Page 1

Halloween

Football

Have no plans for Halloween? Try some of the spook-tacular events happening this weekend. Page 4

The Bronchos are getting set to take on the Black Hills’ Yellow Jackets tonight. Page 8

OCT. 27, 2011 uco360.com twitter.com/uco360

THE VISTA

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA’S student voice since 1903.

Campus

FOOTBALL LOCKER ROOM BURGLARIZED By Trey Hunter / Sports Editor Money, laptops, iPhones and room keys were among the items stolen from the UCO football locker room Saturday. The locker room, located in the Hamilton Fieldhouse on the north side of campus, was left unlocked during their game against Black Hills State University. Tracy Holland, UCO’s head football coach, was unable to comment on the situation. Freshmen Marcus Bruner and Taylor Eagan were among the players who fell victim to the theft. Reportedly, the suspect stole room keys and later broke into the players’ rooms and stole a number of items. “Somebody broke into the lockers during our game Saturday and stole everything from iPhones to sets of room keys,” freshman football player Deontay Wilson said. After the keys were taken, Wilson said, the suspect broke into the rooms and

GRADUATE FAIR EXPLORES LIFE BEYOND UCO

stole money and laptops. “This has been going on for almost a month,” he said. “There have been times when we show up after a game and stuff was missing.” Three incident reports have been filed since Saturday. The first, a burglary II offense, was filed at 5:45 p.m. on Saturday. Two informational reports were filed on Sunday. UCO police were unable to comment due to the ongoing investigation. “It appears that through the police reports that something was taken from the locker room and then went off campus, Charlie Johnson, vice president for University Relations at UCO, said. “This came to our knowledge Tuesday afternoon. These are the kinds of things we take seriously because it happened on our campus. Johnson said they expect a resolution soon. “Whoever did it stole from my friends,” Wilson said. “Our team cannot believe that somebody would break in and take out things,

Graphic by Cody Bromley

not to mention break into dorm rooms and steal laptops and money.”

UCO police ask that anyone with information involving the crime to report it to their headquarters lo-

cated off University on the east side of campus.

Campus Events

EVENT SHINES LIGHT ON ASSAULT

By Bryan Trude / Staff Writer

Continued on page 3

Participants march during Take Back the Night, a event sponsored by the Community Health Club and the Violence Prevention Project, at UCO, Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011. Photo by Garett Fisbeck, The Vista

By Josh Hutton / Staff Writer Once night falls in cities across America, many citizens stay indoors for fear of personal harm, but UCO is seeking to shine a light on sexual violence and “Take Back the Night.” On Oct. 25, the Community Health Club alongside the Violence Prevention Project (VPP) held the inaugural Take Back the Night gathering. “Domestic violence is a big deal, and it goes so unspoken. People are afraid to come forward,” Latisha Fair, Community Health Club senator and senior, said. “We are here to help. As a student, I thought it was important to get my peers involved. So, they can see what’s really happening.” Fair explained the purpose of the Community Health Club student organization is to promote health on campus. The organization focuses on everything from eating habits to healthy relationships. “We are glad to have the opportunity to help host an event like this,” Fair said. Take Back the Night began with participants dec-

orating T-shirts to inform and encourage students. The T-shirts will be components of the “Clothesline Project” hosted by VPP in the Nigh University Center on Thursday, Oct. 27. Groups of students on their way to class were stopped in their tracks by the displays. “People are scared to talk about domestic violence,” Lacey Aldrich, vice president of the Community Health Club, said. “It’s too uncomfortable. We live in the Bible Belt and people do not want to talk about sex or sexual assault.” Participants had access to an informational table.

WEATHER

The UCO Office of Career Services held their third annual Graduate and Professional School Fair yesterday, Oct. 26 from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Nigh University Center Ballrooms. This year, 32 graduate schools and professional schools had information and admissions packets for students looking to continue their education beyond their bachelor’s degree. “We are bringing about 30 different grad and professional schools here to talk about their programs for UCO students interested in graduate school,” Beth Adele, director of Career Services, said. “Masters programs, PhD programs, law schools, med schools, that sort of thing.” Although no attendance figures were readily available, Adele said that her office expected between 150 and 200 students to attend. “We’ve just had a lot of interest. Students were wanting to find out more about the programs offered in this state and a little bit beyond,” Adele said. “It’s not just for a senior student wanting to fill out application packets, it’s for freshman students as well thinking about graduate school.” Several universities had multiple schools in attendance. Representatives from the University of Oklahoma Graduate College, College of Pharmacy, Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education and the College of Law all had booths. Other universities with multiple booths included UCO, the University of Tulsa, Oklahoma City University, Oklahoma State University, Northeastern State University and Oklahoma Christian University. Other Oklahoma schools in attendance included Oklahoma Baptist University, Oral

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Then speakers came up and spoke on various aspects of domestic violence, safety precautions and campus resources afforded to UCO students struggling with abuse. Speakers from the Office of Student Conduct, the VPP, and even Juijitsu instructors made presentations. Katherine Toahty, head of the campus VPP, urged students to be observant and knowledgeable of domestic abuse concerns. “The first thing I do is educate freshmen on campus,” she said. “I work with Success Central classes, all orientations, and even help the campus police

TOMORROW H 61° L 38°

DID YOU KNOW? According to MLB.com, major league umpires can earn as much as $300,000 per season.

More weather at www.uco360.com


OPINION

2

OCT. 27, 2011

THE VISTA 100 North University Drive Edmond, OK 73034 (405)974-5549 editorial@uco360.com

What is your costume for Halloween? The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and only on Wednesdays during the summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

STACY PICKENS

JADEN STANLEY

TYLER MAHAN

Sophomore - Theatre Performance

Sophomore – Vocal Performance

Sophomore – Undecided

EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO. LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author’s printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 730345209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 131. Letters can be e-mailed to vistauco@gmail.com.

STAFF

Management

Editorial

Cody Bromley, Editor-In-Chief Christie Southern, Managing Editor Brittany Dalton, Copy Editor Trey Hunter, Sports Editor

Ben Luschen, Staff Writer Bryan Trude, Staff Writer Chris Howell, Staff Writer Josh Hutton, Staff Writer Mervyn Chua, Staff Writer Trevor Hultner, Staff Writer

Graphic Design

“I’m going to be a ceiling fan. I’ve got a shirt that says ‘Go Ceiling” with a #1 on it.”

“I’m going to be a Hostess Ding Dong and my fiancé is going to be my little cupcake.”

“I’m going to be Othello from Shakespeare.”

ASHLEY WILKINSON

SHELBY GREEN

DEREK DANIEL

Sophomore – Vocal Music Education

Junior –Biology

Freshman – Graphic Design

Anthony Murray

Advertising

Photography

Kylee Turner

Garett Fisbeck, Photo Editor Liz Boyer

Circulation Joseph Choi

Adviser

Editorial Comic Evan Oldham

Mr. Teddy Burch

Editorial

JUGGLING THE FUTURE OF AN INNOCENT MAN Throughout the past week, local media outlets have been enthralled by the story of the tragic murder of 19-year-old Carina Saunders, who was found dismembered inside a duffel bag behind a Bethany Homeland. Shortly thereafter, 21-year-old Cody Perez was named as a person of interest by police after his family reported they recognized Saunders as someone Perez had once brought into the house. Perez, as publicly stated on his Facebook page, is a self-proclaimed Juggalo, which is a term used to describe the followers of Insane Clown Posse. The ICP is a hip-hop duo known both for performing with fully painted faces and for their violent, horror-themed lyrics. Print and television news sources ran wild with Perez’s connection to the group and how their music could have fueled such a heinous act. ICP lyrics depicting violent murders were included in a story about Perez’s alleged connection to the case on KWTV’s website. The Oklahoman ran a picture of Perez wielding a hatchet, an important symbol in Juggalo culture, obtained from his Facebook account. Even the people of online message boards seemed convinced of Perez’s guilt, calling him an “animal,” a “freak,” and claiming he “should be euthanized.” There was one problem, however. As it turns out, Perez’s family misidentified the young woman Perez had brought into the house as Saunders. Gee thanks, mom. Police announced Monday that Perez was no longer a person of interest in the case. So what now? Well, the media will stop and feel embarrassed…for about five minutes before rushing to finish their stories before deadline. The message board users will wait around for the police to name a new “animal” to “euthanize.” But what of Perez? He’ll never be able to escape his ties with this terrifying murder. A Google search of Perez’s name leads to story after story mentioning a decapitated body. Though Perez has a previously established criminal record, he has never been involved in anything as serious as this. These stories aren’t going to just go away, either. The Internet is forever. The real concern here is not as much Perez himself, but how quick the media and the public were to tie Perez to a murder where the biggest case against him seemed to be his musical preference. Hopefully this case serves as a valuable lesson to all those who may want to jump to conclusions based on circumstantial evidence.

“Cleopatra.”

“Nothing.”

“Provocative Peter Pan.”

By Evan Oldham / Cartoonist


NEWS

OCT. 27, 2011

3

Opinion

Campus

UCO HONORED WITH AWARD FOR COMMUNITY COLLABORATION

Out of Context By Brittany Dalton Bound To Get Burned

UCO was awarded the Outstanding Community and Campus Collaboration Award by the Oklahoma Campus Compact. Photo by Garett Fisbeck, The Vista

By Mervyn Chua / Staff Writer UCO was recently awarded the Outstanding Community and Campus Collaboration Award by the Oklahoma Campus Compact. The university was awarded for its collaboration with the United Way of Central Oklahoma to establish the Community Partnership Matching Grant Program. UCO faculty were given $5,000 from the United Way, an organization that collects money for many nonprofit organizations, to work with agencies under their umbrella for community projects. Some of the projects executed last year were the YMCA After School Garden Project; Training for Upward Transitions; and Inktank: Graphic Design and the Community. Others included Donating Stuff and Thrift Shopping: An Examination of Preferences; and Walkfit: Building Community Partnerships to Promote Physical Activity Among Elder Adults.

“The Community Partnership Matching Grant Program has resulted in productive collaborations between UCO and an array of community organizations in the Edmond and Oklahoma City metropolitan area,” Dr. Gregory Wilson, executive director of the Office of Matching Grants, said in a letter addressed to participants and attendees of the Community Partnership Matching Grant Program presentations. “Community service is part of transformative learning. It is one component,” Dr. Patricia LaGrow, vice provost and associate vice president of Academic Affairs, said. “The efforts of students and faculty trying to give back should be recognized.” OkCC is part of Campus Compact, a national member organization located in Boston, Mass. OkCC supports its members in developing college students’ skills and awareness in civic participation.

Continued from page 1

GRADUATE FAIR Roberts University, Southern Nazarene University, Mid-America Christian University and Oklahoma State University – Tulsa. Speaking before the fair, Adele stressed the importance of graduate studies in the modern job market. “[The decision to pursue a graduate degree] depends on what program a student is thinking about. It is a great way to enhance their employability, especially if the occupation they are seeking require a master’s degree,” she said. “We are seeing more and more job descriptions saying ‘Bachelor’s Degree required, Masters preferred.’ It depends if the student has truly though about the occupation and the career path that they are wanting.” “With my degree, I don’t think I’ll be able to find a job with just a bachelor’s,” Erica Oji, sophomore sociology major, said. “It opens me up for a lot of jobs I

couldn’t get before.” The fair also attracted the attention of out of state institutions, with booths set up from the University of North Texas, the University of Kansas Law School, University of Arkansas and St. Augustine University, which operates campuses in Florida and California. Testing services such as Next Step Test Preparation and The Princeton Review were also present. “Sometimes, pursuing a graduate degree is not even a choice, especially with professional schools,” Adele said. “If they want to be a lawyer, they can take the bar exam without going to law school, but law school sets them up for better success.” For more information, contact Career Services in Nigh 338 at 974-3346. For more information on UCO’s graduate college, the Jackson College of Graduate

Studies, visit their office in Nigh 404, or by calling at 974-3341.

For more information about graduate programs at UCO, scan this barcode:

goo.gl/sBZUD

Attention Writers and Poets! Looking to get your work published? Let us help! The Vista is seeking poems, short stories or other works of fiction 1,000 words or less for writing showcases in future issues. Interested? Send your writing along with your name, major and classification to: vistauco@gmail.com Note: The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted writings.

There’s something to be said about distance. One day, I received some bad news about a job I’d applied for. In the same afternoon, a steady relationship was shelved in favor of the sandy shores of California. The icing on the cake came in the form of a dent in my car. On the phone that day after class with a high school friend, she tried to assuage my stress with the old, “That’s the way the cookie crumbles.” Okay, sure. That’s the way the cookie crumbles, and at times the life you planned goes up in smoke. But in the words of Charles Bukowski, what matters most is how well you walk through the fire. Not many of us make a hobby of walking on coals, or through fires. Instinctually, most people shy away from complication and entanglement. There are two types of people I have seen, though. There are those who kindle the fire, because some people just like to watch things burn. Admittedly, for most of my time in college, I counted myself among that group. I craved conflict, I craved the power that came with knowing my words could wound. Those of us who like to watch things burn don’t know about distance. Distance to us is a foreign concept; why would we want to run from things that fill us with voyeuristic glee? Then there are the lost sheep, who retreat to the fringes and watch the fires rage from their safety spots. I don’t like to run away from problems. But I’ve also reached a pivotal moment in life where I’ve realized: if you stray too close to the flame, you’re bound to get burned. And I’m tired of being burned, tired of things too volatile to maintain control over. There have been too many times I’ve strayed too close and been singed, while smarter souls watch from afar. It’s a power rush to think your words hold power, and that what you say ultimately matters. It’s easy to buy into the God complex, and tell yourself you can make or break another soul. In doing this, you’re fanning the flames of not only conflicts that arise, but of your own mistaken self-importance. But that’s all there is. This summer, fires across the state sparked and then raged from sources as small as discarded cigarette butts. The fire you kindle today may burn you out of house and home tomorrow, may damage your reputation or your relationships, may embitter you and turn you into a snarky, bitter cat lady. So, about that “distance.” Love it. Embrace it.


4

NEWS CH OO

OCT. 27, 2011

ELY S I SE YOU W R SCARES

UCO EVENTS:

UCO Housing and Dining continues its Halloween tradition this year with a haunted house, dance and Trick-or-Treats for the children. West Hall, the girls’ dorm, will host a Trick-orTreat event, at which treats will be passed out from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Murdaugh Hall, the boys’ dorm, will host its annual Murdaugh Haunted House. The haunted house will be open from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. and is free to students and the public.

Continued from page 1

VIOLENCE

After going through the haunted house, students can dress up in their favorite costumes for the Halloween dance, held in the Murdaugh Hall lobby. The dance will go on from 9 p.m. until midnight and is free to all UCO students All events will be held Oct. 27 on campus.

Bricktown “Pitch Black will consist of 20,000 square feet of pure terror with blood curling surprises around every corner, and guests will have only a glow stick to light their way.” The event is open now until Oct. 31. It takes place from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 6 p.m. to midnight Friday, Saturday, Hallows Eve and Halloween night. Tickets are available for $13 per person or $18 per person for no-waiting VIP privilege. Students can purchase tickets online at www.stubwire.com or by calling 405-236-4143.

The Gazette’s fifth annual Halloween Parade will be held at 7 p.m. on Oct. 29. The parade starts at Northeast Third Street and E.K. Gaylord. The procession will travel north and end at Northwest 12th Street and north Walker Avenue.

Frontier City During this event, the amusement park will host the Nightmare Haunted House, Booville, the Trick-or-Treat Trail with a pumpkin patch and pumpkin painting. Storytelling, face painting and other carnival type activities will also be offered. Fright Fest is open Friday, Saturday and Sunday from now until Oct. 30. Aside from the $5 cost of admission for the Nightmare Haunted House, Fright Fest is free. General park admission, however, is $24.99 for guests 48 inches or taller, $19.99 for guests under 48 inches and free for children three years old and younger.

THE ZOO

Haunt the Zoo will be open to guests from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Oct. 26-31. Tickets can be pre-purchased for $6 per child from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. daily or for $7 at the gate. Accompanying adults’ admission is free.

As per Title XI, Chapter Three, Section 100 of the UCOSA Statutes, “The Executive Branch, under the direction of the President, as a whole or separately, along with the Senate, under the direction of the President Pro Tempore, and the House of Representatives, under the direction of the Speaker of the House, shall publish bi-weekly reports to The Vista.” Violation of that act will be punishable by appropriate authorities and measures as set forth in the University of Central Oklahoma Student Association constitution, statutes, and University policy.

In the interest of transparancy within our student government, as space allows, The Vista will gladly run these bi-weekly submissions. By Matt Blubaugh / UCOSA Student Body President I ’ m proud to officially announce that I have appointed 5 new Supreme Court Justices that will be serving students on this Campus. The UCOSA Supreme Court is comprised of 5 Justices that have a number of duties to include presiding on the Parking Appeals Board, Student Conduct Committee and Student Conduct Appeals Board as well as advocating for students within other entities on campus. The Supreme Court has original jurisdiction in all cases and interpretation of the UCOSA Constitution, Statutes, rules and regulations. All of my appointments to the Supreme Court were ap-

proved unanimously by both houses of the UCOSA Congress via House Joint Resolution 11-101. Mackenzie Hall was appointed as Chief Justice and Alex Braden, Sam Snelson, Daniel Joseph and Kaitey Heggy were appointed as Associate Justices of the court. My appointments reflect a large and diverse cross section of students on campus. Members of the newly appointed court include both male & female, Greek and non-Greek as well as nontraditional commuter students and 1 international student. I’m very confident in the integrity, abilities, energy and motivation of these students to impartially and fairly perform their duties and serve the student body.

By Lacie Larschan / President Pro Tempore UCOSA Senate I a m proud to say that the UCOSA Senate has successfully accepted two new student organizations to be recognized by the University of Central Oklahoma. We looked at four concurrent resolutions for organizations. Beta Upsilon Chi and UCO Reach Out passed with over 2/3rd’s majority, The National Society of Leadership and Success and UCO Chinese Club were postponed indefinitely due to their absence at the Oversight Committee. The Senate also passed a resolution concerning sustainable practice within the Senate itself. From now on we will be

sending the meeting agenda, legislation, and any other information electronically prior to our regular meeting. Senators are encouraged to bring their laptops to look at these documents during the meeting. We also will have a projector set up to display the agenda and legislation. We are now counting down to the end of the semester. With only five meetings left the senate committees should be finishing legislation to bring before the Senate. There are also many more organizations that will be going through the process of becoming recognized by UCO. If there is a need that UCOSA can address please come by our office and let us know. We are always looking for student inspired change to

By Cole Stout / Speaker of the UCOSA House Vista readers, I am pleased to report to you that the past three weeks have been very productive for the UCOSA House of Representatives. Last week the UCOSA House approved two new student organizations: Beta Upsilon Chi and UCO Reach Out were both approved by the House and Senate. This week the House approved three new student organizations: Young Americans for Liberty, National Society of Black Engineers, and Gold Key International Honor Society. The House was unable to consider the Overcoming Performance Anxiety student organization

due to time constraints, so it is expected to be considered on Monday Nov. 2nd. To find more information about new or existing organizations visit the Student Organizations Office (NUC 150). Last Monday the UCOSA House also approved four new Justices for the UCOSA Supreme Court. These justices will serve on a number of campus wide committees, and provide student representation. Thank you all and God bless

Adrienne Martinez of the Office of Student Conduct speaks during Take Back the Night, a event sponsored by the Community Health Club and the Violence Prevention Project, at UCO, Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011. Photo by Garett Fisbeck, The Vista

force. Secondly, I provide advocacy.” The event is a key part in the VPP’s Domestic Violence Awareness Month. “We hope events like these make the issues real,” Toahty said. “When you are victimized, it is easy to feel helpless. We strive to let students know what their rights are, what choices they have.” Redline Juijitsu trainers Ty Gay and Jennifer Gray stressed psychological preparation as much as knowing how to physically defend oneself in the face of a sexual altercation. “We have women’s empowerment programs that are about being aware and teaching moves based on timing and leverage. This gives the weak the ability to defend against the strong,” Gray said. When encountering a stranger, Gay stressed the importance of knowing the four phases of a sexual attack: targeting, subduing, exhausting and sexual assault. The trainers demonstrated techniques on how to defend oneself in the third or forth phase. “People think it’s like magic. You can subdue an attacker with your legs in six seconds,” Gay told the audience. Following the presentations, all participants were given a flashlight as they marched across campus, chanting, “Take back the night!” Many attendees hoped the event would be the first of many. “We plan to make this an annual event. With each year, it will draw more attention, and bring in more people,” Dr. Sara Cole, the Community Health Club advisor, said. “I think it’s vital everyone is informed, because we are all a part of the solution. We have to be properly informed and take action together.” Take Back the Night concluded with a candle-lighting ceremony and a moment of silence. The VPP will continue to host events through the end of the month. The final event will take place Monday, Oct. 31 in the Nigh University Center. VPP is asking students to write on Halloween Hearts for residents in the YWCA shelter to go alongside food donations.


NEWS

OCT. 27, 2011

5

Law

LEGISLATION SET TO PAROLE 250 INMATES By Chris Howell / Staff Writer

Emergency vehicles an authorities standby at the entrance to the North Fork Corrections Facility in Sayre, Okla. Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2011. Inmates were confined to their cells and their movements restricted after widespread fighting at an Oklahoma prison between black and Hispanic California inmates sent at least 46 inmates to the infirmary or hospitals before police and prison guards were able to restore order, authorities said Tuesday. (AP Photo/ Elk City Daily News, Jodi Davis)

Economy

LEAKED REPORT DETAILS DANGER OF DEBT-FREE By Trevor Hultner / Staff Writer A balanced budget may not have been such a good thing after all, according to a new report classified for over a decade and recently released by NPR’s Planet Money team. As the world watched Europe’s leaders continue to deal with their continent’s debt crisis this week, NPR Planet Money reporter David Kestenbaum received a declassified document that dates back to the final year of the Clinton Administration. The document predicted a financial crisis similar to the one the stock market faced in 2008, but caused by an unlikely source: a debt-free United States. The report, “Life After Debt,” is a small document, about 12 pages in length. It was supposed to be included in President Clinton’s final “Economic Report of the President,” a publicly available, annually published report put out by the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. Written by economist Jason Seligman, the report made the argument that if the government continued to buy back public debt, investors and other treasuries would not have a benchmark to price riskier assets with. According to the report, “Because of their abundant supply and because they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, Treasury securities have traditionally supplied investors with an asset that is highly liquid and free of risk.” The report continues, “By running surplus-

es instead of deficits, the Federal government will be shrinking rather than expanding the supply of this valued financial asset for the first time in recent history.” In a segment on NPR’s daily show All Things Considered last week, report author Seligman said, “There’s such a thing as too much debt, but there’s also such a thing, perhaps, as too little.” He said that the world needs Treasury Bonds, because certain things that are guaranteed by them, like the money taken out of paychecks for Social Security, wouldn’t be able to find reliable alternatives if they no longer existed. “Life After Debt” was rejected because it was, according to NPR, “too speculative.” Economic projections at that time were predicting a continued reduction of what was, in 2000, a $3.6 trillion public debt. In 2000 they were predicting that the public debt would reach “0” by 2011. With a 9.1 percent official unemployment rate and a $10 trillion debt today, one economist, Diane Lim Rogers, who worked under the Clinton administration, was shocked to look at a past prediction. “The document just reminded me of a lot of things I’d forgotten,” she said. “Like I’d completely forgotten that we were projecting that the debt would be completely paid off by 2012.”

Legislation passed earlier this year will parole around 250 inmates on Nov. 1. House Hill 2131, which will expand community sentencing and monitoring for nonviolent offenders, was passed by an overwhelming majority through both the state Senate and House of Representatives and signed by Governor Mary Fallin in May. The bill was one of the priorities for the newly dominant Republican Party, who took every state seat in 2010, increasing their majority in the state legislature. The bill was initially projected to release over 1,000 offenders early, but the Department of Corrections quickly revised the figure. “I could see why they would do it, given how stressed the Department of Corrections is. It was a necessary evil,” Dr. Donald Mizell, professor of criminal justice, said. The bill will save around 3.5 million dollars by expanding the eligibility for GPS monitoring, according to an estimate by the Department of Corrections. Offenders released by the reform will still be required to wear ankle monitors. The Department of Corrections has a budget of 462 million dollars for the 2011 fiscal year, down from 503 million dollars in the 2008 and 2009 fiscal years. While the Department of Corrections had been operating at nearly full capacity for years, it had also been receiving budget cuts. The Department of Corrections was operating at 97 percent capacity, with 25,390 offenders, according to a report released in May. However, that number has risen to more than 28,000 by September. During this period, the DOC laid off more than 300 employees out of a staff of 4,400. A provision in the bill that would automatically grant paroles if the Governor did not act upon them. Oklahoma is the only state that

requires the governor to act upon all paroles. This reform was intended to address the backlog of parole cases caused by this requirement. However, this provision was challenged

“I could see why they would do it, given how stressed the Department of Corrections is. It was a necessary evil.” - Donald Mizell, criminal justice instructor

by state Attorney General Scott Pruitt, who deemed it unconstitutional. A little more than half of the offenders, 51.5 percent, in the Oklahoma criminal justice system are nonviolent. The most common crime is distribution of a controlled substance, followed by assault and possession of a controlled substance. “They need rehab, not incarceration. Putting [drug users] in prison doesn’t help them with their drug problem,” Jordan Crump, a graduate student of criminal justice, said. Oklahoma also incarcerates more women than any other state, with 10 percent of offenders being female, according to the September monthly report by the Department of Corrections. A number of states have reformed their parole process since 2007 and the start of the Great Recession. Among others, Louisiana removed the requirement that the parole board must vote unanimously to grant a parole in 2010. In 2009 Texas eliminated life without parole for juveniles, and California allowed for the possibility of parole without a hearing in some cases.


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CLASSIFIED CROSSWORDS

EMPLOYMENT

Now Hiring Now hiring employees, management, and cashiers. Full and Part-time available with flexible schedules. Fast Lanes Of America, 2220 S. Broadway, Edmond OK. 8448084.

Research Volunteers Needed Researchers at OU Health Sciences Center need healthy volunteers ages 18 to 30 who have a parent with or without a history of an alcohol or drug problem. Qualified participants will be compensated for their time. Call (405) 456-4303 to learn more about the study and to see if you qualify. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

Help Wanted Help Wanted for front desk. Apply in person at the Stafford Inn. 1809 E. 2nd St. Edmond, 73034.

OCT. 27, 2011

Help Wanted Seasonal Workers Needed on Christmas Tree Farm Flexible HoursGreat for Students Call (405) 340-5488 for Interview

Help Wanted Full and Part-time positions. Apply in person at Comet Cleaners. Flexible Schedules. 1401 S. Kelly Ave. Call 3595958.

FOR RENT

For Rent Townhouse for Rent: Jefferson Square. 1450 sq ft, 2b. 2ba, enclosed backyard, Washer & dryer hookup, garage, $725/month. Call 3408147.

OCT. 25 CROSSWORD ANSWERS

FUN FACT

The phrase “going commando” originated during the Vietnam War, a time when American troops spent extended periods of time in hot, humid jungles. Tight-fitting undergarments reduced ventilation and increased the risk of fungal infections in the groin area.

SUDOKU

The Historical Main Building at Ellis Island is the property of Manhattan, while the surrounding parts of the island are property of New Jersey. During a 1956 speech for his campaign of deStalinization, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev was asked by an unseen audience member why, as an advisor to the dictator, he had never stopped Stalin from committing his atrocities. Khrushchev immediately lashed out, “Who said that?” The room grew quiet. Khrushchev repeated his query to more silence, waited a beat, and then said, “Well, now you understand why.” The Hard Rock Café got its name from a now-defunct bar that appeared on the back of the Doors’ album Morrison Hotel. It is most improper to refer to a servicemember as having “won” the Medal of Honor or similar military commendation. It is not a contest or competition; there is no winner. One should refer to the servicemember as being awarded or simply receiving, the commendation. “Pepsi-Cola” is an anagram for “Episcopal,” which some believe the drink is named after. But then “Britney Spears” is an anagram for “Presbyterians,” so we’re inclined to discount this theory.

SUDOKU Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50)

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Across

Down

1. Kuwaiti, e.g. 5. Erased 10. Boor’s lack 14. Box office take 15. Start of a refrain 16. Bounce back, in a way 17. Brawl 18. Three-___ fork 19. Heroin, slangily 20. Beginning 22. Equips for military duty 24. Lively intelligence 26. Home, informally 27. “Potemkin” setting 30. Wears away 32. Machine to cut and bundle grain 33. Banquet 34. Blouse, e.g. 37. Driver’s licenses, for one (2 wds) 39. Deer-like 41. “For shame!” 42. Exactly (3 wds) 44. Chemical cousin 45. Statue base 47. Most desperate 48. “Beat it!” 49. Harvest fly 51. More loyal 53. Pomp 57. Grasp 58. Retain with stone 60. “Field of Dreams” setting 61. Carbon compound 62. Fragrant resin 63. Alpine transport 64. Contradict 65. Big Bertha’s birthplace 66. Toy that comes easily to hand

1. City on the Yamuna River 2. Commuter line 3. Above 4. Residential suburb of Washington, D.C. 5. His “4” was retired 6. Frock wearer 7. Imaginary 8. Type of guitar 9. Carpenter’s groove 10. Blue book filler 11. Computer’s interval between request and delivery (2 wds) 12. Mariner’s aid 13. Clothing 21. Claim 23. Lower surface 25. Forgive 27. Final notice 28. Lover of Aeneas 29. Vertebrate’s brain 31. Iroquoian language 35. Aces, sometimes 36. Chipper 38. Bags with shoulder straps 40. Excessive desire to eat 43. Those who steal 46. Forte 48. Backgammon piece 50. ___ de menthe 51. Abandon 52. Algonquian Indian 54. Gray wolf 55. “Shoo!” 56. Hawaiian tuber 59. Bolivian export


SPORTS

OCT. 27, 2011

7

Continued from page 8

CENTRAL HOCKEY WEEKEND MATCHUP

SHAKING HANDS In sports, there is. That’s why there is a scoreboard. That’s why they play. In the words of former New York Jets head coach, “You play to win the game.” However, when the final whistle is blown and one person stands in victory and the other in the shadows, the respectful thing to do is meet at midfield, shake hands and go about your business. There is no shame in acknowledging that for just one day, you weren’t the best man or woman on the field of battle. Losing, unfortunately, is a part of life that everybody has to deal with. The New England Patriots entered Super Bowl XLII with a perfect 16-0 record. They were handed the first and last loss of the season by the New York Giants thanks to two amazing catches, one by Plaxico Burress for the go-ahead touchdown. What did Tom Brady and Billichick do after the game? They shook their opponents hands and congratu-

lated them on their hard-earned vicotry. That was that, as professional as it gets. If they can show admiration after a loss like that, why can’t we all? Hopefully there was a lesson learnt from all of the turmoil after that game. Each coach, after reaching the locker room, should have looked in the mirror and admitted that what they just did was wrong. There was a lot to be lost in that certain battle of egos. The loss of respect from fans and the loss of admiration from the kids who love to watch them should have been enough to stick in the back of their minds for the rest of their careers. There should be reconciliation and the NFL’s public relations team should jump at the opportunity of turning the incident around. Whatever happens, everybody around the NFL needs to realize that golf shouldn’t be the only gentleman’s game.

@ Arizona State Sun Devils Friday: TBA Saturday: TBA CENTRAL BASKETBALL ALUMNI GAME When: Saturday Time: 12:00 p.m. Where: Hamilton Fieldhouse Who: Former Graduates

Sports Opinion

VISTA SPORTS PREDICTIONS: NFL WEEK 8 Vista Sports Editor Trey Hunter hasn’t given up the picks lead through seven weeks of the NFL season. He has a four game lead over The Huddle’s Terry Fox and a 10 game lead over The Vista’s Bryan Trude.

NFL Week 8

Trey Hunter Vista Sports Editor

Bryan Trude Vista Sports Writer

Garett Fisbeck Vista Photo Editor

Amber Pyle Vista Sports Writer

Terry Fox UCentral’s “The Huddle”

Kyle Renfrow UCentral Weather

Courtney Landsberger UCentral’s “The Huddle”

Cardinals @ Ravens

Ravens

Cardinals

Cardinals

Ravens

Ravens

Ravens

Ravens

Vikings @ Panthers

Panthers

Panthers

Panthers

Panthers

Panthers

Panthers

Panthers

Jaguars @ Texans

Texans

Texans

Jaguars

Texans

Texans

Texans

Texans

Dolphins @ Giants

Giants

Giants

Dolphins

Giants

Giants

Giants

Giants

Saints @ Rams

Saints

Saints

Saints

Saints

Saints

Saints

Saints

Colts @ Titans

Titans

Titans

Titans

Titans

Titans

Titans

Titans

Redskins @ Bills

Bills

Bills

Redskins

Bills

Bills

Bills

Bills

Lions @ Broncos

Lions

Lions

Broncos

Lions

Lions

Lions

Lions

Patriots @ Steelers

Steelers

Patriots

Patriots

Steelers

Patriots

Patriots

Patriots

Bengals @ Seahawks

Seahawks

Bengals

Seahawks

Seahawks

Bengals

Bengals

Bengals

Browns @ 49ers

49ers

49ers

49ers

49ers

49ers

49ers

49ers

Cowboys @ Eagles

Eagles

Eagles

Eagles

Eagles

Eagles

Cowboys

Eagles

Chargers @ Chiefs

Chargers

Chargers

Chiefs

Chargers

Chargers

Chargers

Chiefs

Last Week’s Picks* (W-L)

9-5

9-5

7-7

7-7

8-6

9-5

7-7

Season Picks* (W-L)

71-32

61-42

62-41

64-39

67-36

63-40

64-39

* Includes the results from Monday Night Football between the Jets and Dolphins during week 6.


8

SPORTS

OCT. 27, 2011 Central Football

Opinion

VIEW FROM THE CHEAP SEATS

BRONCHOS FOOTBALL TO HOST BLACK HILLS By Trey Hunter / Sports Editor

By Trey Hunter

Vista Sports Editor

Just Shake Hands Whatever happened to grown men acting like grown men? The NFL is certainly no gentlemen’s game. It’s ruthless and filled with blood, sweat and hard hits that sometimes leave players lying on the bed in the emergency room. It’s not like golf, where one man competes against many and at the end of the round they take their hats off and shake hands. The NFL obviously wants no part of that tradition. We’ve all seen the epic battle of words between Detroit Lions coach Jim Schwartz and San Francisco 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh two weeks ago. The 49ers came from behind to give the Lions their first loss and Harbaugh sprinted to the middle of the field and after a hop, skip and a jump, slapped Schwartz in the back and took off for the showers. Schwartz wasn’t having it. He chased Harbaugh down and the two had to be split apart by players and NFL personnel. For five minutes, the game wasn’t about the players or the teams that just finished one of the better games of the season. It was about two coaches who showed a disregard for the fans watching and shunned the respect that each should have been accountable for. They looked like two kids fighting in the sandlot because one just called the other out at second base. It was, for the lack of a better term, childish. Professionalism is something that is slowly losing faith in the sports that we love to watch on television. The lockout from earlier in the year put the fans on the back burner and now two of the league’s up and coming coaches have done the same thing. They decided that their own egos were more important than showing the youth of America how to win and lose with dignity and respect. “There are certain tradition that have been in the game for a long time,” University of Central Oklahoma head football coach, Tracy Holland said.”They stand for certain principals morally and ethically.” “I hate losing more than anybody, but without the other coach, I don’t have a game. He deserves the respect and for me to look him in the eye and say good job. I believe it should stay, and for anybody who thinks other-wise, they need to reevaluate their profession.” There is nothing wrong with hating to lose. In fact, nobody in the business of professional sports should want anything to do with it. However, it happens. It is one thing that separates sports from politics. In a political debate, they argue and scream about what they feel is best for anything and everything, but after it’s all over, there is never a clear-cut winner and loser.

Continued on page 7

The Central Oklahoma football team, in search of its second win of the season, plays Black Hills State University tonight at Wantland Stadium in Edmond. UCO comes into the game riding a three-game losing streak and coming off of a 38-21 loss to Fort Hays State last Saturday in Edmond. The Bronchos’ only win came against East Central University on Oct. 1. With three games left on the schedule, all at home, Central still has questions to be answered. The most important of which comes from the quarterback position. Sophomore Landon Greve got the first start of his career against Fort Hays State last weekend and it switched the game plan completely for the Bronchos. UCO entered the game with a passdominant offense led by junior Ethan Sharp, but with Greve in the game, they started to carry the ball. Thanks to the mobility of their new starter, Central rushed the ball 34 times for 205 yards and one touchdown. Running back Josh Birmingham had 15 carries for 133 yards and a score and Greve rushed 14 times for 47 yards. Although the team seemed to focus more on the run for the first time all season, Greve still attempted 49 passes and completed 31 of them for 298 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions. He spread the ball around by completing multiple passes to eight different receivers. Tucker Holland, son of head coach Tracy Holland, caught both of Greve’s touchdown passes and finished with a team-high 63 yards. “Ethan got banged up in the first game of the year against North Alabama,” Holland said. “Landon has been in our program for several years now and he’s going to get the start against Black Hills.” “We are trying to get Ethan rested up,

UCO’s Tucker Cason (22) congratulates Joshua Birmingham (21) during a game between UCO and Fort Hays State at Wantland Stadium, Friday, Oct. 22, 2011. Photo by Garett Fisbeck, The Vista

but we don’t want to anything that will disrupt the healing process.” The Bronchos offense will not change according to Holland. The team will stick to the wide-open offense, but if last week’s performance was any indication, the run game will be in full affect. “Defensively, they’re a 30-stack team which is similar to us,” Holland said. “They’re solid, but that type of defense makes it a little harder to run and opens up the passing game.” Black Hills enters the game with a balanced offensive attack. They are averaging 102 yards per game on the ground and nearly 187 yards through the air. The Yellow Jackets are led by a stable of running backs. Sophomore Drew Neilsen and freshman Trent Butler lead the team, each averaging over 30 yards per game and sophomore Bryar DeSanti averages 22.4 yards per game. Quarterback Wes Kragt, who has seven passing

CENTRAL FOOTBALL QUARTERBACK COMPARISON Landon Greve GP/GS: 8-1

PASSING: 36-60 325 yards 2TD 2INT RUSHING: 17 Attepmts 76 yards 0TD

Ethan Sharp GP/GS: 7-7

PASSING: 206-343 1,852 yards 6TD 9INT RUSHING: 23 Attempts 63 yards 1TD

touchdowns, also averages over 20 yards per game on the ground. “They use two tight ends, which is tough to defend from a personnel standpoint,” Holland said. “They try and work with mis-matches and we feel like we can take some strides in that area.” The Bronchos are preparing for their second game of a four-game home stand to end the season. They have played a strong schedule with games against the number one team in the nation, North Alabama and the fifth ranked team, Washburn. “This week presents another challenge on our schedule,” Holland said. “It almost feels like playing at home is an odd thing. The team is looking forward to playing at home even though after fall break we have a short week.” Kickoff of the Bronchos’ game against Black Hills is set for 6 p.m. tonight. It is the first home, night game of the season.

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The Vista - Oct. 27, 2011  

The Vista - Oct. 27, 2011

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