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www.thevistaonline.com

The Student Voice of the University of Central Oklahoma Since 1903

November 20, 2007

Embattled Vick continues legal maneuvering, turns self in by AP Writer

Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick arrives with his attorney Billy Martin, right, at federal court in Richmond, Va., in this Aug. 27, 2007 file photo. Vick surrendered to U.S. marshals Monday Nov. 19, 2007, three weeks before his sentencing on a dogfighting charge.

Tea House open; serves all cultures

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) _ Michael Vick surrendered to U.S. marshals Monday and will remain in jail until his sentencing on a dogfighting charge in three weeks. The Atlanta Falcons quarterback is scheduled to be sentenced Dec. 10 but turned himself in because he anticipates a prison term on the federal dogfighting conspiracy charge, according to a court document. Vick could be sentenced to up to five years in prison. "From the beginning, Mr. Vick has accepted responsibility for his actions, and his self-surrender further demonstrates that acceptance," Billy Martin, one of Vick's lawyers, said in a statement. "Michael wants to again apologize to everyone who has been hurt in this matter, and he thanks all of the people who have

offered him and his family prayers and support during this time." Vick is being held at Northern Neck Regional Jail in Warsaw until his sentencing, U.S. marshals told The Associated Press. The mixedgender facility houses about 450 inmates. The order filed in U.S. District Court said: "Vick has indicated his desire to voluntarily enter custody prior to his sentencing hearing. It appearing appropriate to do so, the U.S. Marshal is ordered to take custody of the Defendant immediately upon his surrender." The order added Vick was taken into custody "based solely on his desire to begin his period of incarceration prior to his sentencing hearing and not because of violation of any condition of his bond." In an e-mail sent to the AP,

is admitting fault," Bacigal said. Whether that will work is anyone's guess. "It's kind of like reading tea leaves knowing what's the exact impact on the judge," Bacigal said. The federal dogfighting case began in late April when authorities conducting a drug investigation of Vick's cousin raided the quaterback's home. owns. in Surry County and seized dozens of dogs, most of them pit bulls, and equipment associated with dogfighting. It's there that the dogfighting enterprise known as Bad Newz Kennels operated since 2001 on 15 acres of land Vick owned. Vick initially denied any knowledge of the enterprise, then pledged after he was charged that he would fight to clear his name. Vick followed suit.

NStyle offers cheap alternative to bigger stores

have one in the market, so I thought it'd be a great idea and I enjoy coming into work We all have clothes we no everyday," Dave said in refdisplay. There's still more to longer wear and are sick of erence to the reason why he by Abha Eli Phoboo come," said Crawford. them taking up space in our wanted to open up Nstyle. Staff Writer Students who want their closets. Spending ridiculous Their first store was only As UCO reaches out to the art work displayed are amounts of money on trendy 600 square feet and was community, Edmond recipro- encouraged to contact the Tea clothing seems ludicrous located close to UCO. After cates through various ways by House. Further plans include when there is a place right a few months in the busiintegrating the global culture providing a forum for the here in Edmond where dress- ness, it seemed apparent that the university has come to UCO community to nurture ing trendy doesn't have to be they needed a bigger store, represent. The latest is The artistic talents and versatil- expensive. Nstyle Fashion so the hunt was on for locaTea House at 310 B E. Hurd ity by establishing itself as a Xchange is just the store tions. The store found it's to visit. Walk in with your new home in Oxford Pointe. Street, just behind the Alumni student area. "American students are clothes and walk out with The reason they chose this House. location is its proximity to the The Tea House is a tiny welcomed just as much as money in your pocket. A local Edmond family, college, is right in the heart establishment tucked away international students, but we behind the International want The Tea House to dis- the Wilkins, opened Nstyle of Edmond and is where they Women's House, which pro- play all the cultures that are in April 2003. Dave runs the chose to reside in Edmond, vides off-campus housing involved with UCO through store and his mother, Darlene, according to Dave. Nstyle buys and sells for female UCO students. decor, activities planned works part time, takes care of and drinks served," said all the business paper work trendy, stylish, brand name Targeting international stuand makes sure all bills are clothing and accessories. The dents and people of differ- Crawford. So far, The Tea House paid. clothing needs to be less than ent cultures, the new estabplans are Saturday night dinDave moved to Kansas to two years old, be clean and lishment is designed to be a hotspot for the university ners and game nights. They work when he left the army, in good to new condition. crowd, a place to hang out are still looking for volunteers and while living there he The items can be brought in who will just hangout and found a place to shop for on hangers, but it's preferred and interact. help plan events for. Friday, brands of clothes he wore. that they be folded in shop"We want to provide interSaturday afternoon and Not only that, but the store ping bags, boxes or laundry national and American stualso paid him cash for his pre- baskets. Clothes in trash bags viously worn clothes. After are not recommended. 'WE WANT TO PROVIDE becoming a frequent shopWhen bringing in clothes, per, he became an employee the owners are picky about INTERNATIONAL AND and learned how the business what they buy. They only AMERICAN STUDENTS A ran. After moving back to look for the coolest, trendiest Oklahoma to be near family fashions, said Dave. Nstyle PLACE CLOSE TO CAMPUS and friends, lie began discuss- buys daily, so the selecWHERE THEY CAN STUDY, ing with his parents, Scott tion also changes daily. A Darlene, about the resale few brands that they carry READ, HANG OUT, MEET and store in Kansas. As time include Abercrombie & SOME COOL PEOPLE, AND passed, Dave finally made Fitch, Hollister, American the decision, along with his Eagle, Lucky, Seven Jeans, J FEEL AT HOME." parents, to give it a go. Crew, Gap and Express. Items "Too many people nowa- that Nstyle are interested in -ANDREA CRAWFORD days hate their jobs and their include jeans, T-shirts, shorts, stuck there. There's stuff I dresses, jackets and hoodies, did in Wichita and we didn't swimwear, shoes, boots and dents a place close to campus Sunday. where they can study, read, The first big event of the hang out, meet some cool Tea House is the Thanksgiving people, and feel at home," dinner, which will actually said Andrea Crawford, UCO hosted by the International student and coordinator of the Women's House. The dinTea House. ner starts at 2 p.m. and is Even though the main taropen to all UCO students who get of the Tea House is interwant to meet new people on national students, it wants Thanksgiving. to create an ambience that Interested students can makes cross-cultural commuemail superchic21@cox.net nication and sharing of ideas for more information. possible. Currently, the house has a kitchen area for drinks, a computer, and a small library. "We are working on creatAbha Eli Phoboo can be reached ing a music forum, food pantry, clothing exchange and art at aphoboo@thevistaonline.com.

News Central Channel 6 Mon. through Thurs. at 5 p.m.

the U.S. attorney's office confirmed Vick's surrender but declined further comment. Vick's decision to begin serving time before sentencing was approved by the judge and Vick's lawyers. Ronald Bacigal, a University of Richmond law professor who specializes in criminal law and criminal procedure, said there are no real direct legal benefits to Vick's decision to turn himself in before sentencing. "I don't think there's any benefits except getting (the sentence) started," Bacigal said. "I would think he's purely thinking about timing as far as when he can get back to his football." Vick also could be trying to show the judge he has accepted responsibility for his actions in hopes of a lighter sentence, Bacigal said. "One of the things the judge is liable to consider

by Lyndsay Gillum Copy Editor

"Thanksgiving Day is a jewel, to set in the hearts of honest men; but be careful that you do not take the day, and leave out the gratitude." â&#x20AC;&#x201D;E.P. Powell

Photos by Lyndsay Gillum

Nstyle is located at 1822 E. Second Street, in Edmond.

purses. surprised at the quality of the "It has a lot of stuff that merchandise. It is such a nice somebody couldn't sell at store and the prices are so their yard sale or that has reasonable." been in their closet for ten Nstyle is open Monday years. It's good quality, name through Friday from 11 a.m. brand stuff that's in style," to 7 p.m. and Saturday 11 Dave said. "People have the a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed on opportunity to buy some of Sundays. Hours to bring in the type of clothes we sell and clothes to sell are Monday it also brings in some of the through Friday from noon to other kids who aren't quite as 6 p.m. and Saturdays from fortunate and be able to wear noon to 4 p.m. Oxford Pointe nice things too." is located at 1822 E. 2nd St. The cost of clothing var- For contact information, call ies, but it is all in a great price (405) 216-8226. range. It's possible to shop Nstyle Fashion Xchange is Nstyle and get a pair of jeans a place to shop where dressand a shirt for under $20. ing trendy doesn't have to be Nstyle is not a consign- expensive. The name says ment store where you have it all - trendy clothes on a to wait for your clothes to budget. sell. When a customer brings "This store fits in well in in clothes, they get paid that Edmond because it has many same day. They can either of the same designer brands receive cash or store credit for you see at the mall but at their exchange. much cheaper prices," adver"I recently wentinto Nstyle tising major Kyle Sonner Fashion Xchange for the first said. time last week!" advertising senior Lauren Jones said. "I was surprised at how nice the store was, how friendly Lyndsay Gillum can be reached at the staff were and I was also Igillum@thevistaonline.com .

UCO Theatre brings

"Conviction" to the stage See Page 6


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OPINION

November 20, 2007

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Cartoon by Jared Aylor

CAMPUS QUOTES: Compiled and photographed by Chris Albers

No Black Friday This Year?

"What are you thankful for?" "I'm thankful that Oklahoma's consent law in 16 years old."

Skyler Smith photographic arts soph.

"I'm thankful for my family getting me through college."

Rick Bales psychology jr.

"Sunshine and smiles."

Brad States psychology jr.

"That I have a home to go back to."

For most college students, the holiday season is probably more about receiving than it is about giving. With most of them dependent on parents or some kind of financial aid to get by day-to-day, the fact they can't afford gifts for loved ones is understandable. But some banks, credit unions and other reputable financial institutions do a little to help out during the holiday spending rush. These institutions do this by deferring loan payments during December, so long as the person responsible for the amount borrowed is in good standing. But, what does this matter to college students? Like most working adults, millions of college-aged students across the nation have car loans through banks or credit unions. With the average new car loan running anywhere from $400 to $500 per month, it's clear to see how freeing up that kind of cash during the holidays would be almost a windfall for broke college students. The cost for taking advantage of this skipa-month program is usually pretty cheap, anywhere from $15 to $75, even if it's not the wisest way to make loan payments. And with major companies like Wal-Mart, Home Depot,

THEVISTA

Hannah Puryear psychology fresh.

"I'm just really thankful for being alive and well."

Photo illustration by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Macy's and a host of other retailers expecting lower than average sales this holiday season, due mainly to stratospheric energy costs, students should do what they can to

EDITORIAL

PHOTOGRAPHY

Andrew Knittle, Editor in Chief Steven Reckinger, Co-Editor Aaron Wright, Managing Editor

Chris Albers, Photographer Chris Otten, Photographer Brenda O'Brian, Photographer

Lyndsay Gillum, Copy Editor

NEWS Isaac Darko finance sr.

Justin Langston, Staff Writer' Shannon Hoverson, Staff Writer Nelson Solomon, Staff Writer Abha Eli Phoboo, Staff Writer Hannah Jackson, Staff WriterJana Davis, staff writer

"For my family and their health."

SPORTS

CARTOONS/ ILLUSTRATIONS communication soph.

Megan Pierce, Ad Director Keith Mooney, Ad Designer

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Tresa Berlemann

Jeff Massie, Sports Editor Alex Gambill, Sports Writer

McKnzle Bruner

ADVERTISING

Jared Aylor

ADVISER Julie Clanton

ensure that Black Friday these financial institutions doesn't become Almost Black offer these programs, they just don't aggressively advertise Friday. So, call your bank at once them the way they should. and ask about the skip-amonth program. A lot of time The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and on Thursdays only during summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034. Telephone: (405) 974-5549. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO.

LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters and does not publish anonymous letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 107. Letters can be e-mailed to editorial@thevistaonline. COM.


November 20, 2007

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Detroit claims dubious title of nation's most dangerous city

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AP Photo

The Grande Mariner cruises on the Detroit River next to the city's skyline in a June 14, 2006 file photo in Detroit., In ,another blow to the Motor City's tarnished image, Detroit pushed past St. Louis to become the most dangerous city in the U.S., according to a private research group's analysis of annual FBI crime statistics released Sunday, Nov. 18, 2007. The study ranked Mission Viejo, Calif., as the safest U.S. city.

by AP Writer

DETROIT (AP) _ In another blow to the Motor City's tarnished image, Detroit pushed past St. Louis to become the nation's most dangerous city, according to a private research group's controversial analysis, released Sunday, of annual FBI crime statistics. The study drew harsh criticism even before it came out. The American Society of Criminology launched a preemptive strike Friday, issuing a statement attacking it as "an irresponsible misuse" of crime data. The 14th annual "City Crime Rankings: Crime in Metropolitan America" was published by CQ Press, a unit of Congressional Quarterly

lished it until its acquisition by CQ Press. The study assigns a crime score to each city, with zero representing the national average. Detroit got a score of 407, while St. Louis followed at 406. The score for Mission Viejo, in affluent Orange County, was minus 82. Detroit was pegged the nation's murder capital in the 1980s and has lost nearly 1 million people since 1950, according to the Census Bureau. Downtown sports stadiums and corporate headquarters — along with the redevelopment of the riverfront of this city of 919,000 — have slowed but not reversed the decline. Officials have said crime reports don't help. Detroit police officials released a statement Sunday

"The first step in making our cities and states safer is to understand the true magnitude of their crime problems." CQ Press Inc. It is based on the FBI's Sept. 24 crime statistics report. The report looked at 378 cities with at least 75,000 people based on per-capita rates for homicide, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary and auto theft. Each crime category was considered separately and weighted based on its seriousness, CQ Press said. Last year's crime leader, St. Louis, fell to No. 2. Another Michigan city, Flint, ranked third, followed by Oakland Calif.; Camden, N.J.; Birmingham, Ala.; North Charleston, S.C.; Memphis, Tenn.; Richmond, Calif.; and Cleveland. The study ranked Mission Viejo, Calif, as the safest U.S. city, followed by Clarkstown, N.Y.; Brick Township, N.J.; Amherst, N.Y.; and Sugar Land, Texas. CQ Press spokesman Ben Krasney said details of the weighting system were proprietary. It was compiled by Kathleen O'Leary Morgan and Scott Morgan, whose Morgan Quitno Press pub-

night disputing the report, saying it fails to put crime information into proper context. "Every year this organization sends out a press release with big, bold lettering that labels a certain city as Most Dangerous, USA," Police Chief Ella Bully-Cummings said in the release. "It really makes you wonder if the organization is truly concerned with evaluating crime or increasing their profit," said Bully-Cummings, who noted the complete report is available only by purchase. "With crime experts across the country routinely denouncing the fmdings, I believe the answer is clear." The mayor of 30th-ranked Rochester, N.Y. — an expolice chief himself — said the study's authors should consider the harm that the report causes. "What I take exception to is the use of these statistics and the damage they inflict on a number of these cities," said Mayor Robert Duffy, chairman of the Criminal and Social Justice Committee

for the U.S. Conference of Mayors. The rankings "do groundless harm to many communities," said Michael Tonry, president of the American Society of Criminology. "They also work against a key goal of our society, which is a better understanding of crime-related issues by both scientists and the public," Tonry said. Critics also complain that numbers don't tell the whole story because of differences among cities. "You're not comparing apples and oranges; you're comparing watermelons and grapes," said Rob Casey, who heads the FBI section that puts out the Uniform Crime Report that provides the data for the Quitno report. The FBI posted a statement on its Web site criticizing such use of its statistics. "These rough rankings provide no insight into the numerous variables that mold crime in a particular town, city, county, state, or region," the FBI said. "Consequently, they lead to simplistic and/or incomplete analyses that often create misleading perceptions adversely affecting communities and their residents." Doug Goldenberg-Hart, acquisitions editor at CQ Press, said that the rankings are imperfect, but that the numbers are straightforward. Cities at the top of the list would not be there unless they ranked poorly in all six crime categories, he said. "The idea that people oppose it, it's kind of blaming the messenger," GoldenbergHart said. "It's not coming to terms with the idea that crime is a persistent problem in our society." The report "helps concerned Americans learn how their communities fare in the fight against crime," CQ Press said in a statement. "The first step in making our cities and states safer is to understand the true magnitude of their crime problems. This will only be achieved through straightforward data that all of us can use and understand." The study excluded Chicago, Minneapolis, and other Illinois and Minnesota cities because of incomplete data.

www.thevistaonline.corn

.••

Max Chambers Library

Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving!


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November 20, 2007

Fashion show to highlight Workers struggle to feed families Central American states by AP Writer

Photo Provided

The fashion show Moda Bella will be held at 7 p.m. Nov. 28 in Pegasus Theater.

by Aaron Wright Managing Editor

Fun, bright and sexy are words used by students in Dr Susan Miller's Fashion Advertising and Marketing Promotion class to describe the styles of Central America and Mexico. The students have been working since September to put together a fashion show portraying the styles of these areas in conjunction with the Passport program, which promotes cultural activities centered around a specific country every fall semester. The show, titled Moda Bella, which translates as beautiful fashion, will be held at 7 p.m. on Nov. 28 in Pegasus Theater in the Liberal Arts Building. "We're doing this theme because -that's" --w1;tat _ the Passpoi`ris doing this" year," said Katie Eaton, fashion -

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marketing senior and co-chair committees, each tackling a specific aspect of the producof the fashion show. Traditional/cultural, mod- tion. The groups are music, ern and dance are the vari- staging, models, merchandise ous types of clothing that and promotion. They are trywill be showcased during the , -lig to prepare this show with production. The tradition61 limited financial means, relysection will feature quinded- ing on donations and borfiera dresses. A quincetffie'Pa rowed items, said Eaton. "We have no budget," she is a celebration fOr 15-ye'thold girls common in Central said. American countries. The Students from the model dance portion will focus on committee are still looking dresses worn during cultural for students willing to perdances such as the Flamenco. form as models in the show. The modem part of the show Those interested can contact will showcase Latin-inspired Jessica Shropshire at jshropclothing available today. All shirel@ucok.edu. For other the clothing is borrowed from general questions about the fashion show, e-mail smillstores and individuals. "We're trying to do a lot of er43@ucok.edu. local Edmond retailers," said Jamie Juenger, fashion marketing senior. She said many of the clothes are coming from boutiques in the Spring shopping center To prepare for the h6; ; Aaron Wright can be reacpediar the class has broken into awright@thevistaonline.com .

CINCINNATI (AP) _ Diana Blasingame has lately found herself having to go to a free food pantry once a month to feed herself and her teenage daughter. "I'm pretty good at making things stretch as far as I can, but food is so high now and I have to have gas in my can to do my job," said Blasingame, 46, who earns $9 an hour as a home health aide. "I work full time, but I don't have health insurance and sometimes there just isn't enough to pay bills and buy food." Operators of free food banks say they are seeing more working people like Blasingame needing assistance. The increased demand is outstripping supplies and forcing many pantries and food banks to cut portions. "We have food banks in virtually every city in the country, and what we are hearing is that they are all facing severe shortages with demand so high," Ross Fraser, a spokesman for America's Second Harvest — The Nation's Food Bank Network, the nation's largest hunger relief group, said Friday. "One of our food banks in Florida said demand is up 35 percent over this time last year." Demand is being driven up by rising costs of food, housing, utilities, health care and gasoline, while food manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers are finding they have less surplus food to donate and government help has decreased, according to Lisa Hamler-Fugitt, executive director of the Ohio Association of Second Harvest Foodbanks.

"I've been doing this for 20 years, and I can't believe how much worse it gets month after month," she said. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's annual hunger survey released Wednesday showed that more than 35.5 million people in the United States were hungry in 2006. While that number was about the same as the previous year, heads of food banks and pantries say many more people are seeking their assistance. Tony Hall, vice president of the Food Bank of Southwest Georgia, estimates a 10 percent to 20 percent increase in demand for food in the 20-county area the organization serves. He cites cutbacks by local companies, rising fuel costs and the lingering impact of a March tornado that tore through Americus, Ga., destroying or damaging hundreds of homes. "We really didn't rebound from that," Hall said Friday. "We're definitely down in donations. Each year the demand gets bigger and bigger." Supplies are down to a little over 8 million pounds of food from a peak of about 12 million pounds two years ago at Hocking-Athens-Perry Community Action, which provides food bank services in 10 counties in southeast Ohio. "We've lost factory jobs and many service jobs don't pay a livable wage," said Dick Stevens, director of the organization's food and nutrition division. "We see a lot of desperation in families who are trying to figure out how to pay higher fuel and utility costs and still put food on the table."

Most food banks and pantries aren't optimistic about the coming winter. "November weather has been relatively mild, and you haven't seen the cost of home heating fuel added to what a family has to deal with," said Evelyn Behm, associate director of the Mid-Ohio Food Bank, which supplies food to pantries, soup kitchens and other charities in 20 central and eastern Ohio counties. "Those prices, we all know, are going up substantially this year." At the Society of St. Vincent de Paul food pantry in Cincinnati, clients now get three or four days' worth of food instead of six or seven. "We are trying to stretch our resources to help more people," said Liz Carter, executive director of the society. "But it's so difficult when you see the desperation and have to tell them you just don't have enough to give them what they need." Officials with the Regional Food Bank of Northeastern New York, which serves nearly 1,000 agencies in 23 counties, also are worried. Through the end of August, the food bank was down almost 700,000 pounds of USDA commodities that include basic essentials such as canned fruit and vegetables and some meat — food that is very difficulty to make up in donations, Executive Director Mark Quandt said. "We're bracing ourselves for a very tough winter, especially with home heating fuel prices at record highs in the Northeast," Quandt said. "People living in poverty or near poverty just can't sustain those types of increases."

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Designer Style Sunglasses

AP Photo

Julie Rack stocks nearly empty shelves at the St. Vincent Food Pantry, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2007, in Cincinnati. Food pantries facing an increasing demand that is outstripping supplies are being forced to cut back on portions to make those supplies feed as many as possible.

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Put Yourself to the Test... Do you have the skills and knowledge to challenge one of our exams? We have approsimately 45 nationally standardized exams and 158 tuts developed here at UCO that you can take to earn college credit to benefit your degree.


November 20, 2007

5

Bush honors Americans who give back to the community by AP Writer

peanut butter, green beans and soup, then loaded a few crates of oranges, potatoes and macaroni and cheese onto a rolling cart. "C'mon man, let's go," he cheerfully told Mike Hennigan, a local pastor, as the two worked together. Later, he delivered remarks on the nation's giving spirit at Berkeley Plantation, in a tent overlooking the James River. Never in his presidency has he devoted a whole speech to the holiday, let alone several

Atlantic. Their proclamation of thanks is carved into the "Thanksgiving Shrine" that Bush visited. Of course, Plymouth, Mass., is best known as the home of Thanksgiving, as the place where Pilgrims and Indians celebrated the autumn harvest with a feast in 1621. Bush took care not to explicitly take sides in that debate, though his hosts seemed to view his presence as all but an endorsement.

CHARLES CITY, Va. (AP) _ A reflective President Bush on Monday honored acts of everyday decency and supreme sacrifice, and called on Americans to give back to their communities. In his first speech dedicated to Thanksgiving, Bush said the holiday is a time to hail those who serve causes larger than themselves. He cited police, firefighters, teachers and religious leaders as examples. "Our nation's greatest strength is the decency and compassion of our people," Bush told hundreds gathered in an open-air tent at a plantation that stakes a claim to the first Thanksgiving. "As we count our many blessings, I President George W. Bush encourage all Americans to show their thanks by giving back." Presidents tend to honor hours of choreographed trav- The president did call the Thanksgiving with routine el. The events allow Bush, in plantation a "historic treasure" proclamations, radio address- a very public way, to thank with a "role in this important es that always sound the same, people who made an impres- holiday" and gave a detailed and pardons for a couple )Of sion on him for acts of com- recounting of Berkeley's hislucky turkeys. Bush elevated passion. Aides say it is part toric claim. it a bit on Monday. "The good folks here say pf the job he truly enjoys and First he stopped by a that Bush wanted to pay trib- that the founders of Berkeley Richmond, Va., food bank, ute to them. held their celebration before a former tobacco warehouse The soft theme of the day's the Pilgrims had even left that has been converted into events also aim to put Bush in port," the president said to a highly organized distribu- a positive light at a time when much applause. "As you tion center that sends millions the country is in a disapprov- can imagine, this version of of pounds of groceries to ing mood, soured by war and events is not very popular up needy families each year. The Washington politics. North." visit to the Central Virginia Berkeley Plantation says As for the presidential turFoodbank underscored a quiet it is the site of America's first key pardon, that is still on problem — 35 million people official Thanksgiving in 1619, Bush's agenda. in this country went hungry when a group of British setIt happens Tuesday. in 2006. tlers knelt in prayer of thanks Bush walked by stacks of for a healthy arrival across the

"Our nation's greatest strength is the decency and compassion of our people."

AP Photo

President Bush visits the Thanksgiving Shrine prior to delivering Thanksgiving remarks at Berkeley Plantation in Charles City, Monday, Nov. 19, 2007.

Broncho Battalion wins Ranger Challenge Competition by Hannah Jackson Staff Writer

The UCO Broncho Battalion won the Ranger Challenge Competition Nov. 17 at Boomer Lake in Stillwater during which cadets are physically and mentally challenged. "We've been training since the beginning of the semester until now, every morning, five days a week, from 6 am. to 7 a.m." Shelby Williams, senior cadet and UCO team captain, said. UCO took two teams, black and gold, to compete against the OU, OSU and NSU in the annual competition. Both teams had nine members. The teams were made up of the most physically fit and mentally acute, said Williams. The black team, which won the event, had the most experience, the gold team cadets had less ROTC experience. "It gives the younger cadets more experience and learn what The Ranger Challenge is about," said Williams. Last year UCO hosted , the event and came in third place, the year before that the event was regional and UCO came in tenth place out of 30 teams. The Ranger Challenge is usually a regional event, but for the past two years, the competition has been localized. "Since the war's been going on ...they've been

doing it at a local level," said Williams. "That way ROTC can save their money to do more joint training overall." The first event in this years competition was a physical fitness test in which cadets had to do two minutes of push-ups, two minutes of situps and complete a timed twomile run. Individual scores were added and averaged for a team score, the black team came in third place. The second event for the

assembly in one minute and five seconds. This event also included marksmanship, in which cadets shot air rifles from a prone position. Each cadet had ten targets to hit twice within ten minutes. The targets were ten meters away and each cadet had only 20 rounds. . "It's important to note that each target is only about one and a half inches in diameter," said Jimmy Letterman, senior cadet and ROTC Public

"It gives the younger cadets more experience and learn what The Ranger Challenge is about." Shelby Williams

black team was the hand grenade assault course. Cadets had to identify different types of grenades and what each was used for. Then cadets ran through a course trying to hit targets with training-grenades. The black team came first in this event. Cadets were then timed assembling and disassembling an M-16 rifle. The black team came first with an average time of one minute and 30 seconds. Williams set the record for the day completing his assembly/dis-

Information Officer. The fourth event was land navigation, physical navigation and a test. The black team came third in the written test portion of the event. Cadets had to complete intersection, resection, terrain analysis and map analysis. Intersection and resection means finding personal and enemy position on a map. • The black teamcadets came first in land-navigation orienteering. During which, cadets were given 20 sets of coordinates around Boomer Lake. The course is

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The black team of the UCO Broncho Battalion won the Ranger Challenge Competition Nov. 17 in Stillwater, Okla. about three miles and cadets were allowed 40 minutes to find all the points. The sixth event involved cadets construction a bridge with a rope. "You have two poles and a pond. It's about 120 ft. The first person swims across and ties it down, and you can construct it from there," said Williams. The cadets had to complete the event while wearing full uniform, including a rucksack. The event is timed, beginning when the first cadet

jumps into the water. After the team pulls themselves along the rope, the last cadet ties the rope around him/her and is pulled across the water. The UCO black team came in third place with a time of ten minutes and thirty seconds. The final event was a five km forced road march which cadets completed with a 25 pound rucksack, carrying a weapon and wearing an LBV. The black team completed the march in 35 minutes, earning fourth place. An awards ceremony con-

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eluded the event, in which the UCO battalion received a trophy, ribbon and streamer for their guide-on flag. "I am really proud of how much work and dedication the team has put in, and this is a really great reflection of ROTC and UCO in general," said Williams. "It's not so much about the amount of money that a school has or puts in, but the amount of quality in the institution. It's a great reflection on UCO." Hannah Jackson can be reached at hjackson@thevistaonline.com,

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Arts & Entertainment

November 20, 2007

UCO Theatre takes on immigration in 'Conviction' by Steven Reckinger Co Editor -

With many of the sensitive issues addressed in today's world, UCO Theatre Department decided to tackle something familiar with Oklahomans with the play, "Conviction," which showed in Mitchell Hall Theater from Nov. 15 to Nov. 18. Written by UCO alumnus Elford Alley and directed by Theatre chair, Dr. Robert McGill, "Conviction" tells the story of a Texas deputy sheriff named Eduard Gonzales . (Colin Espinales) who makes a fateful decision to fire upon a moving vehicle containing a Mexican family. The incident triggers uproar by the Mexican government, costing Gonzales his freedom when he sentenced to three years in a federal prison. Upon release,

Gonzales becomes a changed man, ultimately bringing down his wife, Marie (Kelsey Patterson), and his friend, Sheriff John Singer (Jimmy Pike). The play is loosely based on actual events. Alley made a few trips to Rocksprings, Texas, to conduct research by interviewing the people involved. "A former professor was related to Gilmer Hernandez, a deputy sheriff who was on trial for firing at a van carrying a group of people after the driver attempted to run him over," Alley said. "Everyone thought this would be a unique angle to approach a play about the illegal immigration debate." According to Alley, the project went into effect in May after he was approached by Dr. McGill to write a piece

about immigration and its overall influence. The script was finished by July and preproduction started in August. The political nature of illegal immigration and national security compels the story to be balanced on equal levels to avoid a one-sided argument. At the beginning of the play, Gonzales upholds a patriotic attitude, thankful he's an American, even though his heritage resides in Mexico. The events that lead up to his conviction gradually alter his way of thinking, causing him to revert to a different sentiment about America. By the end, he's able to see the issue from both sides. "It was a challenge because what I wrote is a piece of fiction, and even though I used interviews and very real incidents, I needed to distance myself from the people I had

Photo Provided

Colin Espinales and Kelsey Patterson play husband and wife in the provocative production of "Conviction," a play that deals with illegal immigration and national identity.

Photo Provided

A confrontational scene between Miguel Aponte, played by Nathan Hendrix, and Eduard Gonzales, played by Colin Espinales, during UCO's production of "Conviction." met and present a play that is fiction and does not lean too heavily to one side or the other," Alley said. The set design, by Nathan Braniff under the guidance of Christopher Domanski, was basic with small pieces of furniture scattered about to provide a more interactive environment for the actors. The background was a picture of a desolate desert landscape to give the audience a sense of Texan scenery. Under the direction of professor Cate Wieck, Sachiko Komuro designed the costumes, which were convincing for each character. Following the Thursday premiere, a question and answer session took place. American Democracy Project student coordinator Meredith Scott hosted the event. Among the participants that

led the discussion were Dr. to convey the importance of Diana Pardo, assistant profes- the issue at hand. The work sor of Modern Languages, itself raises many questions, Literature and Cultural particularly where the moral Studies; Glenn Freeman, threshold lies within the conwho works in Immigration/ finements of illegal immigraActivity at UCO; and Dr. tion. Elaine Bartgis, associate "To me, this was UCO at professor of Sociology and its best: an entirely student Criminal Studies. The ses- work, relying on the talents of sion lasted roughly 30 min- A.D.P. [American Democracy utes and consisted of ques- Project] to bring an audience tions concerning immigration not only the work of art but and national identity from the the informed commentary of audience members. experts in various fields," Dr. "The panelists spoke of McGill said. the play's truth to the human condition and to the situation at hand," Dr. McGill said. "Audience members affirmed how fairly and daringly the play raised issues that are of immediate consequence to our society." "Conviction" turned out Steve Reckinger can be reached to be a more personal effort at sreckinger@thevistaonline.com . for the Theatre Depai intent

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Arts & Entertainment

Palmer paints for the bank

November 20, 2007

7

'Beowulf' is not as epic as it could have been

Palmer of the wall he painted across Asia. The fact that the painting The UCO branch of was unveiled the day before Edmond Citizen's Bank was the Oklahoma Centennial bustling with an attractive was just a coincidence, said business crowd on Nov. 15. Hayes. Palmer said that Suits and skirts, ties and heels with all the concentration on wandered throughout the Oklahoma, he thought it'd be room, but amidst the profesa nice change to do somesional attire was a man covthing about the world. ered in paint from his hands "I wanted it to be attracto his shoes. tive and educational," said Dr. Bob Palmer, professor Palmer, "Hopefully inspire in the College of Media, Arts people to learn and perhaps and Design, was obviously travel." the man of the moment as Palmer has worked on the bank unveiled its newest murals and other public art work of art. within Oklahoma and has Palmer's painting was a also worked on projects in map of the world, accented Canada, Croatia, Mexico and with animals, architecture and Macedonia. He is currently other artwork symbolizing working on graphics for the different countries. recently renamed Omniplex "We wanted an interna(now "Science Museum tional theme but he just took Oklahoma") and multiple it and ran with it," Robin centennial projects including is just as tough and crazy. didn't think was in the original by Justin Langston Hayes, Edmond Citizen's the murals on the train depot He kills the monster, Grendel, poem. Even though hubris is Staff Writer Bank Branch Manager, said. in Bricktown, Oklahoma with his bare hands and fights kind of the focus of the movie, If Neil Gaiman wants to a dragon mono-a-mono. it still comes off as tacked on. Hayes said that the UCO City, and work at the State mess with an ancient story, That's all the same (except It just gets in the way of the branch had recently underCapitol. he's probably earned the right for the part where Beowulf rest of the story. Essentially, gone redecorating, with new Hannah Jackson can be reached to do so. He wrote "the blocks the dragon's flame the movie would have been carpet, paint and chairs. The at hjackson@thevistaonline.com . Sandman," giving him a pass with a steel tower shield). better off with Beowulf just bank's previous artwork, a to do what he wants with What's different is Grendel's going around killing monsters at least one ancient poem. mom, who instead of being a without any of the added or Unfortunately, some of the hideous monster, is a beautiful changed stuff additions Gaiman ads, along succubus played by Angelina While the story isn't perwith his co-screenwriter 'Jolie who manages to seduce fect, a lot of it can be forRoger Avary and director Beowulf into siring a son. given because of the excellent Robert Zemeckis, don't really Also, in the poem, Grendel computer animation, which work too well, and kind of was just some monster. In looks pretty cool in 2D, and end up as a distraction from the movie, he's the child of even better in 3D. The action the hero beating up monsters. Hrothgar (Anthony Hopkins), sequences look plain amazing "Beowulf' is the old who had been seduced by and the quality of animation English poem about a war- Grendel's mother years prior. is the best I've seen outside of rior-king so tough he rips a Instead of a story about one Pixar's studio. monster's arm off with his guy beating monsters to The animation makes a lot bare hands and then proceeds death, the movie tries to add of the fantastical look real. to beat the said monster to some depth by adding a sub- While the dragon isn't perdeath, also with his bare plot about hubris and all that. fect, Grendel is. He's gross hands. When the monster's In one way, it's kind of and deformed, parts of his mom gets uppity, Beowulf a neat spin on the story. flesh are torn off, and he is, in ventures to the lake she lives Everything that's in the poem essence, the epitome of ugly. in and fights her underwater gets mentioned in the movie, Further, the people look for nine hours straight. Then, whether it's what really hap- almost like real actors, espen'f.mfaregam.:, by Vista photographer Chris Albers years later, when Beowulf is pened or not. In the movie, cially Beowulf. While the an old man, a dragon attacks Beowulf didn't tear off people look a bit too perDr. Bob Palmer, arts, media and design professor, stands in front of a painting he his kingdom. Beowulf, who Grendel's arm with his bare fect to be real, the animation crafted for the Citizens Bank located on campus in the Nigh University Center. was Clint Eastwood millennia hands. He uses a chain, a never crosses into uncanny before Clint Eastwood was door and some leverage, but valley territory, so no one Clint Eastwood, sets off with the townspeople assume that's looks creepy or anything. his squire to kill himself some how he did it. He never fights The bottom line is this is a dragon. While Beowulf can't Grendel's Mother under a decent movie. It's not really quite defeat the dragon and lake for nine hours, but that's the same thing as the poem, begins to die of his wounds, the story he tells when he but in a lot of ways, it is. stupid old age and all that, the comes back. It's kind of like It's got a big, epic hero guy squire kills the dragon with a "Troy" from a few years ago, killing monsters for an hour dagger. where the film isn't really an and a half. There are a few The bottom line is, adaptation of the poem itself, half-hearted attempts at addBeowulf is all about manly but more of a postulation of ing something extra, and it's macho stuff, like killing what might have happened to kind of annoying, but still, it's things with one's bare hands inspire the poem. worth checking out. and stopping gout of flame On the other hand, the with a steel tower shield. The hubris subplot just doesn't to movie in essence, really isn't fit well. It really seems like much different. Gaiman and Avary wanted to Justin Langston can be reached In the movie, the character add some "depth" that they at jlangston@thevistaonline.com.

by Hannah Jackson Staff Writer

painting of a boat also by Palmer, had been hanging in that bank for almost nine years. Following the facelift, Hayes thought it was time to celebrate. "I came up with...UCO and internationality, embracing the world and it's diversity," said Palmer about deciding what to paint. Palmer began this project about a month ago, first working on the continents and then adding all the extra pictures. "I picked something from the five major continents," he said. "I wanted images people would immediately recognize." The painting includes pictures of mountains, trees, The Statue of Liberty, an African mask, Stone Henge, a Russian palace and flips flops. Some of the wildlife within the painting includes a kangaroo and a joey near Australia, an Emperor penguin with a baby penguin near the North Pole, a lotus and a butterfly near South America. "The Great Wall of China is my favorite part," said

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CLASSIFIEDS

November 20, 2007

Deadlines/Pricing DEADLINES: All classifieds MUST be submitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. Prices: Classified ads cost $6/day for the first 20 words and $.10/word thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call 974-5549 or 974-5918 for info.

Services EDMOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTE Conveniently located on the UCO campus, offers English as a second language classes for intern. students/individuals. NOW FEATURING a specially designed program with: Strong emphasis in listening and speaking Highly inter. classes, Comprehensive TOEFL program. Enjoy small classes and the campus facilities. Contact us @ (405) 3412125 or www.thelanguagecompany.com . INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS! Need to pass the TOEFL, an 1-20 for a friend, or a 12 week cert.? English Language Center can help you! Call (405)3487602, visit our web site www. elcok.com , or come meet us in person at 1015-C Waterwood Parkway, next to the UCO Universi Plaza on 2nd Street.

Employment HIDEAWAY PIZZA Is now hiring Full & Part Time, Kitchen Staff, Servers and Host/ ess. Flexible schedules, tenure bonuses, meal discounts, and a GREAT working environment. Apply between 2-5pm at the following locations. All Positions @ 116 E. 5th Street Edmond. All Positions @ 6616 N. Western Ave. OKC. GREAT PIZZA! GREAT JOB! PERFECT JOB FOR CREATIVE COLLEGE STUDENT Receptionist position, part time @ the hottest salon in OKC! Personality, style & computer skills a must. Call 752-5556 or apply @ Salon Rebel, 9419 N. May Ave., OKC. Salon Perks.

BEST WESTERN GUTHRIE Now hiring front-desk clerk. Day, evening & night shifts available. STUDY DURING DOWNTIME! 20 minutes from UCO. Take I35 north, Exit 157. Apply in person or fax resume to 282-2100. CARRABBA'S ITALIAN GRILL Now hiring service staff. Apply Mon - Thurs., 11a3p. 3121 W. Memorial Rd. PT NANNY NEEDED 9-6 M & W; 7:30-6 TUE. Pref. Early Childhood Major. Near Bryant & Waterloo. Send resume to Tiffany.McGowen@ roberthalf.com

GET GREAT EXPERIENCE WORKING IN A PROFESSIONAL WELLNESS SPA Do you enjoy helping others? Are you calm-natured and health conscious? Have you ever wanted to work in a spa? If so, then this is your opportunity! The Wellness Spa in Edmond has an opening for a Spa Therapist. This position involves performing a wide array of spa treatments in a pleasant and professional work environment. Great experience for the right person. We will provide training, Hours/Days for this position are 1-6, Wed. - Fri. and 10-4 Sat. For more info please call 330-8488.

PROMETRIC TESTING CENTER Located at 2224 NW 50th, Suite 196, is searching for college students to assist with proctoring and scheduling National Board exams. The hours will be somewhat flexible during the week and also Saturday. Excellent customer service skills and basic computer skills are required. The position could lead to more hours and even full-time in the summertime. Please fax resume to 405-810-9455 or e-mail resume toi d_g:ar sK2@slcgae o lob I.n t. TEACHER Needed immediately for Edmond Daycare. FT/PT. Experience preferred, competitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262

CONSTRUCTION WORK Hiring laborers now. No experience necessary. Part-time or full-time carpentry experience preferred. 824-8954

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EDMOND FINANCE CO. Is seeking a Part-Time Front Desk/Data Entry Clerk. M-F 9:00 - 2:00. Must have phone and computer experience including Word, Excel, and 10-key by touch. Paid holidays and vacation. Email resume to mpecinosky@abflIc.com or fax to 405-715-5735.

NEED PT JOB? St. Elizabeth Ann Seton afterschool program is looking for someone to work 3pm to 6pm five days a week. The position pays $6.50 an hour. Starting date would be January 2nd or 6th. If interested call the CDC office at 340-1789. Also needing subs between 7am and 6pm on PT basis.

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TOUCHMARK @ COFFEE CREEK Edmond's premier retirement community, is seeking energetic, friendly servers for our upscale resort style dining room. Duties include taking orders from residents, serving food, cleaning dishes from dining room, special event set up and service, and assistance with food preparation and dishwashing. Call Mike Bates @ 340-1975 or apply in person at 2801 Shortgrass Rd. in Edmond.

UNDERCOVER SHOPPERS Earn up to $150 per day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and disning establishments. Experience not required. Call 800-722-4791.

WANNA WORK IN ADVERTISING? If so...then The Vista needs you! We're looking for a motivated student (preferably an Advertising/PR major) who's interested in doing advertising sales for UCO's one and only student newspaper. Excellent experience for the right person, and this will look great on your resume! Come by our office today, located in the Communications Bldg.

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PART-TIME WORK 10-15 hrs. per wk., w/Residential & Commercial cleaning service. Some days starting time 10:00am - 11:00am. Flexible schedule. M-F. Must have own trans. & good references. Good pay (Hourly+) 348-4697. UPS STORE Is hiring seasonal help. Must be available between 12-7pm. 1050 E. 2nd St., next to Denny's. Apply in person. No phone calls please. TED'S CAFE ESCONDIDO Hiring servers/hosts. Apply M-F 2-5. 801 E. Danforth, Edmond. SERVER POSITION Available @ Pearl's Lakeside. Apply within. 748-6113.

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THEVISIA

SPORTS

November 20, 2007

9

Bronchos begin with a bang as UCO topples St. Gregory's by Justin Langston Staff Writer The UCO Men's Basketball team traveled to Shawnee to beat out St. Gregory's Saturday night earning a 79-62 victory. UCO led for almost the entirety of the game, beating out the Cavilers despite a few offensive problems. "One of our goals this year was to keep people below 60 points," head coach Terry Evans, said. "I think defensively we had a good game, but offensively there are still things we have to work on." Forward/Guard Sam Belt led the team in points and rebounds, scoring 23 points

and earning six rebounds. Forward Lance Harper earned a career high with 18 points for the team. Forward Terry Tucker scored 11 points and guard Eric Cazenave scored 11 points and led the team in 3-pointers, scoring three of the team's five. UCO's first home game was Monday night and over the break, they will travel to Weatherford to compete in the Southwest Oklahoma Classic where they will compete with Southwest Baptist on Friday and New Mexico Highlands on Saturday. Justin Langston can be reached at jlangston@thevistaonline.com

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

AJ Alfrey slides belly down across the ice to save puck control at Saturday night's match at Artic Edge against Texas Tech. The Bronchos blugeoned Texas 9-3.

Tech can't touch Bronchos Alfrey and Matt Cohn, bringing UCO's lead to two. The second period was The UCO Hockey team quiet, but things exploded in triumphed over Texas Tech the final period. In less than in two impressive victories a minute, defenseman Greg over the weekend; with forMasters scored with an assist wards AJ Alfrey and. Jason from Thibodeau. Less than Thibodeau each earned hat a minute after that, Alfrey tricks. Alfrey earned his on knocked another one in the net. Friday night when UCO skatAround 14 minutes left in the ed to a 5-0 win and Thibodeau period, Alfrey knocked in the received his on Saturday night last goal of the game, earning when Texas Tech got beat out his hat trick and giving UCO a 5-0 lead that lasted for the entirety of the game. On Saturday, UCO took off early, scoring two goals in a minute and a half. Forward Ray Wingfield scored the first goal and Cohn, with an assist from Alfrey, scored the second. With less than 15 minutes left in the period, Thibodeau knocked in his first goal of the game. Soon after, Thibodeau scored again, with an assist from Masters and Cohn. Late in the period though, Texas Tech made their first score of the weekend, preventing UCO from shutting them out twice in a row. In the second period, Thibodeau earned his hat trick in less than two minby Vista photographer Chris Albers utes after the start of the period. Thibodeau scored Sophomore Shawn Steggles faces off with a Texas Tech player on on the power play with Nov. 17 at Artic Edge. The Bronchos won 9-3. an assist from Alfrey, earning Thibodeau's first hat trick for the season. Match Up Alex Jeff Justin Just over a minute later, forward Rob Deubel scored GB -3 4 Det GB GB GB with an assist from forward Shawn Steggles. NYJ +14 @ Dal Texas Tech managed to Dal NYJ Dal score twice before the period ended, their first one with a Indy -11 @ Atl Indy Indy Indy man down. However, with a minute and a half left on by Justin Langston Staff Writer

with UCO gaining a 9-3 win. "We came out and put our game plans together and we skated well both games," head coach Craig McAlister, said. "This was a great way to come back after Kansas last week." UCO came out and scored early in Friday night's game with Alfrey scoring in the opening minutes of the game. Late in the period, Thibodeau scored another goal, with an assist from

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SOCCER from page 10 goalkeeper Ashton Caffrey denied what was described as a point-blank shot. UCO was unable to send the game into an extra period; it was the third time the 19-5-1 team from Edmond had been shutout this season. With the final whistle the season concluded as did the UCO careers of nine Bronchos. The seniors, Carly Fischer, Carmen Davis, Cooley, Juroch, Sarah Addison, Kasey Mahaffey, Moriah Chinnock, Rebekah Svensson and. Teagan Breslin have each helped lead UCO to four consecutive regular season conference championships while leading the team to its second ever Sweet Sixteen. "They've really contributed to keeping the program at a high level," Cook said. "[We] hope to build on it."

NOTE: Due to there being no paper on Thursday, NFL picks were forced to be made on Monday and point Jeff Massie can be reached at jmassie@thevistaonline.com spreads are liable to change.

the clock, forward Jonathon Cannizzo scored with an assist from Steggles. Then, with 28 seconds left cfri the clock, Masters scored, bringing the lead to 8-3. Only in the final period, forward Alex Jackson scored, and UCO held their 9-3 lead for the rest of the game. Over the break, UCO will travel to Michigan to compete in the Michigan Dearborn Tournament. On Dec 7, UCO will begin their cross-town rivalry against the University of Oklahoma. The first game will be held on Friday on OU's ice, Dec 7 and the second game will be at Arctic Edge Ice Arena the next evening.

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by Vista photographer Brenda O'Brian

Justin Langston can be reached at jlangston@thevistaonline.com

Chance Hardaker jumps over a teammate's head to dunk the ball during Hamilton Havoc on Nov. 13.

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1 0 November 20, 2007

THEVISA

SPORTS

UCO volleyball team ends successful season Nebraska-Kearney," Boyland Allen fought hard to keep said. "The first game we were the Bronchos in by makSports Writer in it, we had a short lead, but ing 35 digs. Araujo played UCO Volleyball won one couldn't close it in the end." well on defense with 19 Central lost three of four digs, three blocking assists and lost one over the weekend at the NCAA Division games; UCO finished 28- and one blocking single. II Tournament-Southwest 30, 31-33, 30-20 and 23-30. Araujo's scoring game Regional Nov. 16 and 17 in "In the second game we was very impressive, mak' were up 29 ing 21 kills and hitting .203. Kearney, Texas. that to 26 and we UCO fin- "I reall) -believe Reynolds stepped ished its sea- we were probably the had a couple up to make 17 kills and of swings to Schult chimed in with 12. son 32-7 and better team." win the game tied the school Other scorers were Legako and did not with 11, Whitlow with nine record for wins. "We played - Coach Boyland succeed at it, and Wedberg with four. which was very well against Fort Boyland said he is sad to disappoint- see seniors Lacie Allen, Tara Lewis," UCO head coach Jeff Boyland said. ing," Boyland said. Delaney and Katie Schult go. In the third game UCO "They had an All-American middle that we neutralized." rallied together for a 30-20 The Bronchos won their victory, but didn't keep the first match of the tournament ball moving into the fourth. "I really believe that 3-0: 30-20, 32-30 and 30-25. Alex Gambill can be reached at Central outmatched Fort we were probably the bet- agambill@thevistaonline.com . Lewis College in virtually ter team," Boyland said. every aspect. UCO played a decent blocking game with 18 blocking assists to the Skyhawks' six. Mari Araujo played an excellent game making 14 kills and Kelsey Reynolds played well making 11. Courtney Whitlow made nine kills, Jessica Legako eight, Meaghan Wedberg seven, Katie Schult seven and Carolyn O'Connor one. Wedberg set 43 while the Skyhawks only managed 40 as a team. Lacie Allen played a lofty defensive game with 26 digs. This victory was the first national tournament win for the Bronchos since 1994 and improved their record to 32-6. UCO then advanced to the semifinals against the tournament host Nebraska-Kearney. Unfortunately, UCO lost to NebraskaKearney, but not without a fight. "In the second by Vista photographer Alex Gambill match we played in front of 1600 Mari Araujo prepares to put down a spike against Abilene Christian on people against Oct. 27 at Hamilton Field House.

by Alex Gambill

by Vista photographer Alex Gambill

Carmen Davis fends off an Angelo State defender as she dribbles the ball down the field.

Central soccer stopped in Seattle by Jeff Massie Sports Editor

All good things must come to an end, and the Broncho soccer team found its finish line in Seattle, three games short of a national title. After starting the national tournament with two wins, the Bronchos found themselves on the wrong side with a 1-0 score against second seeded Incarnate Word. It was the first time in seven years that the UCO soccer team advanced past the first round of the national tournament. Undefeated in conference, the Bronchos suffered a surprising upset in the Lone Star Conference tournament, which yielded a less favorable seed and a more turbulent road at Nationals. Despite the defeat, head soccer coach Mike Cook

expressed how proud he was of the team. "The Sweet Sixteen is an amazing accomplishment, an unbelievable year," Cook said. The Cardinals' 'scored the game's only goal in the 19th minute as UCO was unable to register any points despite an abundance of opportunities. The Cardinal's scored after the Bronchos tried to clear the ball, but it struck a Broncho defender and bounced in front of Incarnate's forward who tapped it in from a yard out. In the first half, UCO outshot its opponent eight to six, but none reached the promised land as they either were off target or denied by a Cardinal. Jenny Racicot led

all players with seven shots, only one of which was on goal. The Bronchos also held a six-to-one advantage in corner kicks, and were fouled 17 times, but they could not take advantage of any set pieces during the shutout. According to a Media Relations press release, Incarnate Word shifted their focus to defense in the second half, limiting UCO to only five shots. What seemed to have been the best opportunity to even the score came in the game's closing minutes when midfielder Kristen Juroch crossed the ball to Lacy Cooley. Cooley wasn't marked by any defenders, but Cardinal

see SOCCER, page 9

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The Vista Nov. 20, 2007  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Nov. 20, 2007  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.