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Making a run for it E.L. Crossley Correspondent Earlier this month, E.L Crossley Secondary School students participated in the annual Rankin Cancer Run. The events of the day included an inspirational speech about the organization, students from grades 9 to 12 walking and running around the Pelham, and a free barbeque organized by the business leadership class. The Rankin Cancer Run is an annual event that occurs in the Port Weller area of St.Catharines in May. However, Crossley has its own version of the run, which happens early in the school year. All proceeds gathered from generous students and parents within the community are contributed to the money raised in May. In the past, Crossley has supported the Terry Fox Foundation. However, in 2011, the school decided to focus its efforts more locally for the benefit of a Crossley student who had cancer

Ringside with the President

at the time. By choosing to contribute to the Rankin Run, local residents are guaranteed that all of the funds raised will go back to local hospitals and centres.

When I helped make sure that the sound was loud and clear

Local residents are guaranteed that all of the funds raised will go back to local hospitals

BY JULIAN ROBERTS

Special to the VOICE

S

ings. “My wife and I also own a number of buildings downtown and we put an awful lot of time, effort and our life savings into building these places to make them beautiful,” Turpel said. “They would be so much more appealing if they weren’t just buildings on

INCE THE VOICE went to press before the third and final debate tonight, I can’t say whether Donald J. Trump finally imploded, or whether, yet again, he dragged the American electorate further down into the slime pit known as the 2016 presidential election. Watching this race unfold south of the border, I’m reminded of one of the best experiences of my younger days. I won’t claim that it seems like yesterday, but I know that many readers will understand that the older you get, the faster the decades pass. It was three days shy of exactly 40 years ago: October 22, 1976. President Gerald Ford, an old-school Republican, was trying to hold on against his upstart Democratic challenger, former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter. Like Clinton and Trump this evening, Ford and Carter were meeting for their third and final debate. It was a Friday night. The debate was held on the campus of the College of William & Mary, in the his-

See TREES Page 3

See DEBATE Page 8

Rankin, in previous years, has donated $400,000 to the Walker Family Centre, $150,000 to Hospice Niagara, $200,000 to Wellspring Niagara, and at least $250,000 to local hospitals. The Director of this See RANKIN Page 3

E.L. Crossley students running for Rankin earlier this month.

GAVIN MIDDLETON PHOTO

Trees and splash-pad top resident wish-list BY VOICE STAFF On Tuesday, Oct. 11, the Town held an open house for residents and business owners to provide input into the 2017 Town of Pelham capital and operating budgets. Topping the list of ideas offered up during the meeting were enhanced tree planting initiatives and

beautification, as well as a splash pad. Giving the first presentation and establishing the primary theme of the discussion was Dr. Jim Turpel. Citing a number of benefits that come with increasing urban tree cover, he explained to Council why it would be in the public’s best interest to set aside more funds for improving and in-

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Crossley students hold their own version of the Rankin Run BY KAYE CHANG

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creasing local green space through tree planting. “I believe, as do many other people, that we are not doing enough to replant trees in our community,” Turpel said. “It’s a great town and we want to ensure that it just continues to look that way.” Since moving to Pelham 17 years ago, Turpel said he and his wife couldn’t be

happier. Having raised their children here, he said they have a vested in interest in making the town the best it can be. Turpel said that when standing at the corner of South Pelham and Hwy 20 and looking south, basically all people can see is what he called “hardscape” — asphalt, some interlocking brick, businesses and build-

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Page 2

The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

PUBLISHER’S CORNER by Dave Burket

From the little acorn a mighty oak...No doubt about it, we're mighty tree-heavy this week, what with the Comfort family reunion; residents wanting more trees as wonderfully expressed in Town Hall last week by Jim Turpel; and the continued mystery die-off of trees in downtown Fonthill, noted in this week's editorial cartoon. Given the proximity of so much auto exhaust (and occasional hot air around the corner), it's a wonder that anything at all grows on Pelham Street between College and Hwy 20. Wait! Local real estate is still a bargain...Was August an anomaly? We quoted a local realtor two weeks ago to the effect that the average selling price in Pelham was $522,227. Well, September's average was a marginally more affordable, and that's in air-quotes, $436,767. Guess we'll have to wait another little while before we can claim to be the town of half-mil homes. And by the way, we're advised by a real estate agent that technically there is no such thing as a

real estate "agent," so forget all those decades of common usage and listen up: There are "brokers," and there are "sales representatives." Period. Got it? Remember this the next time you go hiring a real estate agent. Detect the pilots...Father-son drone duo Paul and James McGuire continue to send in great shots. Can you spot them in this week's image? That's one extreme selfie. Aiming for invisible... Larry Cote's commentary on the experience of newcomers to Pelham hits it on the head, especially relating to friendly pedestrians. Out walking the dog or taking an afternoon stroll, you can always spot the uncomfortable urban refugees, doing their best to pretend that they are alone on the street. Make eye contact? Offer a friendly hello? What cultish place is this! Leave us alone! Shot in the arm...Shoppers Drug Mart says flu shots will be in by the end of the month. Get jabbed— it might save your life.

Beavers learn fire prevention and safety Fire Safety Week offers kid-friendly safety message BY NATE SMELLE

The VOICE

Throughout the past week, local firefighters have been reaching out to the public in a variety of ways to better inform residents on fire safety. As part of this year’s campaign, the 3rd Fonthill Beaver Colony paid a visit to the Station 1 Fire Hall last Wednesday for a tour of the facility and a lesson in fire prevention. Once the Beavers had taken their seats and suited up in their very own firefighter helmets, Fire Prevention Officer William Underwood welcomed the colony and then began the lesson with a short video. Educating the kids about the basics of fire prevention, how a fire is ignited, why not to play with matches or lighters, and what to do if caught in a fire, the film was also a good reminder for the adults in the room. When Underwood questioned the children on what they had learned afterwards it was obvious from their responses that they were paying attention. One of the most important things pointed out by Underwood was smoke alarm safety. Underwood said it is essential for smoke alarms to be replaced at least every 10 years or sooner, depending on the time frame indicated by the manufacturer. The expiry date can be determined by looking at the manufacture date on the back of the smoke alarm. He encourages property owners to check the manufacturer’s instructions for the expiry timeframe of their smoke alarms. “Smoke alarms are required on every level of their

home and outside all sleeping areas,” said Underwood. “It is important for people to test their smoke alarms on a monthly basis by pushing the test button on the alarm. They also need to replace the batteries

The best way for us to keep the public safe is through fire prevention

at least once a year or when the alarm’s low -battery signal starts beeping.” Before taking the children on a tour of the station Underwood and the other firefighters had them practice a stop, drop and roll exercise. Splitting into smaller groups, the Beavers next had an opportunity to get a close-up look at the fire trucks and other firefighting equipment. Watching the firefighters suit up to enter a fire, they learned how each piece of gear protects them from the heat. “Our goal is to reach as many people as possible,” Underwood said. “The best way for us to help keep the public safe is though fire prevention.” Because 72 percent of fires in Ontario take place in residential dwellings, Underwood said it is wise for the public to take measures See BEAVERS Page 7

www.thevoiceofpelham.ca

IN THE NEWS Retirement home theft suspect

The Niagara Regional Police are asking for the public’s help in identifying a person of interest in a theft at a Pelham retirement home on October 8. Police are trying to identify a white male who appears to be in his late 40s to 50s, with greying hair and dressed all in black. The male appears to be bow legged when he walks. Anyone who believes they recognize this male is asked to call Detective Sergeant Brian Smith at 905688-4111.

Witnesses sought

On Sunday October 2, at approximately 3:15 PM, police say that an act of indecency occurred at the McDonald’s in the Wal-Mart on Oakwood Drive in Niagara Falls. Investigators are specifically looking to speak with three women who were approached by the male as he exited the restaurant. Anyone with information, or who may have witnessed the incident, are requested to contact police at 905688-4111.

New student bursaries

The Education Foundation of Niagara (EFN) has created two new endowment funds to help students in need access post-secondary education. Beginning in 2017, The Education Foundation of Niagara Bursary Fund for DSBN Students and The Education Foundation of Niagara Bursary Fund for DSBN Academy Students will each yield one award to a qualified student who demonstrates financial need and who is a first generation student, meaning their parents did not complete a post-secondary education. The funds were established through general donations to the Foundation and are being managed by the Niagara Community Foundation. Now seedling funds, EFN says that their intention is to grow the base amounts in order to generate more and higher annual bursary amounts in future years. “Even with the Ontario government’s recent announcement to make post-secondary education more accessible, many young people in the Niagara Region still face financial barriers to education due to school related costs,” said Cindy Paskey, Education Foundation Executive Director. “These endowments present a wonderful opportunity for an individual, or a business or service group to encourage the career ambitions of Niagara’s youth. Donors can leave a legacy in various ways.” EFN says that options for giving include a donation of any amount to either of the two existing funds, or the creation of a named fund within either one with a donation of $5,000. Brock University students did just that, creating The Brock Leaders Citizenship Society Fund, which is part of the bursary fund for DSBN Academy students. A gift of $25,000 lets donors create and set the terms of a named endowment that will provide one student with a

Alleged beam thief nabbed

minimum annual bursary of $750. Paskey asserts that the funds also offer long-term societal benefits. “The link between education and better health and economic outcomes for citizens is well-established,” she said. “We are working to improve the post-secondary graduation rates in the region and to support Niagara’s efforts to retain young people. Support for education at its earliest stages is an investment in the future prosperity of the region as a whole.”

Gas bar robbery

Last Thursday at approximately 12:30 AM, police says a lone male suspect entered the Pioneer Gas Bar on Hartzel Road in St.Catharines. The male produced a weapon and demanded cash. The suspect obtained an undisclosed amount of cash then fled. No person was injured as a result. The suspect is described as being a white male with a thin build and approximately 5’5” tall. He was wearing a blue hooded sweatshirt, dark pants and sneakers. The incident is being investigated by members of the Niagara Regional Police 1 District Detective Office.

Falls motel fire

At approximately 5:30 PM on Tuesday, October 11, members of the Niagara Regional Police and the Niagara Falls Fire Department responded to a fire at the Value Inn on Lundys Lane, Niagara Falls. Police say the fire was quickly extinguished and damage was contained to one room. The motel was vacant and not in operation at the time. Police say they have determined that the fire was deliberately set. Investigation continues by the 2 District Detective Office and Niagara Falls Fire Prevention. Anyone with information in relation to this incident is urged to contact police.

St Kitts Petro Canada robbery

On Tuesday October 11, at about 10 PM, members of the Niagara Regional Police Service responded to the Petro Canada gas station located at 437 Niagara Street in St. Catharines for reports of a robbery. Police say that a male suspect entered the store and produced a knife demanding money from the lone attendant. After receiving a quantity of cash the male fled the scene on a bicycle westbound through the adjacent plaza parking lot. The gas station attendant was not injured. The suspect is described as a white male, approximately 6’0 tall, with a slim build wearing a black hooded sweatshirt with the hood drawn tightly around his face, black sunglasses, loose fitting light khaki pants and white running shoes.

On October 7, Niagara Regional Police attended a construction site at the Burgoyne Bridge, St. Paul Street West, St. Catharines, in response to a theft complaint relating to several missing aluminum beams. Police say that their investigation led them to arrest a St. Catharines resident and the recovery of the stolen beams. Arrested was 63-yearold Dan Rizzardo. He was charged with Theft Over $5,000 contrary to the Criminal Code; Driving While Suspend contrary to the Highway Traffic Act; and Fail to Comply with his Probation Order contrary to the Provincial Offences Act. Rizzardo was held in custody pending a bail hearing.

Lincoln man arrested for sexual assault

Police say that detectives from the Child Abuse Unit commenced an investigation into a sexual assault allegation stemming from an incident that occurred in Beamsville in July. As a result of the investigation, 52-year-old Michael Cherwaty, of Lincoln, was arrested and is charged with the following: Sexual Assault, contrary to Section 271 of the Criminal Code of Canada; Sexual Interference, contrary to Section 151 of the Criminal Code of Canada; Expose genitals to a minor, contrary to Section 173(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada; Invitation to sexual touching, contrary to Section 152 of the Criminal Code of Canada. The alleged offences were committed while the accused was considered to be in a position of trust or authority over the victim, who was under the age of 16. Police say that no further information will be released to protect the identity of the victim. Anyone with information regarding this investigation is urged to contact the Niagara Regional Police Service Child Abuse Unit at 905-688-4111 extension 9457.

Grimsby drugs arrest

On Sunday, October 9, at 11:45 PM, Niagara Regional Police Service received numerous calls of a fight on Fairview Street in the town of Grimsby. Police say that they quickly responded to the area, and while doing so were provided with an update that one of the males in the fight had a gun. Police were then advised that the male, and the rest of the group had left in vehicles. A vehicle description was provided and police located the vehicle on Main Street East, Grimsby. Police conducted a traffic stop, detained the occupants and searched the vehicle for the gun. During the search of the vehicle police say they located a large amount of powdered cocaine and Canadian currency. Arrested and charged were Gerald Rogers, 20, and Christian Boyd-Galego, 19, both of Hamilton. Both men See IN THE NEWS Page 5

NRP impaired driving charges In an effort to bring further attention and deterrence to driving while impaired by alcohol or drugs, the Niagara Regional Police Service reports the names of those people who are charged with an alleged criminal impaired driving offence in the Region. None of the following charges have been proved in court. In addition to being charged, these individuals are also bound by a Ministry of Transportation 90-Day Administrative Driver’s License Suspension and are prohibited from operating a motor vehicle on a roadway. The public is encouraged to contact the Niagara Regional Police Service Traffic Safety Hotline or Crime Stoppers to report those who are driving in contravention of the suspension. The following individuals have been charged criminally with impaired driving by alcohol or drugs, driving with a blood alcohol concentration above 80 mgs of alcohol in 100 ml of blood, or refusing to provide a breath / blood sample.   Kevin T. YOUNG, 40, Buffalo, NY David C. ABBOTT, 71, Cushing, ME Stephan A. KOROTASH, 59, Thorold David A. HALL, 51, Niagara Falls Jianbo CHEN, 23, Thorold Tracy E. RIVARD, 33, Niagara Falls John A. VANDERWIER, 31, West Lincoln John P. WAKELIN, 71, St. Catharines Christopher MORALES, 33, Buffalo, NY Mary GANGLOFF, 24, West Seneca, NY Garrett MOFFETT, 31, Elma, NY Nicholas P. STUART, 21, Port Colborne The Niagara Regional Police Service is committed to reducing impaired driving offences through education and the apprehension of offenders through enforcement programs like RIDE. Impaired driving is still the leading cause of criminal deaths in Canada and destroys thousands of lives every year.

RIDE checks net impaired Last Saturday, members of the Niagara Regional Police Service conducted R.I.D.E. checks in Niagara Falls and St. Catharines. Police say they stopped some 600 vehicles throughout the night. Of those drivers stopped, 15 were required to provide breath samples for suspected alcohol consumption. As a result, three drivers received a three-day licence suspension. One driver was arrested for impaired driving and also issued a Provincial Offence Notice for having open alcohol in the vehicle. In addition to the alcohol related charges and suspensions, police say that officers issued eight Provincial Offence Notices to drivers in contravention of the Highway Traffic Act and Compulsory Automobile Insurance Act.


www.thevoiceofpelham.ca

The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

Page 3

Family reunites at Comfort Maple Comfort family gathers at namesake tree for annual reunion BY NATE SMELLE

The VOICE

The Comfort Family forms a circle around the 500-year-old tree in North Pelham known as the Comfort Maple at their annual family reunion last Saturday. NATE SMELLE PHOTO

TREES continued from Page 1 a street without any trees. With as much work that has gone into all of the hardscapes and everything that has been done I think it is incredibly important to soften that, so that we don’t look like a suburb — all concrete, all asphalt, all buildings and minimal green space.” Though planting trees does help improve the look of the town in his opinion, Turpel said there are many other reasons besides aesthetics why putting more trees in the ground is a good idea. Just as important as the aesthetic benefits, he said that getting volunteers involved will improve community respect, trust and

the overall feeling of being part of the community. Volunteers will help decrease costs and increase the chances of the trees’ survival. He said the experience of planting trees with the students, teachers and parents at Glynn A. Green school has proven to him that his suggested approach will work. “It’s not just getting the trees in the ground. It’s actually creating something for people that they will look at and appreciate because they are a part of it,” said Turpel. “My son and daughter and a lot of their friends that I met through greening the school property still talk about that day.” His hope is that one day when his children grow up they will be able to tell their kids about the trees they

planted at their school in 2011. Turpel said there are two components to planting more trees: one is the capital cost of purchasing the trees and planting them; the second is maintaining the trees. To help alleviate pressure on budgetary limitations, Turpel proposed setting up a committee that included the Town’s arborists, the maintenance department, and community volunteers. If the Town decides to go ahead with his tree planting initiative, Turpel said he will be happy to take the lead on the volunteer committee. Councillor Peter Papp thanked Turpel for his presentation and his commitment to the environment. Papp told his fellow Councillors that he lived a neighbourhood where many of

With each year that passes, the Comfort family’s roots grow deeper in Pelham. When John B. Comfort first settled in North Pelham in 1797, the landscape was very different. There is however one feature that for the most part has remained the same until today— the Comfort Maple. Believed to be the oldest sugar maple tree in Canada, the Comfort Maple is estimated the trees had died, and he noticed the effect the lack of foliage had on his quality of

I think it is incredibly important to soften that, so we don't look like a suburb

life. “We take it very seriously, what attracts people to our community,” said Papp. “We have beautiful sub-

to be at least 500 years old. Throughout its long life the tree has been known as a comfortable meeting place for people living in the area. Gathering for their annual family reunion beneath the tree’s sprawling canopy last Saturday, the Comfort family carried on this tradition for the 122nd time. As the great, great, great, great-grandson of John B. Comfort, Neil Comfort has spent a significant amount of time with his family

divisions that we have built, but quite frankly the lack of foliage makes it hard for anyone who goes out for a walk. Noticing [the effects of] climate change during the past summer, the trees are a Godsend.” Deputy Mayor Marvin Junkin reminded Council that the Town already does commit funds to tree planting. Director of Public Works and Utilities, Andrea Clemencio, said that the Town currently allocates $75,000 a year for tree replacement throughout the community. She said the majority of these funds are used to plant trees in public parks and to replace trees that have been cut down because of damage caused by the Emerald Ash Borer. “Our main concern is maintaining and watering

See COMFORT Page 6 the trees we plant,” Clemencio said. “The priority will be to plant trees where they are easily accessible to maintain.” John Abbot continued the conversation on planting trees and beautification in his presentation to Council. Focusing on the “charm” of the Pickwick Place neighbourhood where he resides, Abbott asked Council to dedicate more funds and attention to maintaining the trees and shrubberies planted along the median. He said there are currently five flowering trees planted in this space and three of them are dead or barely alive. Another, he said, is in need of pruning, and the fifth tree is young and healthy. “Four of these trees need to be replaced along with some of the pine shrubbery,” said Abbott. When the lights on the cul de sac are replaced, Abbott said that it is likely more of the pine shrubbery will get damaged and need to be replanted. He also told Council that the 25-foot-tall lighting proposed for the street did not fit with the old-fashioned look of the neighbourhood and asked for them to consider more suitable lighting.

Splash pad could provide relief

E. L. Crossley students seen wearing the school's Rankin Run T-shirt, designed by Christie Tran. GAVIN MIDDLETON PHOTO

Rankin Run on Crossley schedule raises $40K over five years continued from Page 1 unique cause, Mary Ann Edwards, first came up with the idea to start an organization that dealt specifically with cancer in the Niagara region when she was a volunteer at a national committee between 1999 and 2004. Edwards started her own group in 2004, but was left with the problem of who the lead sponsor was going to be. Fortunately, in the

same year, Tom Rankin of Rankin Construction agreed to accept the position and the foundation was finally launched. Since then the Rankin Cancer Run has been notably successful throughout the years in which schools like Laura Secord Secondary, Canadian Martyrs, Dalewood and Richmond have contributed their efforts in supporting the cause. Crossley alone has raised

at least $40,000 in the past five years. The Rankin Cancer Run is still successful today, seeing as students of every grade and classroom at Crossley are continuously donating through pledges. Although the pledges are very effective, Crossley has gone above and beyond with creative and inventive solutions that have further propelled the amount of money raised. One of these ideas

has been giving Rankin Run t-shirts (designed by E.L Crossley student, Christie Tran) to students who donate over $20 in their pledges. Other means of accumulating funds include selling raffle tickets to students that want to win quality jewelry donated from sponsors. To top-off the icing on the cake, baked goods made by supportive teachers and

parents were also sold on the day of the run. Undoubtedly, The Rankin Cancer Run is an excellent community organization, however it is also a fun and unforgettable activity to participate in. The day of the run provides students with the opportunity to spend time with their friends and walk around a serene safe community, all in the name of a good cause.

Resident Paul Kuczera believes it beneficial for Council to build a splash pad for its residents, pointing out that Pelham’s population is growing, that there are no public splash pads within the municipality, and only one public pool. In a letter addressed to Council he stated, “Considering how hot this summer was and the potential for these hot summers in the future, splash pads seem to be effective at providing relief from heat at a reasonable price.” Pelham resident Bill Heska also requested that Council consider adding a splash pad to the local landscape. Recognizing how much of a success they have been for communities such as Port Robinson and St. Catharines, Heska said there are a lot of young children and grandchildren in the community that would get enjoyment from it. “Everybody is building these splash pads and I think they are a key item,” said Heska. “There is a lot of fundraising to be done, but economically it is not that big of an investment.” One of the locations for the splash pad that Heska suggested was near the public pool in Marlene Stewart Streit Park.


Page 4

The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

www.thevoiceofpelham.ca

OPINION COMMENTARY / OP-ED Larry Cote PELHAM |ˈpeləm| noun a town, a pleasant place, a corps of pleasant people ORIGIN: late 18th cent.

P

EOPLE WHO HAVE recently moved to Pelham are pleasantly delighted by the welcoming nature of the town, its residents, and its merchants. As new arrivals, we have been impressed by the reception we’ve received. I can only imagine the magnitude of the elation experienced by the growing number of people who have moved here from larger city centers. It must be culture shock for them to be greeted on the street by residents, pleasantly acknowledged by merchants and others they meet by chance, finding a free parking spot near the door of their destination, or crossing the street without the blare of a horn or the glare from a selfishly entitled driver. As a bonus, some who move here have sold their urban properties at skyrocketing (and often higher that the asking-) prices. From these proceeds, they buy what they consider nicer properties out here, and pay much less per square foot than for their former residences. And so the re-

tirement nest egg grows even larger and they live in

It must be culture shock for them to be greeted on the street by residents ...and others they meet by chance a more pleasant surroundings. These happier people now regularly comingle with other happy people and are still in some disbelief that this is the new normal. In large part, this Pelham penchant for pastoral hospitality has its roots in the mixed suburban-rural setting that the town has enjoyed for many years. The town is situated on the crest of the Niagara Escarpment, nearly at the center of the mega-acreage devoted to

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Alcoholics Anonymous Find a Niagara meeting. 905-682-2140 Crime Stoppers 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) www.niagaratips.com Text 274637(CRIMES), keyword Niagara, then your tip

The Voice

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www.thevoiceofpelham.ca MANAGING EDITOR & PUBLISHER Dave Burket publisher@thevoiceofpelham.ca NEWS EDITOR Nate Smelle editor@thevoiceofpelham.ca ADMINISTRATION Lori Gretsinger office@thevoiceofpelham.ca CORRESPONDENT John Swart jswart7@cogeco.ca LETTERS TO THE EDITOR letters@thevoiceofpelham.ca ADVERTISING INQUIRIES advertising@thevoiceofpelham.ca

a remarkably wide variety of agricultural produce and products. The upper and lower benches of the Escarpment provide different soils and climates that support this diversity. Witness the growth of the wine industry over the last two decades as just one example of the bounties this area provides. But every silver lining has its cloud. Those who have lived here for some years and others who have long established roots in Pelham are witnessing a dramatic growth in cookie-cutter residences and the entry of large retail and other chain enterprises. While these urbanist developments are a boon to out-of-town developers, such disfigurements could wilt the bloom that Pelham once enjoyed. Consider for a moment the attributes that residents value and believe have contributed to making Pelham what it is. The ample greenspaces and walkways could give way to parking lots paved with black tar. Is that really the ‘pro’ of progress that residents want to walk on and breathe in? See CULTURE SHOCK Page 5

Letters Open letter to Mayor Augustyn Dear Mr. Mayor, I used to ask questions and make comments on your official Town of Pelham Facebook page. As I am no longer allowed to do that, I’m putting my questions out to you here, in our LOCAL paper. I am quite sure many more of our local citizens would like to read the answers as well. East Fonthill How many acres sold so far? What was the sale price per acre?

CONTACT YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS Member of Federal Parliament

Members of Pelham Town Council

Dean Allison, MP 4994 King Street Beamsville, ON L0R 1B0 Dean.Allison@parl.gc.ca 877-563-7900

Ward 1 Councillor Richard Rybiak rrybiak@pelham.ca 905-892-2105

Electoral District: Niagara West

Members of Niagara Regional Council Councillor David Augustyn mayordave@pelham.ca 905-892-2607 Ext 317 Councillor Brian Baty 742 Memorial Dr. Fenwick, ON L0S 1C0 905-892-5317 Town of Pelham 20 Pelham Town Square P.O. Box 400 Fonthill, ON L0S 1E0 905-892-2607 Mayor of Pelham David Augustyn mayordave@pelham.ca 905-892-2607 Ext 317

Councillor Marvin Junkin mjunkin@pelham.ca 905-684-4870 Ward 2 Councillor Catherine King cking@pelham.ca 905-658-8599

How much in development fees have been collected to date? Medical Centre What will it include? How many Doctors have been recruited? Retirement complex What company is building it? How many units will it have? Community Centre The contract was let for $36.2 million including soft landscaping, parking lot, curbs and sidewalks and lighting. What about the additional $7 million for the paving stone piazza etc? There were detailed numbers at the presentation about expected revenues and the cost of operation. I realize that that rental fees vary at different times of day. On average, from

What will it cost to rent ice time? What will it cost to rent a gymnasium? What will it cost to rent space for a wedding or other gathering? What will it cost to use the walking track? Skate Park Why are we paying to have it lit at night when it is for daylight hours only? Maple Acre Library At the Chamber of Commerce State of the Town breakfast, you stated that the library would be ready mid-November. Is there a performance bond stipulating penalties if not completed on time? I look forward to your answers in next weeks' paper. Thank you. Marianne Stewart Fenwick

&

Councillor Gary Accursi gaccursi@pelham.ca 905-892-5528

There are only two fundamentals of great advertising.

Ward 3 Councillor John Durley jdurley@pelham.ca 905-892-5388

Consistency

Councillor Peter Papp ppapp@pelham.ca 905-328-6008

Repetition

Jill C. Anthony Law Office BARRISTER, SOLICITOR & NOTARY

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR are welcome provided the submission contains the writer’s full name, address and telephone number. Names only will be published. Names may be withheld if compelling reasons are provided. The newspaper reserves the right to change, condense or reject any contribution for brevity or legal reasons. All material in this publication is protected by copyright. Reproduction is prohibited without express, written permission of the publisher. ADVERTISING: The Voice of Pelham regrets any errors or omissions that appear in advertisements in this newspaper, however, we will not be held responsible for more than one absent or incorrect insertion or for any damages beyond the cost of space containing the error. The Voice is an independent, locally owned and operated publication.

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The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

Page 5

Pelham Public Library: Maple Acre Progress BY KIRK WEAVER

CEO Pelham Library

We are only a few months away from opening the renovated and expanded Maple Acre Branch in Fenwick. If you have been in Fenwick recently you will have seen the structure taking shape as the walls and roof timbers have been installed. As the construction proceeds as planned, Library staff are making plans to make the facility ready for opening day. There are many details to be organized. We are in the middle of the Growing Maple Acre Library Together fundraising campaign to raise $50,000 towards furnishings and equipment. These additional funds will supplement the funds raised in the past by dedi-

cated volunteers. To date, we have raised close to $30,000. We would certainly appreciate your support and participation in reaching our goal. Opportunities to participate in the campaign include making a donation, purchasing clothing from this week’s clothing sale, purchasing books from the book sale room, and coming out to the Christmas craft sale hosted by the Friends of Maple Acre Library on November 25 and 26 at the Fenwick fire hall. Furniture and equipment is being selected and ordered now with the aim of opening a state of the art community library. We will include comfortable seating for the lounge area, a reading table and chairs, materials for a children’s activity center, com-

puter tables and chairs and related technology, and furnishings for the public meeting room.

We would like to be able to offer as many as 28 hours per week

We are also making plans to purchase a special opening collection for the newly renovated library. We want

to open with a new and fresh collection of materials for our patrons. We are also beginning to think about some of the details related to setting up the new facility. While dates are not finalized yet we do plan to have an open house in advance of the official opening. We are hopeful that we will be able to offer more hours of service when the new facility is ready. Prior to the construction we operated fourteen hours per week. Subject to upcoming 2017 budget deliberations at Town Council we would like to be able to offer as many as 28 hours per week. Please look for details and updates about Maple Acre progress on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pelham.ibrary

Mossimo's Atom Rep season starts BY BRIAN MILTENBURG

Special to the VOICE

After a busy preseason the Panthers Atom Rep team started on the road heading North to the Early Start Tourney in Oro-Medonte. The entire weekend was backstopped with great games from the goaltending tandem of Isaac Gravelle and Ryan Leduc. Game 1 ended in a 3-0 shutout win over the South Huron Sabres. The defence core of Max Myers, Aaron Lee, Maxx Veld and the Miltenburg brothers (Braeden and Brody) kept the pressure off the Pelham Net while the forwards turned it on in the other end. Luke Breadner had a pair of goals and Veld had a beauty from the point. Game 2 vs the Colling-

wood Blackhawks was a back and forth game which saw a hat trick from Breadner, a goal from Brandon Bernardi and great work at both ends of the rink by forwards Austin Wilson, Erik McQueen, Justin Narvaez, Caleb Walton, Ian McQueen and Ethan Baxter. Game ended a 4-4 tie. After the round robin the Panthers finished first in the pool heading into the semi-final vs the Penetang Flames. The game was a tough one with Penetang giving up very few scoring opportunities. When the game ended, Penetang moved on with a 2-1 win. Thanksgiving weekend the Mossimo’s Panthers started the regular season at home facing the Glanbrook Rangers. Action was end to end

with some gritty plays by both teams. Walton started the scoring for Pelham by burying one from just outside the crease. Pressure was intense from the Rangers as goals were exchanged. Bernardi and Breadner also had goals for the Panthers. Leduc kept the Panthers in the game but the Rangers proved too much as they squeaked a 4-3 victory in the season opener. Last Saturday the Panthers hosted the Thorold Blackhawks to a great home crowd. Goals were exchanged by the two teams as Wilson, Walton, Erik McQueen and Narvaez all found the back of the net. The Panthers found themselves down by one goal as the last minute approached. Leduc was pulled

and the Panthers applied the pressure. Baxter pounced on the loose puck and tied the game 5-5 with 1.4 seconds left on the clock. On Sunday the team headed out on the road and visited the Glanbrook Rangers trying to tie their season series. Gravelle was steady in net as Glanbrook came out firing. Wilson and Ian McQueen scored for Pelham halfway through the game tying things up at 2. The Panthers kept the action mostly in the Rangers end but couldn’t find a way to get the puck past a solid goaltender. Final scored ended up with Glanbrook ahead 4-2. Panthers are back in action at home this Saturday afternoon at 4:20 facing the NOTL Wolves.

Culture shock: GTA refugees want preservation too continued from Page 4 Neighbourhoods of wellkept, architecturally pleasant small houses could be bulldozed to make way for bland, nondescript cement towers of hive-like cells. Is that the ‘pro’ of progress you want to reside beside? The quaint little shops operated by friendly neighbours could give way to chains and franchises owned by multinational corporations. Is this the ‘pro’ of progress that residents envision when they shop and stroll downtown Fonthill and Fenwick? Some might suggest such musings to be anti-business or anti-development.

IN THE NEWS continued from Page 2 have been charged with Possession of a Schedule I Substance for the  Purpose of Trafficking, and Possession of Proceeds of

But to the contrary, these are meant to be Pro-Pelham before it becomes Ante-Pelham. Pelham is what it is because of its past parts. Parts of this past are defined as quaint, peaceful, people-friendly, laid back and pastoral. These qualities need be recognized, valued and retained. Future development should embrace these attributes, not kill and bury them. Ask your Town Councillors to verbalize and publish their vision for the future of Pelham. Do these visions honour and value the past? What kind of future do you want for Pelham? Use your voice, and your Voice,

Crime Under $5,000. Rogers has additionally been charged with Fail to Comply  With Probation. Police say as a result of this investigation they seized $2,490 worth of cocaine and $3,740 in Canadian Currency.

while you can still hear the birds sing. Larry Cote is a retired college professor, a past recipient of the Governor General’s Medal

for community service and has been associated with a number of community service organizations and projects. He and his wife recently relocated to Pelham.

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Blessing of the animals In honour of St. Francis of Assisi (whose feast day was Oct. 4) and Thanksgiving, N~SNAP (the Niagara Spay Neuter Assistance Program) invited Father Paul McDonald of the Scared Heart Parish in Chippawa to come to Fonthill Pet Valu on Saturday October 8 to perform a Blessing of the Animals for the animals currently up for adoption. N~SNAP has no paid workers and relies solely on donations from the public and monies raised by its fundraising activities and events.  The organization says that 100% of the money it raises goes towards spay/neuter of cats in the Niagara Region and caring for cats & kittens in its adoption program.

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Page 6

The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

Ken Crowe displays a photo of a tree he planted grown from a maple key collected under the Comfort Maple by the NPCA. NATE SMELLE PHOTO

COMFORT continued from Page 3 around the ancient tree. He said it is not too often that people get to experience

something so old — five centuries old — that is still living. His wife, Margaret, has come to appreciate the tree as a part of the family. As an author and his-

torian, she has studied the Comfort Maple in depth and even wrote about it in her book on the history of North Pelham and Fenwick, Intertwined Through Time. “It’s a natural wonder that this tree is still here,” said Margaret. “It’s hard to imagine that the Comfort family has been here a little over 200 years and this tree would have been here 300 years ahead of that. It’s also said to have been a sacred burial ground and meeting place for First Nations people. Somehow it lasted through storms, ice, insects and just continued to grow naturally.” Neil Comfort said his family has too many fond memories of spending time together at the tree to count them all. Still, for him there are a few that stand out. One such moment is when his daughter Laura Comfort Cousineau and her husband, Ryan, had their wedding photos taken under their family tree. Taking the day off work to enjoy the day with her family at their special place, Laura said the Comfort Maple was naturally her fist choice as

a location for their wedding photos. She said the tree has always been there for her as a place to identify herself as a Comfort. “It’s a place for us to get together as a family and make memories,” Laura said. “It really is a part of us. When I became old enough to drive I would bring my friends here to see the big tree. My daughter Charlotte has been coming here more and more with us, and she has been asking a lot of questions about the sugar maple in our front yard at home and if it will look like the Comfort Maple one day. The tree is just so much older than she can comprehend.” With another child on the way, Laura said there will soon be another Comfort under their tree. Her sister Amanda and brother David are also eager to keep growing the legacy of memories they have shared with their family there. With both siblings following in their father and grandfather’s footsteps by pursuing careers in agriculture, they have acquired a

www.thevoiceofpelham.ca deep appreciation for their family’s rich history. “We have to thank our mother [Margaret] for bringing us here when she was doing research for her book,” said Amanda. “She really helped us dig into our roots and now we definitely know where we came from. We grew up on a ninth-generation farm and I used to think that was an everyday thing, but it’s not. Our tree has really stood the test of time and I am amazed by how many people are connected to it.” “Nothing lasts forever but when you look at all of the axes this tree has dodged it is hard to believe it has made it,” added David. A monumental moment for everyone in the family, he said, was their 100th reunion in 1994. During the celebration, their family history and the story of the Comfort Maple was preserved in a couple of new ways. As a testament to the tree’s resilience, Canada Post launched a stamp in its honour as part of their maple tree series. At that time the Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority (NPCA) also distributed saplings from maple keys collected under the Comfort Maple. Anne Marie Comfort’s son Ken Crowe and his wife Ina were two of the lucky individuals to receive one of the tree’s descendants. They planted it on the farm where they lived in West Lincoln and the tree is still growing strong.

“The NPCA gave me one, so I planted it in the flower pit, and once it took I moved it over to the barnyard,” Ken said. “They also sent saplings out to nurseries across Canada. We’ve since sold our farm but the tree is still doing well.” Entrusted to the NPCA by Edna Eleanor Comfort in 1961, the Comfort Maple continues to flourish in spite of being struck by lightning and the all of the other damage it has incurred over the centuries. Having earned its fame and place in history it has become a popular tourist destination for tree-huggers around the world. Joining the Comfort family at their reunion this year was a film crew from France documenting the tree’s history for a television program entitled Histoire D’arbres. Producer Christophe Dyvoire said the show features the stories of famous trees from all over the planet. Sharing these stories he said is a good way to protect them. “This tree is very beautiful and it makes me happy to see it in person,” said Dyvoire. “It has been through a lot and it has many stories. Every tree has a story to tell and when people hear these stories they begin to appreciate nature.”

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The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

Members of the 3rd Fonthill Beaver Colony on their tour of Station #1.

Page 7

Novice Rep champs

VOICE PHOTO

BY MARK IANNIZZI

BEAVERS continued from Page 2 to prevent a fire from occurring in the first place. The majority of these fires are caused by cooking activities, followed by smoking, faulty electrical and heating systems and appliances. Considering how busy many people’s lives have become, he said unfortunately fire safety all too often be-

comes an afterthought. “Most home fires are easily preventable when we narrow our focus and take personal steps to increase our safety,” he said. “One way to do this is by proactively combing through each room in your home to find signs of danger and fix them.” Extending their outreach during Fire Prevention Week even further, the depart-

Lawyer as Niagara WestGlanbrook Liberal candidate The Ontario Liberals announced last Thursday that Vicky Ringuette will stand for the party in the upcoming Niagara West-Glanbrook by-election. According to a party press release, Ringuette is a longtime regional volunteer and bilingual lawyer, with experience as a board member of the Centre de santé communautaire Hamilton/Niagara, and a board member of the Hamilton Community Legal Clinic. “I am proud to represent Kathleen Wynne’s Ontario Liberal team and to bring our positive message to my friends and neighbours in Niagara West-Glanbrook,” said Ringuette. “Our community needs modern transit infrastructure and quality local healthcare facilities. The Ontario Liberals are the only team with an effective plan to deliver on the needs of our community.” Ringuette was joined by Premier Kathleen Wynne, St. Catharines MPP Jim Bradley, and community members from across Hamilton

and Niagara for an evening reception last Wednesday. The press release notes

I am proud to represent Kathleen Wynne's Ontario Liberal team that Ringuette is a trained mediator, “early neutral consultant” and a “collaborative lawyer.” She is currently an associate member of the Ontario Association of Family Mediation and a member of Collaborative Practice Hamilton/Halton. "I would be honoured to represent Niagara West-Glanbrook at Queen's Park and feel it would be a natural extension of the community work I have accomplished to date," said Ringuette. "I will work hard on behalf of the entire community...."

ment went door-to-door to check peoples’ smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. Sparky the Fire Safety Dog also joined the campaign on Thursday, Oct. 6 at the Pelham Farmers’ Market, giving kids a chance to explore a fire truck, meet firefighters and to learn smoke alarm safety tips. Last Saturday, Fire Prevention Week concluded with a barbecue in the Font-

hill Giant Tiger parking lot. Although the annual initiative officially ended on the weekend, Underwood is determined to continue raising awareness on fire safety and prevention all year long. For more information on how to make your home fire-safe, contact Officer Underwood at 905-8922607 ext. 202, or by email at wunderwood@pelham.ca

Habitat for Humanity's ReStore turns 25 $1 being donated with every transaction through end of October Swiffer is helping mark 25 years of Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore by donating $1 for every ReStore transaction from October 17 to October 31, according to a Habitat press release. To provide additional incentive, Swiffer is also giving out a free Swiffer Duster with all purchases while supplies last. “Since 2013, P&G and Swiffer have been strong supporters of Habitat for Humanity Canada and we couldn’t be happier to partner again to help celebrate this landmark anniversary for Habitat ReStore,” said Corinne Durieu, Communications Manager from Procter & Gamble Canada. “We encourage Canadians to visit their local ReStore and take part in this promotion, which is a step towards ensuring all Canadians have a safe and affordable place to call home.” There is a ReStore on Highway 20, between Cat-

aract Road and Merrittville Highway. With nearly 100 locations across Canada, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStores are home and building supply stores that accept and resell quality new and used building supplies, home furnishing, appliances and décor. Habitat’s ReStores accept donations of secondhand, overstocked and discontinued items, as well as salvageable building materials donated by manufacturers, stores, contractors and individuals. Proceeds fund Habitat for Humanity operations and homebuilding projects in communities across the country. Habitat for Humanity’s first ReStore was opened in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1991. Today, there are almost 100 locations across Canada and almost 1,000 worldwide generating funds to support the work of Habitat for Humanity.

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Special to the VOICE

The Pelham Kirkpatrick Stoneworks Novice Rep team were the champions of the Oro - Mendonte Early Bird Tournament on October 1st and 2nd. The final game against the home team the Oro Thunder finished in a dramatic fashion. Ryan

Higgins buried a pass from Cory Fraraccio with 51 seconds left in the third to break the 4-4 tie. The Panthers then held off the Thunder with some amazing team defense and goaltender by Max Stevenson to secure the 5-4 win. Congratulations to all the boys on a job well done!

Greenfield Gardens is offering a full time job in the greenhouse industry to a highly motivated individual. Responsibilities include planting, sticking, pinching and packing. Must be able to work in hot and humid or cool and damp environments. Wage is $11.40 per hour. Position available from January to October. Please email resume to frank@greenfieldgardens.ca or fax it to 905-892-2447. Only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.


Page 8

The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

DEBATE continued from Page 1 toric town of Williamsburg, Virginia, where I grew up, and where I was working as a junior technician for Ma Bell. The college was founded in 1693. The auditorium where the debate was to happen seemed about as old—it was totally devoid of modern telecom wiring. Inevitably, since it was a monopoly, AT&T got the job to wire the hall. It was a long time getting to zero hour. By the night of the debate, the parking lot next to the auditorium looked like a D-Day staging area. A heavy rain had fallen on Wednesday. The scent of damp leaves mixed with diesel exhaust from countless telephone company and TV broadcast trucks idling in the lot. Their drivers drank coffee from styrofoam cups as video and audio engineers ran final checks on cables snaking into the hall. The temperature dropped to the high-30s as dusk fell, leaving everyone looking like they were pack-a-day smokers—which most of us were anyway—with our frosty breath. All this manpower was aimed at avoiding a repeat of what had happened at the first debate in Philadelphia a month earlier—an audio glitch that lasted for 27 minutes. That’s right. A half-hour of dead air. Carter and Ford had stood awkardly behind their po-

diums. Tens of millions of live viewers watched dumbfounded as technicians scrambled behind the scenes to solve the problem. (Years later, both men said that they regretted not stepping out to mix with the audience, or taking a break, anything not to have looked “robotic.”) Now, this Philly failure wasn’t AT&T’s fault, but it was a huge embarrasment all around, and the company mounted an unprecedented effort to ensure that it wouldn’t happen in Williamsburg. Equipment was flown in, personnel allocated. Hundreds of phone lines and a dozen, hose-like coax TV links were installed. While construction crews were running massive cables through conduits leading to the network central office a mile away, I was on the team of technicians working backstage to install the terminating gear. The assignment was a perk for having consistently excellent performance ratings in my three years on the job. I assume that I was vetted in some way by the FBI, and there were plenty of Secret Service agents keeping an eye on us. (Ford had been the target of two assassination attempts, just weeks apart, the year before.) We worked 12 hours a day for nearly three weeks, which for us union workers meant the Holy Grail: triple-time-and-a-half wages. I had every intention of turning this bonanza into a nest-egg to move to the west coast (and succeeded).

Everything was overbuilt and gold-plated. There were Ma Bell trucks stationed at every connection point, all along the streets back to the central office. While 63 million viewers saw the debate on live TV, I spent those 90 minutes watching from the wings. I hovered just off-camera, along with my boss, his boss, and his boss’s boss, ready to spring into action at the slightest sign of trouble. Just before the debate began, I was able to greet and shake hands with President Ford and Rosalynn Carter. (Jimmy was still in makeup.) Barbara Walters was the moderator. It was interesting to meet her, too, since she’d been in the news herself. She had just become the first female co-anchor of a network evening news show, working with Harry Reasoner at ABC, earning a then-unprecedented salary of US $1 million per year. (As showtime approached, I overheard a CBS cameraman refer to Walters as “the million-dollar speech defect,” which wasn’t very nice, but also it wasn’t entirely, you know, wong.) As it happened, all went well that evening after all. No audio glitches, no video problems. Most people remember the debate, if they remember it at all, as the one in which Carter discussed having “lust in my heart” for women other than his wife. How innocent this sounds now, in an era of such Trumpian vulgarity. Happily for me, Ma Bell HQ was documenting our

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Julian Roberts confirms that an entire wall of new wiring is up to snuff, October 22, 1976. A cardboard hand labelled “Do Not Touch” guards the precious video cables, top center.

SUPPLIED PHOTO efforts for posterity, the same as if we’d been doing disaster recovery after a hurricane, so I have a picture to remember it by. There wasn’t much light backstage, so the photographer propped-up one of the worklights we’d brought in for the job, giving the scene a 1940s Buy War Bonds look. Ford was smooth and

confident that night, Jimmy spoke poorly in comparison. Ford lost the election anyway, of course, mostly for having pardoned Richard Nixon, but also for coming across as not very bright, and for being seen as part of an establishment that voters wanted to sweep away for a clean start. Carter, luckily, was an

educated man of principled convictions. This time around, let’s hope that Canada’s southern cousins don’t mistake cleaning house for burning it down. Julian Roberts is a retired AT&T executive and volunteer Voice proofreader. He blames any missed typos on not enough morning coffee.

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The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

Page 9

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Page 10

The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

www.thevoiceofpelham.ca

Stories from Standing Rock Local family returns after taking stand against Dakota Access Pipeline BY NATE SMELLE

The VOICE

Diners enjoy tasty soup at Sunday's luncheon.

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Fenwick Lioness Club serves up the soup BY VOICE STAFF Last Sunday the Fenwick Lioness Club hosted another of its reknowned soup luncheons. The club holds the event on the third Sunday of each month throughout the autumn and winter, except for December, and serve up a selection of five homemade soups, breads, desserts and beverages. Lioness Helga Hall is a club director. She says that the Saturday before the soup luncheons are a good opportunity for Lionesses to catch up around the kitchen as they prepare for the event. “We have a lot of fun times together,” says Hall. “It’s a really nice group and we are all good friends. I enjoy spending time with all of the members and the people who come out to our events. Everybody knows each other and it’s like a family. We talk and we laugh and it’s always for a good cause.” The Lionesses raise funds for a variety of organiza-

The

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Find the Voice at these locations: Indulgence Bakery Mossimo’s Pelham Street Grille Keith’s Restaurant Fenwick Pie Company Sobeys Fonthill DeVries Fruit Farm Beamer’s Hardware & TV Fonthill Library Black Pearl Fish & Chips Bob’s Boys Antiques Moku’s Fonthill Fitness Curves McDonald’s Fonthill Legion Semenuk’s Gas Bar Target Store Tim Horton’s Giant Tiger Shoppers Drug Mart Zee Lube Express Care Lazy Loon Minor Bros Stores Avondale Stores A-1 Market Sobeys South Pelham Broken Gavel Restaurant Picard’s Peanuts Petro Canada Mtvl. Hwy. Renewed Thrift & Vintage Ridge Berry Farm

tions, working in cooperation with the Lions Club to help provide funds for Guide Dogs for the blind, deaf and people with special needs.

We talk and we laugh and it's always for a good cause

They also contribute to Lions Camp Dorset, which is a retreat for kidney dialysis patients, and to the Lake Joseph Center for the Visually Impaired. Members also provide volunteer service and financial donations to numerous local charities and community organizations. “We do a lot of special things to help the community,” Hall says. “It is very busy for us at Christmas time with so many things going on. We also help out with the parade and do what we can to help the Lions Club whenever they need us.” The Fenwick Lionesses next Soup and Bread Lunch is Sunday, Nov. 20 from 11:15 AM to 1:30 PM at the Fenwick Lions Club Hall, 999 Church Street in Fenwick.

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Arriving back in Pelham from their journey west to North Dakota, the Zanutto family — Janet Zanutto and her daughters Jade, 15, and Violet, 6 — have returned home with a remarkable story to tell about joining the Standing Rock Sioux First Nation in protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). Travelling 4,400 kilometres in just eight days, one might think they would be ready for a little rest and relaxation. Instead, the three of them are feeling more inspired than ever to continue their campaign to help protect the environment and Indigenous rights. Camping with friends of theirs from Six Nations within the main camp at the Standing Rock Reservation, the Zanuttos spent a lot of their time volunteering at the medical centre and at the school. Overall, fifteen-yearold Jade said their experience on the road and in the camp was positive, and that people on both sides of the conflict were very friendly towards them. Her mother agreed. “The atmosphere in the camp was completely inclusive of all nations,” said Janet. “It would not be unusual for indigenous water protectors to harbour some mistrust for non-indigenous supporters, and yet I was completely welcomed by every person I encountered. Our indigenous neighbours at camp also commented on how native nations that are historical enemies were living and working side- byside toward this common goal, fulfilling a prophecy of the unification of all nations.” Janet said they were impressed at the cleanliness of the camp and how smoothly it ran with so many people there. Operating on a volunteer basis, the gathering of 4,000-plus functioned as a collective. If help was needed cooking, chopping wood, or driving someone to

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town in case of emergency, she said an announcement would be made and more than enough volunteers

The atmosphere in camp was completely inclusive of all nations William Thomas chats among the stacks. would show up to get the task done. While visiting Standing Rock, the Zanuttos had the honour of presenting both the Nisga'a flag from their home Nation, and the Two Row Wampum flag from the Two Row on the Grand group to Standing Rock Elder JR American Horse. They also had the privilege of participating in a water ceremony with their travelling companion and friend, Lisa Green from Six Nations, Elder Feanette Black Bear, and women from Akwesasne. “Our friend who was on the trip with us, Lisa Green, brought water from the head of the Mississippi River that had gone through a Moon Ceremony she had put on at Six Nations for the people of Standing Rock,” Jade explained. “We then brought the water down to the big river and an Elder from Standing Rock joined us as we poured the water into the river as we prayed for the water.” With so many people from North America and around the world coming together for the same reason — to support the Standing Rock community and stop the pipeline, Jade said there was no shortage of interesting people to learn from. One of the most important lessons she learned was how “everyone there could help in some way by doing whatever they do best, and that just by being there, See STANDING ROCK Page 14

NATE SMELLE PHOTO

Best-selling author visits Pelham Library Shares life lessons from horse racing's most lovable loser BY NATE SMELLE

The VOICE

Award-winning author and columnist William Thomas was at the Pelham Public Library on Thursday evening to elaborate on stories from his best-selling book, The Legend of Zippy Chippy: Life Lessons from Horse Racing's Most Lovable Loser. The author of 10 books including Life in the Litterbox, Thomas has been nominated twice for the prestigious Gemini Award for writing movies for television. As a syndicated humour columnist, his work is also regularly featured in 50 newspapers across Canada. Since his latest book’s release in April, it has been an astounding success, says Thomas, selling out of copies on Amazon the first day it was published and again a few months later. Thomas is now courting offers for his book to be turned into a Hollywood movie. The subject of his book is the legendary losing thoroughbred racehorse, Zippy Chippy. Twice named by People Magazine as one of the most intriguing personalities in America, Zippy has become a celebrity in his own right. He was even mentioned by

NEWSFLASH Tell us your story Introducing Column Six, presenting tales of personal triumph, adventure, strange-but-true stories, life-changing events, and looks-back at our past. Have a tale to tell? Have you conquered Everest or kicked a bad habit? Did you meet your spouse-to-be in jail or on an African safari? Do you know where Hoffa’s buried? Write it down, send it in: publisher@thevoiceofpelham.ca (You won’t get rich, but you will get paid.)

the Prime Minister of Japan in a radio broadcast to children as an example of perseverance. Accolades for Zippy’s unique personality are well-deserved, says Thomas and his antics at the track and around the stables where he has lived speak to how he has earned his reputation. For instance, Thomas says that when Zippy was bored he would often kick his water bucket around like a soccer ball. To help ease his boredom on one particular occasion, Thomas says his trainer put Zippy in the exercise barn to keep him busy. According to Thomas it didn’t take him long to find something to do. “This idea went well for about two minutes, until he started destroying the exercise barn,” he says. “Within minutes he actually buck-kicked the control panel so that nobody could ever use that exercise barn ever again. Needless to say he got banned from the exercise barn, which I believe was his intent.” Described as a humorous love story between a thoroughbred horse and his trainer who never quit on their dream to win big, Thomas credits his book’s reception to the fact that Americans cannot seem to get enough of the underdog story. “I knew it was a good underdog story when I wrote it,” Thomas says. “I think if you look at the lessons in it, there are some really good ones. I didn’t want to be preachy in the book because I am not a motivator, but there is a lot to be said about being slow and sure and the way Zippy ran. He did it honest, didn’t cheat, he loved the game and always thought he won. I think there is a good message there for kids.” See ZIPPY Page 11


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Page 11

Fire leads to IED discovery In aftermath of Welland blaze, firefighters find improvised bombs BY VOICE STAFF Last Sunday, at about 1:30 PM, Emergency Services responded to 79 Park St. Welland for a house fire. Police say that information was received that a 41-year-old male fell from a second floor window. Welland Fire Department located the male in the front yard and he was treated by paramedics. He was transported to Welland County General Hospital, then transferred to Hamilton General Hospital in critical condition. The fire was extinguished with approximately $200,000 damage, according to a police estimate. As the fire was being extinguished, firefighters found several improvised explosive devices inside the residence. The neighbouring area was evacuated until 11 pm Sunday night. The Niagara Regional Police Service Explosive Disposal Unit responded with bomb technicians to locate and neutralize the devices. The scene remained under guard by police at presstime, with further investigation being conducted by the Ontario Fire Marshall's Office, Welland Fire Department and Central Region Detective Office. Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to call the Niagara Regional Police Service at 905-688-4111, ext. 3300

TIME TRAVEL ON PELHAM STREET When he's not working at Tasty Thai, Grade 12 student Scott Hooper is working at Moku's. After his shift last Friday night, he shot this time-lapse image of traffic passing on Pelham Street. Cue the Moody Blues... SCOTT HOOPER PHOTO

ZIPPY continued from Page 10 When Vince Lombard first opined 50 years ago that, “Winning isn’t everything, it’s the only thing,” Thomas says it set a dangerous tone of over-competitiveness that tainted the sports world and society as a whole. He believes Lombardi’s win-atall-costs philosophy created an atmosphere of aggression that has led to an increase of concussions, the use of performance enhancing drugs and bullying. As an example of why this mentality is not a healthy path to victory, Thomas points to the story of Buffalo Bills guard Richie

Incognito — the NFL player who, Thomas says, bullied his fellow teammate Jonathan Martin by threatening to rape his sister and mother in an attempt “toughen him up.” “This is what winning at all costs is about,” he says. “It’s wrong. It’s the wrong thing to tell our kids.” Even though Zippy Chippy has never won a horserace and was eventually banned from competing at nearly every track, Thomas says his story provides a more accurate understanding of what it means to be a winner. In spite of his losing record, in the end Zippy was actually

the most victorious of all the horses he competed against. Unlike the other horses, he now has a biography written about him, has a movie deal in the works and is the star of the show at the Old Friends Thoroughbred Retirement Home, where he resides in Saratoga, New

York. “People come and buy his t-shirts, they buy his hats and he is now generating enough money to support 22 other horses on that farm who were winners,” says Thomas. “They have actually changed the motto of the

farm to ‘You don’t have to come first to be a winner.’ The main point of Zippy’s story is that you can win in other ways than just coming first. That’s really what it’s about. It’s about the journey. It’s not necessarily about the trophy.”

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12 volt, 100 watt monocrystalline solar panels, top quality $179. Over $498 in stores.  Kits available.  Call Harry 905-892-0583.

RARY CARD MAKING WORKSHOP with fall themes, learning a variety of techniques. Materials SEEKING SPACE At time of registration, please OFFICE enquire about tools needed. Fonthill office seeks to downsize to smaller space. 6 10 – 12:30. $10. Please register ahead. Visit www.pelhamOne medium-size office, plus storage room required. call 905-892-6443 more details. Public foot for traffic minimal but present. Must be located within the Town of Pelham. Please contact David, david.daveduck@gmail.com

ENWICK LIONS FISH FRY h funds heading straight back into the community. Haddock, SPACE FOR RENT d much more. Sept.Mondays 9 fromand 4-7Fridays p.m. at Studio 20, Fonthill. Shared Runs office space Easy parking, lots of foot traffic. Perfect for health practitioner, reflexologist, RMT, nutritionist, etc. Contact Krysta for more info: HOCKEY EQUIPMENT SALE 289-687-0814 (voice or text).

OR de used equipment at the Pelham Arena. Aimed to provide CUSTOM MILL ns for players in this upcoming season. Runs Sept. 6 from Portable sawmill service. I will come to your home or farm and custom rning. mill your logs. Firewood & lumber also available. Call Rob Patterson, 905-401-4948 riverwood@primus.ca.

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GIONAL EXHIBITION FINANCIAL SEMINARS and live entertainment headline this years exciting event. It 2 FREE seminars at the Pelham Public Library presented by Financial . 11-14 at the Welland Fairgrounds. Advisor Nicolle Lalonde of Edward Jones in Fonthill. Join us from

1:00pm to 3:00pm on Tues. Oct. 25 for Making Your Money Last: 10 Principles for Living in Retirement, or on Tues. Nov. 22 for Estate ANCER RIDE Planning - Building Your Legacy. Complimentary lunch provided. Call (905) 892-9930 to reserve your seatride at one (or all) of these informative Cancer Ride is a non-competitive taking place on Sept. events.

r the Big Move stay in Niagara and support the Walker FamROAST BEEF DINNER tre. Fonthill United Church, Saturday October 29, 2016, 6 pm. Tickets – adults $15, children 12 and under $10. Reserve by calling 905-8926433. Craft boutique in the church foyer.

UB alking in Pelham? Join them Tuesdays at the Pelham Arena and Thursdays at FonthillHELP Bandshell for 9-10:30 am. There WANTED is program. For more information, please contact jcook@ SEASONAL NURSERY WORKERS January toext October all 905 892-2607, 329. $11.40 per hour: Must be willing and

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Waiter, this glass of water is simply mesmerizing...


Page 14

The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

STANDING ROCK

and we didn't have subjects,” said Violet. “We also had a place to smudge in the morning and the cook gave us lunch in another tent. I noticed that a lot of people had native names like wolf and eagle and that was pretty cool.” Jade said the family-friendly atmosphere at the camp was unfortunately disrupted by the nearly constant presence of drones and helicopters buzzing overhead. “I think they saw us as a threat when really all we were doing was living our lives on the land,” she said. “It was intimidating

continued from Page 10 they were making a difference.” Pitching in around camp and studying the Lakota language and culture inside a teepee, six-year-old Violet said she learned a lot from the experience as well. During her time at the camp she learned how to make medicine pouches from one of her teachers, who had painted a teepee for President Barack Obama. “The difference between schools here and there was we were taught using games

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knowing that they were constantly monitoring us, and knowing that we couldn’t do anything without them watching.” Mom Janet said she really appreciated that in response to such intimidation the Elders promoted a peaceful resolution to the pipeline dispute. She said it was clear that the Standing Rock Nation does not condone violence, and that they did not want protectors putting themselves in situations where there was the threat of arrest. Janet also brought up that everyone participating in the demonstration was encouraged to do so with their faces uncovered since they were doing nothing wrong and had nothing to hide from. The Zanuttos believe that the Dakota pipeline should be stopped for two reasons. First, because it threatens the Standing Rock Sioux’s source of freshwater, and second because it threatens their culture. Elaborating on why she thinks the DAPL is a bad idea, Jade said it “needs to be stopped because it violates the agreements made between the native and

Violet and Jade Zanutto. non-native settlers in the area. It is also destroying our burial grounds and other pieces of history that are being ignored for profit.” She would rather see the billions of dollars being spent on building the pipeline used to clean the water, or to help the people of Flint, Michigan with their water crisis.

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A week after getting home the Zanutto family found out that one of their friends had been arrested and charged with inciting a riot and resisting arrest, along with 27 others including actress Shailene Woodley. According to Janet, video footage shot and live-streamed before and during the arrest by the award-winning actress known for her starring roles in, The Divergent Series and The Fault In Our Stars apparently refutes the charges brought against the activists. Stepping-up her support for the Standing Rock First Nation, Woodley paid bail to have the 26 others

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and herself released. Dealing with colder weather than they expected while at the camp, Jade said her friends there are going to be in need of winter supplies very soon. The best way for people in Pelham and throughout Niagara to help the cause she said is to educate themselves’ on the DAPL and the threats it poses for the Standing Rock Sioux First Nation. Monetary donations or useful supplies such as camping equipment, tools, environmentally friendly heating and cooking devices can also be contributed at www. standingrock.org.

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www.thevoiceofpelham.ca

The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

Page 15

Niagara Bruce Trail Club promotes conservancy Year-round hikes scheduled in Pelham BY JOHN SWART

VOICE Correspondent

We often overlook the beauty in our own back yard. Travel conversation over cocktails or coffee is more apt to be about exotic destinations or photo-ops of timeworn tourist staples than wonders close at hand. For members of the Niagara Bruce Trail Association, our Pelham backyard, and the whole Bruce Trail, is superb. "There is so much more to our Escarpment trail than its natural beauty," says Debbie Demizio. She and her husband Frank moved to Fonthill 10 years ago, "And I ordered my Bruce Trail Conservancy membership before we even arrived," says Debbie, currently Vice-President and Media Relations person for the Niagara chapter. "We saw a lot of things we didn't like in Niagara—Lundy's Lane, Clifton Hill—but the Bruce Trail was special." She begins to list the gems nearby: Swazye Falls, Terrace Creek Falls, Black Walnut Side Trail, Morningstar Mill, Rockway, many within Pelham's boundaries. The Niagara Bruce Trail Club is one of nine clubs along the Unesco World Biosphere Reserve escarpment footpath managed by the Bruce Trail Conservancy. The Conservancy, with some 9,000 members and 1,500 volunteers, is steward of one of the largest land trusts in Ontario: 10,000 acres, including the Bruce Trail, that stretch 892 kms from Queenston to Tobermory. Much of the trail is secured by ownership or easements, but 703 private

landowners still control a bit over 200 kilometres of the route. The Niagara Club is responsible for the 80 kms

There is so much more to our Escarpment trail than its natural beauty from Queenston to Grimsby, and 40 kms of side trails. It's a busy group, with 700 members including 34 trail captains mandated to maintain the trails, guide hikes five days a week, promote special events showcasing the trails and raising funds, nurture positive relationships with landowners, and much more. "You don't even have to be a hiker," says Demizio. "There's the social aspect, the idea of preserving the corridor for future generations, land acquisition for the trust is a big part of it, special events too." Demizio is the organizer of the Laura Secord hike. "It's 30 kms long, all on the original Bruce Trail from the Laura Secord house in Queenston to the DeCou House. It's often a two- day hike, but this year it was one day so participants could experience what Secord achieved. The June 18 date [similar

Winter hiking at Terrace Falls. SUPPLIED PHOTO to Secord's original walk] meant the temperature was sweltering this year as 45 hikers started the event. Forty one finished, an amazing percentage. Another event, the Niagara End-to-End, is a threeday hike covering the complete 80 kilometres within the Niagara club's jurisdiction— 145 of the 240 hikers who attempted it this year finished. Potential club members needn't be concerned about their fitness at the beginning. All hikes are rated for length by time and difficulty. Pelham hosts regular

hikes of one-and-a-half hours with various start locations, including the arena and Town Hall, using relatively flat terrain varying from the Steve Bauer Trail to the Lathrop Trails. "Sturdy shoes, not even hiking boots, and good wicking socks are all you need to start, and a water bottle," Demizio says. "You don't have to be a member to join us on a hike, and it doesn't cost anything." She does confide that after she sees you on a few hikes, she'll give you a brochure and discuss the benefits of the Conservancy. Even so,

$50, tax deductable, for an annual Family Membership to the Conservancy is arguably a bargain. The Niagara Bruce Trail Club has partnered with Niagara College and the Niagara Health System on two significant community ventures. The club provides a $500 bursary annually to a Niagara College student in Environmental Studies, and hosts its Bruce Trail Day at the Niagara College Greenhouse, Glendale campus. New in 2016, club members have led successful “Mood Walks” for clients of Niagara Mental Health, extending the proven men-

tal and physical benefits of “forest bathing” and “green exercise” to people who struggle with everyday living. Margaret Northfield, Hike Coordinator, says simply, "They have found their spirits lifted by walking around the beautiful parks and woods we have in the Niagara Peninsula. A full schedule of Fall hikes and activities are available on the club's website (www.niagarbrucetrailclub.org), and the winter schedule will be posted by mid-November. Time to explore our own back yard.

Motorcycle collision on Hwy 20 sends rider to hospital BY VOICE STAFF At approximately 2:15 PM last Saturday, the Niagara Emergency Medical Services, Niagara Regional Police Service and Pelham Fire Services were dispatched for a motor vehicle collision on Highway 20 near Balfour Street. Police say that initial investigation revealed that a 51-year-old Grimsby male was riding his 2007 Suzuki motorcycle eastbound on Highway 20 when he slowed for traffic ahead of him. The vehicle behind this motorcycle was a 2010 Toyota motor vehicle being driven by a 31-year-old male resident of Port Colborne. The driver of the Toyota motor vehicle collided with the rear of the motorcycle. The driver of the motorcycle suffered what appeared to be life-threatening injuries and was transported to the Niagara Health System Welland Site by ambulance. He was later airlifted to the Hamilton Health Sciences General Hospital Site, where he remains in serious but stable condition at press time. The driver of the Toyota did not suffer any inju-

ries. This collision remains under investigation by 3 District Uniform Officers of

the Niagara Regional Police. Any witnesses with information regarding this col-

lision are asked to contact investigators at (905) 6884111, extension 4-3300.

KIN CRAFTS A SUCCESS Adrianne Pike of Happy Bee Apiaries scoops out a sample of wildflower honey for Nathan West at the Fonthill Kinsmen’s annual Craft Show last Sunday at Centennial High School in Welland. VOICE PHOTO

&

There are only two fundamentals of great advertising. FABULOUS WINNERS On September 20, the Fabulous Fenwick Lions Club turned over the Tracker 16.5’ boat, 75HP motor and trailer to the winner of this year’s Wheels & Waves raffle, Annita Tudor of St. Thomas, at the BassPro store in Niagara-on-the-Lake. The Fabulous Fenwick Lions donated $7,500 of the proceeds of the raffle to the Lions Foundation of Canada Guide Dog Program, $6,000 to sponsor a Canine Vision Dog, and $1,500 toward our Region 38E Zone Chair Lion Holly Cavanagh’s 2016-2017 project of raising $12,000 for an Autism Assistance Dog. Pictured, left to right, Lions Al Beamer and Herb Lodde, winner Annita Tudor, and Lion Ken Suthons. MEL DOVE PHOTO

Consistency

Repetition


Page 16

The Voice of Pelham, October 19, 2016

www.thevoiceofpelham.ca

The Voice of Pelham

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Hire with confidence! Region adds extra week of branch collection BY VOICE STAFF Niagara Region announces that an extra week of branch collection has been added due to the anticipated early fall season. Fall branch collection will start October 24 and continue until November 25. Branch collection takes place on residents' regular

garbage/recycling collection day during this time. Curbside branch collection is available across the region to all single residential households and apartments with six units or less. When setting out branches for collection it is important to remember: Branches must be tied in bundles

Unusual fall weather leads to schedule change Maximum weight of bundle = 22.7 kg (50 lbs.) Maximum size of bundle = 1.5 m (5 ft.) in length and 0.5 m (1.6 ft.) in diameter Individual branches inside of the bundle must not

exceed 7 cm (2.8 in.) in diameter Branches must be at the curb by 7 a.m. on the designated collection day Branches and leaf and yard waste are sometimes

picked up in a separate truck, as a result, the collection of branches and leaf and yard waste may occur at a different time than garbage/recycling. In addition to curbside collection, branches and yard waste can also be dropped off by residents at one of the Region's landfills or residential waste and re-

cycling drop-off depots for free. For more information about Niagara Region's waste management services, including landfill / drop-off locations and hours of operation, call the Waste Info-Line at 905-356-4141 or 1-800-594-5542, or visit www.niagararegion.ca/ waste.

The Voice of Pelham, October 19 2016  
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