinking and feeling deeply about the topics. How can we look at an opera, see the bigger truth and use it as an opportunity to gather around an idea?”

Fashion your world beautiful. Style it confidently. Shop new and like new designer brands you love for less.

115 Fairfax Ave. 502.403.3432 Tues. – Sat. 12 – 6 p.m. bellemondeboutique.com Let’s be friends! bellemondeBMB bellemondeboutique

28

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

The Kentucky Opera

To support and stay up to date on new content, check their website kyopera.com or follow @kyopera on social media.

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Erica Denise.

From the Vault Actors Theatre of Louisville presents a trans-media season of virtual plays, radio plays, interactive games, weekly podcasts and unscripted episodes. Erica Denise, director of learning and creative engagement, shared that the Facebook Live and Unscripted conversations have been, “interactive with the audience because in real-time the audience can type their questions or comments on the topic being discussed. We’ve been very responsive to what has been happening in our city with police brutality and the pandemic.” Adapting to the virtual world, yet still grasping to the classics, “Dracula” and “A Christmas Carol” will be presented as radio plays, harkening back to a time when the radio was the central form of communication and will allow the listener’s mind’s eye to imagine the stories. “COVID-Classics” takes a contemporary angle on oneact plays by master playwrights Guillaume Apollinaire, Anton Chekhov, Luigi Pirandello, August Strindberg and Thucydides. Robert Fleming, executive artistic director, directs the enduring love story “Romeo & Juliet” with a twist. Actor and Writer Lance Newman II teased, “in Fleming’s vision, the Montagues are from Louisville’s West End, a predominantly Black, low-income neighborhood, and the Capulets are from Louisville’s East End, a predominantly White, middle to high-income neighborhood. Familiar plays bring warm feelings to the theater’s regulars, but in that comfort, we find the ability to slide in a bit of truth they might have chosen to ignore.” The season also presents original pieces such as “Ali Summit,” depicting a 1967 conversation between Muhammad Ali and other Black athletes surrounding the Vietnam War, and “Where Did We Sit on the Bus?” a one-person show reflecting the experience of an immigrant family through rap, hip-hop and the spoken word. Fleming concluded that, “All of our season is a reflection and celebration, as well as an opportunity to demonstrate resilience in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and systemic racism reckoning happening across the nation. It has been exciting during a very challenging time to still have this plethora of creativity flowing while connecting with and serving the community.” V Stay tuned through their website actorstheatre.org or by searching Actors Theatre of Louisville on social media.

NOVEMBER 2020

Bespoke

502-893-0900 www.finerjewelry.com 3720 Frankfort Avenue Monday - Friday 10-5, Saturday 10-3

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

29


Sponsored Content

Two Years of 502 Hemp Wellness Center New Kentucky Flavored Relief CBD oils now available By ELIZABETH SCINTA Photo by KATHRYN HARRINGTON

O

n Oct. 18, 2020, 502 Hemp Wellness Center, owned by Dee Dee Taylor, celebrated its two year anniversary. In 2014, Taylor got into the hemp business when her husband, John Taylor, turned to alternative medicine to help with his grand mal seizures. Since the two years her retail store has been open, Taylor says she’s seen the hemp industry grow and expand. “Unfortunately, there are a lot more people that have jumped on the CBD bandwagon just to make a buck and it hurts legitimate companies like mine,” said Taylor. 502 Hemp Wellness Center offers a large selection of hempbased products such as CBD oil, edibles and beauty products, to name a few. All of the products are made locally from Commonwealth Extracts, John Taylor’s company, and other local vendors. 502 Hemp Wellness Center has also won Best CBD Oil and Best CBD Store in the LEO Readers’ Choice Awards two years in a row. CBD is known to provide relief from anxiety and depression and to help with better sleep. It is also known for helping with overall human health, according to the 502 Hemp Wellness Center website. “[My favorite product is] our 750 mg Orange Dreamsicle full spectrum CBD Oil. Most of my customers use it for anxiety and sleep,” said Taylor. They now have a “Kentucky Flavored Relief” section of the store that includes a bourbon and Mint Julep flavor in 750 or 1500 mg. They also have new lotions, scented CBD bath bombs and gummies. For their full inventory, check out their website at 502hemp.com, or in person at one of their three locations in La Grange, Middletown or Simpsonville. “We’ve been in business for a reason and that’s always been about helping others,” said Taylor. Interested in trying one of their products but don’t know where to start? Don’t worry, Taylor and her team will help you find the best product for your needs. 502 Hemp and Wellness Center La Grange, Middletown and Simpsonville 502.654.7100 | 502hemp.com

30

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

Lifting Mist © 2020

HAPPY HOLIDAYS! Lynn Bayus

(Formerly Lynn Dunbar the Oil Painter)

Oil Paintings & Commissions Visit my studio for new work! 1000 Swan Street 502.905.5966 | Dunbar-Art.com

Sensory Mitt Ministry A sensory mitt is made with embellishments inside and out to provide activity for the restless hands of loved ones with dementia and Alzheimer’s. Join us - let’s make mitts together!

Mondays at 1pm drop-ins welcome Touching lives, one mitt at a time

2501 Rudy Lane (502) 896-0303 calvinpreschurch.org /groups/SensoryMitts/ NOVEMBER 2020


1

2 MAMILI 826 E Main St. Louisville, KY 40206 mamili502.com 502.384.4450

the It List

1. Red & white polka dot 100% silk necktie by Dion Neckwear Collection, $113. 2. Gold studded green handbag with multi-color strap by Page Rockstar, $55.

Photos by KATHRYN HARRINGTON and ANDREA HUTCHINSON

A

lready stressing about holiday gifts? No need to worry because we’ve compiled a list of festive, gift-worthy items all available locally for everyone on your list. Happy shopping!

3

5 DETAILS FURNITURE GALLERY & DESIGN 11816 Shelbyville Road Louisville, KY 40243 detailslouisville.com 502.253.0092

4

3. Amethyst crystal with metal stand, 20” tall, $609.99. Amethyst crystal with metal stand, 16” tall, $154.99. 4. Seashell encrusted box, 10” x 13”, $399.99. 5. Porcelain cheetah, $1,109.99.

12 32

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


6 LYNN DUNBAR ART STUDIO 6. “Tug on Ohio River,” 1000 Swan St. oil on canvas, 20" x 60", $3,750. Louisville, KY 40204 dunbar-art.com 502.905.5966

8

7

AESTHETICS IN JEWELRY 410 West Chestnut St. Louisville, KY 40202 aestheticsinjewelry.com 502.589.2728

9

10

7. Diamond platinum ringdant with 83 diamonds equaling 16 carats, $30,000. 8. 14K hollow link chain bracelet washed with pure gold, $2,690. 9. All North American stones necklace of ammolite, fire agate, peridot and druzy stones set in sterling silver, $5,800.

NANZ & KRAFT FLORISTS 141 Breckenridge Lane Louisville, KY 40207 nanzandkraft.com 502.897.6551 10. White orchid with pine cones embellishment, $70. 11. Thymes Frasier Fir sink set, hand wash & hand lotion, $48. Thymes Frasier Fir fragrance diff user, $46. Thymes Frasier Fir aromatic votive, $17. Thymes Frasier Fir aromatic candle, $38.

11

12. Happy Holidays cardinal pillow, $69.95.

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

33


FROM THE VAULT 3720 Frankfort Ave. Louisville, KY 40207 finerjewelry.com 502.893.0900

13. From the Vault Italian Connection handmade 18K yellow gold with a green Pegasus Intaglio pendant featuring a .08ct round bezel set emerald with a sterling silver backing, $1,400. 18” 14K yellow gold filled necklace, $145.

13

14

14. 22K yellow gold Ethiopian opal and fire opal pendant with a 14K yellow gold bail, $1,300. 18” 14K yellow gold square diamond cut spiga 022.7MM necklace, $228.

15 15. The Soy Sauce Tasting Experience includes Bourbon Barrel Aged, Handcrafted Soy Sauces, Bluegrass Soy Sauce, Double Fermented Imperial Soy Sauce, Bourbon Smoked Bluegrass Soy Sauce and Small Batch Bourbon Ponzu. Each soy sauce is handcrafted in Louisville, using the Bluegrass State's all-natural and locally sourced ingredients, $68. 16. Choose a gourmet gift box by Bourbon Barrel Foods, add a bottle of Bourbon or let us help you curate the perfect custom gift that fits your needs. Each gift is packed with care by one of our team members to ensure quality and we deliver throughout the Louisville area. Gift shown, $88.

16

17

34

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

BOURBON BARREL FOODS - EAT YOUR BOURBON MARKETPLACE 2710 Frankfort Ave. Louisville, KY 40206 bourbonbarrelfoods.com 502.618.0939

17. Bourbon Smoked Snack Trio includes Bourbon Barrel Foods’ most popular snacks: Bourbon Smoked Sea Salt and Pepper Peanuts, Bourbon Smoked Spiced Snack Mix and Bourbon Smoked Chili Peanuts. This trio makes a great gift if you're willing to share! #eatyourbourbon, $36.

NOVEMBER 2020


MERKLEY KENDRICK JEWELERS 138 Chenoweth Lane Louisville, KY 40207 502.895.6124 mkjewelers.com

21 21. Edwardian platinum, ruby and diamond brooch, $3,521. 22. Circa 1970 18K yellow gold Rolex GMT Master, reference 1675 with brown bezel, brown "nipple" dial and riveted Oyster bracelet, $32,000.

18 PAPPY & COMPANY 843 E Market St. Louisville, KY 40206 pappyco.com 1.888.834.9831

23. Platinum 2.01ct emerald cut diamond ring with emerald cut sapphire side stones and full cut diamond accent stones, $24,998.

18. Pappy Van Winkle Tradition cigars. Churchill size box of 10, $160. 19. Award winning Pappy Van Winkle Bourbon Barrel pure maple syrup. 12.7 fluid oz., $38.

23

20. Wilson silver julep cup 10 oz., $250.

22

19

24

25 26

CALOSPA REJUVENATION CENTER 2341 Lime Kiln Lane Louisville, KY 40222 502.814.3000 calospa.com

24. Forever Young BBL Give yourself the gift of more youthful looking skin this holiday season with our non-surgical, zero downtime BroadBand Light™ treatments. With Forever Young BBL™, you can look as young as you feel. 25. Achieve That HALO Glow Halo™ laser is the first hybrid fractional laser ever developed for skin resurfacing. It can correct many skin tone and texture issues giving patients results they love without the discomfort or downtime they expect. 26. HydraFacial Keravive

20

NOVEMBER 2020

Treatments at CaloSpa are even better when you leave with a gift! Did you know the HydraFacial Keravive treatment includes a take-home treatment spray that helps deliver ongoing scalp health benefits? This spray should last for 30 days between your in-office HydraFacial Keravive treatments. Who is ready for healthier, shinier and fuller-looking hair?

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

35


27. Maker's Mark 101 The founders of Maker's Mark, Bill Samuels, Sr. and his wife Margie, would often share a special bottle with their closest friends and family, particularly during the holidays: Maker's Mark at 101 proof. Maker's Mark 101 is being released this year as a tribute to that Samuels family tradition, available to seasonal shoppers while supplies last. 750ml, available at retail stores, $37.99. 28. CommUNITY Batch The CommUNITY batch unites the finishing stave combinations made by dozens of independent bars and restaurants from around the country who have a heart for giving back. Proceeds from this extremely limited release go to the LEE Initiative. Visit leeinitiative.org/makers for availability and more information. 750 ml, 107.7 proof. 29. Maker’s Mark 46

29

2020 is the 10th anniversary of the unique finishing process Bill Samuels, Jr. created to make his personal favorite expression of Maker’s Mark, resulting in a bolder, spicier whisky with deep, complex notes of vanilla and caramel. 750ml, available at retail stores, $34.99.

27

28

MAKER'S MARK DISTILLERY 3350 Burks Spring Road Loretto, KY 40037 makersmark.com 270.865.2099

31

30. Free People shoes, size 7, $32. 31. Kate Spade wallet, $24. 32. Bulova gold tone watch, $175.

30 SASSY FOX UPSCALE CONSIGNMENT 150 Chenoweth Lane Louisville, KY 40207 shopsassyfoxconsign.com 502.895.3711

32 37

36

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


33 502 HEMP WELLNESS CENTER 201 Moser Road, Suite B Louisville, KY 40223 502hemp.com 502.654.7100

34

35

33. Kentucky flavored relief by 502Hemp, 1500mg $119.95, 750mg $60.95. 34. Clinical Strength CBD Balm by 502Hemp, $29.99.

36

35. Starlight Distillery’s Carl T. Bourbon Whiskey Starlight Distillery’s Carl T. Huber’s small batch bourbon is a farm-to-bottle, craft bourbon. Blended from bourbons aged 4 to 6-years-old on the Huber estate, Carl T. is the perfect gift for any bourbon aficionado on your gift list, $34.99

HUBER WINERY & STARLIGHT DISTILLERY 19816 Huber Road Borden, IN 47106 starlightdistillery.com huberwinery.com 812.923.9463

KENTUCKY DERBY MUSEUM 704 Central Ave. Louisville, KY 40208 derbymuseum.org 502.637.1111 36. Kentucky Derby 146 Embroidered Horses Cap. This cap features an embroidered horse pattern and the official logo of the 146th Kentucky Derby. Available in navy, hot pink, white or tour blue. One size fits most. Regular price is $28, now on sale for $14!

38

37. Twin Spires Woodford Reserve. This year, 2020 marks the 125th anniversary of the Twin Spires at Churchill Downs. Since their debut in 1895, they have served as an iconic landmark of the world-renowned racetrack. Initially designed and created as simply an addtion, these structures have become permanently linked to Churchill Downs and the Kentucky Derby. Distiller's Select Woodford Reserve, Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey. Personally selected by the Kentucky Derby Museum. 45.2% ALC/VOL (90.4 Proof) 1.0 liter, $146. 38. Radley London Racehorse Silhouette bag. A part of the Royal Ascot collection, this bag is crafted with the finest leather and intricate detailing to match the high sartorial standard of the occasion's outfits. Clutch in hand or swing over the shoulder with a strap to stay hands free at your next event, $198.

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

37


Cartwheels Papers & Gifts 3919 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207 502.895.1800 39. 2021 Karen Adams desk calendar This best-selling calendar makes a great gift that helps the recipient celebrate year-round. Each twelve 6-inch square — one for every month — features an original Karen Adams design that is printed and hand-finished. A beautiful gold or silver easel is enclosed to showcase the month's artwork on your desk, shelf or counter, $64.

40 39

Three Dog Bakery 3929 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207 502.897.3364 threedog.com

41

40. It’s been a “ruff ” 2020 and even your dog needs a little “licker” now and then. These adorable Champagne (2 sizes) and Barker’s Mark (2 sizes, larger not pictured) toys will lift their “spirits,” from $14.95.

42 CHENOWETH SQUARE 3907 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207

43

Fleur de Lis Interiors Accessories & Gifts 3913 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207 502.893.5341 fleurdelisandmerci.com 41. Eyewear by Peepers, $22 each. Merci Boutique 3911 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207 502.893.4252 fleurdelisandmerci.com 42. Dolce Vita cashew suede zelma shoe, $150.

44

Bedded Bliss 3936 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207 502.899.5153 beddedblisslinens.com 43. Barefoot Dreams robe & socks, $160.

45

Dolfi ngers 3937 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207 502.895.3226 dolfingers.com 44. Glitterazzi ornament by Joy To The World, $78.

38

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Digs Home and Garden 3905 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207 502.893.3447 digshomeandgarden.com

J. McLaughlin 3931 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207 502.893.8786 jmclaughlin.com

45. Horsehead bookends, $40.

48. Harlem cognac dress, $228.

H.J. Redmon Exclusive Footwear 3933 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207 502.894.9800 46. Vaneli Footwear Sahar leopard print shoes, $165. Lemon Tree 3915 Chenoweth Square Louisville, KY 40207 502.690.3315

47

47. Katie Wrap available in tomato, camel, black and teal by Top It Off, $50.

46

48

49

GANGSTA DOG 2400 Lime Kiln Lane Suite A-1 Louisville, KY 40222 gangstadog.com 502.694.3644 49. Dog donuts, $4.99 each.

50

50. Dog birthday cake, $35.

51 NOVEMBER 2020

51. Gangsta Dog gourmet dog food 5lb bag, $22.50. Christmas toy prices vary by type and size.

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

39


52

52. Magnificent diamond bracelet with 53 dazzling emerald cut diamonds set in an 18K white gold bracelet. $62,000. 53. A ring fit for a princess! Gorgeous three carat oval shaped genuine blue sapphire surrounded by 11 sparkling full cut diamonds with a total gem weight of 1.33 carats, $17,700.

53

54. Dazzling diamond necklace that’s perfect for that little black dress! Over two carats of round brilliant cut diamonds and baguette cut diamonds are set in this fabulous white gold pendant. $3,995.

GENESIS DIAMONDS 4600 Shelbyville Road, Suite 106 Louisville, KY 40207 genesisdiamonds.net 502.891.0424

55 CATHERINE BRYANT Studio by appointment catherinebryantart.com 502.314.5897

54

55. “First Notes of Spring,” oil, 30" x 40", price upon request. 56. “Warm Water Feels Good,” oil, 36" x 48", price upon request.

56

40

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


57. The A Method Holiday Kit Give the gift of gorgeous skin this holiday season with a powerful age-preventive kit featuring four medical grade products PLUS the NEW C Gel Facial Masks, the latest addition to The A Method Family and your new favorite Vitamin C Facial Mask. Ideal for your introduction to The A Method brand and a great travel kit.

57

58. The A Method MASKNE Kit Our answer to the culprit no one saw coming: maskne! Mask-Induced Acne is a real condition that requires real, medical grade attention. The A Method Maskne kit features three blemishbusting products designed to keep breakouts in-check and prevent blemish prone skin from acting up while wearing protective facial masks.

THE A METHOD / SHALIA BOTANICALS 1920 Stanley Gault Pkwy., Suite 100 Louisville, KY 40223 877.746.4407 theamethod.com and shaliabotanicals.com

59. C Gel Facial Masks (6-Count Pack) A perfect and relaxing way to introduce your skin to the incredible age-defying benefits of stabilized vitamin C. These weekly restorative masks are packed with ultrahydrating ingredients designed to improve skin elasticity, boost circulation and increase antioxidant activity beneath the skin’s surface. Use code VOICE10 for $10.00 OFF your order!

58

THE SHOP AT LL&A 249 Spring St. Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812.282.6606 leslielewisdesign.com 60. Smell of Tree Potpourri, $23 each. Smell of tree candle, $26.50 each.

59

61. Holiday wine bottle toppers, $16 - $20 each. 62. Rustic metal planters with long-neck reindeer heads and little tails, $55 each.

60

NOVEMBER 2020

61

62

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

41


The Day That Kept On Giving How the Community Foundation’s annual day of giving hit record numbers despite the pandemic By ELIZABETH SCINTA Below: River City Drum Corp. Photo by Taris Smith Right: Deja Jackson and Emory Williamson.

42

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

W

hen preparing for this year’s annual Give For Good Louisville Day, the Community Foundation of Louisville’s executive team anticipated a much lower turnout, in terms of donations and donors, than years past. However, much to their surprise, Give for Good day on Sept. 17 far exceeded all expectations. “Over $7.7 million was raised which was a record, as well as the most donors — over 22,000 — which was also a record,” said Ron Gallo, president and CEO of Give For Good Louisville. In a time when a global pandemic has struck the nation, instead of turning away from local nonprofits, Louisvillians came out in full force to help keep 500+ nonprofit organizations afloat. Most nonprofits had to cancel their in-person galas and events, so for most, Give for Good was one of their only fundraising opportunities this year. “What they [the nonprofit community] really appreciated, was that we went ahead with it and totally retooled our training in the weeks prior. It was all digital, but we helped them be successful on the day by helping them set goals, crafting fundraising language, social media storytelling and tips on how to engage their donors. I think that the hidden gem in all of this is really what happens leading up to giving day which is as important as the day itself. The nonprofits were very appreciative of that,” said Gallo. Give for Good day was virtual this year due to the pandemic, and although it was different from years

NOVEMBER 2020


2020 Record Year: 22,000 Donors $7.7 Million

past, Gallo believes the Community Foundation will continue to implement some of the social media tactics they used this year in the future. “I think that with Give for Good we will retain some of the digital interactions because it works so well. The proof is in the pudding!” said Gallo. “We’re always looking to do it better and better, but I think the main thing that might carry over is a mix of continuing to do things digitally at a distance and through social media. But I’m sure we will also — because it’s so much fun — be out in the field again when it is safe to do so.” For River City Drum Corp, Give for Good day could not have come at a better time. They were preparing to launch a brand new fundraising campaign this year when COVID-19 hit. They raised over their set fundraising goal of $15,000 for the day and ended with $16,020 thanks to the people of Louisville. “With it being a strange year, at this point, it’s going towards operations. I would assume that in years past we’d be able to do some special programming or give our kids access to some special event at no cost. But with everything slowing down and us not being able

NOVEMBER 2020

} ACH } Remote Deposit Capture† } mRDC (Mobile Remote Deposit Capture)† } Lock Box

} } } } }

Merchant Services Sweeps Account Analysis Online Wires Business Online Banking*

p: 502.259.2490 / e: bsuite@cbandt.com

www.CBandT.com/businesss-banking Mobile data and text messaging rates may apply. Contact your service provider for details.*Requires internet banking enrollment. †Deposits subject to verification. Availability may be delayed under some circumstances.

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

43


Photo by Shutter Photography & Film.

Shop our newest styles that will keep you looking beautiful into the holiday season! We have a great selection of women’s clothing, shoes, jewelry and accessories, select men’s apparel and accessories plus youth and gift items.

502.384.4450 826 E. Main St. Louisville, Ky 40206 NuLu Marketplace

to do things normally, we just want to ensure that we are able to remain sustainable in this difficult period,” said Jerome Baker, the associate director of River City Drum Corp. For Hosparus Health, the day resulted in an equally successful fundraising push. The organization raised just over $22,000 on Give for Good day according to Tawanda Owsley, the vice president of development for Hosparus Health. Hosparus Health canceled its annual Candle Glow Gala this year, but on Nov. 6, they’re launching a brand new fundraising campaign. They encourage interested parties to visit their website and social media channels to learn more about the People of Compassion Campaign. “Right now is a critical time for the community to support all of the nonprofits in our community. We all need help more than ever. We are continuing to provide services to the community and we need the community to support us as we want to continue to be able to provide those services,” said Owsley. Have a favorite nonprofit organization? Check out their website to see ways you can help. Unsure of who to support? Go to Give for Good’s website to learn about 500+ nonprofit organizations in Louisville that need your help at giveforgoodlouisville.org. V Community Foundation of Louisville 325 W. Main St., Suite 1110 Waterfront Plaza, West Tower Louisville, KY 40202 cflouisville.org 502.585.4649

Follow us on social media @mamili502

44

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K


Left to Right: Evan McMahon, Kim Spence, Toni Carver Smith, Stephen Reily, Emma Pridham, Abby Shue, Steven Bowling and Shannon Karol. .

46

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Art For All, Forever Speed Museum Director Stephen Reily reflects on his milestones and the future of the museum

T

he end of one chapter opens the beginning of another. When Stephen Reily stepped in as interim director of The Speed Art Museum in April 2017, he began with an end in sight. He always knew that this role wouldn’t be forever, though his original plan of staying 18 months extended far beyond his initial expectations now that he’s reaching the four-year mark. The Speed’s blend of rich history dating back to 1927 and the fresh, contemporary renovation provided him a unique opportunity. Reily said, “At heart, I’m an entrepreneur, and I felt there was an exciting chance to tackle the Speed as a start-up and help figure out what this new, ambitious role was that it wanted to play. The building wasn’t the strategy, the building was a tool to use to fulfill a strategy.” Centering around the three parts of the new mission statement that Reily, his colleagues and the board created, Reily said, “At the Speed Art Museum, we invite everyone to celebrate art, forever.” Reily continued by identifying milestones that he aspired to accomplish during his time at the Speed. “If I felt I had accomplished them, or come close, then I would know that the reason I was here was coming to an end,” Reily noted. Now, as Reily intends to depart from his role as director on March 31, 2021, confident in the passionate team he leaves behind, we spoke with him to reflect on these milestones and what the future entails for the next director, the Speed Museum team and

NOVEMBER 2020

By SARAH LEVITCH Photos by KATHRYN HARRINGTON

I felt there was an exciting chance to tackle the Speed as a start-up and help figure out what this new, ambitious role was that it wanted to play. The building wasn’t the strategy, the building was a tool to use to fulfill a strategy.

Stephen Reily

the museum itself. Reily’s first milestone was to make the Speed accessible to everyone, which involved creating programs such as Owsley Free Sundays, the Speed for All membership and free family membership for whom cost is a barrier to entry. “Inviting everyone meant continuing to make the Speed a place where everyone feels at home. We’ve made school tours, and now virtual school tours, for all Title I schools completely free, as well as free transportation,” said Reily. Abby Shue, deputy director for external relations and finance, commented, “Stephen is someone who thinks constantly about how he can use his own privilege to make greater accessibility for everyone around him. Every decision that he makes as a leader is thinking about how he can move the Speed to a stronger place than he found it.” His second milestone was to celebrate art by both acquiring and exhibiting it through a diversity of artists that reflects the whole state and brings people together. “I learned early on, to my surprise, that people were really open to the Speed using art to address some of our complicated topics,” said Reily. “It made the Speed pretty fearless in saying, as long as we ground it in art, which is creative and open-ended, people want to have these conversations.” Reminiscing of an early encounter, Reily shared, “When I met with a group of security guards, I learned that not only were they great security guards, but most of them were practicing artists on the side. It’s something people don’t think about, that they

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

47


Left: Abby Shue. Right: Stephen Reily and Toni Carver Smith.

Stephen is someone who thinks constantly about

how he can use his own privilege to make greater

wanted to be around art all the time in a museum more than anywhere else. That was inspiring to me, and I see what the people at the Speed bring to the community and to our mission, but also to each other.” Third, forever “means sustainability both financially and in our teams. I built an advancement department that has grown our contributed revenue by 50%. We actually just completed our most successful fundraising year in history. Also, the teams don’t need me there to be successful. I’m proud of the leadership team I built, and the teams they built,” said Reily. “I’m especially proud of my seven-member leadership team, which includes Speed veterans like Kim Spence and Steven Bowling and rising leaders like Shannon Karol and Emma Pridham. Two members of that team oversee multiple departments and teams themselves and have recently gained new titles. Abby Shue, previously chief advancement and programming officer, is now our deputy director for external relations and finance and Toni Carver Smith, formerly COO/CFO, is now our deputy director for operations and finance.” Toni Smith added, “he [Reily] cares about the growth of all his staff, not just what’s happening 48

accessibility for everyone around him.

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

As a leader, there are times when he listens to the team’s voices and understands that they’re greater.

Toni Carver Smith in work, but also outside of work. As a leader, there are times when he listens to the team’s voices and understands that they’re greater.” Longevity also demands transparency and honesty. Issuing a racial equity report in August revealed to the public how far they’ve come, as well as quantifying their commitments for the future. “We’re not congratulating ourselves because there is still so much more to do,” Reily urged. “How do we continue

Abby Shue

helping and healing this broken world, Louisville in particular being one of the epicenters of national conversation? How do we play the right role in that? That’s an ongoing challenge, and we’ll never get it all right.” Preparing for a new chapter, the Speed team begins a national search for the next director, with a focus on diversity to reflect the community in new ways. Ideally, they’re looking for someone who is passionate about art, is organizationally equipped to lead a large institution and can strategically think of new ways to build upon the strong foundation of programs and teams constructed by Reily. Allowing the wind to carry him to wherever he is meant to land next, Reily knows one thing for sure, he said, “I want this to be a community where we feel more connected to each other, where we’re not scared to tackle hard issues and where we’re confident we can grow stronger. I want this to be a community where everyone feels at home, together.” V Speed Art Museum 2035 South Third St. Louisville, KY 40208 speedmuseum.org 502.634.2700 NOVEMBER 2020


A full service interior design firm specializing in corporate, healthcare, hospitality and residential interiors.

CORPORATE • HEALTHCARE • HOSPITALITY • RESIDENTIAL • STAGING

812.282.6606 • www.leslielewisdesign.com • 247 Spring St., Jeffersonville, IN 47130 KYCID, IIDA, ASID, NCIDQ & WBE Certified


Homes

50

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


A BEAUTIFUL RETREAT How a home was transformed before a quarantine no one expected

I NOVEMBER 2020

By ELIZABETH SCINTA Photos provided by Leslie Lewis Sheets nterior Designer Leslie Lewis Sheets and her team at LL&A Interior Design transformed this home right before the pandemic hit. Unknowingly, they created a beautiful and tranquil space for the homeowners to retreat to for the unexpected next eight months in quarantine. The family wanted a light, bright, vacation-like feel to the home, so Lewis Sheets and her team did just that. Located in Sellersburg, Indiana, this home sits on Fuzzy Zoeller’s Covered Bridge Golf Club that provides magnificent views.

With numerous large windows in the great room, Lewis Sheets decided to play on the view of the golf course by choosing a natural color palette filled with creams, taupes and warm neutrals. The accent color is a sea glass blue-green to give it a calming spa effect. Lewis Sheets said she wanted to bring the outside in “because with the everchanging seasons, the finishes on the inside work so well with the environment that they would see out their windows.” It took approximately eight months to renovate the home, and for four of those months, the family moved out of their

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

51


52

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


house and into an apartment in downtown New Albany, Indiana. “They were able to experience downtown New Albany and the fun nightlife the area offers,” Lewis Sheets explained. “It was a completely different neighborhood environment, so it was almost like city living. So it wasn’t like they had to live through the hardship of living through a renovation.” Initially, the house was more closed off, with a fireplace separating the great room and kitchen from each other, according to Lewis Sheets. Now, it’s a much more open floor plan with the great room, kitchen and dining room all connected. “My favorite part of the home is the kitchen and the opening right into the great room,” Lewis Sheets said. “Everyone always gathers around the kitchen island and this plan allows for that. They have two children, so when their kids are home or their kids and their friends are all together it’s just a nice open plan.” Aside from the marvelous golf course views, the home has a lovely outdoor space complete with a firepit. However, this outdoor space is also about to be redesigned by Lewis Sheets and her team. “The homeowners loved what we did inside so much that they want to carry that to their outside space. They love being in their home, but they also want to enjoy their outdoor space that includes a pool, a grilling space, a kitchen and bar, a gathering space and firepit,” said Lewis Sheets.

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

53


54

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

|

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

55


With the everchanging seasons, the finishes on the inside work so well with the environment that they would see out their windows.

Leslie Lewis Sheets

56

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

57


Lewis Sheets has been an interior designer for 35 years and started her company, LL&A Interior Design, 15 years ago. “When I was a teenager, my family worked with an interior designer when we were building a home. I remember thinking, ‘Oh my gosh! If that’s a job, I know that’s what I want to do!’ I think it’s such a gift that I knew what I wanted to go to college to do and this is my 35th year in design,” said Lewis Sheets. When talking to Lewis Sheets about her career, it’s very clear how much she loves her job. She described how the day-to-day job hasn’t changed during her years in the business, but it’s a job she wouldn’t trade for the world. V LL&A Interior Design 247 Spring Street Jeffersonville, IN 47130 leslielewisdesign.com 812.282.6606

58

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Serving our Community for 28 years

Bathrooms * Kitchens * Room Additions NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

59


Sponsored Content

A Helping Hand

S

ince the onset of COVID-19, our nonprofits have needed our help more than ever, which is why we dedicated an entire section of this issue to just that. The nonprofit organizations in this section stretch far and wide across both our city and state, and they need your help now to continue to support those in need and offer their services free of charge. We hope this section will educate you on ways you can lend a helping hand to the nonprofits of our community that make our city great.

60

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Sponsored Content

The Filson Historical Society Goes Virtual

T

he Filson Historical Society is one of Kentucky’s largest privately funded historical societies. Started in 1884 in Reuben Durrett’s library, it has evolved into one of Kentucky’s premier research institutions, offering 60+ public programs every year. At the beginning of 2020, no one could have imagined how this year would turn out. In late February, the novel coronavirus started making waves in the news, and by March 14, the Filson closed its doors to the public. It quickly became apparent that the coronavirus was not going anywhere soon, so in response, the Filson began offering programming virtually via Zoom, an online, cloud-based platform, free of charge to the public. In addition to moving all programming to a virtual platform, the Filson launched an updated website on June 1, which features a “Bringing History Home” page with activities for all ages. These activities include digital

exhibits, educational activities and access to to previous pandemics and our work during recordings of our past lectures. Lectures are the COVID-19 crisis. The pandemic has put now posted on YouTube after the live record- the Filson in a unique position to reach poping has ended. ulations both inside and All in-person research outside our traditional geoSince the pandemic, at the Filson was also susgraphic boundaries. This the Filson has seen an pended in early March. In new approach has taken increase in exposure to lieu of in-person research, this moment of crisis and its collections related the collections department allowed the organization to previous pandemics has been working remotely to pivot to new forms of to add more content digiengagement that provide and our work during exciting paths to explore in tally. Twenty-nine collecthe COVID-19 crisis. the future, while leveraging tions and 14 exhibits are its more than 130 years of now available online and content is being added weekly. The Filson history, reputation and connections. Visit is locally and nationally renowned for its the Filson online at filsonhistorical.org to see contributions to Ohio Valley history. The everything the organization has to offer. collections at the Filson document the lives The Filson Historical Society of people in the Ohio River Valley from 1310 S. 3rd St., early European settlement through the 20th Louisville, KY 40208 century. filsonhistorical.org Since the pandemic, the Filson has seen an 502.635.5083 increase in exposure to its collections related

T h e r e’ s s o m e t h i n g f o r e v e r y o n e i n THE GERTRUDE POLK BROWN LECTURE SERIES

THURSDAY, DEC. 3

MONDAY, DEC. 14

THURSDAY, JAN. 7

TUESDAY, APRIL 13

THE HOUR OF FATE b y SUSAN BERFIELD 6:00-7:00 p.m.

THE ZEALOT AND THE EMANCIPATOR b y H. W. BRANDS 6:00-7:00 p.m. FREE Live, Virtual Lecture

REGANLAND: AMERICA’S RIGHT TURN, 1976-1980 b y RICK PERLSTEIN 6:00-7:00 p.m. FREE Live, Virtual Lecture

JFK: COMING OF AGE IN THE AMERICAN CENTURY, 1917-1956 b y FREDRIK LOGEVALL 6:00-7:00 p.m. FREE Live, Virtual Lecture

FREE Live, Virtual Lecture

The Filson Historical Society | 1310 S. 3rd St. | Louisville, KY | (502) 635-5083 | Details online at filsonhistorical.org/events

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

61


Sponsored Content

CHANGING LIVES CHANGING LIVES CHANGING LIVES

At Volunteers of America, we are fulfilled by our mission.

We find families stable housing, veterans in mission. need and help moms overcome substance use disorder. At Volunteers of America, we areserve fulfilled by our At Volunteers of America, we are fulfilled by our mission. We help young people find alternatives to the criminal justice system, provide support and answers for We find families stable housing, serve veterans inneed needand andhelp help moms overcome substance use disorder. We find families housing, serve veterans moms substance disorder. our neighbors who stable have questions about HIV in and serve adults with overcome developmental anduse intellectual We help young people find the criminal criminaljustice justice system, provide support and answers We help young people findalternatives alternatives to to the system, provide support and answers for for disabilities. our neighbors who have HIV and andserve serveadults adults with developmental and intellectual our neighbors who havequestions questionsabout about HIV with developmental and intellectual Last year, VOA served more than 25,000 people across four states in more than 40 individual programs. disabilities. disabilities. We are a professional, accredited behavioral health provider that does so much more in our communities VOA served morethan than25,000 25,000 people in more thanthan 40 individual programs. LastLast year,year, VOA served more peopleacross acrossfour fourstates states in more 40 individual programs. than you may know. But you can count on VOA to do the hardest work and when it is needed the most. We are a professional, accredited behavioral health provider that does so much more in our communities We are a professional, accredited behavioral health provider that does so much more in our communities We are here to create in the lives of individuals and families throughout ourtheregion. know.positive Butyou youchange cancount count on work andand when it is needed most. thanthan youyou maymay know. But can on VOA VOAtotododothe thehardest hardest work when it is needed the most. We areHouse here towe create positive changefamilies in the lives of individuals and families throughout our region. At Unity are able to keep facing homelessness together while we find long-term, We are here to create positive change in the lives of individuals and families throughout our region. stable housing. At House Freedom House, operate a nationally-recognized program and parenting At Unity we are able towekeep families facing homelessness together whilefor wepregnant find long-term, stable At Unity House we are able to keep families facing homelessness together while we find long-term, stable housing. we operate a nationally-recognized and parenting women who At areFreedom starting House, new lives free from addiction. And weprogram are onefor of pregnant Kentucky and Clark and Floyd housing. At Freedom House, we operate a nationally-recognized program for pregnant and parenting womenlargest who are starting new lives freefor from addiction. we are were one ofthere Kentucky Clark Floyd to be Counties providers of services veterans. OurAnd veterans for us,and and we and are proud women who are starting new lives free from addiction. And we are one of Kentucky and Clark largest providers of services for veterans. Our veterans were there for us, and we are proud toand be Floyd thereCounties for them. Counties largest there for them.providers of services for veterans. Our veterans were there for us, and we are proud to be And even during an unprecedented pandemic, we have not stopped. Our VOA Heroes are taking every thereAnd foreven them. during an unprecedented pandemic, we have not stopped. Our VOA Heroes are taking every precaution – but the care we give does not wait for Covid to go away. We are here every day caring for – but care we give does not wait for to go away. WeOur are here day caring for every Andprecaution even during anthe unprecedented pandemic, we Covid have not stopped. VOAevery Heroes are taking the people who count on us. We are so thankful to our VOA family – our supporters, our partners the people whothe count Wedoes are sonot thankful to our VOAtofamily – ourWe supporters, partners and and precaution – but careonweus.give wait for Covid go away. are hereour every day caring for our incredible VOA team members for the workthey theydodoevery every day – no matter what. our incredible VOA team members for the work day – no matter what. the people who count on us. We are so thankful to our VOA family – our supporters, our partners and our incredible VOA team members for the work they do every day – no matter what. Learn more wedo doand andhow how you be part of the Learn moreabout aboutthe the work work we you cancan be part of the VolunteersofofAmerica America mission mission at or or follow us @voamid Volunteers atvoamid.org voamid.org follow us @voamid

Learn more about the work we do and how you can be part of the Volunteers of America mission at voamid.org or follow us @voamid

62

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE voicead2pages1.updatedsize.indd 1

|

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020

10/20/2020 12:47:32 PM


Volunteers of America celebrates the Power of 1 to change the world. For moms struggling with substance use disorder to families facing homelessness. For our friends and neighbors looking for answers about HIV. For adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities. For finding alternatives to incarceration for at-risk youth to standing up for our veterans. Volunteers of America is there for the people who need help most. With your help, Volunteers of America changes lives every day. Learn more about the work we do and how you can be part of the Volunteers of America mission at voamid.org or follow us @voamid

570 South 4th Street, Suite 100 | Louisville, KY 40202-2504 2676 Charlestown Rd. Ste. 10 | New Albany, IN 47150

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

63


Sponsored Content

The Library foundation

Creating a stronger library for a stronger Louisville

I

n 2020, the Library Foundation is celebrating 40 years of raising private funds and advocating for public dollars on behalf of the Louisville Free Public Library. Having raised over $40 million dollars since 1980 to enhance LFPL’s programs and services, the Library Foundation continues to work to ensure Louisville has a public library system able to meet the needs of the community today — including remote access to books and materials, early childhood literacy programs and job skills and search assistance — as well as the needs of a world class city of the future. The Library Foundation advocates for the public dollars that are by far the largest source of operational funds for LFPL. The Foundation also raises the private dollars needed to enhance regular programming and fund initiatives such as:

STEAM Programming

LFPL sets the standard for education and culture in our community by serving over 2.4 million visitors annually and providing internationally recognized programs and services, all for free. While free for everyone to use, there are costs to provide them. Private donations through the Library Foundation are essential to providing the enhanced library services and programs that are critical to a well-informed and healthy community.

Adult Literacy Programs

WHERE ARE WE NOW?

The New Book Endowment Early Childhood Literacy Programs Summer Reading

Author Talks

Louisville’s funding for libraries is 33% below the average of cities serving populations of 400,000 or more.

How-To Festival New Technology

WHAT DO WE NEED? LFPL needs greater public support and private investment to increase operational capacity and provide enhanced services and programs. Increased private investment in LFPL through donations to the Library Foundation from individuals and businesses helps fund excellence. In the summer of 2020 alone, donors to the Library Foundation met the challenge of the quarantine and fully funded the Summer Reading Program. This doubled the fundraising goal and ensured that Jefferson County children of all ages have books to read in their homes.

Capital Campaigns 64

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


A STRONGER LIBRARY FOR A STRONGER LOUISVILLE.

NOVEMBER 2020

NEARLY

NEARLY

LOUISVILLE HOUSEHOLDS LACK A COMPUTER

LACK RELIABLE INTERNET ACCESS

45,000

50,000

This year has been one for the books. But with support from the Library Foundation, the Louisville Free Public Library never stopped providing Louisvillians with the digital resources they needed, from ebooks and emagazines to audio books and online learning platforms for kids and adults. And now the Library Foundation will continue to support the Louisville Free Public Library as it leads our city into recovery, providing job recovery assistance like computer literacy and resume help, as well as childhood literacy programs to ensure a strong future for everyone. Help write a new chapter for Louisville at LFPLFoundation.org/StrongerLibrary.

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

65


Sponsored Content

With the help of our career coaches, many of the people we serve are connected with partner agencies that provide legal assistance, housing and other services to address problems that have kept them from working successfully.

Goodwill Industries of Kentucky

G

More than just thrift stores

oodwill Industries of Kentucky operates at a unique intersection where conscience-minded people can donate their unwanted belongings, bargain shoppers can hunt for great deals and disenfranchised individuals can find support to improve their lives. Being one of the nation’s most well-known brands means that the average adult in Kentucky recognizes the 66 stores Goodwill operates as trusted locations where they can donate their possessions. What many of them don’t know is that the thrift model Goodwill has built in Kentucky allows the organization to repurpose goods throughout the commonwealth in a way that diverts more than 50 million pounds of used items from landfills. In a similar fashion, many people have become familiar with the great deals that can be found by shopping at Goodwill. In fact, it’s not uncommon for shoppers to build their own brand-name wardrobes by shopping exclusively at the retail stores. However, very few of those shoppers are aware that many of the Goodwill staff members they encounter are intentionally using their employment experience to build pathways to more lucrative careers. As a part of its overall mission, the organization assists those individuals in overcoming barriers that have prevented them from working in the past by connecting them to our various career services programs. By operating in 103 of Kentucky’s 120 counties,

66

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

Goodwill helps coordinate soft-skills training sessions, financial literacy courses, trade certification opportunities and job searches that help put many of its employees and program participants on more productive pathways. “Goodwill offers people an opportunity to build the kind of life they want by harnessing the power of work,” said Amy Luttrell, president and CEO of Goodwill Industries of Kentucky. “With the help of our career coaches, many of the people we serve are connected with partner agencies that provide legal assistance, housing and other services to address problems that have kept them from working successfully.” The goal for Goodwill isn’t to keep “mission employees” on the payroll forever. Instead, the organization’s career coaches purposefully develop career plans for many of the mission employees to help securely transition them into higher-wage jobs with other employers within the commonwealth in order to make room to begin the same process with another disenfranchised individual. Ultimately, Goodwill expects to help the Commonwealth of Kentucky make substantial progress in addressing its worker shortage by adding men and women to the

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

employment roles who have disabilities or are overcoming backgrounds that include limited education, chronic poverty, drug addiction or criminal histories. So far, Goodwill’s workforce development model has been successful. Last year alone, the nonprofit organization, which is headquartered in Louisville, helped place 2,910 Kentuckians into employment opportunities with hundreds of businesses throughout the commonwealth. The average hourly wage of those jobs was $11.70, which means that all workers supported by Goodwill are moving into career opportunities that place them above minimum wage. “Those are efforts and metrics that have the ability to change lives, families and communities,” said DeVone Holt, vice president of external affairs for Goodwill Industries of Kentucky. “Our combination of providing career development opportunities at our retail stores, using career coaches to support thousands of other job seekers throughout the commonwealth and partnering with citizens who donate and shop at our stores gives us an especially unique ability to support our commitment to help reduce poverty in Kentucky.” NOVEMBER 2020


Because you give, second chances are possible. “After I was introduced to heroin, that became the love of my life. I gave up everything. I gave up my children, my family.”

moved into her own home. Additionally, Tiffany has reconnected with family and regained custody of her children.

Tiffany served time in prison for drug trafficking before being released to a halfway house in Louisville. There, she was referred to Goodwill’s LifeLaunch program and was placed into employment at our Middletown store. Since then, she has been promoted to floating assistant manager, purchased a vehicle and

“I am dependable today. I am accountable. I feel like I have a purpose in my life — being trusted with keys to all Louisville Goodwill stores and passwords to their safes means so much to me. There was a time when I wasn’t even trusted to go into my mom’s house alone. This job is everything to me.”

If someone you know could benefit from Goodwill’s free employment services, visit www.goodwillky.org or call 1-844-GWK-WORK.

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

67


Itzel was diagnosed with a hearing processing disorder at an early age. She needed hearing aids and a personal FM system, something insurance would not fully cover. When Itzel’s mom, Alma, reached out to Kosair Charities for help, the Kosair Kids® Financial Assistance Program covered the cost of her equipment. Soon after, Itzel’s school performance improved drastically. You can help more kids like Itzel reach their potential and overcome their obstacles. “I know Itzel is destined to do great things and now she can.” -Alma, Itzel’s mom

I want to support Kosair Kids like Itzel with my gift of: ____$25

____$50

____$100

____$250

Surprise us: $___________

Name: __________________________________________________________________ Street Address: __________________________________________________________ City: ____________________________ State: ______ Zipcode: _________________ Phone: ________________________ Email: __________________________________ Please send this slip and your check payable to: Kosair Charities • PO Box 37370 • Louisville, KY 40233 To make a gift online, visit: kosair.org/donate 68

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Sponsored Content

Kosair Charities: Helping Kids Like Itzel Reach Their Potential This year has been filled with challenges, especially for the kids and families of our community. Because of generous donors, we have been able to continue providing support and resources so Kosair Kids like Itzel (Itzzy) have everything they need to grow up happy, healthy, and safe. For children like Itzzy, donor support is life-changing. Itzzy is a bubbly, outgoing, and bright 6-year-old who loves to paint and play with her Jack Russell Terrier, Jackie. When Itzzy was 3 years old, her mom, Alma noticed she was struggling with speech and language development. Despite seeing specialists and speech therapists, Alma was still worried her daughter would fall behind in kindergarten. Itzzy’s doctor suggested additional testing to help find a diagnosis. Unfortunately, her doctor did not accept insurance for this testing. That is when Alma and Itzzy found Kosair Charities.

“I know Itzzy is destined to do great things and now she can,” Alma said. There are many kids in our community who still need your support. The COVID-19 pandemic has created additional challenges for many families, especially those who have children with medical needs. Kosair Charities is committed to ensuring all kids in Kentucky and Southern Indiana have what they need to thrive, but we need your help to provide these vital resources. Kosair Kids need you now more than ever. Please make your most generous gift today:

kosair.org/donate Kosair Kid d Itzel and her mom, Alma.

Itzzy received the testing she needed at no cost to her mom through the Kosair Kids Financial Assistance Program. After years of searching for answers, she was diagnosed with hearing loss and an auditory processing disorder. With this diagnosis, Itzzy, Alma, and her medical care team were able to create a care plan designed especially for her. Thanks to donors like you, Itzzy also received hearing aids and an FM transmitter system from the Financial Assistance Program. Her test scores have improved more than 50% and her comprehension has developed significantly! She now has resources they need to reach her full potential.

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

69


Sponsored Content

Give the Gift of

HEALTH & HOPE This Holiday Season! Support SOS to provide critical medical supplies to help those in need! SOS provides medical equipment, such as this wheelchair, to a little girl with disabilities.

SOS Delivers Health & Hope to Our Community

D

96

%

of your gift/donation will go directly to the SOS local and global mission.

Visit www.SOSHealthandHope.org to see how your generous spirit will make an impact on the lives of those who need it most. SOS International Louisville, Kentucky 502.736.6360 SOSHealthandHope.org

Helping our Neighbors • Healing the World • Protecting our Environment 70

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

elivering health and hope to communities near and far is what SOS does every day. When the health pandemic and racial unrest hit our own city this year, SOS was immediately there to help. “We quickly pivoted our operations to focus 100% on local needs. This meant processing our massive inventory of recovered surplus medical supplies to donate to clinics serving marginalized residents, nursing homes, first responders such as police and fire, and many non-profit agencies providing aid to those in need,” said Denise Sears, president and CEO of SOS. Since this past March, SOS has made a profound impact on Louisville and Southern Indiana, providing life-protecting aid to more than 300 local organizations valued at over $1.5 million. Established in 1993, as a global mission with headquarters in Louisville, SOS began making a significant impact on the health of residents in the local community approximately three years ago. Sears, who took the helm of SOS after working at non-profits in West Louisville, brought with her the sad knowledge that many of our Louisville neighbors struggle to live, work and raise families in geographic areas fraught with healthcare disparities and barriers to education. The belief that healthcare and medical education opportunities should be accessible for everyone is what drives her small team of nine to continually collect, reprocess and deliver critical medical supplies to help our community. The need for both accessible healthcare and job skills training in the healthcare field has never been greater. In the past year, the work of SOS has been instrumental in removing barriers to quality healthcare and education which positively impacts many Louisvillians and their families, especially in South and West Louisville. Whether it’s furnishing no-fee clinics with healthcare supplies and equipment, equipping Covid-19 testing sites with protective gear or providing a handicapped child with a new wheelchair, SOS cares for our community and is doing it all! How can you help? Contact SOS today at 502.736.6360 or SOSHealthandHope.org to volunteer, give a financial gift or just start the conversation for a better tomorrow for our neighbors in need. NOVEMBER 2020


Sponsored Content

T

Nazareth Homes Foundation supports ongoing giving at Nazareth Home Highlands and Clifton campuses

he Nazareth Homes Foundation, founded in 2018, is a nonprofit supporting the elders, their families and staff of Nazareth Home Highlands and Nazareth Home Clifton. Both campuses are five-star, long-term care and rehab centers with specialty programs for short-term, inpatient and outpatient rehab, memory care and skilled care. In 1976, Nazareth Home was established as a healthcare ministry sponsored by the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth. The goal was to provide elders with a place to age gracefully, focusing on social, spiritual and physical wellness. More than four decades later, the healing mission of Nazareth Home continues. Each day, the elders are loved and cared for by staff members who genuinely believe in the person-centered approach that drives Nazareth Home’s core values of compassion, respect,

cooperation, spirituality and excellence. Nazareth Homes Foundation is dedicated to enhancing the mission and values of Nazareth Home. Giving to the foundation improves, maintains, enhances and broadens the services, programs and environment for the benefit of all those Nazareth Home serves. The foundation directly benefits the elders, their families and the staff, including equipment upgrades, capital improvements, innovative technology, programming and other enhancements. “The foundation empowers Nazareth Home elders and staff, and supports our approach to innovative, compassionate person-centered care,” said Director of Development Roberta Steutermann. “The generosity of donors brings our healing mission to life.” Individuals, community groups and local businesses can make monetary donations

to any Nazareth Homes Foundation fund, like the new Sandra King Education and Excellence Fund, which directly supports employees who attend college and take advanced certification classes. Donors can give online at nazhome.org or mail checks to Nazareth Home, 2000 Newburg Road, Louisville, Ky., 40205. All donations are 100 percent tax-deductible. For more information or questions, contact Roberta Steutermann at 502.473.2375 or RSteutermann@nazhome.org.

Where you are more than a name You like to have an early afternoon snack before heading to bingo on Mondays, so we have our chef whip up one of your favorites, pimento cheese on wheat. Yes, this is home.

Long Term Care Memory Care Personal Care Rehabilitation to Home

NOVEMBER 2020

Nazareth Home Clifton (502) 895-9425 2120 Payne Street Louisville, KY

Nazareth Home (502) 459-9681 2000 Newburg Road Louisville, KY

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

nazhome.org

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

71


Sponsored Content Top: Compassionate Companions Marie Mill and Susie Hoff man with Micheal. Bottom: Executive Director, Karen Cassidy with Thelma. Far right: Hildegard House located in Butchertown.

Hildegard House Providing compassionate care for those at the end of life who have no home or loved ones to care for them so that they may die with dignity

A

t Hildegard House, a community of volunteers provides compassionate care and a home for our neighbors at the end of life who are homeless, have no family to care for them or resources to pay for caregivers. Our services help the elderly in need spend the last chapter of life with dignity, surrounded by caring individuals. We rely solely on donations and God’s

72

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

grace, and operate in the spirit of St. Hildegard of Bingen, Germany. Hildegard House offers care to those of faith and no faith, so all are welcome in our home. Residents receive care from Hosparus Health, just as they would in their own home, so we provide the home and family so that they can access hospice. Thank you to Clore Construction for sponsoring this ad!

Hildegard House 114 Adams Street PO Box 5613 Louisville, KY 40255 hildegardhouse.org 502.797.7411

NOVEMBER 2020


Sponsored Content

I

Art + Emergent Technologies + Sociocultural Transformation + Liberation  

n 2020, the world has shifted in ways we never could have predicted. But, for the Actors Theatre team, the drive to imagine and tell stories that reflect the complexity of our time has never slowed down. With open-hearted curiosity, we’ve leaned into exploring how emerging technologies will shape the future of our art form, expanding the ways we can make and share work. In fact, the last eight months have been a whirlwind of creativity as we’ve worked with remarkable artists to produce storytelling experiences in service of our mission to unlock human potential, build community and enrich the lives of our audience. We’re releasing more than 20 projects and experiences, ranging from livestreams to animated shorts to radio plays, along with numerous conversations on our virtual platforms.     At the center of all of this activity has been the question, “How can we be of service to — and alongside — our Kentuckiana

NOVEMBER 2020

communities?” Just some of the ways we have answered that calling include: • Refocusing our work to respond to the evolving needs of our community with programs like Unscripted, our public conversation series, and an interdisciplinary podcast, Borrowed Wisdom with Robert Barry Fleming • Garnering national attention with our first digital production, The Bengsons’ The Keep Going Song, which was named a New York Times Critic’s Pick • Showcasing the talents of eight exceptional young writers during the 15th Annual New Voices Young Playwrights Festival Virtual Reading • Receiving the Business Impact Award from Louisville Business First for organizations who have assisted the community during COVID-19 and/or furthered racial

justice and equality • And launching a Community Donation Partner program to generate support not only for ourselves, but for many other community-building organizations throughout Louisville. Your continued engagement is vital to Actors Theatre’s next chapter, and we invite you to join us in the exploration. Visit our website at ActorsTheatre.org and see what we are up to, check out a project that excites you and follow the lively dialogue on social media — and if we inspire you, please consider making a donation.  Actors Theatre 316 W. Main St. Louisville, KY 40202 actorstheatre.org development@actorstheatre.org

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

73


Sponsored Content

T

The Parklands of Floyds Fork

he Parklands of Floyds Fork is Louisville’s newest park system comprised of four parks: Beckley Creek, Pope Lick, Turkey Run and Broad Run. This expansive system is free of charge and open to the public 365 days a year. As a visitor-supported public park, The Parklands does not receive tax-dollar support for annual operations, which is why community support is essential. When you donate to The Parklands, you are investing in efforts to grow healthy communities, outdoor education, habitat for wildlife, trails for exploring and so much more.

PARKS IN THE PANDEMIC In The Parklands, visitors benefit from being outside while maintaining a safe distance from others. Trails and open spaces have remained open for park guests to exercise and enjoy the outdoors throughout the pandemic, providing a source of recreation and respite.

NTI RESOURCES

NTI — contains fun and engaging videos and worksheets that students can watch and comLed by Parklands Interpretive Rangers plete remotely. This online hub is frequently — all of whom are trained educators and updated and houses vidscientists — the Forest eos of recurring educaLearning Lab offers stutional programs, such as THE PARKLANDS dents in grades K-6 a Wednesday Wonders. BY THE NUMBERS structured day of non-traTeachers, parents and visiditional instruction, 3,111,680 visits in 2019 tors of all ages can view all homework help and outresources at theparklands. 80+ miles of trails for door exploration. Weather org/classroom. hiking, biking permitting, classes are and paddling held almost entirely outRENTALS & doors to provide a safe, 77,980 trees planted EVENTS engaging environment for Our venues offer a vari95,000+ outdoor children to thrive during ety of versatile options, education experiences NTI. Registration is now including indoor and since 2013 open for dates through outdoor space for wedDecember 18, 2020. dings, corporate meetings, Additional dates to be added as needed. View full details at thepark- retreats, birthdays and more! Staff are keeping up with the latest guidelines to help deliver lands.org/nti. The Parklands Virtual Classroom — a free, safe events for guests. Call 502.815.0277 for online resource to supplement and support more information.

OPEN SPACES MADE POSSIBLE

Thanks to visitors like you! As a visitor-supported public park, The Parklands of Floyds Fork relies on community support to deliver a world-class park experience, free of charge, to millions of visitors each year. Learn more about our nearly 4,000-acre park and donate at www.theparklands.org. 74

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

A VISITOR-SUPPORTED PUBLIC PARK

NOVEMBER 2020


Sponsored Content

  H   I

S

ince 1880, Home of the Innocents has been there for our community. Through wars, recessions and pandemics, including COVID-19, we have remained open, providing care for some of the most vulnerable populations. We’ve been challenged and adapted as times have changed, remaining the heart of our city for children and families who need it most. The Home provides a range of important residential and community-based programs. Serving more than 10,000 children and families last year, our programs include a safe haven for children who have been abused or neglected. We provide crisis intervention services, clinical treatment and therapeutic foster and adoption services. We also operate a skilled nursing facility for medically complex children who are often dependent on technology to sustain life. We provide

NOVEMBER 2020

healthcare in a wide variety of disciplines for any child in the community through Open Arms Children’s Health, our integrated pediatric health center. With the support of the community, our care and compassion have never wavered. You can make a difference for the children and families served by Home of the Innocents in various ways. Volunteers play an important role for our organization, especially during COVID-19. Virtual volunteers have meaningful experiences interacting with our residents and team members.

It’s hard to put into words the impact our donors have on the Home, and our gratitude for that impact. Our donors save and transform children’s lives and their support has never wavered, even during a world-wide pandemic. Become a supporter of the Home and let our children know how much you care. No matter how you choose to give, your message of love will be heard loud and clear. Learn more by visiting our website at homeoftheinnocents.org or calling 502.596.1000. We are Home of the Innocents. We are the heart of our city.

Especially during COVID-19, virtual volunteers have meaningful experiences interacting with our residents and team members.

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

75


Sponsored Content

Making Sure All Families are Safe at Home

A

t The Center for Women and Families, we are advocates for both domestic violence and sexual assault survivors in Kentuckiana. We provide help for people of all genders who have experienced domestic or sexual violence, including their friends and family. Our services are free, safe and confidential. • 24/7 Crisis + Information Line • Safety Planning • Emergency Shelter • Court + Legal Advocacy

Meet Jessica:

• Medical Accompaniment

Home for the holidays should be a place of warmth and safety. For those experiencing intimate partner violence, instead of comfort and joy this season, home could be the most dangerous place. Jessica was a bright, young student who moved in with her high school sweetheart shortly after graduating. With dreams of getting a degree, Jessica began taking college

• Therapy + Support Groups • Information + Referrals • Prevention + Education Intimate partner violence and sexual violence are complicated issues. Those who are affected by violence need support and care 76

that is tailored to their individual needs. At The Center, we work with individuals to determine the path that best fits their situation and goals. The Center could not provide 100% free services 24/7, 365 days a year without its Everyday Advocates — those volunteers, staff, donors and community partners who show support through their words and actions. Please consider supporting The Center through your time, talent or treasure. Visit us online at thecenteronline.org to learn more.

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

classes until her boyfriend became controlling and kept her from leaving the house. Jessica eventually got pregnant, but the violence increased. The day she went into labor, Jessica had been thrown down on the floor. Once she saw her vulnerable newborn baby, she knew they had to get out. While recovering in the hospital, Jessica was visited by an advocate from The Center for Women and Families who talked to her about a safety plan for her and the baby. It was quickly determined that emergency shelter was the best place for their situation and safety. At The Center, Jessica was able to meet regularly with her Advocate, work with a therapist and receive the support she needed to begin healing. Jessica hopes to save for a place of her own and go back to school to become a nurse. This year, the holidays look a lot different for Jessica. She is excited to decorate her new place and celebrate the season with her children in a violence-free home. NOVEMBER 2020


Sponsored Content

NOT EVERYONE IS SAFE AT HOME YOU CAN HELP Check in on friends, family and co-workers. Ask gentle questions and listen without judgement. Know where you can refer them for resources.

Kentuckiana’s Rape Crisis + Domestic Violence Center 24/7 Crisis + Information Line 1-844-BE-SAFE-1

www.thecenteronline.org


Sponsored Content

The Power of Plants

Y

ew Dell is a 60-acre botanical garden right outside the Louisville metro area, in Crestwood, KY. We believe that natural beauty is essential to our mental health and well-being, and that plants have the power to lift our spirits. In the 18 years that Yew Dell has been a public botanical garden, we have focused on building up and showing up for our community. We exist because our community members see the value that we add to their lives and our region. We love nothing more than to support our community and spark new or deeper interest in gardening and plants. Support Yew Dell Botanical Gardens’ mission of keeping community, science and beauty alive. Yew Dell Botanical Gardens 6220 Old Lagrange Rd, Crestwood, KY 40014 yewdellgardens.org 502.241.4788

The world needs goodness!

W

here can we find path-blazers, companions and a clear vision to light the way? Drepung Gomang Center for Engaging Compassion is committed to expanding compassionate hearts in our community. We take our inspiration from His Holiness the Dalai Lama who we hosted in Louisville in 2013. With his disarming humor and profound wisdom, the Dalai Lama called each of us — over 18,000 strong — to build a compassionate world and to be our best selves. offering compassion skills for living well in challenging times Secular Compassion Education • New online classes beginning regularly • Mindfulness Meditation • Compassion Cultivation Training • Nonviolent Compassionate Communication Tibetan Buddhist Teachings & Rituals • Many online offerings each week by Geshe Rapgyal and Minyak Rinpoche • Monks offer rituals daily for World Healing DrepungGomangUSA.org DrepungGomangCompassion@gmail.com 502-614-5616 78

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

OUR DONORS HELP US SERVE THE COMMUNITY AS:

• A bustling Compassion Education Center with non-religious classes and programs in meditation, practical compassion training and nonviolent compassionate communication • Louisville’s only Tibetan Buddhist Center that offers regular dharma classes and retreats led by our teacher, Geshe Rapgyal, and visiting Buddhist teachers Expand your neuropathways and rewire your habits for good. Explore DGCEC’s diverse programs for nourishing your caring heart and mind by visiting DrepungGomangUSA.org. NOVEMBER 2020


Care packages and hand sanitizer that Huber’s delivered to local hospitals and emergency responders.

80

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

|

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Huber family.

A Family Business THAT CARES

How Huber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards and Starlight Distillery supported their community during quarantine

H

NOVEMBER 2020

By ELIZABETH SCINTA Photos provided by Huber’s uber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards and Starlight Distillery have been around for 177 years, but do you know the history behind them? Simon Huber opened the business in 1843 and the farm has now been passed down to the seventh generation of Huber’s. It is currently co-owned by first cousins, Ted and Greg Huber. Did you know that Huber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards and Starlight Distillery is an entirely separate entity from Joe Huber’s Family Farm and Restaurant? Huber’s has been

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

81


a part of the Southern Indiana community for almost 200 years, so you can imagine they’re well-loved and well-connected. They aim to help serve the community in the same way the community supports them by purchasing their products. During quarantine, Huber’s created a free hand sanitizer to be given to first responders and the public. During quarantine, the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS) encouraged distilleries to produce their own hand sanitizer to help their communities. “We were delighted to be able to step forward and provide. We donated over 10,000 gallons of hand sanitizer in probably the first six weeks to our emergency responders, our hospitals, our nursing centers and our police officers,” said Dana Huber, the vice president of marketing and public relations at Huber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards and Starlight Distillery. Now, they’ve switched to selling the hand sanitizer for a minimal price to cover the materials needed to make it.

Huber’s was allowed to stay open during the quarantine period because they’re an essential business. During this time, they were able to brainstorm and develop other ways to give back to the community. “We had a super fabulous leadership team that came up with great ideas for us to do some carryout and to also do some online shipping with our wines and delivering care packets to our local ER responders at some of our hospitals,” said Huber. “We had community members that wanted to actually call in and purchase some of these care packets that included cheese, sausage and some other local goodies.” Producing and supplying hand sanitizer and care packages isn’t the only way Huber’s gives back to the community. Huber’s allows nonprofits to host events at Plantation Hall and donates their products or services, such as wine tours or tastings. Due to the pandemic, there have been fewer events happening in Plantation Hall, but many nonprofits have been generous to carry their deposits into 2021 in the hopes

THANK YOU TO OUR 2020 FIELD & FORK SPONSORS! Although the annual Field & Fork event benefiting The Parklands of Floyds Fork could not be held in person due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the sponsors listed below continued their generous support of The Parklands through a 2020 Field & Fork sponsorship. Funds raised during this annual event support daily maintenance and operations of the nearly 4,000-acre, donor and visitor-supported public park system.

PRESENTING SPONSOR: SUPPORTING SPONSORS:

Bahe Farnsley • Butchertown Grocery Bakery • Carla & Bryan Brown • Carol & Charles Hebel • Catholic Education Foundation • Charlotte & Randy Hockensmith • Cralle Foundation • Doug Whyte • George & Betty Gibbs • Interlock Industries, LLC. • Jean Frazier • Kathy & Larry Fisher • Keith L. Williams • Kelley Construction • LB Schmidt & Associates, LLC • Lisa & Dan Jones • Main Street Realty, Inc. • Mary & Ted Nixon • Metzger Family • Michter’s Distillery, LLC • Paul Ogle Foundation, Inc. • Perkins, Smith & Associates • Rhonda & Bryan Johnson • Sam Swope Family Foundation • Sociable Weaver Foundation • White Clay Consulting APPEAL SPONSORS:

Barbara & Bill Juckett • Barbara West & Vertner Smith • Bruce A. Maza • Carrie & Win Stites • Celia & Scott Catlett • Eleanor & Robert Maddox • Elizabeth & Jackson Andrews • Ellen Sears • Glenview Trust Company • Hanna & Skipper Martin • Heather & Sloane Graff • Hebel and Hornung, PSC • Janet & John Conti • Jessica & Neville Blakemore • Julie Beam & Richard Hornung • Kathryn Mershon & Dr. Todd Gardner • Kathy & Joe Daley • Kosair Charities • Kroger Co. • Kyle & Giampaolo Bianconcini • Larie & Barry Allen • Long Run Creek Properties • Maggie & Benton Keith • Mary & Dan Parker • McCarthy Strategic Solutions, LLC • Mo & Jeff Underhill • Philip & Austin Anderton • Scott Neff & Michelle Wells • Sharon & Gerald Karem • Strothman and Company • Susan & David Wood • Unistar Purchasing Solutions TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE PARKLANDS OR TO DONATE, PLEASE VISIT WWW.THEPARKLANDS.ORG.

82

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


of having the event then. They have been able to continue to donate products and services as many events have switched to an online format. “There have been some virtual events going on, so whether it’s our virtual time to get on and share some details about cocktails or spirits, or whether a donation or product, some of those virtual events still happened this year with those nonprofits,” said Huber. Thanks to the 700 acres Huber’s has, it’s easy for them to provide wine tastings and tours safely. Whether they’re providing hand sanitizer to the community or donating wine tours and tastings, Huber’s has been giving back to the community for 177 years and will continue to do so as long as there is a need. “I think our primary goal [in 2020] is to support those nonprofits in our community in any way that we can as much as we can,” Huber explained. “Without our community, we wouldn’t be the historic business that we are today. It’s a very high priority for our family leadership to support our community because we want to come out of

this stronger than when we went in and we are all in this together.” V Huber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards and Starlight Distillery 19816 Huber Road Starlight, IN 47106 huberwinery.com 812.923.9463

We donated over 10,000 gallons of hand sanitizer in probably the first six weeks to our emergency responders, our hospitals, our nursing centers and our police officers. Dana Huber

The Catherine Bryant Studio Studio by Appointment (502) 314-5897 CatherineBryantStudio www.CatherineBryantArt.com “Peaceful Morning” at Edenside Gallery • Fine Art Painter • • Accepting Commissions• “Peaceful Morning”, 24” X 36”, OIL

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

83


THE 2020 F-PACE

Radical and advanced with head-tuRning good looks.

JAGUAR LOUISVILLE 4700 BOWLING BLVD LOUISVILLE, KY 40207 SALES (502) 895-2451 jaguarlouisville.com


A Note of

CONFIDENCE

Left to right: JoVahn Allen, Dave Christopher and Jaelyn Stewart.

86

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


How AMPED Louisville is connecting the community through music By MIRANDA MCDONALD Photos by ANDREA HUTCHINSON

“W

hat I want people to know is that AMPED is more than just a music program,” Executive Director of AMPED, Dave Christopher, states as we sit outside the Greenwood Avenue campus of the Academy of Music Production Education and Development. We are sitting in a circle — six feet apart — with two young musicians named JoVahn Allen and Jaelyn Stewart. The tone of excitement and determination I hear in his voice is quite tangible. “Music is a tool we can use to connect a community, and that connection is our goal,” said Christopher. When Christopher moved to Louisville in 2000, he was focused on his technology company and being a single father to his son. “I remember having this moment of panic one night. My son was watching a television show and I was wondering how I was going to connect with him at that time. I asked him what he wanted to do with his life,” Christopher recalls. “The next morning, he told me he wanted to be a record producer or own a recording studio. So, I went out and bought two thick books on how to do both and read them from cover to cover.” It was at that very moment that Christopher decided to use music as a tool for bonding with his son. This is also when the first seed was planted for the development and creation of AMPED. Now, the organization has grown into a free music program that allows children to explore their creativity through songwriting, musical composition, sound recording and engineering. “It wasn’t until I came to AMPED that I realized how much of a music city Louisville is,” states Allen when I ask him about his first experience with the academy. He learned how to produce music through the program when he was in seventh grade. “I initially didn’t want to come to AMPED, because I didn’t really like after-school programs. After only one week, I was hooked,” he goes on to explain. “Now, AMPED has become more like a family. I’ve learned so much about the music industry and about life through them.” AMPED also recently launched its Family Learning

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

87


Left: Jaelyn Stewart. Right: JoVahn Allen.

and Technology Program as However, AMPED is “Please [tell others] to another way to give back to about much more than the families in the community. support our program technical programs it offers. This program provides parWhile spending time with not because you feel ents with necessary work Allen and Stewart on camskills through online learnpus, I realize the confidence sorry for our youth ing, mentoring and techand genuine relationships nology training. that are being built through and our families, but “We wanted to work with these programs are the real more than just the kids. We backbone of this establishinstead because you also wanted to work with ment. As the two musicians the families,” Christopher give me a tour of the facility, sincerely care about explains. “We started to Christopher excuses himself notice there were kids with to set up for the AMPED creating a fair and just Up for the Weekend live parents that needed help getting jobs that paid real performance. It is a weekly society that benefits living wages. Since my backperformance that is curground is in technology, I rently only being streamed ALL of society and know just how beneficial it every Thursday on social is to have skills in this area.” media due to COVID-19. not just some of it.” Christopher also explains This weekly offering has that he is currently expandbecome a way for the comD a ve Ch ri stophe r ing this technology program munity to stay connected by providing important during a time of uncertainty technology-based work experience for par- and social distancing. ticipants once they complete training. He “This place gave me self-esteem,” Stewart will accomplish this with a business he just explains. “At first, I didn’t like who I was. launched that will contract out IT support Now, when I write music, I am talking for other local organizations. He acknowl- to myself and also talking to other people edges that providing skills and training only through my lyrics. I want to tell them they goes so far. are beautiful being who they are, as in I am “These parents need more than training. beautiful being who I am.” As I listen to They need work experience that will help Stewart speak, I am amazed by the genuine them secure better paying jobs later on,” he confidence the 17-year-old possesses. This explains. “This is why we are creating these self-assurance is even more apparent when initial jobs for them to gain that.” Stewart picks up a guitar and starts playing 88

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

while we sit in AMPED’s main recording studio. I soon learn it is one of several instruments the young musician has mastered since being with the academy. As the interview progresses, Allen and Stewart show me the two other recording studios on the premise. Allen tells me he just released a new album called, “Journey to My Mind.” I also find out that Stewart’s father is a music producer. They both then explained the no cursing policy Christopher established for any music that is being recorded on campus. By the end of the interview, I am amazed by the tenacity and true talent that both of these teenagers possess. A week later, I email Christopher to thank him for taking the time to speak with me and ask him if there is anything else he wants to add to our conversation. He quickly and candidly replies, “Please [tell others] to support our program not because you feel sorry for our youth and our families, but instead because you sincerely care about creating a fair and just society that benefits ALL of society and not just some of it. AMPED exists to provide resources to individuals who are already capable, but lack those resources that are needed to realize their own destiny.” V AMPED Louisville 4425 Greenwood Ave. Louisville, KY 40211 ampedlouisville.org 502.822.1953

NOVEMBER 2020


THE 2020

Stelvio Quadrifoglio Start it up and start the show

ALFA ROMEO LOUISVILLE | 4710 Bowling Blvd, Louisville, KY 40207 | Sales: (502) 894-3436 | alfaromeolouisville.net


Home Couture Y O U ’ R E I N V I T E D

W

this year due to the ith most 2020 galas and fundraisers going virtual you, our readers, to rage pandemic, we thought it would be fun to encou g of choice and outin l get dressed up at home while attending your virtua home, doesn’t at stuck se we’re all to showcase what that would look like. Just becau s, all ration inspi t a few outfi mean we can’t still have fun with fashion! Here are available to shop locally.


Photographer ANDREA HUTCHINSON Stylist LIZ BINGHAM Styling Assistant SARAH LEVITCH Makeup TAMEKA ELLIOTT Models AUSTIN BOUCHARD from Heyman Talent, CARLY CHILDERS and SHANTAY CHANDLER from NV Models Location LINCLIFFE

Samuelsohn navy tuxedo (jacket not pictured), $1,595; Eton tuxedo shirt, $285; Eton paisley bow tie, $105, available at Rodes For Him. Aidan Mattox gown, $98; Vintage Whiting & Davis handbag, $48, available at Stella’s Resale Boutique. 42 Gold heels, $120, available at Mamili. Lalaounis 17-inch handwoven 22kt Greek revival neck chain, $15,000; Plique à jour ruby and diamond post earrings, $14,650; Emerald and diamond dome ring, $9,950; 18kt yellow gold black opal ring with mix of sapphires, tsavorite garnets and spessartite garnets, $8,500; 18kt yellow gold 18-inch anchor link chain, $4,200, available at Aesthetics In Jewelry.


Left: Monique Lhuillier top, $295; Monique Lhuillier pants, $495, available at Glasscock Women’s Boutique. Vintage Chanel earrings, $999, available at Belle Monde Boutique. 14kt white gold, opal ring with diamond halo, $5,153; Yellow radiant diamond ring with diamond pave halo in platinum, $16,485, available at Merkley Kendrick Jewelers. This page: Monique Lhuillier top, $295; Monique Lhuillier pants, $495, available at Glasscock Women’s Boutique. Sam Edelman heels, $38, available at Stella’s Resale Boutique. Circle diamond drop earrings, $22,545; 14kt white gold opal ring with diamond halo, $5,153; Yellow radiant diamond ring with diamond pave halo in platinum, $16,485, available at Merkley Kendrick Jewelers. In room: Gucci Horsebit boots, $500; Naheem Khan beaded maxi dress, $1,199, available at Belle Monde Boutique. Tory Burch velvet flats, $98; Vintage Eloise Curtis pink mini dress, $128, available at Stella’s Resale Boutique. Sam Edelman feather heels, $32; Kate Spade dress with feather detail, $64, available at Sassy Fox Upscale Consignment. Stuart Weitzman lace-up boots, $695; Red Valentino lace mini dress, $1,175, available at Rodes For Her. Carolina Herrera black lace mini dress, $3,290; Pink faux fur jacket, $195, available at Glasscock Women’s Boutique.


Bottom Left: Zimmermann blouse, $395; Zimmermann pant, $450, available at Circe. Bally heels, $29; Chanel earrings, $499; Yudofsky fur coat, $400, available at Belle Monde Boutique. Rhinestone belt, $98, available at Rodeo Drive. Louis Vuitton purse, $850, available at Sassy Fox Upscale Consignment. 18-inch 14kt white gold link chain, $2,400; Pearshaped emerald and diamond ring, $13,400; 14kt white gold sapphire and diamond necklace, $3,590; 18kt white gold tanzanite, tsavorite garnet and diamond ring, $3,490; 7-inch 14kt white gold four-prong diamond tennis bracelet, $19,475, available at Aesthetics In Jewelry. Top Left: Red Valentino blouse, $695, available at Rodes For Her. Elan skirt, $75; Daisy bag, $138, available at Mamili. Ann Tuil flats, $28, available at Sassy Fox Upscale Consignment. Headband, $32, available at Stella’s Resale Boutique. 14kt white gold pear-shape ring with kunzite and diamonds, $4,600; Emerald and diamond dome ring, $9,950; 18kt yellow gold black opal ring with mix of sapphires, tsavorite and spessartite garnets, $8,500; 18kt white gold drop earrings, $6,990; 7-inch filigree platinum diamond bracelet, $14,500; 18kt white gold filigree diamond bracelet, $11,700, available at Aesthetics In Jewelry. This page: Rachel Zoe sequin jacket, $239; Mac Duggal dress, $499; Chanel earrings, $899, available at Belle Monde Boutique.


Left: Byron black tuxedo, $1,095; Eton black shirt, $265; R. Hanauer red bow tie, $60, available at Rodes For Him. Right: Samuelsohn navy tuxedo, $1,595; Eton tuxedo shirt, $285; Eton paisley bow tie, $105, available at Rodes For Him. This page: Ralph Lauren velvet dress, $98, available at Stella’s Resale Boutique. Hermès pumps, $400, available at Sassy Fox Upscale Consignment. Yves Saint Laurent bag, $2,150, available at Rodes For Her. 18kt white gold aquamarine ring with diamonds, $17,500; 14kt yellow gold blue zircon and seed pearl necklace, $13,500; Yellow gold earrings with blue zircon, $1,850, available at Aesthetics In Jewelry.


Left: Naeem Khan beaded jumpsuit, $12,265; Naeem Khan beaded shawl, $7,155, available at Glasscock Women’s Boutique. Christian Louboutin heels, $498, available at Stella’s Resale Boutique. Sondra Roberts clutch, $175, available at Rodes For Her. 18kt white gold and diamond “brut” ring, $6,875; Yellow radiant diamond ring with diamond pave halo in platinum, $16,485; 14kt white gold and opal ring with diamond halo, $5,153; Oscar Heyman diamond chandelier earrings in platinum, $160,000, available at Merkley Kendrick Jewelers. Right: Solani dress, $399, available at Belle Monde Boutique. Kate Spade heels, $42, available at Stella’s Resale Boutique. Lele Sadoughi beaded headband, $198; Rodo Firenze clutch, $510, available at Rodes For Her. Julie Vos gold pearl drop necklace, $195, available at Mamili. 18kt yellow gold and diamond-quilted bangle, $9,580; 18kt yellow gold diamond marquise earrings, $12,375; 18kt yellow gold Secret Garden convertible diamond necklace, $36,000, available at Merkley Kendrick Jewelers. Facing page: Joan Leslie dress, $48, available at Stella’s Resale Boutique. Satin heels, $22, available at Sassy Fox Upscale Consignment. Red Valentino jacket, $1,500, available at Glasscock Women’s Boutique. Yves Saint Laurent bag, $2,590, available at Rodes For Her. Vintage opal and diamond earrings, $2,520; Handmade platinum sapphire and diamond ring, $43,400; 14kt white gold and opal ring with diamond halo, $5,153, available at Merkley Kendrick Jewelers.


100

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Left: A 2020 Corvette from the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, KY. A disco ball was donated from Omega National Products in Louisville. Below: Locally made dresses donated by KMAC Couture.

Don’t Ever Let Anyone Tell You Kentucky Ain’t Cool A new Frazier History Museum exhibit shows off everything “cool” about Kentucky

T

By ELIZABETH SCINTA Photos provided by The Frazier History Museum

he Frazier History Museum is opening its newest exhibit this fall called “Cool Kentucky” featuring numerous artifacts that make Kentucky “cool.” Visitors can expect to see a signed Louisville Slugger Bat from Jennifer Lawrence, a Corvette and Tori Murden’s boat, the Pearl, the entire murder mystery series by internationally known author, Sue Grafton, among many others. Upon learning about this new exhibit, we had the honor of interviewing the Frazier History Museum President and CEO, Andy Treinen, to learn what this new cool exhibit is all about.

What inspired the “Cool Kentucky” Exhibit? To be honest with you, it was probably when we took on the brand “Where the World Meets Kentucky,” and also the fact that we’re designated as the official starting point of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. What we discovered in our new role is that we are a concierge service for bourbon tourists to go to different distilleries all around the state. We decided with “Cool Kentucky” that we would take that same concept to all tourists, not just bourbon tourists. So, it’s a small

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

101


representation of all the different museums in the state, industry of people, great stories and culture. If you’re interested in the Corvette, which you’ll see sitting in the lobby of the Frazier, then you go to Bowling Green and go to the [National] Corvette Museum. If the Muhammad Ali story inspires you, then you go to the Muhammad Ali Museum. If it’s bluegrass music, you go to Owensboro. So it’s really a position statement as a starting point for tourism in the state of Kentucky.

Why did the Frazier think there was a need for an exhibit like this?

Above: A stump that Daniel Boone etched his name into, donated from the Filson Historical Society. Right: The inside of the 2020 Corvette from the National Corvette Museum.

As you can imagine, this is a massive story because there is an awful lot that is cool about the state of Kentucky. We had to start somewhere, and we’ve been working on this project for about a year and a half. We have a committee who brainstormed ideas on what we wanted for the exhibit, and once we came up with a list, they started contacting museums and attractions in the state to see what items we would be able to secure. That being said, it is a permanent exhibit, so it will evolve.

A lot is going into this exhibit, were most of the items donated? It’s a combination of a lot of things. Many of them are loans. We have loans from virtually every other museum in the state, and museums tend to do that when they have a story that fits something that another museum has. You will loan some of your items out, but I don’t think ever at this scale. I don’t know if anybody has had virtually every museum represented in their [own museum]. The great thing about Kentucky is that it’s a tight-knit community, and it’s not so big that people won’t pick up the phone. If you make a phone call and make a good case, we have found that people have been really receptive. I can’t tell you how much I’m looking forward to throwing a party to celebrate with all the people who donated to the museum. We initially thought that the party was going to be in October, but we knew a few months ago that that wasn’t going to happen, so now we’ll see. When the world allows it, we’re going to have one heck of a bash.

Book your ad in the December 2020 BESTIE issue now. Contact your Account Executive for details! advertising@voice-tribune.com 502.895.9770 www.voice-tribune.com

102

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Why did the Frazier Museum decide to make this a permanent exhibit?

which is the basketball team that won the ABA Championship in 1975 and disbanded in 1976. We got a stump from the Filson [Historical Society] today, a huge tree stump that has Daniel Boone’s name etched in it. When we brought the boat that Tori Murden rode across the Atlantic into the Great Hall, we had to engineer it and tip it onto its side and slide it through, and it only made it by about a half-inch on each side; that was a really cool day. So, it’s hard for me to commit to one specific thing because it changes every day when more tangible things come into the building.

Our brand is “Where the World Meets Kentucky,” so if we’re going to commit to that, we have to tell stories about the people, the culture and the industry and the landscape of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. I couldn’t think of a better way to do it than with an exhibit like “Cool Kentucky” because it gives us an opportunity to partner with Louisville tourism and Kentucky state tourism on getting regional travelers to come here to the Frazier first because it doesn’t end there. It’s not only a starting point, it’s a launching pad to other attractions throughout the state of Kentucky.

If you had to describe the exhibit in five words or less, what would they be?

What is your favorite part of the exhibit?

I can do it in one: cool. Don’t let anyone ever tell you that Kentucky ain’t cool.

I get excited about different things every day. We’re at the point where we’re seeing things come in tangibly. Today we got a bunch of stuff from the Kentucky Colonels,

Make sure to check out the full exhibit when it opens in fall 2020 to see all of the things that make Kentucky cool. V

NOVEMBER 2020

Frazier History Museum 829 W. Main Street Louisville, Kentucky 40202 fraziermuseum.org 502.753.1699

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

103


Nostalgia from A to Y

Reflections on the life of murder mystery novelist Sue Grafton

I

By STEVE HUMPHREY

thought I’d take a break from science for a month, and, in honor of the “Cool Kentucky” exhibit at the Frazier Museum, featuring Sue Grafton among others, write a bit about Sue’s life and career and how she became a renowned murder mystery novelist. I met Sue in 1974 when we were living in the same apartment building in West Los Angeles. I was 23, recently graduated from UCLA and awaiting word about admission to graduate school. I was working as a welder in a factory that manufactured rolling measuring devices. Sue was 34, twice divorced, a single mom raising two young children and trying to make a living as a writer. She had already published two novels, the Sue Grafton. second of which, “The Lolly Madonna War,” was optioned for film by a British producer. She and he co-wrote the script, and it was filmed in Knoxville, TN starring Rod Steiger, Robert Ryan, Gary Busey, Harvey Keitel, Jeff Bridges and Randy Quaid. When her partnership (and relationship) with the producer broke up, she had trouble finding further film work. The assumption in the industry at that time was that the boy did the writing and the girl did the typing. We started out just having a fling. She invited me to her apartment one evening to share some brandy, and one thing led to another. We began seeing one another, and before long, we were in a relationship. We would pool our meager pennies and splurge on dinner at the Great Western Steak and Hoagie on Lincoln Blvd. in Santa Monica.

104

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

When her savings account drifted below a certain level, she would get some menial job working for a production company. I remember her working as a production secretary for Danny Thomas Productions on a tv movie called “Satan’s Triangle,” starring Doug McClure, and on a series entitled “Faye” starring Lee Grant. At that time, nobody paid any attention to her. She lived on the first floor, with a picture window that opened onto a courtyard, and she would spend all hours at a plastic table in the window, drinking coffee, smoking cigarettes and writing. Her nickname in the building was the “Ghost Writer.” Her first real break came when she submitted a few spec scripts for the tv series “Rhoda.” None were used, but the producers and story editors liked what she did and she finally got an assignment. After that, her luck began to improve. She met a female producer who liked her work and had contacts, and they began to create movies for tv. In the fall of 1975, I moved to Columbus, OH to begin graduate school, and a year later, very inadvisably, she followed me. During this time, her ex-husband and father of her kids kidnapped their children and started a vicious custody battle. She would lie awake at night, thinking of ways to get back at him, but knew she would get caught and, as she put it, “spend the rest of my life in a shapeless prison dress, eating carbohydrates and embarrassing the very children I was trying to save.” Oddly enough, her career did not suffer from her move to Columbus. Producers liked

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

to brag that they were flying their writer “in from Ohio.” At the time, Hollywood people were telling her she was great with character but weak with plot. She decided that the best way to learn how to better write plots was to write mystery novels, as her father, C.W. Grafton, had done. She started writing “A is for Alibi” around 1979, incorporating her best “husbandicidal” ideas. She said that rather than actually doing him [her ex-husband] in, it would be better to put her idea in a book and get paid for it. She generated 80 pages, found a literary agent and sent it out to publishers. She wanted to write “hard-boiled detective fiction,” which virtually no women were doing at the time. Many editors at publishing houses suggested she write “women’s fiction,” like “Fear of Flying,” by Erica Jong, but she had no interest in that. Finally, Marian Wood at Henry Holt bought “A” based on those 80 pages, so Sue had to take a deep breath and finish the book. It came out in 1982 to great critical acclaim and thus was born Kinsey Millhone and “The Alphabet Mystery Series” that lasted for 25 books. We married in 1978, and spent the next 39 years together, until she passed in December 2017. She never got to “Z.” I remember Sue most for her indefatigable spirit. Nothing kept her down for long, not even her final illness. She was the most upbeat, optimistic person I have ever met. She was also universally beloved. No one didn’t adore Sue Grafton and all those wanting to learn more about her can visit The Frazier History Museum’s “Cool Kentucky” Exhibit when it opens this fall! V Steve Humphrey has a Ph.D. in the history and philosophy of science, with a specialty in the philosophy of physics. He teaches courses in these subjects at the University of California, Santa Barbara and has taught them at the University of Louisville. NOVEMBER 2020


Andy Warhol: Revelation Through November 29

New Hours Friday 3 – 8 Saturday & Sunday 10 – 5

Discover another side of the Pop artist of Campbell’s soup can fame. Andy Warhol: Revelation is the first exhibition to comprehensively examine Warhol’s complex Catholic faith in relation to his artistic production.

Advanced ticket purchase strongly encouraged and face masks required.

speedmuseum.org

Andy Warhol: Revelation is organized by the Andy Warhol Museum. Presented by:

Media support from:

Frontline healthcare workers enjoy free admission—we thank you.

Additional support from: Christina Lee Brown The Paradis Family LG&E and KU Foundation DDW, The Color House Land Rover of Louisville Contemporary exhibition support provided by: Augusta and Gill Holland

Exhibition season support provided by: Cary Brown and Steven E. Epstein Paul and Deborah Chellgren Debra and Ronald Murphy


Sponsored Content

Save BIG with Byrne Insurance Group LEARN MORE ABOUT THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE COMMUNITY By ELIZABETH SCINTA Photos by ANDREA HUTCHINSON

Left to right: Jacob McGill, Frank Buster, Dana Reinhardt, Aaron Byrne, John Anderson, Missy Webb, Jim Gross, Hope Little, Arra Whitty, Ben Byrne.

106

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


H

elping out in the nonprofit commu- mission to make a big impact in your life. Whether it nity is one of the pillars of Byrne is through our business owner clients, their employees, Insurance Group or BIG. The HR representatives, individual clients, our employees organization helps with insurance at BIG, or nonprofits, our goal is to simply make a big and financial services for those in impact in their life. We strive to do this with all facLouisville, Lexington and San Diego. They work to ets of our business so that mission has rubbed off on protect businesses, families and their our entire team and hence the involveassets and contribute to the nonprofit ment in the community,” said John community along the way. owner and managing part“It is important Anderson, Byrne Insurance Group is a full-serner, and Ben Byrne, president and to Byrne vice insurance group, meaning they owner of Byrne Insurance Group. can help you find the best prices by COVID-19 didn’t stop Byrne Insurance Group Insurance bundling and combing coverages. Group from continuing to participate in to give back to the local community. They can help your business with workers’ compensation, employee ey sent personalized cards with nonprofit work Th benefits, consulting and more. If you positive messages to those in nursing have a question about insurance and homes and assisted living facilities. because it is don’t know where to go, turn to Byrne “With COVID-19 restricting visiour company’s Insurance Group. They believe staytors, we were trying to think of addiing local with your insurance advisor mission to make tional ways to get involved and give is very important because the more especially to those who were a big impact in back, you get to know your agent, the more isolated,” said Anderson and Byrne. they’ll be able to help you, according This was an initiative their employees your life.” to their website. Owned by Ben Byrne invented and put into action. –Ben Byrne and John Anderson, they’re located With their participation with nonin Louisville’s Hurstbourne neighborprofit organizations growing, Byrne hood and aim to help you get the best Insurance Group isn’t stopping now coverage possible for your situation. but is full steam ahead. They spent the last week of The Byrne Insurance Group team has worked with October voting on new ways that they, as a team, can several nonprofits in 2020. Some of their employees are continue to help out in the community during the on the board of local nonprofit organizations, which holiday season. “We understand how difficult this year is how they came to know about them. As a team, has been for the community and we are looking for they donate their time and resources to the Salvation unique ways to give back,” Byrne and Anderson said. Army Board, St. Francis School, Gilda’s Club, Letters They hope to continue working with the nonprofit Against Isolation, Love for the Elderly, Hope Scarves, organizations they’re already familiar with and new Christ Church Methodist, Golf Outing Chair ones as they continue to learn about the community’s Member, The Ballard Alumni Committee, Rancho needs. Coastal, San Diego Human Societies, Kid’s Center for Save BIG and protect the BIG things in your life by Pediatric Therapy, Bluegrass Center for Autism, FEAT connecting with an advisor at Byrne Insurance Group. Louisville and Sojourn Community Church. To learn more about Byrne Insurance Group, check “It is important to Byrne Insurance Group to par- out their website at byrneinsurancgroup.com or email ticipate in nonprofit work because it is our company’s them at info@byrneinsurancegroup.com.

Located at:

Byrne Insurance Group of Louisville 9401 Williamsburg Plaza Suite 110 Louisville, KY 40222 byrneinsurancegroup.com 502.426.4200

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

107


108

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


LIBERTY WE ALL DECLARE FOR

Quappi Projects opens new exhibit that focuses on the future of American Citizenship

T

Story and photos by JOSH MILLER

he initial concept for Quappi Projects’ latest art exhibit that opened October 9, 2020 in Louisville, KY titled “We All Declare for Liberty: 2020 and the Future of American Citizenship,” was birthed over a year ago by founder and artist John Brooks. “I am a politically engaged person,” Brooks said. “I have a degree in political science, these are things that are always on my mind. I knew that this year — being a big presidential election and with other elections as well — was going to be quite a year. I had no idea, no one could have known, how things would play out.” Stepping into Quappi Projects off of Market St. you are met by Sean Starowitz’s “statues are silent teachers,” created specifically for the show and installed as a monument destroyed. “He came into the gallery in January, before things closed, and we talked about the show,” Brooks explained. “He’s been working with repurposed and reimagined monuments for years.” The piece is made from Indiana limestone. Starowitz created it as one solid piece, and after shaping it into an obelisk, broke it apart for the exhibit. “It speaks to the conversation about our monuments. Who do we honor? Why do we honor them? Should we still be honoring certain people and ideas? It feels very much like a relic that was installed like an obstacle [in the exhibit].” The exhibit includes a multi-generational group of 18 artists, featuring viewpoints from people who represent different lived experiences including Immigrants, Black, White, Women, LGBTQ+, Straight and Religious/Spiritual. Their pieces come together in response to a quote from Abraham Lincoln’s speech in 1864. “The world has never had a good definition of liberty, and the American people, just now, are much in need of one. We all declare for liberty, but in using the same word we do not all mean the same thing.” Some of the artists submitted pieces to Quappi’s open call for artists, while others were invited to participate as 2020 unfolded. “With COVID-19 and the economic repercussions, and with what is going on in Louisville with the death of Breonna Taylor and the protests, I decided to invite a few artists whose work I thought would specifically reflect what has gone on in Louisville this year,” Brooks shared as we walked through the exhibit, looking at KING LOUI, a photograph by Kenyatta Bosman taken during the Breonna Taylor protests. “I felt like we couldn’t have a show about the state of our politics — our future — without talking about what’s going on this year here.” One of the things I have said throughout 2020 is that at times it feels like we are in a twilight zone or a parallel universe. In some ways, I felt that way walking through the exhibit while looking at the contrasting pieces of art, like Brooks and artist Kris Thompson in masks installing a piece reflecting in the neon self-portrait by Destiny Mbachu. I saw it in Andrew Cenci’s black and white photos reflecting Hannah Drake’s poem “Spaces” and Matthew

NOVEMBER 2020

Now more than ever, it could not be more clear that life — let alone art — does not exist separately from the events and movements of society, culture and politics.

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

Facing page: “statues are silent teachers” by Sean Starowitz, “Person, Woman, Man, TV, Camera” by John Brooks.

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

109


McDole’s piece “Infinite Jest.” I felt it in Kenyatta’s photograph reflecting Denise Furnish’s Tumbling Blocks quilt “Duplicity.” There are layers upon layers of information to process; a demonstration of the complexity we find ourselves grappling with today. As Brooks said, “All of these artists are extremely thoughtful. They are informed, engaged in their community and in the world. I think sometimes people can look to art as something that’s just pretty or in the background, something maybe a little bit unserious. This show is a great example of why that’s wrong. These artists are thinking about things that affect all of us. Artists are doing the work of looking at our world closely, analyzing our culture and our society with a critical eye and then trying to illuminate how we can be better.” For a contemporary art gallery whose mission is to feature artists whose work reflects the zeitgeist (a German word for spirit of the age or time), the show reflects notes about our history and the year we’ve had. “In many ways, this will be the most important exhibition in our program to date,” notes the Quappi Projects website. “Now more than ever, it could not be more clear that life — let alone art — does not exist separately from the events and movements of society, culture and politics.” Artist Vian Sora, an immigrant from Iraq, described her piece as a “work that addresses the meaning and representation of citizenship and its relationship to the American flag. A flag that could resemble an escape, hope and endless possibilities, and simultaneously violence and brutality.” Across the gallery, Hannah Drakes’ words jump off the wall:

Left: “SHOW ME SOME FUCKIN RESPECT” by Destiny Mbachu. Below, Front: “MAGA” by Kris Thompson. Back: “Consume” by Bryan Kelly Holden. Bottom Front: “Vessel of Manifest Destiny! (2nd Permutation) by Travis Townsend. Back Left: “A History of Women’s Suff rage” by Skylar Smith. Back Right: “North, South, East, West” by Timothy Robertson.

“It is for everyone that will come after me For everyone to know they have a right to be in these spaces, to have seat at the table in these spaces, to have a voice in these spaces, to have influence in these spaces That is why I stand in spaces that make me uncomfortable Speaking boldly against injustice even now while some of you sit looking at me and now you feel uncomfortable But today you have heard me You cannot unsee me! In this space, I belong...In this space...this space We are here & We belong here! In this space!” Artist Destiny Mbachu said, “I am so happy to be able to express myself on this level! The fact that I get to fight for my equity as a Black woman while having my work in a gallery makes me extremely ecstatic.” From the role of a leader and president, to the amount of information and news we are faced with daily, to the question of who “spaces” are designed for and what they should celebrate, the artists put forward work that begs us to question attitudes and mindsets. “This show isn’t about partisanship,” Brooks said. “It asks, ‘What is the state of our national politics and the future of it? What does it require of us?’” V Quappi Projects Gallery 827 E Market St. (Side Gate Entrance) Louisville, KY 40206 502.295.7118 quappiprojects.com The exhibit runs through November 21, 2020. 110

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


That’s the power of flowers


Tastes

A Chef Knows Best How to avoid isolation through a delicious recipe meant to share

F

By LIZ GASTIGER AND KEVIN

or a chef, the starving artist is a very fitting topic for the Arts Issue of The Voice. Why didn’t all those starving artists just meet a chef? No one would rather feed a starving artist more than a chef, except maybe their mothers. Part of the explanation for why artists “starve” has to do with being too busy with their art for a relationship with a chef or anyone else. Some of the answer has to do with pop culture romanticizing the isolated artist. Some of the answer, today, has to do with the isolated artist being taught in schools as a historical fact. While some famous artists fit the cultural and societal label of an isolated artist, like Vincent Van Gogh (Impressionist Painter), Daniel Day-Lewis (Actor), Herman Hesse (Author), Ani DiFranco (Musician) and George Orwell (Author), many other artists did not isolate. This romantic, isolated image of the artist comes especially from the likes of Michelangelo, lying on his back up high on scaffolding and alone for years while painting the Sistine Chapel. Applying these images in today’s culture, you could ask yourself, do we romanticize isolation too much? Is isolation dangerous? Today, more and more, I see examples of isolation as a solution to everything. Of course, we know all this stems from the pandemic when at least 27 countries on every continent have closed their borders to some foreign nationals. Canada, our closest neighbor, still has not opened its borders. Large international cities, like New York City, became isolated. And without any doubt, hundreds of millions of homes became isolated. As we all adapted valiantly to isolation, it became easier and easier to apply it to many aspects of our lives. It became easy to isolate from that dating relationship, or that sometimes annoying neighbor, or those relatives, even siblings, whose choices we question. Isolation, while it may benefit a few artists in focusing on their talent, can lead some to loneliness, depression and losing oneself. Because, if or when we get to the point when we are tired of the isolation, what will we be left with? Do not make isolation your lifestyle. I say practice baking a cake, bread or a pie and reconnect soon. Here is a delicious recipe that is meant to share with others: 112

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

Best Ever Chocolate Cake Ingredients 1 ¼ cup flour 1 cup sugar 1/3 cup cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup warm coffee (I usually use decaf) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/3 cup vegetable oil 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

Instructions Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Mix the flour, sugar, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt with a whisk. Combine the coffee, vanilla extract, vegetable oil and vinegar. Combine the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients with a whisk, just until mixed. Butter, flour (or use a baking pan spray) and coat an 8” round cake pan. Pour in your prepared batter and bake for 30 minutes.

Tips Before baking, you can sprinkle some chocolate chips (you can use butterscotch, peanut butter chips or any other chips you may like) before baking. I like this cake served plain with powdered sugar sprinkled on top. However, I have iced it with a cream cheese frosting and a salted caramel frosting, and they were both equally delicious. V NOVEMBER 2020


Bring the holidays home and support Norton Children’s Hospital

View and buy trees, wreaths and holiday décor Nov. 13 to 15. New this year — premium items available Nov. 13 to 21!

FestivalOfTreesAndLights.org Festival of Trees & Lights presented by

Snow Ball is presented by


5 Health

WAYS TO

DE-STRESS

FOR THE HOLIDAYS

N

By JOE KIRVEN

o matter which holidays you celebrate, this time of year is already filled with added stress. Days feel shorter, commitments feel longer and patience is thinner. Add a global pandemic and an election year to the list and 2020 is bound to have you stressed out beyond an alltime high. This holiday season is presenting us all with unprecedented stressors and circumstances that even the most seasoned of party-goers or hosts and hostesses have never encountered. For some, there will be no office parties, Thanksgiving dinners or family gatherings leading to potential isolation and loneliness. Others will debate masks versus no masks, hoax versus real, attend in-person

114

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

versus online and the list goes on and on. If just reading that list causes a bit of angst and anxiety, the good news is, you’re not alone. We are all feeling a little stressed these days. Stress is normal, and sometimes good, for all of us. Your body is full of amazing hormones and mechanisms designed to help you survive stressful and dangerous times. You’ve probably heard of the fight or flight phenomenon — a dangerous scenario occurs, and we stay and fight our way through it or run for cover and safety. This is a normal physiological response to a stressor. This response is first triggered by our sympathetic nervous system with the production and release of hormones. Norepinephrine, epinephrine, testosterone, estrogen and cortisol (among others) play a vital role in our body’s response to stress. Again, this response is natural and sometimes

NOVEMBER 2020


Joe Kirven is a NSCA Certified Personal Trainer with 13+ years of experience at Baptist Health/Milestone Wellness Center. Joe specializes in Corporate Wellness programming, where he works with companies like LG&E, ISCO Industries and Papa John’s. Joe also specializes in Pilates reformer training. With his wide range of personal and professional experiences, Joe keeps his clients’ programming varied and balanced, with a focus on overall health and wellness. Joe believes that our health and well-being are the key ingredients to living a long and fulfilling life. In his free time, Joe enjoys playing football, basketball and rock climbing with his sons Jacob and Lincoln. Photo provided by Baptist Health/Milestone Wellness Center.

life-saving. However, if we allow outside stressors to linger and control our body the effects can be damaging as these hormones are created and/or stored in levels of excess. It is often the reason we have a hard time sleeping, focusing, eating or remembering things when we are faced with a stressful circumstance like a job

loss, divorce, loss of a loved one or a global pandemic. It is when the stressors become constant (perceived or real) that our hormones become so out of balance that we can gain weight, lose mental clarity and have many other physical and emotional setbacks. Our brains literally think we are under attack and prepare us to fight or fly without

Our brains literally think we are under attack and prepare us to fight or fly without the actual scenario taking place.

Coaching to activate COURAGE during ever changing times.

www.joshmiller.ventures

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M |

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

115


the actual scenario taking place. Imagine there is a tiger in the woods and you spend your entire life wondering if it will come after you. That’s stressful and would wreack havoc on your mental and physical wellness. This season, don’t let those hormones build to a level that allows you to damage your body. Turn to a health and wellness routine to help regulate your body’s hormones, lose weight and help keep or re-gain mental clarity and peace of mind. Below are some useful holiday tips for the most avid exerciser to someone who has never worked out a day in their life. 1) Keep it simple: Don’t overwhelm yourself with an unrealistic task or overly time-consuming workout. Move your body in a way that feels both safe and efficient to you. If you like swimming, swim; dancing, then dance; walking, then walk. Don’t complicate an already complicated time. Moving your body burns calories and releases the feel-good hormones serotonin and endorphins. 2) Your time is important: Don’t feel obligated to make every party or everyone

happy. You owe it to yourself to make YOURSELF happy. If promising to be at too many events causes stress or emotional turmoil, it’s time to take things off your plate. Chances are, the truly important people will be there long after the holidays are behind us and they will understand if you have to take a rain check. 3) Lift weights, do yoga or pilates: Any form of strength training can help breakdown and build up muscle mass. This again helps regulate hormones but also makes your body more metabolically active. You’ll improve sleep, body composition and create a healthy release for those stress hormones that are building up. 4) Go for a post-dinner/party walk: If you are meeting in person, make a game of it, especially if holiday meals and treats are the center point of your get together. After dinner, see if you can get outdoors for a family walk or scavenger hunt. Try to not only burn a few extra calories but use it as an excuse to get away from the annoying relative who won’t stop talking about his or her favorite politician winning or losing.

5) Eat (or bring) a healthy plate: Again, food is often the center point of gatherings. Don’t feel the need to eat anything and everything in sight. Prepare a healthy salad or fruit tray to bring so you know there will be at least one healthy option available. Or, eat ahead of time and politely state that you are eating healthy and merely there to enjoy the company. So whether you’re stressing over awkward questions from your crazy aunt about why you’re still single or just wondering how you’ll manage so many occasions, treats and shopping lists in so little time, be sure to allow your body to release stress and excess hormones. Just ten minutes on a yoga mat or a jog around the neighborhood can do wonders for your mental and physical health. V Baptist Health/Milestone Wellness Center 750 Cypress Station Dr. Louisville, KY 40207 baptistmilestone.com 502.896.3900

BELONGING THROUGH CREATIVE ARTS ACTIVITY BOOK ACTIVITY PLANS FOR YOUTH, TEACHERS, ARTISTS, PARENTS, AND YOUTH-SERVING ORGANIZATIONS TO USE AND ENJOY! Made possible by Sutherland Foundation, Brown-Forman, the Kentucky Civic Engagement Table, Gheens Foundation, Louisville Metro Government Arts Fund Grants, and the Kentucky Foundation for Women.

Visit ideasxlab.com/activitybook to download your FREE copy!

116

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

| VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Occasions

1

1. Kent and Kathy Oyler, Steve Humphrey and Janice Carter Levitch, Steve and Terri Bass. 2. Steve and Terri Bass. 3. Kathy and Kent Oyler. 4. Senior Executive Chef David Danielson and Chef de Cuisine Jeff Dailey. 5. Senior Executive Chef David Danielson. 6. Kathy and Kent Oyler, Steve Humphrey and Janice Carter Levitch, Steve and Terri Bass.

2

Introducing Matt Winn’s Steakhouse at Churchill Downs Racetrack Photos by KATHRYN HARRINGTON

O

n Oct. 3, The Voice-Tribune Publisher, Janice Carter Levitch, and guests enjoyed a private dining experience in the Bourbon Room of Matt Winn’s Steakhouse at Churchill Downs with proceeds benefiting the Churchill Downs Backside. The group also received a private tour of the new space from Senior Executive Chef, David Danielson. From their extensive whiskey selection, top-of-the-line cuisine and a stunning view of the racetrack, this is an experience you don’t want to miss!

3

4

5

6

118

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

|

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


2021 Audi Q5 Now Arriving

Audi Louisville 4730 Bowling Blvd. Louisville, KY 40207 Sales : (502) 894-3427 | audilouisville.com

Louisville


Occasions

Waterfront Botanical Gardens Celebrates Its One-Year Anniversary

1

2

Photos by ANDREA HUTCHINSON

O

n Oct. 4, the Waterfront Botanical Gardens celebrated its one-year anniversary with a private virtual concert featuring CMT’s Next Women of Country Artist, Stephanie Quayle, dinner and dessert from Wiltshire Pantry and cocktails from Beam Suntory. Guests were invited to socially distance at the Annual Gala at tables in groups of two or four and enjoyed an evening to get dressed up and celebrate one of Louisville’s botanical treasures.

3

4

6

120

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

7

|

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

5

8

NOVEMBER 2020


10

9 12

1. Amie and Clinton Deckard with Vincent Farrante and Elizabeth Chandler. 2. Teri Smith and Pat Ballard. 3. Bridge 19 performing at the Annual Waterfront Botanical Gardens Gala. 4. Charles and Lisa Barr. 5. Allison Whitehouse, Duncan Cherry, Kasey Maier, Elizabeth Chandler and Misty Cruse. 6. Duncan Cherry with a lovely floral arrangement. 7. Stephen Wesley and Craig Scherman. 8. Steve Humphrey and Janice Carter Levitch. 9. Peggy Grant and Teri Smith. 10. Andy and Harriet Mays with Jeff and Cindy Cummins. 11. Janet and Kurt Graeser. 12. Kasey Maier welcoming guests. 13. Courtney and Tim Corrigan.

11

13

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

121


Occasions

1

Joyce Meyer Hosts Voice October Issue Launch Party Photos by ANDREA HUTCHINSON

O

n Oct. 7, Joyce Meyer hosted a small get-together for close friends and family at her home to celebrate the launch of the October issue of The Voice-Tribune.

3

4

2

5

6

1. Joyce Meyer, Lisa Stemler, Larry Shapin, Ladonna Nicolas, Lynnie Meyer, Vincent Straight, Thomas and Tinsley Meyer, Mary Lou Meyer and Kelly Hymes. 2. Mary Lou and Joyce Meyer, Coyote Calhoun, Kelly Hymes, Tinsley and Lynnie Meyer and Lisa Stemler. 3. Larry Shapin and Ladonna Nicolas. 4. Joyce Meyer and Lisa Stemler. 5. Judge Eric Haner and Mary Lou Meyer. 6. Thomas, Tinsley and Lynnie Meyer. 7. Janice Carter Levitch and Steve Humphrey.

7

122

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

|

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


Tis the Season to Shop Local at Chenoweth Square

Like” Chenoweth Square on Facebook for Holiday hours and events!

The locally-owned & operated shops of Chenoweth Square invite you to celebrate small business-shopping & dining.

“Like” Chenoweth Square “Like” onon Facebook Chenoweth forfor Square Holiday on hours Facebook and for Holiday hours and events! “Like” Chenoweth Square Facebook Holiday hours andevents! events! ” Chenoweth “Like” Square Chenoweth on Facebook Square for on Holiday Facebook hoursfor and Holiday events!hours and events!


Occasions

1

2

3

Quappi Projects’ “We All Declare for Liberty” Exhibit Photos by KATHRYN HARRINGTON

O

n Oct. 9, the NuLu art gallery Quappi Projects opened a new exhibit titled “We All Declare for Liberty: 2020 and the Future of American Citizenship,” that was created by founder and artist John Brooks. Patrons were invited to peruse the exhibit in small groups and many of the artists were in attendance for them to meet.

4

124

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

|

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

5

1. Theo Edmonds, Joey Yates, John Brooks and Josh Miller. 2. Jasmine Salahuddin and Blake McGrew. 3. Tommy and Maryanne Elliott. 4. Molly Mackowiak with Emma and Sarah Shadburne. 5. Celes, Darius and Jamelia Smith.

NOVEMBER 2020


CONGRATULATIONS

Bob Baffert on your 6th Kentucky Derby win with Authentic! ®

Derby Day was different this year. But Bob Baffert’s 6th Kentucky Derby win gave us all something to smile about, as he tied the record for most wins with trainer Ben Jones. To help Louisville celebrate, the Museum is offering a “buy one get one” ticket, good on November 7. See our signature movie, “The Greatest Race,” now updated with footage of Authentic’s big win. Visitors will enjoy our new exhibit “Right to Ride” about trailblazing female jockeys and a complimentary Historic Walking Tour of Churchill Downs.

Thank you to our supporting sponsors of Kentucky Derby Museum’s Bourbon Dinner with Bob Baffert on November 4, 2020

Buy One Ticket Get One Free Promotion Saturday, November 7, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Tickets at the door Learn more at derbymuseum.org/bogo


Occasions

St. Francis School’s (re)Imagine! Auction & Fundraiser Photos by KATHRYN HARRINGTON and ANDREA HUTCHINSON

1 2

3

4

O

n Oct. 10, St. Francis held its annual (re)Imagine! Art Auction and Scholarship Fundraiser virtually that was hosted by Kevin Harned and live-streamed on Facebook and YouTube. Several St. Francis families and supporters hosted small gatherings in their homes to both support the auction and tune-in to the live event. 5

1. Susan and Sean Maguire, Nick and Ursula Melhuish, Chad and Lee Middendorf, Weasy MacLean and Dr. Mike and Maria Doyle. 2. Head of School Alexandra Thurstone and Cheri Collis White. 3. Greg Brown and Bill Schreiber. 4. Sandy Schreiber and Scott Rogers. 5. Hosts Mark and Emily Kirchdorfer. 6. Patrick Piuma and Christine Brinkmann, Emily and Mark Kirchdorfer, Kirk and Alissa Shoemaker with Kandi Walker and Sam Julian. 7. Hosts David and Laura Linkous with Jason and Jaime Bronfman.

6

7

126

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

|

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


O

The Kentucky Derby Museum’s Ladies in Leadership Photos by KATHRYN HARRINGTON 1

3

2

O

n Oct. 16, the Kentucky Derby Museum hosted the Ladies in Leadership breakfast, sponsored by LG&E, with the slogan “Empowered Women Empower Women.” The morning included booths from local, femaleowned businesses, a panel of female speakers including former female jockey Donna Barton Brothers and access to the new exhibit, “Right to Ride,” about trailblazing female jockeys.

4

1. Peggy Noe Stevens. 2. Beth Fay and Sarah Trasatti. 3. Macy Spears and Megan Lakes. 4. Artist Liz Richter. 5. Rebecca Gorman and Shannon Follette. 6. Ashley Overberg, Tara Logan and DeDe Kelley. 7. Raeshanda Lias-Lockhart. 8. Rachel Brown and Tara Levitz with Kendra Scott.

7

5

6 8

NOVEMBER 2020

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

127


Occasions

NouLou Chamber Players at Oxmoor Farm Photos by ANDREA HUTCHINSON

O 1 2

1. Deborah Fortel and David Sawyer. 2. Robert Simpson, Karen Keith and Don Wenzel. 3. Mary and Joe Bellino with Kim Kline. 4. Rachel and Tammy Thaler. 5. Andy Dozier and Cheri Boden. 6. NouLou Chamber Orchestra performs at Oxmoor Farm. 4

n Oct. 18, the NouLou Chamber Players performed “Crisp Air” in the gardens at Oxmoor Farm for a small gathering of socially distanced guests.

3

5

6

128

THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

|

VO I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

NOVEMBER 2020


THE 2020 DEFENDER Capable of great things.

LAND ROVER LOUISVILLE 4700 BOWLING BLVD LOUISVILLE, KY 40207 SALES (502) 429-8085 landroverlouisville.com


A family-owned funeral home with deep roots in the community.

UPCOMING EVENTS

We’ve been chosen by families who have lived here for generations - folks who have come to know and trust us over the years. You see, unlike funeral homes owned by faraway corporations, we have a committment to this community.

Winter Woods Spectacular

NOV

Louisville Parks Foundation

After all, our roots are here.

NOV 9 , 16, 23, 30

The Intuitive Witch Circle

Jessica Tanselle: Medium

NOV 14

Punch Bowl Cocktails

Make & Muddle

Reflections & Mirrors: Writing and Publishing Your Memoir!

NOV 17

Louisville Literary Arts

NOV 20 Owned by the Owen and Wagner Families

3331 Taylorsville Rd., Louisville

502-451-4420

(Virtual) Vernissage 2020 KMAC Museum

highlandsfuneralhome.com Call for our free brochure. Why Choose A Family-Owned Firm?

redpintix.com


South Central Bank We are Accepting Loan Applications Now!

Our Lobby is Open!

Commercial Lending • Commercial Real Estate Loans Residential Mortgage Loans and Construction Financing

2000 Warrington Way • Ste 200 • Louisville, KY 40222 502-715-4292


Profile for Red Pin Media

The Voice-Tribune November 2020