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The Student Voice of the (Hi\ ersitv of Central Oklahoma Since 1903

Golf management students compete in Jones Cup

Rugby splits against John Brown The UCO rugby football club hosted John Brown University Saturday afternoon and split the two games, losing the first game 17-24, and winning the second team game 20-5. The match was the last of

the club's fall season, and was one of the three of home matches. Coach Nate Rowland said that his team has come a long way since the beginning match at Oklahoma State.

Students from the University of Central Oklahoma's PGA Golf Management program competed in the Jones Cup at the Professional Golfers' Association headquarters two weeks ago in Port St. Lucie,

Florida. The students played the 36-hole tournament against college students from the other 19 PGA golf management programs nationwide.

Hockey checks Sooners in second game By Kaylea Brooks

Sports Editor

Students predict elections correctly Three days a week in the Liberal Arts building at UCO, a group of students study a form of political science not often seen in a classroom: predicting elections. This semester's focus was on the presidential and Senate elections, and the students in Dr. Randall Jones' class have had interesting results. -Page 3

Families encouraged to participate in Family Week When the turkey is gone, the mashed potatoes are cold and there's a single piece of pie left, the traditional Thanksgiving family fight begins. But before any feelings or children get hurt, remember it will be National Family Week. -Page 5

No. 11 UCO hockey split its two games against No. 6 Oklahoma University this weekend, losing 1-3 at OU, and winning 2-1 in Edmond Saturday night. Oklahoma scored at 16:29 for the first goal in the first period. At 5:02, UCO rebounded with a shot by Matt Cohn assisted by A.J. Alfrey and Greg Masters. But the Sooners turned up the heat, not allowing the Bronchos to score for the rest of the first period. In the second period, UCO came out fighting, but even so OU scored again at 11:18 after the Bronchos' goalie dropped the puck. The Bronchos tried for a comeback in the third period, but missed the two shots that they took. The Sooners scored in the by Vista photographerChris Albers last sight seconds of the game, and the score ended with UCO AJ Alfrey carries the puck while fans watch from behind during UCO's Friday night match against OU at Artic Edge Ice Arena. UCO lost the Friday game 1-3 but came back the next night to win 2-1. losing 1-3. On Saturdy OU came to ' the gronc B ronchos los rink' ioi; Ryan Arndt. scored at 10:48, assisted by Alex Jackson. second game in the series. OU fought back an scored at 3:35 in the The third period both teams failed to In the first period there was no scoring, period, but less than two minutes later Mike score, sealing the win for the Bronchos, 2-1. but in the second Brian Thompson of UCO Haszto scored on a power play assisted by A

The start of a new legacy: Pham wins Miss Asian UCO

Features

By Abha Eli Phoboo

Senior Reporter

A look into the life of Taylor Upson Last Saturday, UCO welcomed the new 2009 campus queen, sophomore Taylor Upson of Sigma Phi Lambda Christian sorority. The 2009 Miss UCO Scholarship Competition was Upson's tenth pageant to participate in. Her platform was supporting the Children's Miracle Network - connecting kids with hope. -Page 3

by Vista photographer Chanel Henry

Kim Pham was crowned Miss Asian UCO 2008 Saturday Nov. 15 in Constitution Hall.

Kim Pham, from Vietnam, was crowned Miss Asian UCO 2008 at the pageant Nov. 15 at the Constitution Hall, Nigh University Center. Pham, a finance and business major, grew up in Vietnam and later moved to the United States. Upon winning the crown, Pham said she wanted to help bridge the gap between international and domestic students at UCO. "The international students play an important role in UCO's diversity," Pham said. "As the next Miss Asian UCO, I will create direct connection between the ISC and the UCO student council body." Along with the title and crown, Pham wins a $900 tuition waiver scholarship, $350 cash scholarship, and a gift basket. Samina Daneshfar, from Iran, was first runner-up, and Anuja Magar,

from Nepal, was second runner-up. Daneshfar received a $600 tuition waiver scholarship and a $150 cash scholarship. Magar received a $250 tuition waiver. Daneshfar also won the Miss Congeniality and Miss Photogenic titles. Magar took home the Miss Talent title, which entailed $100, with a Kathak performance. Other title winners were: Japan's Hitomi Ushio for Future Business Woman Award; India's Manisha Ragha for Director's Award, and Naho Kaneko, also from Japan, for People's Choice Award. Ushio received a $200 cash scholarship for selling the most number of advertisements for the Miss Asian UCO pageant brochure. Jenny Statler, director of the pageant, named Ragha as the most dedicated and committed of the contestants.

see LEGACY, page 5

UCOSA expresses opposition to campus gun bill By Andrew Knittle and Nelson Solomon

Senior Reporters

Lady Bronchos In a game where the Lady Bronchos were leading by 10 points for the majority of the game, UCO lost to the Oklahoma Flyers in overtime, 119-112. UCO came into the game with energy that allowed them to have a narrow lead over the Flyers until 05:00 in the last period. -Page 8

The UCOSA Senate voted in favor of the Oklahoma Student Government Association's resolution to oppose the campus gun bill if and when it comes up during the upcoming legislative session at its weekly meeting on Monday. Daniel Stockton, president pro tempore of the UCOSA Senate, was in favor of the resolution to oppose the campus gun bill, saying that most (93 percent) of crimes committed against college students occurs offcampus. Stockton also expressed

concern about those who would be left out if the campus gun bill was enacted. "International students are not allowed to carry or purchase weapons," he said. "So that disqualifies a sizable group on campus." UCOSA voted 56 to 10 to adopt the resolution to oppose the campus gun bill, although students in favor of the bill were also allowed to voice their opinions. David Jenkins, a UCOSA

senator, said the campus gun bill, if enacted into law during the next legislative session, could help prevent another massacre like the Virginia Tech shootings in 2007. "The [campus gun] bill is preven ti five and reactive," Jenkins said. "[The UCO] DPS is a reactive force — they are there to retrieve the body bags." Jenkins said the laws banning firearms on state and federal property aren't taking into

Watch it! "Excellence is to do a common thing in an uncommon way."

--Booker (T: Washington

Live Coverage of the election on channel 125.

account that shootings happen on college campuses where security is lax in comparison. The campus gun bill, which was passed earlier in the year by the State House, never reached the Senate after education officials banded together and passed a resolution to oppose the bill. Both President Roger Webb and UCO Police Chief Jeff Harp personally oppose the campus bill, saying that allowing students to carry weapons would decrease the level of safety currently enjoyed on campus.


Page 2 Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008

FEATURE pus Notes Want to contribute to The Vista? Did you know The Vista was originally a literary journal devoted to showcasing UCO's creative minds? We've decided we'd like to get back to that. We're looking for poems and short stories from UCO students to publish in upcoming issues of The Vista Weekend. Due to space limitations, we can only print one per issue, and submissions must be shorter than 500 words in length. Send them by e-mail to vistastudentfiction@ yahoo.com and look for your work in the next issue!

`Career Ready' Luncheon, Wednesday in Room 301, NUC

The Vista

Schedule of Events

Odds & Ends/

UCO Jazz Lab

News of the strange

The Jazz Company feat. Brian Gorrell and Shane Conaway: Jazz, UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to 10:30 pm., $7foradults, $5forchildren 12 & under. Friday, Nov. 21

From the Associated Press

Michael Summers: Jazz, UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to 10:30 pm., $7 for adults, $5 for children 12 & under. Saturday, Nov. 29

AJ & Why Not: UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to 10:30

UCO Jazz Combos: Jazz, Special Event, UCO Jazz Lab, 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1

Percussion Concert: UCO Jazz Lab, 7:30 p.m., Donations accepted Monday, Nov. 24

Krauss, Turd & Kidwell Band: Jazz, UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., $7 for adults, $5 for children 12 & under. Thursday, Dec. 4

p.m., $7 for adults, $5 for children 12 & under. Saturday, Nov. 22

Chamber Orchestra: UCO Jazz Lab, 7:30 p.m., Donations accepted. Tuesday, Nov. 25 Big G: Blues, UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to 10:30 pm., $7 for adults, $5 for children 12 & under. Friday, Nov. 28

UCO students, faculty and staff are invited to the Career Ready Institute (CRI) from noon-12:50 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19, in Room 301, Nigh University Center. Princeton Review will sponsor lunch and present "How and When to Apply for Graduate Schools." CRI is a seminar series that enables students to fine-tune their job-search competencies and prepare for internships, employment or graduate / professional school. Please attend and encourage students to participate. A complete schedule of seminars is located on the Calendar of Events at http: / / www.careers.uco.edu . For more information, contact UCO Career Services at 974-3346.

Shortt Dogg: Blues & Soul, UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., $7 for adults, $5 for children 12 & under. Friday, Dec. 5

For more information:

100 E 5th St Edmond, OK 73034 (405) 359-7989

www.ucojazzlab.com

Photo of the Week

UCOSA seeks response in student surveyi this week UCOSA are asking students to respond to two separate surveys beginning Wednesday, Nov. 19, through Thursday, Nov. 20. Topics will be Oklahoma House Bill 2513, which would allow CLEET-certified and military veterans to carry guns on college campuses, and the possibility of UCO becoming a 24/7 tobacco free campus. To take the survey, students will log onto UCONNECT and look for Broncho Survey on the left side of the screen.

New Web Site launched for GreenRide program GreenRide has a new Web address, http:/ / www.uco.greenride.com / enUS / . Students, faculty and staff must now log in using their @uco.edu e-mail address. If you are a returning member and have trouble logging in, please contact the Office of Commuter Student Services, 974-3655. GreenRide is a Web-based application that helps users find carpool and other ride-share (vanpool, bus, bicycle, etc.) partners. GreenRide works for daily commuters, as well as those making longer, less frequent trips.

Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night stars Nov. 20-23 The Department of Theatre, Dance and Media Arts will stage Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 20-22, and at 2 p.m. Nov. 23, in Pegasus Theater, Liberal Arts. (The play was moved to Pegasus due to construction at Mitchell Hall Theater.) After the opening night performance on Nov. 13, David Macey, Ph.D. and chair of the English Department, will host a panel discussion at approximately 10 p.m. The panel will include UCO professors who teach Shakespeare. All are welcome. Tickets are are $14 for adults, $10 for senior citizens and UCO faculty and staff, and $4 for UCO students. To reserve tickets, call 974-3375. For a complete schedule of UCO College of Arts, Media & Design events, visit http:/ / www.camd.uco.edu /events.

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

contestant Emily Weeks unintentionally forms the "U" to complete the Miss UCO signage behind her during the final stretch of her vocal performance at the 33rd Annual Miss UCO Scholarship Pageant Nov. 8 at Constitution Hall. Miss UCO

Astronauts hitch giant crate to space station By Marcia Dunn AP Aerospace Writer

until all the equipment — most notably the water recycling system — has been installed and tested. Additional equipment will be launched in February. CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) -- Astronauts Until now, the space station has been a onehitched a giant shipping crate full of home kitchen, one-bath, three-bedroom house. That improvement "goodies" to the international space third bedroom is actually a makeshift nook in the station on Monday, a critical step for boosting the U.S. lab. The orbiting outpost is on the verge of population in orbit. becoming a two-kitchen, two-bath, five-bedroom It was the first major job for the crews of the home and will have six full bedrooms in a few linked space station and space shuttle Endeavour, more months. and highlighted their first full day together. Astronaut Sandra Magnus — the newest space "We're here to work," the space station's station resident — spent Monday getting used to skipper, Mike Fincke, called down. "This is the her new home. She flew up on Endeavour and can-do crew." promptly traded places with Gregory Chamitoff, More than 14,000 pounds of gear was stuffed into who's headed home after a six-month mission. the 21-foot container that flew up on Endeavour Magnus will spend 31/2 months on board. and was hoisted onto the space station. It held an Besides being moving day for the 10 space extra toilet, refrigerator and kitchenette, exercise travelers, Monday involved gearing up for the machine and sleeping compartments, and a first of four planned spacewalks. new recycling system for converting urine into On Tuesday, two of the shuttle crew will venture drinking water. outside and begin the most complicated cleaning Fincke called it "the goodies ... things needed and lube job ever attempted in orbit. One of two for an extreme home makeover." massive joints that turn the space station's solar NASA cannot double the number of space wings toward the sun has been jammed for more station residents from three to six next year than a year.

Buddy Broncho sighting

`Brighten the Night' Entry Forms Available Entry forms for the "Brighten the Night" holiday decorating contest are now available in the Office of Commuter Student Services (Room 115, Nigh University Center) and are due back by 5 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1. "Brighten the Night" is a holiday, home decorating and lighting contest that challenges off-campus students to get into the spirit of the season. Students decorate the exterior of their homes with lights and anything else to display their holiday spirit. Homes will be judged based on five categories: Clark Griswold Award (Most Lights); Broncho Light Show (Most School Spirit); Best Apartment; Best Greek House; and Best House. Winners will be announced at Winterglow on Thursday, Dec. 4, and will receive a prize package and a plaque. For more information, contact Nathan. Box, coordinator of Commuter Student Services, at 974-3655 or nbox@uco.edu .

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Buddy Broncho casually teases UCO Hockey fan Leah Bates while watching Friday night's match against OU at the Artic Edge Ice Arena.

limes Square getting its first 'green' sign NEW YORK -- This winter, New Year's Eve revelers will have a close-up view of Times Square's first environmentally friendly billboard powered entirely by wind and sun. But the billboard might not be quite as dazzling as some of its high-powered neighbors along the Great White Way. Construction on the 35,000-pound sign advertising Ricoh Americas Corp. is to begin this month across the avenue from the building where the ball drops on New Year's Eve. Powered by 16 wind turbines and 64 solar panels, the sign is expected to save $12,000 to $15,000 per month in electricity costs. Ricoh, an office equipment and document storage supplier, estimates the sign will also keep 18 tons of carbon out of the environment. The billboard will be lit by floodlights rather than lightemitting diodes. It won't have a backup generator, so it could go dark during a long period with little wind or sun. But Ricoh spokesman Ron Potesky said the sign's turbines will probably be able to keep the billboard lit even after four days without breezes or bright sun. "The point is that there are ways of being environmentally friendly to the planet, even on a billboard," Potesky said. A lighting ceremony for the 126-foot wide, 47-foot tall sign is scheduled for Dec. 4.

NY pet cemetery ranked among Taj Mahal, pyramids WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -A travel guide's list of the

best places in the world to be entombed includes a cemetery for animals in a New York City suburb. "Lonely Planet's Best in Travel 2009" includes the Hartsdale Pet Cemetery with the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramids among the 10 "best places of rest." A spokesman for Hartsdale says it's "delighted to be in such esteemed company" The guide says the headstones at the pet cemetery are fascinating to read. One says, "Sport: Born a dog, died a gentleman." There are 70,000 creatures and several bereaved humans in the 112-year-old pet cemetery, which is 20 miles north of New York City.

Vista Retraction In the Nov. 13 issue of The Vista, we wrote in our story regarding the Broncho Spirit Card that UCO would be retaining student banking information as part of the new refund process. However, with UCO's partnership with Higher One, the university will no longer have to hold the responsibility of keeping banking information safe. Higher One will maintain banking information for students because they will be handling refund disbursements. This benefit is a major reason UCO pursued a partnership with Higher One. We apologize for the error.


Page 3 Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008

NEWS

The Vista

Who is Miss UCO? By Lauren Lubbers Staff Writer

Last Saturday, UCO welcomed the new 2009 campus queen, sophomore Taylor Upson of Sigma Phi Lambda Christian sorority. The 2009 Miss UCO Scholarship Competition was Upson's tenth pageant to participate in. Her platform was supporting the Children's Miracle Network - connecting kids with hope. In this competition she not only won the title of Miss UCO, but both the swimsuit and talent competitions along with the Director's Award for the contestant who was most kind and helpful to her fellow competitors. Her winnings for the pageant included a $1,800 tuition waiver as well as a $500 cash scholarship. Upson will also get the opportunity to continue on to the Miss Oklahoma Pageant. Upson competed in her first pageant her junior year of high school. "I got started in pageants because one day me and some of my girlfriends decided it would be fun to enter the 2005 Miss Teen Owasso Pageant at my high school and I was shocked when I actually ended up winning it," Upson said. "I've been competing ever since." Upson has held the titles of Miss Teen Owasso, Miss Southern Delaware County Miss South Oklahoma City, and most recently, Miss UCO. "My favorite thing about being in pageants is getting the opportunity to meet all of the great people," Upson said.

A deeper look into the life of Taylor Upson

"My favorite pageant was by far "I wantedto compete for Miss UCO," Upson said. "I was most Miss UCO because this excited about the fact community has done so that I won the talent competition because muchfor me...I hope to out of all the pageants leave a positive image I've ever been in, I have never won the of myself and represent talent portion until the school and the other now. I have danced students the best as I since I was four years old so I have always can." performed lyrical --Taylor Upson dances for my talent and to finally win was so exciting for me." "When they announced me been inspired by the words of as the pageant winner, I was poet Mya Angelo, who said, completely shocked because "People do not care about there were so many awesome what you say or what you girls in this pageant that no do. They care about how you one knew who would get it," make them feel." She will use she said. "It could have been that inspiration to help others while she reigns as Miss UCO any of us." One of the best things this next year. "Taylor is my little sis in about the Miss UCO pageant was that, unlike the previous Sigma Phi Lambda and truly pageants that most of the girls one of the most beautiful have competed in that are only girls I know inside and out," a one-day competitions, this Jennifer Getts said. "She is one was a week long process kind, humble and so giving of and it was a good opportunity time to those around her." Taylor Janelle Upson is 19 to get to know all of the years old and was born and contestants Upson said. "I wanted to compete raised in Owasso where she for Miss UCO because this graduated high school in 2007. community has done so much She is the daughter of Mark for me. I have been given Upson, a Tulsa firefighter and scholarships from my previous owner of his own construction pageants and the school has company, and Andi Upson, supported me so much that I a sports store manager, both wanted nothing more than to of Owasso. She has a sister, give back to it. I want to be able Kyndal, 18, who is currently to support the school like it has in cosmetology school. She supported me. As Miss UCO, I is a sophomore majoring in hope to leave a positive image elementary education and will of myself and represent the be initiated as a sister of Sigma school and the other students Phi Lambda Christian sorority this December. as best as I can." Upson said she has always

Golf management students compete in Jones Cun Students from the University of Central Oklahoma's PGA Golf Management program competed in the Jones Cup at the Professional Golfers' Association headquarters two weeks ago in Port St. Lucie, Florida. The students played the 36-hole tournament against college students from the other 19 PGA golf management programs nationwide. UCO students Nathan Hamstead of Marlow, Adam Miller of Stillwater, Daniel Stith of Oklahoma City Beau Streck of Kingfisher, and Trent White of Cameron, Mo., participated. They represented the 31-member charter class of UCO's PGA-

accredited golf management program. The tournament was held at the PGA's Wanamaker Course, an internationally recognized golf course. The UCO team came in 19 out of 20, a result that Internship Coordinator Wes Wilkinson was pleased with, citing the newness of UCO's program. "This tournamentwasn'taboutwho won or lost, it was about learning experiences, networking opportunities with other students and golf professionals, and a chance for these students to see what the PGA is all about. They will be joining something bigger than themselves," said Wilkinson.

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Miss UCO 2009 Taylor Upson models her eveningware Nov. 8 during the 33rd Annual Miss UCO Scholarship Pageant held at Constitution Hall.

New version of thevistaonline.com

Students predict elections accurately with help of class By Stephani Tobin

Staff Writer Three days a week in the Liberal Arts building at UCO, a group of students study a form of political science not often seen in a classroom: predicting elections. This semester's focus was on the presidential and Senate elections, and the students in Dr. Randall Jones' class have had interesting results. "If you want to be able to participate in politics, you need to be able to predict elections," Dwight Clark, a junior political science major, said. Clark was part of a team in the class that correctly. predicted the presidential electoral split. Using information and poll results from RealPolitics.com and Pollster.com, along with probabilities from InTrade future markets, the students were able to evaluate their results weekly. Members of this group focused on swing states when measuring their data weekly. They also ignored national popularity polls and looked at state polls because they were focusing on the electoral college, not the popular vote. "The popular vote doesn't elect the president — just ask Al Gore," Clark said. Another group in the class did a survey on the Senate candidates from all 50 states based on appearance. The project, called the Competency and 'Recognition Survey, displayed head shots of each Senate candidate, both new and incumbent, without their names attached. Forecasting students went to a number of UCO classes where students rated the candidate's competency solely by their appearance.

Their hypothesis was the candidates who are perceived by the student raters to be more competent will win their election. "Based on the survey answers, we got about one-third [of the winners] correct," David Larsen, a senior political science major, said. Larsen also said the group who compiled the Senate survey found research that face shape plays a role in a person's perception. People with longer faces and sharper features are seen as more competent, he said. Many students in Dr. Jones' class are polhical science majors, and they all have a substantial interest in the political process. Paul Bashline, a senior political science major, said taking this class gave . him an added appreciation for what the candidates and their campaigners go through. "I found myself, as the returns came in [on election night], going to various Web sites and following the methods I learned in this class," Bashline said. "It made the results more interesting." Jessica England, a graduate student in political science, said students who have an interest working in surveying should look into this class. She also said they noticed poll results would change by the hour, sometimes garnering a different result when they left class. Many students in the class agreed that, although Dr. Jones has taught this class since 1996, this was a great semester to be enrolled in the course. "This was a landmark election," England said.

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Page 4 Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008

OPINION

The Vista

The Vista Comm. Building, Rm. 107 100 N. University Dr. • Edmond, OK 73034-5209 405-974-5549 • editorial@thevistaonline.com The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and only on Thursdays during the summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

MANAGEMENT Jana Davis, Co-Editor Nelson Solomon, Co-Editor

Greg Newby,

Managing

Editor

EDITORIAL

Chase Dearinger, Copy Editor Kaylea Brooks, Sport Editor EDITORIALS Andrew Knitt1e Senior Reporter Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, Abha Phoboo, Smior Reporter reviews and commentaries represent Lana Hoffert, Senior Reporter the views of the writer or artist and Ryan Croft Reporter not necessarily the views of The Laurun Lubbers, Reporter Vista Editorial Board, the Department Alex Gerszewslci, Reporter of Mass Communication, UCO or Stephani Tobin, Reporter Rebecca Shammy, Correspondent the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official Melissa Dixon, Conespondent

medium of expression for the Regents or UCO. LETTERS

The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications

PHOTOGRAPHY Chanel Henry, Photopripher

DESIGN Josh Davis Kayleigh Adamek Andrew Knittle

CARTOONIST

Bring the 'dead' week back to life

Jared Aylor

AD SALES

a 'dead week' so the idea that we should study and study well is seemingly sidestepped. It's not that I don't enjoy getting done early, but it is more the attitude of a leisurely stroll through the semester, and then a sudden "oh crap, it's finals week" on the part of the teachers. Yesterday, in one of my elective classes, "I get thatteachers and students ourteacher want to get done early, but informed us that she I would rather have time to had forgotstudy and do it right." ten how close finals --Jana Davis week was. We shared would have to say it would with her in the confusion, be teachers who think they but then she informed us are doing you a favor by that we would all have to making you turn in your work that much harder to papers and homework a learn the techniques we week early. I understand needed for the final. I know what you're thinkthat UCO does not reserve

Ah, the dreaded finals week. It is approaching us Stacy McIntire quickly. I had the sudden CIRCULATION realization that school was Chris Albers ending, permanently for ADMINISTRATIVE me, and including finals week, we have four weeks ASSISTANT left. Tresa Berlemann I don't like to stress too often in my columns my ADVISER particular pet peeves, but Kelly S. Wray along with chewing ice, I

COLUMN: Decriminalize weed for medical research UC Berkeley is famous (or infamous) for a few things. One would be deeply depressed nerds bawling over their latest midterm — a stereotype I see a great deal (in the mirror). Another may be the amazing scientific research that goes on in the laboratories all around campus, or the infectious activist spirit, the large homeless population, a fantastic academic environment and last, but certainly not least, marijuana. Yes, everyone from Berkeley has almost certainly come in contact with Cal's favorite plant somehow, most likely by walking down Telegraph Avenue. I never really enjoy it when I'm out for a stroll and the unmistakable smell mauls my nostrils, but in the end it's just another one of those lovable Berkeley quirks. However, marijuana outside of Berkeley and similarly — urnm — "mellow" towns is a tricky subject. Many people have a very negative association with the drug or just don't want to get caught up in the legalities involved. The federal government has a strong ban on any cannabis product, classifying it as a Schedule 1 drug. This means that, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, marijuana can do severe damage to the human body, is highly addictive and does not have any medical purposes. Another unpleasant side effect of the federal government's ban is the lack of testing that can be done with cannabis and its derivatives. New research in other countries has suggested that marijuana products can be applied to shrink tumors and even reduce

Cartoon by Jared Aylor

neurological damage done by AIDS and Alzheimer's. Drugs derived from cannabis are in late clinical trials in Europe and one drug is already on the market in Canada, according to an article on slate.com. The United States, however, is making far less headway with marijuana research. Now we Americans have to ask ourselves if an age-old stigma is blocking serious research into curing the diseases of potentially millions of people. In fact, the history of cannabis products is much more based on political fear than any sort of objectivity or science. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled against state medical marijuana laws in 2001, furthering the overkill of the War on Drugs declared in the 1980s under the Reagan and Bush (Sr.) administrations. This is why, in the eyes of the federal government, marijuana is lumped in with drugs like heroin and LSD. Some also feel that the criminalization of marijuana earlier in the 20th century emerged from racism toward cannabissmoking immigrants when they started to take jobs away from Americans during the Great Depression. Yet again, no one seems to care at all about facts, science or being rational. Every day people in hospitals around the globe have to take morphine for pain, one of the most addictive substances known to mankind. This is accepted and legal, yet we can't put aside some hard feelings to try to develop an alternative drug for our ill? That's pretty uptight, man. If only we had some way to make you more relaxed.

The Daily Californian UC-Berkeley

CAMPUS QUOTES:

What's the point? ing, "Life's not fair." But, I don't see why I should have to cram cram cram and be graded on it, all because the teacher failed to realize the proximity of finals week. I think a 'dead week,' like at any other large school, is necessary. I get that teachers and students want to get done early, but I would rather have time to study and do it right. Particularly for those who have jobs, families, other obligations,

it is almost impossible to go straight from turning in the last of our homework to finals week. Breathing room is needed and I think it should be seriously considered. I am tired of cramming, doing an average job, and then doing nothing on finals week. If I am going to be graded on the quality of my finals and the effort I put into it, I should have sufficient time to prepare for it.

Big companies equal crappy customer service The major corporations don't care about you. Hardly newsworthy, right? Of course, the executives don't, but it's pretty disheartening when the people who are paid to care about you as a customer could really care less. My most recent customer service skirmish happened this past weekend. Although it pales in comparison to a few others I've had, it's still worth mentioning. I recently activated satellite radio service in my car because of our pitiful choice of broadcast stations in Oklahoma City. My radio was supposed to have been activated and working properly, but, of course, it's not. All I get is the preview channel and the emergency broadcast channel. I guess my first clue should have been when, at the end of the original activation process, they said, "Go to [whatever-itis-I-don't-even-really-careto-remember-now[.corn if you have any problems with your new activation." At the time, I didn't think much of it other than I'm dealing with electronic devices that have trouble sometimes, but hopefully

Excogitate

not this time. So, after the time had passed in which my radio was supposed to have been working properly, I fire up my computer and go to the activation refresher Web site. I type in the required info and sit there and wait, fingers crossed. Needless to say, this didn't fix anything. The next step was to call the automated service on the phone and attempt to refresh again, but I have to wait three hours because that's apparently how long it takes for the system to reset itself. Three hours later, what is now Saturday night, I dial the number and get exactly the message I wanted to hear: "We're sorry; the system is down for maintenance. Please go to [whatever-it-is-Web-site-

that's-different-than-theone-I-needed-beforacom for further assistance." Well, I have to battle my internet service (which is different story for a different day) to get to this Web site that should be my satellite radio savior. When I finally get there, a message on the screen reads, "The system is currently down for maintenance. For further assistance please call 1-800-[the-number-I-just-called]." After all this, I resort to the user's manual for my radio. I flip the radio on, just to make sure it wasn't miraculously working, and it wasn't. So, I sit there with the preview station blaring, trying to sift through the 12 languages in the user's manual, hoping that I overlooked some kind of reset thing I could do myself,

when the sound garbles and goes digital for a minute before it returns to normal. I hit the scan button and find all the channels that were supposed to have been there four hours ago when I started this process. All of that to say this: It seems to me the customer service industry is a microcosm of the society in which we live. There is a lack of accountability, no one wants to help you solve your problems (which is what they are paid to do), and, at the end of the day, they pass the buck to someone else. I don't know how many times I've been hung-up on by people that were supposed to provide some kind of support for a service I was paying them to provide, but I pay them to provide it. I just fail to understand why these companies think they can get away with not doing the job they are paid to do. If you or I performed our jobs in such a manner, we'd be looking for new ones this afternoon. We need to somehow get the attention of Corporate America and let them know we are not happy with the way they conduct business.

New & Improved: theVistaOriline.com ... Now Available

"What should UCO's new mascot be?"

Photographed and compiled by Chris Albers and Stephani Tobin . "I wouldn't change it - it's a centralized symbol of our school."

Levi Harrel Organizational Communicationt - Junior

"A stallion or a stronger horse."

Leah Tomlin Accounting - Freshman

"UCO seahorses would be cool."

"UCO Pumpernickels."

Jason Kuhlmar

Chris Wilson

StuMo Staff

Undecided - Freshman


Page 5 Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008

NEWS

The Vista

Citigroup to shed another 53,000 jobs By Madlen Read Associated Press

NEW YORK-Citigroup Inc. is shedding approximately 53,000 more employees in the coming quarters as the banking giant struggles to steady itself after suffering massive losses from deteriorating debt. The New York-based bank, which has already reduced its assets by about 20 percent since the first quarter of the year, also plans to trim expenses by 19 percent in 2009 from third-quarter levels, to $50 billion. The plans, posted on the company's Web site, were discussed by CEO Vikram Pandit at the company's town hall meeting in New York Monday with employees. The company said it is shrinking its work force by 20 percent from its 2007 peak of 375,000. The company had already announced in October that it was eliminating about 22,000 jobs from that level. About half of the expected work force reductions will come from business sales; Citigroup already announced that it was selling Citi Global Services and its German retail banking business, accounting for about 18,000 jobs. Citi is planning to sell other businesses, too, but has not announced them yet, a spokesman said. The other half of the work force reductions will come from layoffs and attrition, the spokesman said. The New York-based bank has posted four straight quarterly losses, including a loss of $2.8 billion during the third quarter. In an effort to instill confidence in the

a AP Photo

UCO receives honors at YMCA of Greater Oklahoma City banquet As active board members Thy YMCA of Greater of the YMCA of Edmond Oklahoma City recently Council, Pope and UCO's honored the University of Mark Herrin, assistant vicE Central Oklahoma with the president for Wellness and "Service to Youth" award for Sport, attended the banquet its collective and individual and were joined by UCO's efforts to support youth Executive Vice President activities and its partnerships Steve Kreidler. with the YMCA for coKreidler serves on thE programming and facility board of directors for thE sharing. YMCA of Greater Oklahomr The award, which was City and accepted thE presented at the YMCA's "Service to Youth" award annual awards banquet this on behalf of the university. month, is given to those "These awards show who have demonstrated one more time UCO's Myro n Pope unwavering dedication and engagement as a metropolitar service to children and youth of university, dedicated tc the community over the years. UCO's Vice President of Enrollment improving the community that gives us sc Management, Dr. Myron Pope, was also much in return, and the civility, community recognized for excellence, receiving the and character of our amazing employees "Volunteer of the Year" award, which like Myron and Mark," Kreidler said. For more information en the University gives special recognition to a YMCA volunteer who demonstrates commitment of Central Oklahoma, visit www.uco.edu . to the organization's mission and values, supports programs and events, and provides financial support.

company, Citigroup emphasized in its presentation Monday that its Tier 1 capital ratio, a measure of financial strength, is 10.4 percent after a $25 billion investment from the government — part of the $700 billion financial rescue package passed by Congress last month. That ratio is higher than peers Bank of America Corp. and Wells Fargo & Co., after their purchases of Merrill Lynch and Wachovia Corp., respectively. Citigroup also stressed thatit has doubled reserves in a year to $24 billion; that its revenues are stable; and that Citigroup has lower exposure to U.S. consumer mortgages than JPMorgan Chase & Co., Bank of America and Wells Fargo. But the announcements were not met with enthusiasm from investors. Citi shares fell 46 cents, or 4.8 percent, to $9.06 in morning trading. The company's shares The University of Central Oklahoma will have been trading at 13-year lows. honor five students as the Class Marshals Shortly before the town hall meeting of their respective colleges in recognition in New York, Citigroup Chairman Win of academic excellence during UCO's Fall Bischoff said at a business forum in Dubai, 2008 commencement ceremonies, Dec. 13, United Arab Emirates, that it would be at UCO's Hamilton Field House. irresponsible for Citi and other companies The honored UCO students earned Class not to look at staffing in the event of a Marshal titles for achieving the highest prolonged economic downturn. academic records within their colleges during their academic careers at UCO. Myriah Leah Gabrielle Cooke of Oklahoma City will represent the College of Arts, Media and Design as Class Marshal. She is an arts education major and 2003 graduate of Putnam City North High School. A member of the Kappa Delta Pi and Phi Theta Kappa honor societies, Cooke says that she is honored to graduate from UCO to reliable transportation, employment -and represent her college. "I am very proud of my university and opportunities, education, child care, housing, health care and support from have many happy memories from my time community networks and institutions," here. The professors and students in the art education departments are very dear to she said. From the 2007-2008 Oklahoma KIDS me because of the community they have COUNT Factbook, 170 allegations of fostered here at UCO," she said. Class Marshal Jennifer M. Vickers, a serious child abuse and /or neglect are investigated and 36 incidents are confirmed 2005 graduate of Mustang High School, is to be child abuse and /or neglect. Of those a political science major and will represent cases, the abuse is due to neglect and the UCO's College of Liberal Arts. A member of the Pi Sigma Alpha and OSDH is hoping to remedy that by having Oklahoman parents get involved in school Alpha Chi honor societies, she was the recipient of both the Randall J. Jones Jr. meetings or extra-curricular activities. Neighborhood get-togethers and volunteer Political Science and College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Undergraduate Student projects are also being encouraged. OSDH public health officials have Awards, and is a 2008 UCO Academic also identified five protective factors to Scholar Institutional scholarship nominee. Vickers has plans to pursue a Masters reduce risks of neglect and increase family togetherness. The factors include nurturing degree in International Relations and hopes and attachment, knowledge of parenting, to someday work within the government child and youth development and parental intelligence community. Actuarial science major and Harrah resilience. More information on the protective native Clint Appleseth will represent factors can be found at the OSDH Web site. For those interested in volunteering or giving back to the community, www. volunteermatch.org can serve as a guide to finding the most fitting charity

Five to be recognized for highest academic excellence

State Department of Health encourages families to share in National Family Week By Laura Hoffert

Senior Reporter

When the turkey is gone, the mashed potatoes are cold and there's a single piece of pie left, the traditional Thanksgiving family fight begins. But before any feelings or children get hurt, remember it will be National Family Week. The Oklahoma State Department of Health is encouraging families around the state to do their part in promoting "Connections Count," the theme for this year's National Family Week, Nov. 23 - 29. Families and various organizations will be given the opportunity to organize and partake in community activities during the holiday season to emphasize the importance of strengthening family bonds. "We want to emphasize that children live better lives when their families are strong and families are strong when they live in communities that connect them to economic opportunities, social networks and services," Sherie Trice, OSDH coordinator of the Community Based Child Abuse Prevention Grant said in a Department release. "These connections include access

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the College of Math and Science as Class Marshal. A 2004 graduate of Harrah High School, he says that he has appreciated UCO's focus on teaching students at an individual level. "In nearly all of my classes at UCO, the professors have made an effort to get to know each student. This makes UCO stand out from other universities and has helped to make my four years here some of the most rewarding and memorable years of my life," Appleseth said. He is the recipient of the UCO Baccalaureate; Oklahoma Community Foundation, Valentine Trust and Bridgestone/Firestone National Merit Scholarships, as well as the Achievement in Actuarial Science Award. Denise Jeanne Lozeau's outstanding work as a general studies major earned her the status of Class Marshal for UCO's College of Education and Professional Studies. A Woonsocket, Rhode Island native, she has worked as a UCO employee in the university's Max Chambers Library for 11 years in addition to her studies. Lozeau is the recipient of a UCO Foundation Scholarship and the Deana Lou Hayhurst Memorial Scholarship. Wewoka native Janet L. Elsener will represent UCO's College of Business Administration. She is an accounting major and is an active member of the Alpha Chi Scholarship and Delta Mu Delta honor societies. Elsener said that she couldn't be happier with her decision to pursue her higher education career at UCO. "The class sizes are ideal, the campus is friendly and the professors are interested in their students and in helping them succeed. My time here at UCO has impacted my life tremendously and I expect that the education I received at UCO will continue to bring more opportunities my way," she said. The five UCO Class Marshals will wear Class Marshal stoles during the fall commencement, signifying the highest degree of academic excellence. First presented in the fall of 1994, the Class Marshal title for excellence has become a UCO tradition. For more information, contact UCO's Office of Graduation Support Services at (405) 974-2392.

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Legacy Continued from page 1 "She was there for practice every single time and on time," said Statler. Kaneko gave a very memorable performance in the talent round, with her comic improvisation of the "High School Musical" song "You Are the Music in Me." A self-confessed Disney movie addict, Kaneko said she loved to make people laugh. The contestants were all honored with an official plaque. Miss Asian UCO 2007-2008, Sophia Chung, crowned Pham and wished her the best. Pham, the new reigning Miss Asian UCO, will hold the title crown until next year.


CLASSIFIEDS

Page 6 Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008

The Vista

Deadlines/Pricing

Employment

S8.00/hr NOW HIRING:

Customer Service, Car Wash & Oil Change Attendants — Openings available at 2 Locations: 2220 S. Broadway, Edmond sas-tioa4 Quail Springs/N. Penn., ON 608-0570 great Advancement Management Opportunities Available!

PT/FT NEEDED Start $7.5 0/hr. Meal assemble Business. Fill out application at 3209 S. Broadway, Ste. 121. 21 65 50 0. CHILD TUTOR NEEDED For young children in reading and math. Experience required. Junior students or above. Call Dina at 60 6-40 0 2. EARN EXTRA MONEY FOR THE HOLIDAYS At Christmas Tree Farm. Great for students. Call 4 0 5-3 4 0-548 8 for interview. NOW HIRING FOR CHRISTMAS HELP At UPS Store. Must be available between 12-7. Apply in person, 1050 E. 2nd St. RIVER OAKS GOLF CLUB Is looking for friendly, energetic person to fill weekday shifts and/or weekend shifts in the Bar and Grill. Located 10 minutes from UCO. $8.0 0-$1 2.0 0 per hour. Call Chris or Cindy @ 7 71-5 0 0 for appointment or stop by 1 0 9 0 9 Clubhouse Road, Edmond, to fill out an application. BUSINESS STUDENTS $$ NEED CASH? $$ For Gas-Fun-Plus??? 3-9 hrs per week. Hourly pay Plus Computer/Internet experience helpful. Earning potential excellent. 6 23-2 8 5 7. EARN EXTRA MONEY! Students needed ASAP. Earn up to $150 a day being a mystery shopper. No experience required. Call 1-800-722-4791. SERVER POSITION Available @ Pearl's Lakeside. Apply within. 748-6113 SHOGUN'S STEAKHOUSE Hiring for wait staff, bussers, dish washers, host, bartender. Apply in person at Northpark Mall (NW 122nd & N. May) after 5:30pm. 749-0120 TEACHER NEEDED IMMEDIATELY for Edmond Daycare. FT/PT. Experience preferred, cornpetitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262 SENIOR SERVICES OF OKLAHOMA Is looking for students to fill part time positions. Several 9am - 1 pm and 1:30 pm 5:30pm shifts are available for Mon-Fri. We pay $10 per hour for energetic phone work educating senior citizens on healthcare issues. No experience is needed we will train. Business is located at 1417 NW 150th St. in Edmond. Call 879-1888 to set up an interview. Ask for Hannah McMahan.

UCO Student Newspaper

Sports Writer The University of Central Oklahoma student newspaper is looking for someone who loves sports and loves to write. If you're that person, this is your chance to combine those two passions. As a sports writer for The Vista and thevistaonline.com , you can make extra money by watching ballgames, talking to athletes and coaches, and writing about the entertaining world of sports. The Vista covers all UCO sports. Some NBA in OKC coverage may be included.

Primary Duties The successful candidate will be expected to attend as many UGO home games as possible, take notes, interview players, and write game reports. Because most sporting events occur at night and on the Weekends, some night and weekend work will be required. The successful candidate will also write advances (previews) for upcoming games, as well as player profiles and features.

Qualifications Experience is preferred but not required. Knowledge of sports is a must.

Apply online at UCOK.EDU

BRONCHOS!

All new... Check it out!

www.thevistaonline.com

Services EDMOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTE Conveniently located on the UCO campus, offers English as a second language classes for international students/ individuals. NOW FEATURING a specially designed program with: Strong emphasis in listening & speaking, Highly interactive classes, Cornprehensive TOEFL program. Enjoy small classes and the campus facilities. Contact us at (405) 341-2125 or www. thelanguagecompany.com INT'L STUDENTS! Need to pass the TOEFL, an 1-20 for a friend or a 12-week certificate? English Language Center can help you! Call us at (405) 348-7602, visit our website www.elcok.com or come meet us in person at 1015-C Waterwood Pkwy, next to the UCO University Plaza on 2nd Street. 10P5'

ford audio-video AV RENTAL TECH (Part-time/ On-Call) Prior experience with events setup and operation of audio, lighting, and video equipment preferred. Good troubleshooting, repair skills and excellent customer service communication required. Must have good driving record and be able to work evenings and weekends. Please email or fax resume to:

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APARTMENT FOR RENT 1/2 block off campus. Prefer female students. All bill paid except telephone. Call Chuck Robinson, 406-823-1356.

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ALL BILLS PAID $425 Large Studio Garage Apartment. $200 dep. No pets. Walking distance to UCO. 1001 E. Thatcher, #4. Contact Miss June, 208-2577.

More than 17,000 people are listening. Tell them about your business! UCO Student Newspaper

Reporters If you are looking to advance your journalism career, come join The Vista, one of the most exciting and innovative student organizations on campus. The University of Central Oklahoma student newspaper is seeking talented and motivated writers who can produce well-crafted and clean copy. Our staff writers cover beats regularly and provide story ideas and stories on a regular basis by deadline. We are hiring beat reporters to cover crime, health, housing, finances, transportation, finances, student life, politics, and local arts and entertainment. We also have openings for general assignment reporters.

Primary Duties • Maintaining a list of potential story ideas. • Reporting and writing articles as assigned by editors as well as come up with story ideas on their own. • Reporting and ymriting a minimum of two to four articles per week. •Working with the managing editor until editing and revision process for articles has been completed. • Attending a training/planning session each week.

Qualiffcations

GO

DEADLINES: All classifieds MUST be submitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. PRICES: Classified ads cost $7/day for the first 20 words and $.10/word thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call 974-5549 or 974-5918 for info

This position requires good people skills and interviewing ability, as well as good spelling, grammar, word use, and journalistic writing skills. The successful candidate will be able to report accurately and fairly and demonstrate an energetic and curious attitude. Preference will be given to candidates who have successfully completed Newspaper Reporting.

Apply online at UCOK.EDU

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HEARD. ADVERTISE IN THE VISTA. Call (405) 974-5918 or email vistamedia@yahoo.com today!


Page 7 Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008

ENTERTAINMENT

The Vista

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Pop culture stars, fans say goodbye to MTV's TRL power to influence sales on the pop charts, and became a required stop, not only for those on the road to pop stardom, but those in TV, movies and even sports superstars. Tom Cruise and Will Smith made stops before a new movie; all-star athletes like Derek Jeter mingled with the teens; even legends like Madonna and Michael Jackson made sure they got "TRL" face-time. The moments weren't always cheesy, though. The Backstreet Boys broke news of member A.J. McLean's drug and alcohol rehab on the show; Mariah Carey's bizarre moment involving a striptease and ice cream defined her time of emotional instability. Both of those moments were replayed during Sunday's show, but the event mostly recalled its musical legacy, highlighted by performances from its most important alumni. Beyonce opened the show with her new singles, "If I Were A Boy" and "Single Ladies," but also gyrated to one of her superstar-making hit "Crazy in Love," which got endless plays on AP Photo "TRL." "This show obviously launched Ln Former MTV VJ Carson Daly makes an appearance careers of so many people," said Daly; on MTV's TRL "Total Finale Live" show at the MTV the now late-night talk show hostl !studios in Times Square in New York on Sunday, Nov. who could include himself in ttt§tt c 16, 2008. category. "This is a sad moment." pad group one of music's best-selling acts. Timberlake didn't perform, but arrived with "This s like a high school reunion in a s ike JC Chasez, his fellow 'N Sync member, and way," said Timberlake. "I feel like we all hailed the show for making his launchinggrew up together. 'TRL' was so integral to our careers." Like all reunions, the show featured appearances from its past graduating classes, like former VJs Vanessa Minnillo, Hilarie Burton *Eligible new donors (now an actress on "One Tree Hill") and trivia game answer Jesse Camp. Snoop CASH IN YOUR POCKE DONATE PLASMA. Dogg, Nelly and Ludacris IT PAYS TO SAVE A LIFE. rapped some of their biggest hits in a hip-hop melody; Fall Out Boy performed 716 NW 23rd Street in Times Square without Oklahoma City, OK 73103 the services of soon-to-be405.521.9204 • zlbplasma.com dad Pete Wentz, who spoke later via phone (Wentz is Fee and donation times may vary. the host of the video show New donors bring photo ID, proof that is taking the place of of address and Social Sectirity card. Good for You. Great for Life. TRL - "FNMTV.")

to the Times Square audience from "TRL's" glass-encased studios above. MTV has had other shows that will be remembered for changing the musical landNEW YORK- Carson Daly chatted with scape, including "Yo! MTV Raps," but perEminem, Beyonce gave a show-stopping haps none greater than "TRL." It made its performance, girls shrieked at the sight of debut in 1998, just as the teen pop pheJustin Timberlake and hundreds of fans nomenon was about to explode, when the lined up outside in Times Square for a rap-rock hybrid was bubbling over, and groups like Destiny's Child were considglimpse at superstars. For few hours, it seemed like old times at ered emerging acts. MTV's "Total Request Live" - back when While its concept of a video countdown the show was not only music's most power- show wasn't new, its model - which ful force but a dominant part of pop culture. included a live show, an audience full of Unfortunately, it took the show's demise to enthusiastic kids and viewer feedback helped energize the teen fan base and made make it relevant again. MTV pulled the plug on its most influential them music's tastemakers. Soon, "TRL" franchise Sunday night following years of would become an integral part of boosting declining ratings, but not before marking the careers of superstars like Britney Spears, the occasion with celebration and nostal- the Backstreet Boys, 'N Sync, Eminem and gia, as some of pop's biggest stars paid Christina Aguilera. It's no coincidence that respects to the show that helped launch their biggest sales, and pop's huge sales boom in the new millennium, came during their careers. "I feel like they're kinda tearin' down my the show's most potent era. home," Eminem said via phone as he and "If it wasn't for 'TRL,' I don't think I would Daly, "TRL's" first and most famous host, have this launching pad for my career," commiserated during the live, three-hour said a cigar-smoking Kid Rock, who came to prominence as a raucous rap-rocker on broadcast from the show's headquarters. "It's a bittersweet moment," Diddy, the "TRL" with his baudy hit "Bawitdaba" show's most frequent guest, said as he cried but has since morphed into a country-rock mock tears and gave one of the final waves career that is more CMT than MTV. "It's a big loss, not having this as a platform to promote our music," said 50 Cent in the show's waning We're Growing Like moments. In its prime, "TRL" had "American Idol"-like By Nekesa Mumbi Moody Associated Press

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Page 8 Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008

SPORTS

The Vista

Rugby splits against John Brown By Kaylea Brooks

Sports Editor

The UCO rugby football club hosted John Brown University Saturday afternoon and split the two games, losing the first game 17-24, and winning the second team game 20-5. The match was the last of the club's fall season, and was one of the three of home matches. Coach Nate Rowland said that his team has come a long way since the beginning match at Oklahoma State. "I think we showed a dramatic improvement," he said. "We mostly had problems in ball retention." Ben Selfridge was named by Vista photographer Chris Albers to the "Man of the Match" Krista Beaty watches from the wood panes while teammate Lizzie Brenner secures the rebound award by his teammates. Thursday night against rivals the Oklahoma Flyers at Hamilton Field House. The Lady Bronchos lost Selfridge had a 60-meter run in the match. the game 112-119 during overtime. Rowland said UCO could have won the match, but three of their tries were held up and it changed the "We lost some size out By Kaylea Brooks 3-point to move them up to Sports Editor there when she got taken 105, but the Flyers continued dynamic of the game. out," he said. "She'll out for to pull ahead. In a game where the Lady at least a week." The Bronchos managed Bronchos were leading by As the second period to pull themselves up to 10 points for the majority came to a close, the 10-point 111, just one point behind TOPEKA, Kan. - Chance of the game, UCO lost to cushion that the Bronchos the Flyers, but several Hardaker nailed the the Oklahoma Flyers in had had to fend off the fouls, including Brenner's overtime, 119-112. Flyers grew smaller and foul out, gave the Flyers go-ahead 3-pointer with 3:05 left to play and Central UCO came into the game smaller. At 2:04, the Flyers bonus shots that they took Oklahoma hit clutch free with energy that allowed tied with UCO 98-98, but advantage of. throws the rest of the way to them to have a narrow lead Mallory Markus broke the Overtime ended with the pull out a tough 63-57 win over the Flyers until 05:00 tie with a 3-pointer. Oklahoma Flyers winning over Colorado Christian in the last period. Lizzie For the remainder of the by seven over the UCO. here Sunday afternoon Brenner led the Bronchos period, both teams battled Hardeker is not too on the second day of the in scoring 32 points, but for the lead, but with 26 disappointed with his Washburn Classic. Brenner fouled out in seconds left, Brenner went team's performance, and "It was a tough game and overtime, leaving the for a lay-up to put the said that the exhibition we didn't play particularly Bronchos windless. Also, Bronchos ahead by two. game was a chance to learn well, but we made some 6-foot freshman Alyssa But the Flyers' Kesha from mistakes. big plays down the Fuxa took an elbow to the Watson answered back with "We looked like we ran out stretch," said UCO coach face, and later received a lay-up as well, tying up of gas. We were fatigued," Terry Evans, whose team stitches in three different the game 103-103 at the end said Hardeker. improved to 2-0. "It was places in her mouth, along of the period. "We took that last shot a good opening weekend with emergency dental As overtime opened up, a little too early," he also work. the Flyers scored first with a said, speaking of the shot for us and we saw a lot of things we need to work Losing Fuxa hurt the 3-point shot, and two 2-point by Brenner in the last period on." Bronchos, said Guy shots later, the Flyers were that left the Flyers enough Harper led the Bronchos Hardeker, the women's ahead 110-103. time to score for a tie. once again, hitting 6-of-10 basketball head coach. The Bronchos scored a

Lady Bronchos lose in overtime

Despite the loss, Rowland said he was proud of his team and how they held up against John Brown. "I was really happy with how we played," he said. UCO rugby will begin practice for a full schedule in spring that starts with a home match against the University of Arkansas on February 9. Rowland said that anyone can still join the team and that practice would begin the first week of school in January. For those unfamiliar with the sport, rugby is a sport from which football is derived, and it includes two halves of 40 minutes. There are 15 players per team on the field, including eight forwards and seven backs. To score, a player must run the ball past the goal line and touch it to the ground. This is called a try. The touching of the ball to the ground in the end zone is where the football term

"touchdown" comes from. Passes must be either backward or to the side, but cannot be forward. Blocking cannot take place, and only the player carrying the ball can be tackled. A "scrum" is also a major component in rugby. The eight forwards of both teams interlock arms with each other and push against each other in order to get the ball. The scrumhalf of the team who has been given possession will feed the ball from the side that will give the hooker of his team the advantage. The ball must be fed down the middle of the scrum, and players will try to scrape for the ball with their feet to get it out of the scrum. A scrum occurs after a minor penalty. A "nick is when two players from each team meet over the ball after a tackle. The players cannot use their hands to push the ball back to their side.

Men's basketball defeats Colorado Christian shots and 6-of-9 free throws in a game-high 18-point outing while adding eight rebounds and two steals. Michael Sosanya also came up big, making 4-of-5 shots and 9-of-12 foul shots in scoring 17 points. Phillips added nine points and David Thomas had a career-high seven assists, five steals, five rebounds and four points. UCO jumped out to a 13-4 lead six minutes into the contest on a Keith Marks 3-pointer and Harper's three-point play with 8:33 left gave the Bronchos a 10-point cushion (24-14) en route to a 31-23 halftime lead. Colorado Christian opened the second half

with an 11-2 run to take a 34-33 lead and the Cougars went up 48-41 with 11:58 remaining. UCO came back with a 9-0 run to grab a 50-48 lead on a short Thomas jumper at the 8:55 mark and it went back-and-forth the next few minutes before Hardaker's trey broke a 55-55 deadlock with 3:05 left. The Bronchos didn't score again until Phillips hit two free throws with 32 seconds remaining, with Harper making two charity tosses at 0:17 and another one at 0:06 to keep CCU at bay. UCO returns to action Friday and Saturday at the Southwestern Oklahoma Classic.

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The Vista Nov. 18, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Nov. 18, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.