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FEB. 16, 2012

Women’s Basketball

Beer

UCO takes on the Lindenwood Lions tonight at 6 p.m. in Hamilton Field House. Page 7

Dr. Stephen Law, professor of psychology and award winning homebrewer, brews his own beer and mead. Page 3

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Higher-Ed

THE TROUBLE WITH TENURE By Ben Luschen / Staff Writer Tenure for college professors and academics, a system which has been a fixture in American universities since the early 1900s, is now facing challenges from at least one member of the Oklahoma State Legislature. Rep. Corey Holland (R) is the author of HB 2598, which if passed would not allow new hires into the Higher Education system to attain tenure. Another bill authored by Holland, HB 2599, would require universities to conduct an annual posttenure review. In the current tenure system, newly-hired assistant professors work for a period of usually five to seven years before they get the chance to apply for tenure. If granted, the professor is then promoted to associate professor and is granted a long-term or even indefinite employment contract. With years of further work and peer review, additional promotions and contracts may be granted. If HB 2598 and 2599 were to pass, new hires would instead be subject to yearly contract renewal. According to Holland, part of the reason he introduced the bill was over concerns that the system allowed schools to misplace their loyalties. “Colleges and universities exist for the benefit of the students not the professors,” Holland said. Holland questions whether paying the unquestioned salaries of tenured professors is keeping to university students’ best interests. “The tremendous increase in costs for attending colleges and universities in our state is of great concern to me,” Holland said. “I’m discovering that in many cases tenured professors who do not research are making over $150,000 – more than the Governor – and [are] teaching less than 50 students per year.” HB 2598 is already beginning to receive criticism, mostly from those

involved in higher education. Mark Hochenaur, a UCO English professor who also runs the politically progressive blog Okie Funk, is an avid supporter of the current tenure system. “College tenure is vital to protect academic free speech,” Hochenauer said. “Sometimes professors must present what some people might believe are controversial ideas and theories in the classroom. If you take away this ability through arbitrary employment practices and real or perceived intimidation, then it’s a real loss of

freedom for our culture.” Many of the bill’s critics, including Hochenauer, have stated concerns over what they believe to be a vague description of how the new system would affect previously tenured faculty. Holland, however, says it is not his intention to remove tenure from those who have already earned it. “I do not believe it is proper, much less legal, to remove tenure from those professors who have currently attained it,” Holland said. Among several critics of academic

tenure, one of their biggest problems with the system is their belief that professors become virtually impervious to being fired after achieving tenured status. According to Hocheanauer, however, this is untrue. “I think tenure is widely misunderstood,” Hochenauer said. “Earned tenure does not mean a professor can’t be fired even on a speech issue. It just allows for due process.” Hochenauer also addresses the concerns that tenured professors become complacent by pointing to the

intense review process professors subject themselves to not only before they become tenured, but prior to attaining the status as well. “After tenure, professors are constantly reviewed as they climb through the promotion ranks,” Hochenauer said. “It’s a rigorous process that is not duplicated widely in the public or private sector.” Holland argues, however, that tenure as we currently know it is dated and in some cases obsolete.

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PAINT THE CAMPUS PINK WEEK CONTINUES

Pink paper lanterns hang in the Nigh University center as part of Paint The Campus Pink week. Photo by Garett Fisbeck, The Vista

State House

Plaza District

REVERENDS AND RIFLES MARIPOSA PROJECT WORKING TO

EMPOWER WOMEN THROUGH ART By Brittany Dalton / Copy Editor It began with empowerment. Maria Atkinson, a 2011 photographic arts alum of UCO, says a conversation with good friend and well-known local poet Jennifer Hudgens led to the birth of the Mariposa Project, intended to serve as a female empowerment art project. “Mariposa is Spanish for ‘butterfly,’” Atkinson said. “[This project] was created to encourage women of all ages and sizes to be confident in themselves and their beauty despite what society says is beautiful.” The Mariposa Project will take place tonight from 7:30 – 10:30 p.m. at The Parish, located on NW 16th Street in the Plaza District of Oklahoma City. Multiple art forms will be incorporated to spread a message of self-acceptance and confidence, including photography, mixed media, poetry and music. Atkinson will be displaying her own photography, and Hudgens will be performing poetry alongside fellow poets, including Melissa May and Ashley Combs. In addition to photogra-

WEATHER

““I do feel like someone should have the right to use deadly force in their own home. That makes sense,” he said. “If you are threatened in your own home, someone is there that shouldn’t be.” Since the House of Representatives Public Safety Committee approved the bill by an 11-3 margin, the bill goes on to the full House this week. The Stand Your Ground law was amended last year to include places of business, but House representatives felt that churches should be included. Many churchgoers and ministers feel the bill is appropriate. “I haven’t seen or heard any threats at my church, but a friend of mine at a Baptist church here in Edmond told me about a bomb threat they received a few years ago, all because someone didn’t agree with the preacher,” David Lehman, 42, said. “If a man’s house is protected, so should a house of god be,” Lehman attends the Edmond Church of Graphic by Cody Bromley Christ on 9th and Bryant. By Josh Hutton / Staff Writer If the law is amended, it will read, “The legA current Oklahoma house bill aims to ex- islation hereby recognizes that the citizens of tend the Stand Your Ground law to places of Oklahoma have the right to expect absolute worship. If passed, ministers and church staff safety within their homes, places of business, would have the right to use deadly force if a or places of worship.” Nickell sees it differently. threat of imminent death or severe injury is “I don’t think you should allow it period. perceived. The bill has caused a stir in both sectarian If you are being threatened by someone for what you are preaching about, then you and religious circles. “That’s ridiculous. That’s the most absurd should probably step back and examine what thing I’ve ever heard,” Brooks Nickell, a soph- you are telling people,” he said. “I can’t think of an instance where someone would need a omore at UCO, said. Nickell felt a private residence should be af- gun in church. Especially if you are teaching forgiveness and compassion.” forded a method of defense.

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phy and poetry, local musicians will perform, including Sherree Chamberlain and Anna Kinder, an English Education major at UCO. The participants of the Mariposa Project are donating proceeds from purchases at the event will go to benefit the YWCA’s battered women’s shelter of Oklahoma City. There will be a suggested donation of $5 at the door. “The grass is always greener” Hudgens was first inspired to create the Mariposa Project after her introduction to esteemed poet Sonya Renee Taylor’s “The Body Is Not An Apology,” a work intended to promote self-love and empowerment. Some of Hudgens’ ties to the Mariposa Project are linked to personal experience. “I had a gastric bypass in July 2009 – I have since lost over 300 pounds,” she said. Hudgens said the experience was not only a physical transformation, but an emotional and psychological one as well. “I am not the same person now, which is a

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DID YOU KNOW? On this day in 1923, archeaologists unearted the tomb of King Tut.

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OPINION

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FEB. 16, 2012

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How much did you spend on Valentine’s Day? The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and only on Wednesdays during the summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

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EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO. LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author’s printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 730345209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 131. Letters can be emailed to vistauco@gmail.com.

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“I didn’t spend anything on Valentine’s Day. I just went out with friends.”

“I bought my best friend flowers and chocolate.”

“Altogether I spent about $50. I bought some Hello Kitty stuff and a dinette set – some kitchen stuff.”

BICKY RICE

DALTON RUDD

MATT JACKSON

Sophomore- Communications

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THE STATE OF EMERGENCY On this day in 1968, the nation’s first 9-1-1 system was implemented in Haleyville, Ala. Now, 44 years later, there really hasn’t been that much change in the system. Other than a few new technologies like automatic location finders, the process of contacting the authorities has remained much the same, even as other technologies have skyrocketed in advancement. Don’t expect this to last forever. Perhaps we’ll see a complete upheaval of the current 9-1-1 system within this decade, maybe even within the next four or five years. Truthfully, a blueprint for the future of the service has already been laid out by Next Generation 9-1-1, a current initiative which hopes to bring the system up to date with our modern mobile society. Part of the problem with the current 9-1-1 system is its lack of compatibility with current data sharing and video streaming applications, which are currently available in the phones of millions of Americans. Currently, it is impossible to send a readable text to 9-1-1. This proved to be a tragic flaw in 2007 during the Virginia Tech campus shootings, when a number of students sent out pleas for help to 9-1-1 over text message – messages that would never be read by anyone. Also, because of the lack of means to contact 9-1-1 in a nonvocal way, it has been nearly impossible for those who are deaf or mute to get emergency assistance. I think we all can agree that everyone deserves the right to call 9-1-1 in an emergency. These reasons, coupled with a younger generation that now prefers conversations over text to actual calls, are why Next Generation 9-1-1 hopes to start receiving texts, photos and video in the very near future. New ways to contact 9-1-1 aren’t the only things possible in the future, however. Imagine a world where a medical professional is available to you through FaceTime or Skype to give step-by-step instructions for assisting someone having a seizure as you wait for the paramedics to arrive. Imagine a world where those with cardiovascular disease could have a sensor placed in their bodies that would automatically contact 9-1-1 if they have a heart attack. Imagine a world where people within a certain radius of a horrific fire, car accident or chemical leak could be sent a message advising them to avoid the area. The 9-1-1 system is one that was designed in and for the era of rotary phones, and it’s time for the system to catch up – and soon. After all, lives are at stake.

“I spent probably four dollars. That was a combination with a gift bag, heart candy, a card and tissue paper.”

“None. I watched The New Girl.”

“I probably spent like $10. It was nothing too serious, just a box of candy and a flower.”

By Evan Oldham / Cartoonist


NEWS

FEB. 16, 2012 Politics

Opinion

FORMER PROFESSOR MAKING ANOTHER BID FOR US HOUSE

Out of Context By Brittany Dalton Giving Too Much

Former UCO professor Tom Guild announced his run for Congress at campaign headquarters in OKC earlier this month. Photo by Trevor Hultner, the Vista

By Trevor Hultner / Staff Writer A former UCO professor is again making a bid for a seat in Congress. Dr. Tom Guild, a 27-year veteran political science and legal studies professor at UCO, is campaigning against incumbent District 5 Representative James Lankford (R-Edmond) on a populist “progressive” Democratic platform. “The middle class and the working poor are under attack, and it is becoming more and more difficult to achieve the American Dream,” Guild said. “The people of Oklahoma, and of our great country, deserve better in outcome and in representation.” Guild told a small audience at his campaign headquarters in early February that government does, in fact, work, but not always. “There are many times in the past year, when government has disappointed us and fallen short of the mark on the mature and professional behavior and performance we expect from our elected officials,” he said. Guild’s platform was one of increasing funding to public education, raising the income tax of the top earners in the country, transparency in elections and strengthening social safety net programs. “It is time to get to work to restore confidence in our govern-

ment,” he said. “It is time to go to work to promote and protect policies that make people’s lives better—particularly the lives of the great American middle class.” In 2010, Guild was beaten in the Democratic primaries by Billy Coyle, an attorney from Oklahoma City. So far he is running unopposed. His Republican opponent, the incumbent Lankford, ran on a largely religious platform. Guild will likely utilize his lower- and working-class background as a way to connect with District 5 voters. “I established Tommy’s Fund for students at Payne Elementary in Wichita,Kan., where I attended kindergarten and first grade,” he said. The fund provides four children per year with school clothes and supplies. “The experiences in my life helped shape who I am today; my character developed as I met and overcame difficult challenges,” he said. “If you obtain a good education, work hard and persevere, your life can make a positive difference in the lives of other people.” District 5 covers Oklahoma City and its suburbs, most of Pottawatomie County and a part of Seminole County. There will be a primary election in June and a runoff election in August. The general election is on Nov. 6.

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MARIPOSA active and happier than I’ve ever been,” Hudgens said. While the health benefits of the surgery far outweighed those of continuing as she was, Hudgens said the surgery is definitely not one she would recommend to everyone, and in fact the decision to undergo surgery took Hudgens close to a decade to make. “The trouble with such a huge transformation in such a short period of time was, I started having further issues with my appearance, I didn’t recognize myself in the mirror,” she said. While Hudgens’ recovery was hard physically, she said that in the time since she has struggled with the emotional repercussions as well. Through her struggles, including battles with eating disorders from a young age, Hudgens realized the extent of the battles women fight. After talking with many of her female friends, she also saw how many women still view themselves in a negative light. “Women are bombarded with so many images of what beauty is supposed to mean. The ideas that women have to change who they are to fit into society got me a little angry,” she said. “There is always something we compare with someone else – the grass is always greener, I suppose.”

A cathartic process Atkinson said she as well can relate to the message of the Mariposa Project. “Like pretty much every other female, I’ve struggled with selfimage all my life – not feeling pretty enough, skinny enough, smart enough,” Atkinson said. “Not until recently have I realized that we are all uniquely beautiful just the way we are and beauty is only skin deep.” Another factor that interested Atkinson in the project is its intent to address wrongs in society.

“I watch so many people, myself included, sit around and complain about everything wrong in society – but few people stand up and do something about it,” she said. “I have been enraged about domestic violence, eating disorders and self-mutilation – now I’ve found a way to give back to an organization that helps women who so badly need it.” Atkinson’s hope is that the Mariposa Project will be able to draw a huge crowd, but most importantly, she hopes the event will raise awareness and raise a generous amount for the YWCA. Hudgens’ hope, on the other hand, is that self-abuse in society will stop. “My heart told me I needed to do something not only to raise awareness, but to share those parts of myself,” she said. “Ultimately, I hope this is not only a cathartic process for those involved – I hope it also sheds light on things people are too afraid to talk about.” Hudgens said she could not imagine a cause more deserving of time and love, than the YWCA, and is grateful for the hard work and passion her fellow collaborators have put into the Mariposa Project. She said the project has been a “labor of love,” and worth every minute. Although the Mariposa Project lasts only one night, Hudgens hopes to encourage lasting self-acceptance and positivity, ensuring that the endeavors of the Mariposa Project mean more than one night of art and community. “We all have our bad days, but why not embrace every day as a good day?” she said. “We are all beautiful in our own unique way, that is what we have in common – not our supposed flaws.” For more information on the Mariposa Project, or on how to participate in upcoming collaborations, contact Jennifer Hudgens at metaphornicationmedia@gmail.com.

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RIFLES Nickell is bothered that the idea for the bill came to the mind of Oklahoma citizens. “I think it really speaks for the direction our country is going when extra protection of a religious group is necessary in a nation founded upon religious

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freedom,” Nickell said. Lehman argues that the law is not only beneficial to the protestant majority of Oklahoma, but also to religious minorities. “Just because I don’t agree with Islam doesn’t mean I don’t think a mosque

should be protected,” he said. “People tending to minority faith congregations in this state perhaps need as much protection as they can get. I almost hate to say it, but it’s true.” The House is expected to vote on the bill sometime next week.

Well, we’ve finally done it. “Hard to get” used to be the way to date. Now, we’re giving too much of ourselves away. The Internet’s removed all the guesswork in dating and now serves as a repository for all our most useless and most treasured secrets. I’m not a member of online dating sites, because I’ve got a Facebook and one click on a profile can usually tell me all I need to know. Even the smart ones who set all information to private can’t pull one past me: try their Tumblr and see what you dig up. If all else fails, Twitter can tell you in 140 characters what it might take you two dinner dates to unearth. By pouring so much of yourself into some online persona, you’re destroying all the allure of getting to know someone. What are the odds of having an “oh my gosh, me too!” moment if your date already knows your favorite movie, musical genre and snack food? It’s akin to kissing on the first date – kissing before the first date. When we meet someone through our blog or site of choice, write our life story in the ask box and hit send, we’re circumventing everything from beginning to end. Over the summer I met up with someone I’d started talking to via my personal blog. I knew she’d suffered from an eating disorder, and she knew I suffered from anxiety attacks. We met up downtown and bonded, though superficially, over quesadillas and cilantro lime salsa. We only hung out one more time after that, and we have not spoken since. We just didn’t have anything to talk about. She couldn’t talk about how much she loved her favorite band, because I already knew she had a tattoo of their album art on her calf. I couldn’t talk about the features I write on local musicians, because I’d already posted them. What is there to say when you’ve already blogged it all? The problem’s not what our parents told us when we were teenagers – “watch out for pedophiles and serial killers.” I think our generation is pretty street-savvy and we understand who to let in and who to steer clear from. Our problem is information in excess. Instead of leaving a little to the imagination, it’s the figurative equivalent to inviting that lucky guy or girl in not just for tea but to stay the night. I want something more to talk about. I want to know the person I’m talking to won’t stay just a persona behind a computer screen. And I’m not sure you can guarantee that with zero face-toface interaction. Can you? So remember – keep a little bit sacred, and don’t kiss before the first date.

Comment on this column on UCO360.com Follow Brittany on Twitter @lttlbrd


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NEWS

FEB. 16, 2012

Hearing Health

UCO HEARING CLINIC OPEN FOR APPOINTMENTS By Treva Yarbrough / Contributing Writer With all the noises you hear on a daily basis, when was the last time you got a checkup for your ears? UCO students, faculty and staff can now get free hearing exams. In hopes of maintaining hearing health, audiologist and UCO professor Dr. Brandon Vincent recommends that children get ear checkups every three to six months. He said adults should get them yearly. “A lot of people don’t realize that a lot of your balance issues they actually stem from your inner ear so if people are kind of feeling dizzy or light headed, their blood pressure is rising or falling it can be that, but it can also be the inner ear components,” Vincent said. “We hear through our brains, and there’s a difference between listening and hearing,” Vincent said that to prevent hearing loss, ear plugs should be used. He said once a person’s hearing is damaged, it will not recover. “People mow the lawn consistently, they work outside, use a chainsaw or a drill bit, lots of different types of power tools. Whatever they may be doing around the house,” Vincent said. Vincent said those things have a pretty high degree of decibel loudness level. The sound of a lawn mower is 100 decibels and a chainsaw is 110 decibels. Vincent pointed out that when listening to an iPod, a person should be able to hear

someone’s conversation three to five feet away. He said it doesn’t matter if the conversation is understandable – the important thing is to be able to hear there is a conversation taking place. “I like to listen to my music at the highest level, and I don’t think anything of it. I listen to music to block out the world. I don’t want to hear someone else’s conversation,” freshman Ashley Manor said. “I don’t think I have a hearing problem because I hear perfectly well, but I may go get a hearing exam.” There are different degrees of hearing loss that range from normal limits to profound. Vincent said it is all based on the decibel measurements. Some of the signs of listening to loud sounds for a long period of time could be ringing in the ear, headaches, fatigue, and increased stress rate. “The test we run here basically what we will do is use the over the ear earphones and what we do is just test from the low pitches to the high pitches,” Vincent said. “Every time they can hear it they raise their hand.” Vincent said we have to test a wide range of frequencies because lots of different sounds lie in all the different frequencies. “A person within normal limits would raise a hand at the 25 decibel level, but people with hearing loss may not raise their hand until the 50-80 decibel level,” Vincent said. “That’s when we start saying they have a mild hearing loss, they have a moderate hearing loss.”

Audiologist Brandon Vincent uses a audiometer to measure hearing deficiencies in patients. File photo by Kat Wells, The Vista.

“A normal-hearing person if decibel aren’t changed a lot it usually takes around 30 minutes,” Vincent said. “With a person with a hearing loss probably closer to 45 because we test the middle ear.” The device used to test the middle ear is called a tympanometer. It puts pressure into the middle ear to test for fluids and holes. People in the military, in bands, or anything dealing with music are prone to hearing loss

because of the loud environments they are around. If from the exam a person does have a hearing problem, the next step is to be referred to get a hearing aid. To make an ear exam appointment, call the Speech and Hearing Clinic at 405-974-5419. They take appointments only.

immediate disadvantage in attracting and retaining aspiring academics. “This would have a chilling effect on academic free speech and make faculty employment so volatile and unstable here [in Oklahoma] that it would scare off some of the best minds of our culture,” he said. Ultimately, however, the debate over HB 2598 may prove to be a moot point. Holland admitted that the chances of his bill being heard in committee or on the House floor are

“minimal at best,” mostly due to higher education’s powerful lobbying presence. Still, Holland, who has 15 years of prior teaching experience and is finishing his Masters, is aware that the proposed bills would directly affect him when he does return to his teaching career. “I am not asking anyone to live under a system I am not willing to live under myself,” he said.

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TENURE “Researching this issue, you will find that even from the very beginning the academic freedom idea was more about protecting teachers speech outside the classroom rather than inside,” Holland said. “The other interesting thing you will find is that tenure was less an issue of seeking a type of permanent job security and more about attracting talent because the pay was so terrible,” he added. According to Holland, the amount of mon-

ey made by many contemporary professors no longer warrants such an incentive. As an alternative to the tenure system, Holland says he favors a system which would, “financially reward effectiveness and create an environment that makes it possible for a teacher to more easily be removed if he or she decides to no longer be an effective member of the faculty.” Hochenauer, however, argues that such a system would give Oklahoma universities an

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Respects go to my fellow student body, surely the voiceless ones amongst us. Deepest regards to Matt Blubaugh, our student president. Without him, none of this would be possible. Politicians, the lifeline of the democratic people, the senseless leaders we put in charge, they campiagn; shake babies, and kiss hands. Though they may have the ideal agenda in mind, their sole purpose is reelection. For instance, let’s look at our own prestigious leader, Matt Blubaugh. Scantrons are the student’s cheapest contribution to the University of Central of Oklahoma. UCOSA, the elected hierarchy of Greek Life who promise us change but ask us pay more for services, such as The Vice President’s Commitee, all without funding the forty-nine cent scantrons. There is something problematic that our respected leadership has yet to learn from our own failing government. The lesson to be learned here is budgeting. Matt, you promised us scantrons yet when I go to pick up my free one I’m forced to surrender my Dr Pepper to buy a scantron. All this because UCOSA fell short once again. Ironically enough the sign, which has been taped outside the UCOSA office, and posted last year, informed me there are no more free scantrons. Mr. Blubaugh, you offer so little and supply even less. Have you not learned the value of keeping promises or are you just conforming to the stereotypical politician? Either way, I’m over you. I’m over your lies. I’m over your unfulfilled promises. Keep dressing in your nice blue blazer with that beautiful American flag pendant and the student population will continue to bend over. - Joshua Barnett Freshman, Creative Writing Editor’s Note: The Campus Improvements Act was put forward by a group of students who had gathered the 300 signatures required to bring it to a vote of the student body. While UCOSA President Matt Blubaugh was involved in the writing of the bill, he did so as a student and not as president.


NEWS

FEB. 16, 2012

5

Beer

BRONCHO BREW MASTER By Bryan Trude / Sports Editor Beer is one of the oldest icons of human existence, recorded in the histories of ancient Egypt, its origins traced back as far as 9500 BC. Some archaeologists credit it with the rise of human civilization. For Dr. Stephen Law, professor of philosophy, the beverage is more than a drink; it is both a hobby and a subject of personal academic study and research. Law, who came to UCO in 1987, has won two championships at the American Homebrewers Association competition and is a nationally recognized beer judge. “I’ve been brewing at home since 1993,” Law said. “Oklahoma City had a brew club called the High Plains Draughters; when I started brewing I got involved with the area clubs. It’s something I got interested in.” “Homebrewing has an element of mentorship, so when I got involved with the local brew clubs, I became a lot more serious,” he said. “Someone gave me a sample, and the

scales were removed from my eyes. I realized, ‘I can make this.’” Beer in its most basic form consists of four ingredients; water, fermentable starch such as barley, a flavoring agent such as hops, and yeast to metabolize the sugars in the starch into alcohol and carbon dioxide. In brewing, hot water and the crushed starch source are mixed in a process known as mashing, producing slurry called wort. After the grains are filtered out of the wort, the mixture is boiled in a copper kettle, removing much of the water, while flavorings like hops are added. Yeast is then added and the mixture is allowed to ferment for between a week to a few months, producing beer. Brewing beer, largely a commercial operation since the late 19th century, began to work its way into hobbyists’ homes as the United States relaxed legislation governing the production of beer in the late 1970s. In Oklahoma, homebrewing of

beer was completely legalized in 2010, requiring only a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement (ABLE) Commission. However, confusion still reigns between the Oklahoma homebrewing community and law enforcement. “We’re in this transition where literally many of the regulations are somewhat vague, and the application of the laws are something we are trying to work out,” Law said. In October, ABLE shut down the beer tasting event at the Southern Plains Craft Brew festival held in Moore, citing that the law did not permit organizers to sell homebrew. The organizers sold tickets to the tasting, with the proceeds going to charity. “All of the proceeds was going to go to charity, but because homebrewing and money were tangibly connected, ABLE shut it down,” Law said. “In fact, one of the legislators has called for an investigation to determine if charity events are going to be included under this classification.” He said, “We’re in a transition moment, away from the dark ages, with Oklahoma being one of the last to come onto the scene. We’re learning what it is to share samples with the general public.” Homebrewing is just one aspect of Oklahoma’s alcohol laws, which in the past year have come under increased scrutiny and debate. In May, lawmakers resumed debate on the law stating that wine and high point beer can only be sold in liquor stores. In states such as Washington, such products can be found on grocery store shelves. Supporters of the current law say that allowing such sales would lead to increased alcohol-related crime and fatalities, while supporters of reform say that the law is hurting Oklahoma economically, keeping some potential employers such as Costco (a warehouse store similar to Sam’s Club) from bringing jobs to the state. “The regulations are involved in politics, as usual,” Law said. “Part of the complications we face is that there are a limited number of distributors with a vested interest in maintaining the status quo. One of the things they have lobbied strongly against are things like cold storage.” “Next to us is one of the great brewing states in the country, Colorado,” he said. “Without things like cold storage, we aren’t going to be able to get beers from places like Colorado, California or Michigan. There are some phenomenal beers out there we will never have in Oklahoma because we will never have cold storage, and we will not have cold storage because there are some distributors who do not want Oklahoma to have cold storage.”

Dr. Stephen Law, professor of philosophy, poses with his brewing equipment. Photo provided

Despite the state’s conflict on whether to change its laws, Law sees a bright and foamy future for Oklahoma’s homebrewers. “I think it is something that will grow exponentially,” Law said. “This has proven to be the case in almost all other states since homebrewing was legalized nationally.” “In many places, they are light years ahead of us,” he said. “It’s something that has taken off in other parts of the country, and I’m sure in Oklahoma the artistry and the advantages of doing it yourself will take hold. There’s a satisfaction that comes, we all enjoy making those basic requisites and pleasures.” For Law, that pleasure comes at the end of every batch he brews. “It’s inevitably got to be when you crack open that first bottle,” Law said. “Although I have kegs, one of the advantages of bottling beers

is that you can taste its migration through time.” “Every beer has a life of its own,” he said. “The beer you drink after six weeks and the beer you drink after six months are going to be very different, so you get to see the fruits of your labor after you crack open that first bottle and taste it.” Law also wanted to point out one very important message for UCO students with an interest in homebrew. “I don’t think it should be done on campus; dormitory brewing is not a very good idea,” he said. “This is a place of learning, and I don’t think campus is a place where such things should be happening.” “There is a time and place for everything, and it is hard to engage in proper scholarship with the siren’s call of beer hanging over your head.”

Mead vs. Beer • Mead is the oldest alcoholic beverage • Beer is the second most popular beverage in the world second to tea. • Bavaria defines beer as a staple food • Mead is composed of fermented honey and water • Mead is the source of the term “honeymoon”

DO YOU LIKE PINK EGGS AND HAM?

Heather Kovach, sophomore in Biology, and Nneka Uwudia, freshman in Biology, enjoy the food while chatting, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012. Photo by Cyn Sheng Ling, The Vista

A student receives the food from Jillian Goodman, sophomore in History Education, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012. Photo by Cyn Sheng Ling, The Vista


CLASSIFIED

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CROSSWORDS

EMPLOYMENT

Camelot Child Senior Services Development Center Part-time jobs. Senior 3 Locations now hiring bus drivers and FT/ PT teachers. We promote a very positive and fun atmosphere! Please call for specific openings: Edmond-749-2262 Quail-254-5222 Deer Creek- 562-1315

Services of Oklahoma is looking for students to fill part-time positions Monday-Friday. We pay $10/hour for energetic phone work. No experience is needed, we will train. Business is located at 1417 N.W. 150th St. in Edmond. Call 8791888 to set up interview. Ask for Megan Parris.

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OK Physical Therapy

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Comet Cleaners

Full and Part-time positions. Apply in person at Comet Cleaners. Flexible Schedules. 1401 S. Kelly Ave. Call 359-5958.

FEB. 16, 2012

OPT NORTH AND OPT SOUTH ARE HIRING PT TECHS. PLEASE FAX YOUR RESUME TO 936-6496 OR SEND IT BY MAIL TO 3705 WEST MEMORIAL ROAD, STE. 310 OKC, OK 73134 IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS THE OPT OPPORTUNITIES.

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Across 1. Move quickly. 5. Fleshy fruit of a rosaceous tree cultivated in numberless varieties in the temperate zones. 10. Name of a small silver coin used in S. India during the arrival of the Portuguese. 14. Aerodynamic in styling. 15. Mock. 16. Item of furniture combing with others to form a set. 17. Metamorphosis. 20. Number denoting a quantity of more than one. 21. Ribbons attached to the sides of a book designed to prevent the covers from warping. 22. Alessandro Conte _, Italian physicist. 23. Slang for “headphones.” 24. Negative impression left after the removal of a flake with a stone tool. 26. Literary work exposing and ridiculing human vices. 29. Stimulate something. 30. Jog. 33. Group of households claiming a common ancestor. 34. Piece of jewelry worn on the head by a woman at very formal occasions. 35. Monetary unit in Denmark. 36. One of many diseases in which fat builds up in the large- and medium-sized arteries.

K K S C S C E E E E L N L F N O F O T A T A K L K L É C P É C P E B U E B U L E L F E E N HE F TH LIIN DT LL ND AL AN NA IN I G I G I R R O EO HE TH T

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40. 2002 film directed by Mehdi Norowzian. 41. Establish by law. 42. Period of seven days. 43. Rather than. 44. Fermented dap of several kinds of palm. 45. Takes something without the permission of the owner and keeps it. 47. Used to form the comparative of some adjectives and adverbs. 48. Something given as compensation. 49. Reduced to the simplest and most significant form possible. 52. Band _, pieces of cloth used to cover small cuts. 53. Aka wilderbeest. 56. Having receding jaws. 60. Basic monetary unit of Oman. 61. Person so mentally deficient as to be incapable of ordinary reason. 62. Have the skills and qualifications to do something. 63. Person’s reputation. 64. Parsonage; enough land to support a family.

65. Moderate in degree. Down 1. James _, Scottish inventor. 2. At this time. 3. Known as Persia until 1935. 4. _ Ross, acoustic guitar player. 5. Relation by marriage. 6. Uses diligently. 7. Where the motorcycle rider’s feet rest. 8. Chief monetary unit of Romania. 9. Make a mistake. 10. Graduate responsible for the supervision of an undergraduate at some British universities. 11. Shrub from which indigo is made. 12. Turbulent, violent disturbance of the peace. 13. Gas burner used in laboratories. 18. _ Blazers, originally aired in Japan as Uchuu Senchen Yamato. 19. Incarnation of a god in Hinduism. 23. Cinematographic. 24. Second-person singular of the verb “shall,”

FEB. 14 CROSSWORD ANSWERS

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used with “thou.” 25. Fleshy area between the beak and face. 26. Range of scores possible to achieve on a test. 27. Vary. 28. City in California. 29. System of witchcraft, especially as practiced today in western countries. 30. Minor Hebrew prophet. 31. Projecting bay window corbelled out from a wall. 32. Places where you get information. 34. People who have a lot of power in a particular activity. 37. Surgically remove a part of a structure. 38. Latin “the burden.” 39. Was indebted to. 45. Calm and unhurried. 46. Technical analysis for a price when it approaches a support level to see whether it will break through that level. 47. City in France celebrated for certain manufacturers. 48. Son of Zeus and Europa. 49. Possessing from birth the quality the character stated. 50. Capital of Western Samoa. 51. Former name of Thailand. 52. By the time that. 53. Desert in central Asia. 54. Equal to zero. 55. Employed in accomplishing something. 57. Male human already mentioned. 58. _ clan, Japanese feudal clan from the Sengoku period. 59. Non-spam e-mail.

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen/ on Wed Feb 15 18:20:34 2012 GMT. Enjoy!

If you break me I do not stop working, If you touch me I may be snared, If you lose me Nothing will matter. The answer to last week’s riddle is “a river.”

FACT A group of eggs, such as those found in a bird’s nest, is known as a “clutch.”


SPORTS

FEB. 16, 2012

7

Sports Opinion

VISTA SPORTS PREDICTIONS: NBA WEEK 9 The Vista buys into Linsanity as they all favor the red-hot Knicks over the hapless Hornets. Christie Southern hangs on to her first place lead while Garett Fisbeck moves into sole command of second. The Coin posts another 6-6 week.

NBA Week 9

Bryan Trude Vista Sports Editor

Christie Southern Vista Managing Editor

Garett Fisbeck Vista Photo Editor

Chris Brannick Vista Sports Writer

Terry Fox UCentral’s “The Huddle”

Courtney Landsberger UCentral’s “The Huddle”

“The Coin” 1987 Quarter Dollar

Warriors @ Thunder

Thunder

Thunder

Thunder

Thunder

Thunder

Thunder

Warriors

Celtics @ Bulls

Celtics

Bulls

Celtics

Bulls

Bulls

Celtics

Celtics

Mavericks @ 76ers

76ers

Mavericks

76ers

76ers

Mavericks

Mavericks

Mavericks

Bucks @ Magic

Bucks

Magic

Magic

Magic

Magic

Magic

Bucks

Nuggets @ Grizzlies

Grizzlies

Grizzlies

Grizzlies

Nuggets

Nuggets

Grizzlies

Nuggets

Heat @ Cavaliers

Heat

Heat

Heat

Heat

Heat

Heat

Heat

Wizards @ Jazz

Jazz

Jazz

Jazz

Jazz

Jazz

Jazz

Wizards

Suns @ Lakers

Lakers

Lakers

Suns

Lakers

Lakers

Lakers

Lakers

Hornets @ Knicks

Knicks

Knicks

Knicks

Knicks

Knicks

Hornets

Knicks

Kings @ Pistons

Kings

Pistons

Pistons

Kings

Kings

Pistons

Kings

Bobcats @ Raptors

Raptors

Raptors

Raptors

Raptors

Raptors

Raptors

Bobcats

Clippers

Clippers

Clippers

Clippers

Spurs

Clippers

Clippers

6-6

9-3

9-3

7-5

7-5

8-4

6-6

37-23

44-16

42-18

37-23

40-20

40-20

25-35

Spurs @ Clippers Last Week’s Picks (W-L) Season Picks (W-L)

Women’s Basketball

Continued from Page 8

BRONCHOS TO WELCOME AT THE BUZZER RIVERHAWKS TO HAMILTON the best answer? There certainly has to be better ways to keep football in the news. I don’t know, maybe change the recruiting process to a draftstyle lottery?

Savannah Hamilton (21) during a game between UCO and Newman in Edmond, Saturday, Feb. 4, 2012. Photo by Garett Fisbeck, The Vista

By Whitt Carter / Contributing Writer The UCO women’s basketball team makes its way back home this week, hosting Lindenwood at Hamilton Field House on Thursday evening. The Bronchos (15-9) are coming off a loss at Northeastern State on Saturday, a team who UCO beat at home only two weeks prior and will close the season with next week. Prior to the NSU defeat, the Bronchos upset 23rd-ranked Newman 93-86 at home. Head coach Guy Hardaker is encouraged by the effort that his club showed in the home win over Newman and is excited about the Bronchos moving forward.

“We never give up and it’s been that way all year with our group.”

Savannah Hamilton Junior, Guard

“I’m really proud of them,” Hardaker said of his squad. “We’ve got nine girls, and they are all playing and all of them are giving us valuable minutes.” Hardaker also noted that the Bronchos focus is still being solid on the defensive end of the floor, as well as being fundamental on offense. “Our concern is still to improve defensively. We want to continue to get better there, as well as continue to be fundamentally sound,” he said. “We’ve got to focus on getting better every day, and keep practicing hard, and I think we’ll be fine.” One reason for the Bronchos’ success as of late has been the steady play of sophomore Jill Bryan and juniors Savannah Hamilton and Courtney Harper.

Bryan is averaging 10 points per contest, and grabbing four rebounds per game. Harper is the Bronchos leading scoring, pouring in 12 points per outing, and hauling in five boards per contest. Hamilton, who has been solid for the Bronchos all year long, leads the team in rebounds, pulling down almost eight rebounds per game while scoring 12 points per outing. Hamilton scored 19 points in the win against Newman and sent back a record seven blocked shots, fueling the Bronchos to the upset. Hamilton talked about the team’s toughness and how the squad has grown through the adversity faced this season. “We just keep fighting,” Hamilton said. “We never give up and it’s been that way all year with our group. We are playing hard every night for the girls on the bench, and doing this for them. It’s been an emotional year for us. We have girls that aren’t playing but should be. There is no give up in us, and its fun playing with this group.” Lindenwood brings to Edmond a ballclub with a record of 15-8, who has been playing well as of lately, winning five of their last six. However, earlier in January when the Lions hosted UCO, the Bronchos came out on top, beating Lindenwood 82-74 behind 19 points from Jill Bryan and 16 points and eight rebounds by way of Heather Davis. The UCO women traveled to Central Missouri on Tuesday night along with the men, and will return home to face Lindenwood on Thursday. The Bronchos will finish the season by hosting McKendree University and Northeastern State at home next week. Thursday’s game against Lindenwood tips at 6 p.m. inside Hamilton Field House.

Just talking about conference realignment is making me angry. Why do they keep messing with us like this? Do we have to go through this every year? Well, so much for being a leaf on the wind.


8

SPORTS

FEB. 16, 2012

Opinion

Baseball

AT THE BUZZER

DELAYED HOME OPENER COMING FOR BRONCHOS

By Bryan Trude

Vista Sports Editor

NCAA CONFERENCE REALIGNMENT NO PATH TO PEACE So far this semester, it seems every time I sat down to write something for this column, I’ve always had something I was angry about that I could discuss. You know what? I’m tired of that. This time, I want to talk about something that doesn’t involve me getting angry. I am a leaf upon the wind, a sea of tranquility in the rumbling storm. Inner peace. Recently, the saga of NCAA conference realignments came a step closer to resolving itself. West Virginia University, one of the newest members of the Big XII, announced a deal they forged with their former conference, the Big East, to get out of their conference contract without going through the courts. It is certainly not one of the latest pieces of news – that honor belongs to the Mountain West/Conference USA merger to form what will likely be the most mediocre superconference in college athletic history. However, it is one of the most significant. With the decision, the Big XII can continue on their quest to recover from the defections of Nebraska, Colorado, Missouri and Texas A&M. Meanwhile, the Big East can continue to make their name as meaningless as nonconference games as they continue their warped version of manifest destiny, adding conference members as far away as San Diego State in their bid to keep their BCS automatic berth. For WVU and fellow Big XII newcomer TCU, both stand to gain by sitting at the big boy table. However, the summer is promising to bring more of the same realignment melodrama as the Big XII will possibly look to return to a 12-school roster. Like the labor lockouts that have plagued the pro leagues these past few years, these rounds of realignment are getting old, quickly. It isn’t about honoring a centuryold tradition, or a rivalry that predates statehood, or even about the millions of dollars being banded about. I’m starting to think that all these realignment stories are just a song and dance put on by the NCAA and the BCS to keep college football in the news. It really isn’t a matter of a lack of news. The NFL draft will be coming up before we know it, and soon after that spring practices will start up. I don’t know about anyone else, but to me that sounds about as riveting as bingo night at the senior center. I can understand why the NCAA would want to keep media buzz up, but is screwing with the conferences really

Continued on page 7

Junior pitcher William Kirkpatrick, during a doubleheader game against Arlington Baptist in Edmond, Apr. 28, 2011. Photo provided.

By Stuart Dickison / Contributing Writer After a long wait, baseball is back. The UCO Baseball team is set to play their home opener at Wendell Simmons Field this Friday at 1 p.m., in what is the first game of a four-game weekend series against Northwestern Missouri State. The Bronchos have a few days to rest after three games in five days and are confident they will be rested and ready for the opener. Head baseball coach Dax Leone says his team is ready for the big day. “We’ve been on the road a lot the start the season,” Leone said. “It can be tiring. Missing class and being on the bus for hours. Our guys are excited to sleep in their own beds and wake up to play in Edmond.” Leone hopes the fans will be as excited. “We’re really motivated to play in Edmond,” Leone said. “We’ve got great fans. We have new changes around the field and a new scoreboard.”

The Bronchos return from a trip to Durant, Okla., where they lost to Southeastern Oklahoma State University 7-3. “Baseball is a game of execution, and we haven’t executed in games we lost,” Leone said. “Our offense has stayed consistent, though.” The Bronchos’ two losses come against Northeastern State University, where they recorded six errors; and Southeastern Oklahoma State, where a total of eight walks were issued to the Savage Storm. “Pitching has been a little inconsistent,” Leone said. “Throw strikes and play defense and you always give yourself a chance to win.” Senior ace Uriah Fisher has been battling elbow soreness and has been in the closer’s role to start the season. “He’s been taking it one inning at a time,” Leone said of Fisher. “We hope to have him starting games again by the middle of March.” Not only is this the home opener for

UCO, it is also Northwestern Missouri State’s season-opening series. “They are opening up and excited to play and they will be good,” Leone said. “We have to play our brand and execute. I like our chances. We can beat anybody.” UCO senior Josh Rolan (1-1) will be on the mound for the Bronchos on Friday afternoon. Rolan shows a lot of promise on the mound, pitching a complete game in the 13-1 rout over Austin College to open up the Bronchos season two weeks ago. He allowed only one run on three hits and recorded 10 strikeouts in the contest. Edgar Lopez (2-0) will be the starting pitcher in the first game on Saturday, while Ryan Miller (0-0) will pitch the nightcap. Ethan Sharp (0-0) will then start the final game of the series on Sunday afternoon. The Bronchos can be seen again at home next week, as they will host Newman University on Tuesday, Feb. 21.

The Vista Feb. 16, 2012  

The University of Central Oklahoma's biweekly student publication, The Vista. Student-run since 1903.

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