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Happy moth Birthday, Oklahoma www.thevistaonline.com

The Student Voice of the University of Central Oklahoma Since 1903

November 15, 2007

Director

Student film documents Oklahoma history

arrested for shoplifting by Justin Langston

by Hannah Jackson

Staff Writer

Staff Writer

In support of the Oklahoma Centennial, the UCO Broadcast Department is airing "Cathedral on the Prairie" Nov. 13 through Nov. 16. Seven UCO students produced the documentary as part of a television news class taught by Dr. Keith Swezey. The documentary is split up into sections. The first, which aired Tuesday evening, documented the late 1800s. It details some of Oklahoma's history, including the facts that its first public schoolhouse was in Edmond and the first principle was Richard Thatcher. It also explained that before Old North was built, students were taught in the First Methodist Church. In 1983, when Old North was completed, students marched from the church to the new school building. In 1897, the first class graduated from the school, consisting of two men and two women. All four sections of the documentary include interviews of historians and Edmond residents. There are pictures and film footage that the students found in the archives at the UCO library. The second section of the documentary, which aired Wednesday evening, documented the 1900s through the 1920s. "I concentrated on the school during that time," said Emily Parrott, who worked

AP Photo

Settlers race across the border into Indian Territory as a signal opens the area to white settlement in this file photo shot in Oklahoma City on April 22, 1889. The capital of what is now the state of Oklahoma has expanded through annexation from 80.01 square miles in 1958 to 620 square miles.

1830

1803 What is now Oklahoma is acquired through the Louisiana Purchase, one of history's biggest real estate bargains.

see CENTENNIAL, page 4

1889

President Andrew Jackson President Harrison signs signs the Indian Removal legislation that opens up Act as the United States 2 million acres of land in expands westward. present day Oklahoma. The term 'sooner' is coined to describe those who arrived early to stake their claims.

Following the discovery of oil in the Oklahoma territory, the former No Man's Land becomes the nation's 46th state on Nov. i6.

Program to help smokers kick the habit by Hannah Jackson Staff Writer

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

The 31st annual Great American Smokeout begins today. Sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Smokeout's goal is to start smokers on a path to a healthier, non-smoking lifestyle.

News Central Channel 6 Mon. through Thurs. at 5 p.m.

The Great American Smokeout. It's probably not what you think. And it's probably not what you're hoping. That's in April. This is the opposite. The American Cancer Society and the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust are urging Oklahoma Smokers to quit for two days on Nov. 15 and Nov. 16. The Great American Smokeout has occurred on the third Thursday of November every year for 30 years. This year, ACS and the endowment trust are extending the event into Statehood Day, Oklahoma's Centennial. "As our state's first century comes to a close, tobacco use remains our number one cause of preventable death," said Tracey Strader, executive director of the endowment trust. "The good news is most smokers want to quit and free help is just a phone call or a click away." "Thousands of smokers across the country take part in the Great American Smokeout each year," said

"When you want to fool the world, tell the truth."

Kristen Taylor, regional communications director for the ACS. Mark Brennamen, an adjunct teacher and graduate student at UCO, dedicates much of his life to helping smokers become non-smokers. He said of the many smokers who will quit for one or two days, most will resume smoking, but there is a chance that this day could initiate a lifetime change. "Most people will go back and start smoking, but some people will have the confidence to do it and try it again a next day and perhaps become a life-time none smoker," said Brennamen. "What happens is that a lot of people realize that it's not going to kill them when they go a day without smoking," said Brennamen, Tease Austin, a senior applied liberal arts major, said she smokes socially and isn't ready to quit, but she would stop for a day in support of the ACS. "Smoking isn't something you can quit cold turkey, and I don't have the will power right now," said said. David Meserole, a junior broadcast major at UCO, said although he'd never

heard of the Great American Smokeout, he'd be willing to give it up for two days because he's trying to quit anyway. "I need to quit by January," said Meserole, "It's a goal I set because I go snowboarding every January. I'm the only person that smokes. It's a 12-hour trip and smoking stinks!" Smokers who are trying to quit can visit www.greatamericansmokeout.org , or attend Brennamen's "Non-smoking seminars" which take place every Monday at 1 p.m. and are free for students. Other options include 1-800-QUIT NOW, a helpline which will tailor a quit-smoking plan to each individuals needs, including a "quit coach" and free nicotine patches or gum. "Choosing The Great American Smokeout as the day to quit and using all available resources gives smokers a greater chance of quitting for good," said Taylor.

Hannah Jackson can be reached at hjackson@thevistaonline.com.

Stacy McNeiland, UCO's executive director of Alumni Relations, was arrested last week on a complaint of shoplifting after the loss prevention officer of the J.C. Penny store at Penn Square Mall allegedly witnessed McNeiland select five items and enter a fitting room, according to the police report. As of press time, the university has not made any decisions regarding McNeiland's future at UCO available to the public. "Sheisalongtimededica :d, excellent employee but is now on paid administrative leave through next Wednesday," UCO News Bureau Director Charlie Johnson said. "This will allow her time to deal with these allegations and will also allow UCO time to evaluate the situation as the facts become available." According to the report, the loss prevention officer witnessed McNeiland enter the store with an empty brown bag. The officer told the police McNeiland then entered a fitting room with five items, but only hung up four after leaving. Allegedly, the officer entered the stall and found a discarded tag of a blouse on the floor of the fitting room. According to the report, McNeiland looked at jewelry for a while before exiting the store. The loss prevention officer soon caught up with McNeiland and escorted her back into the store. The officer allegedly found the missing blouse in the bag McNeiland had carried into the store. According to the report, McNeiland claimed the whole thing was a mistake, but eventually admitted to stealing the blouse and said she was sorry. McNeiland was arrested and taken to Oklahoma County Jail. Justin Langston can be reached at jiangston@thevistaonline.com .

Coach Langston dismissed by Andrew Knittle Staff Writer

Head football coach Chuck Langston's year continued its downward slide Wednesday as President Roger Webb announced the coach would not return next season, according to a press release from university spokesman Charlie Johnson. The coach's dismissal came just five days after the Bronchos lost their final game of 2007, ending the season with a losing record.

see LANGSTON, page 4

Oklahoma Centennial See Editorial, page 2

—Otto von Bismarck


OPINION

November 15, 2007

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CAMPUS QUOTES: Compiled and photographed by Brenda O'Brian

"Why is it important for students to get involved on campus?" "Joining organizations, going to athletic games, supporting sports teams gets students involved with campus life."

Kristen Mollman Junior, Studio Art

"When I first got here, I joined Murdaugh Council. It's a good way to get involved and get to know people." Kellan Parker Freshman, English Education

"Students can get to know more people and learn different things by stepping out of the box. It makes college more fun." Whitney Caldwell Freshman, Family Life Education

"Joining clubs, fraternities and sororities can build lasting friendships and school spirit."

Staff Editorial

Centennial worth the splurge What an exciting time to live in Oklahoma. New museums, parades, supportive celebrities. It's good to see Oklahomans coming together to take pride in our state. It's really rare to see Oklahoma mentioned in a national light in a positive way. I mean, even four years ago, I remember meeting people from Washington, D.C. that asked me if I drove a car or rode a horse to school. Really, it happened. In the past few weeks, I've read about famous Oklahomans and the history of our state flag. There have been features on Oklahoma landmarks and traditions. One of my favorite exhibits is the one that features Oklahomans that are almost 100 years old or older. It's neat to hear from people who are literally older than our state. Some Okl ahomans, though, are wondering how much all these celebrations are costing our state. I've heard several people complain about the amount of attention the centennial is getting. They worry about all the "centennial" events that their tax money is going to pay for. One legislator, Representative Mike Reynolds of Oklahoma City,

AP Photo

Parade volunteers maneuver helium balloons during the Oklahoma Centennial Parade Sunday, Oct. 14, 2007, in downtown Oklahoma City. requested that exact costs for each project be presented to the public back in August, before a majority of the larger events had taken place. He questioned the type of events getting centennial approval as well. At that time, the centennial was still working on putting together information. And while we should definitely make sure taxpayers' money is well spent, I think

Jeremy Stuart Freshman, Undecided

"Students can go to campus activities to get to know people and make more friends."

THEVISTA EDITORIAL Andrew Knittle, Editor in Chief Steven Reckinger, Co-Editor Aaron Wright, Managing Editor

PHOTOGRAPHY Chris Albers, Photographer Chris Otten, Photographer Brenda O'Brian, Photographer

Lyndsay Gillum, Copy Editor

Erin Marlett Sophomore, Nursing

"Getting involved on campus makes college life more exciting."

NEWS Justin Langston, Staff Writer Shannon Hoverson, Staff Writer Nelson Solomon, Staff Writer Abha Eli Phoboo, Staff Writer Hannah Jackson, Staff WriterJana Davis, staff writer

Senior, Fashion Marketing

Megan Pierce, Ad Director Keith Mooney, Ad Designer

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Tresa Berlemann

SPORTS Jeff Massie, Sports Editor Alex Gambill, Sports Writer

Amber Maupin

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it's okay to splurge every once in a while. This is a milestone for our state. And whether you're an Oklahoma fan or not, it's still home to us, at least for ndw. I hope people learn something about our history or get out and participate in at least one centennial event. Everyone's admission has already been paid through taxes anyway. As a history lover, I

The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and on Thursdays only during summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034. Telephone: (405) 974-5549. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO.

plan on driving to Guthrie, Oklahoma's first state capital, to see a re-enactment of the statehood announcement at 9:16 a.m. I'll even eat the same food Oklahomans did 100 years ago of smoked beef, a slice of bread and a pickle at the picnic at 1 p.m. Maybe I can even make it to the ballpark later that evening for fireworks.

LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters and does not publish anonymous letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 107. Letters can be e-mailed to editorial@thevistaonline. COM.


November 15, 2007

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UCOMMUTE reaches out to commuters UCO makes impact during OSGA meeting by Nelson Solomon Staff Writer

Approximately 14,366 of UCO's 16,000 students are commuters. A new organization on campus is reaching out to that large majority of students. The UCOMMUTE Council works to bring programs and benefits to commuter and nontraditional students on the campus, according to Nathan Box, coordinator of Commuter Student Services. "Our programs include Brunch in a Crunch and Brake for Breakfast, which work to highlight different offices around campus and the services they provide," Box said. Brunch in aCrunchwas held at the Student Organizational Office and the UCOSA office on Oct. 15 and at Academic Support Services on Nov. 14. Brake for Breakfast was held at the Volunteer and Service Learning Center on Oct. 31 and will also be held at Multicultural Student Services on Nov. 28. The group also offers technology training classes, especially pertainingto UCOnnect and WebCT, Box said. Box said time management classes are also offered, teaching students who have kids, work 30 hours a week and go to school full or part time, how to balance their time effectively. Another unique event offered is the Off Campus Housing Fair to be held on March 26, 2008. "We'll be inviting people who own and manage apartments around campus to give that information out to students," Box said. Box explained that university research had led to the push for commuter services. "Our campus has always been commuter driven and I think what finally

by Nelson Solomon Staff Writer

, -zzaL% Photo Provided

UCommute Council's programs include Brunch in a Crunch and Brake for Breakfast. spurred the push for commuter services was feedback from graduates' exit surveys. If you read through the results, a lot of students will say they felt engaged in the classroom, but outside of it they didn't," Box said. Box said part of the goal of the Council is to help make students more well-rounded by encouraging participation in campus activities. "Whether it is Homecoming or Brunch in a Crunch or you went and saw a play, those things make us more well-rounded students and hopefully wellrounded leaders," Box said. A Web site is also being developed as part of the Council's services, and it will have a number of features specifically geared toward commuter students. Box said a few of the services offered on the site will be the Find a Roommate Program, a carpooling program and real-time weather and traffic updates. The Council plans on developing a Commuter Lounge as well.

Box said a specific location for the lounge has not been picked yet, but it is a focus of the Commuter Student Services office. Commuter and nontraditional students need an area where they can congregate and study as well as relax. Box said the lounge will hopefully be ready by next year. The Council also plans for a local alternative Spring Break, giving students a chance to help out in the community. Box said the Volunteer and Service Learning Center offers an alternative Spring Break which involves a trip out of state to work on a project, but the UCOMMUTE Council will focus on nontraditional students who can't make such a trip. "We may spend the Friday or Saturday of Spring Break working with Habitat for Humanity, providing a truly gratifying experience for the students," Box said. The Council will also focus on assisting students with questions or

concerns they may have. "If a student comes in here and they're having trouble with a class or something, or building their schedule, I'm going to do my part to help them out," Box said. The Commuter Student Services office was created to make sure students are feeling engaged inside the classroom as well as outside, according to Box. Box said that the majority of students feel and understand • that the college experience doesn't just take place in the classroom. "So the joy and pleasure I get out of this job is helping students understand that we at the university are here to help them, to guide them, to have this transformative experience, and when they graduate, they can look back at their time at UCO and say, `That was time well spent," Box said.

Nelson Solomon can be reached at • ' nsolomon@thevistaonline.com .

UCO sent the largest delegation to the fall conference of the Oklahoma Student Government Association on Nov. 10 at the State Capitol in Oklahoma City, according to Student Body President Jason Hines. "The fall conference is useful to talk about things that are a direct benefit to OSGA, things like funding for higher education, wireless internet on campus and library academic resources," Hines said. Hines said the conference is "a great forum for students across the state to get together, talk about these issues and create constructive ideas and give a unified opinion on the matter." Hines said most of the issues are dealing with higher education, as that is what OSGA is concerned with. OSGA makes resolutions that communicate to the State Legislature the issues that must be addressed to help college students. Resolutions that were passed included topics such as implementing Dead Week on campuses, increasing oncampus availability of electronic research materials and urging the State Legislature to make funding for Higher Education a priority in the upcoming legislative session. A resolution was also passed to honor the George and Donna Nigh Leadership Academy and to encourage university presidents in the state to take a significant personal interest in the selection and evaluation of quality Nigh scholars. Because of .a growing

trend of university presidents delegating the appointment of Nigh Scholars to other University staff, the bill w, according to the resolution. A resolution involving a petition to the State Legislature to offer tax exemption to teachers in the state, as many a time teachers will spend out-of-pocket money in order to provide a better classroom environment and learning space for their students. Other resolutions passed involved recycling programs on campuses in the state, investing in nanotechnology as a way to diversify the state's economy and create jobs for Oklahoma graduates. The nanotechnology bill's author, Micheal J. Davis, Research Director for OSGA, said nanotechnology was said by some to be the state's "next oil boom, and should be invested in." A resolution involving the OSGA applying for membership in the United States Student Association and becoming a dues paying member also passed. A total of 14 pieces of legislation were passed by the end of the conference, according to Hines. Hines expressed his satisfaction with this year's fall conference. "I thought the fall conference went very well, and I enjoyed the privilege of chairing the legislative session," Hines said. Hines also said the OSGA spring conference is expected to be held at UCO, with details pending. Nelson Solomon can be reached at nsolomon@thevistaonline.com.

Facebook offers carpooling emission,.Cohn said. By sharing a ride, students are doing their part in carbon reduction. The application is using Thanksgiving break as a launch period for students to find rides home, Cohn said. Cohn said that the application is getting great feedback and already over 10,000 rides have been posted on Carpool in less than four months. The Carpool application uses Google Maps technology to locate rides going in the same direction. Cohn said he was excited to have more people join and is currently looking for representatives and interns for UCO. "We feel that the application can really provide a useful service to students there," Cohn said. If you are interested in representing UCO or want more information about the application, go to www.zimride. coin.

ing, Cohn said. "I can see how it would be beneficial, but I would be scared of people who take advantage of it," Lesley Clark, a senior advertising major said. Cohn said for students to use their best judgment when it comes to ride sharing. Check to make sure friends are mutual, they go to the

by Jana Davis Staff Writer

The launch of a new application on Facebook will help students share rides to school, work, home or the airport. Marcus Cohn, the cofounder of Carpool on Facebook application said it was an application to "link people up who are going in the same direction." Once the application is downloaded, students can type in a city or ZIP code to find travelers heading in the same direction. This application seems to have its concerns. According to freshmen Emily Cole, journalism, and Lauren Smith, nursing, the application seemed questionable. "It seems kind of risky," Cole said, but both agreed that the application would be a good way to meet people. After looking up the rides being offered, Cohn said the viewer can look at their Facebook profile to see who they are, what school they go to and see if they have any friends in common. This feature is supposed to alleviate the fears of people carpool-

same school or if their feedback is in good ratings. "Charge your cell phone before the trip. Inform a friend or family member of your ride plans. If there are delays or changes to your trip, let someone know," Cohn said. "Trust your instincts." Another goal of the application is to reduce carbon

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November 15, 2007

Drumming to a di ei-ent beat

LANGSTON

CENTENNIAL

from page 1

from page 1

"This was an extremely difficult decision for me because I have enjoyed my relationship with Chuck Langston," Webb said. "However, for the future of the program, I believe a change must be made." The remaining coaching staff will stay in place, for the time being, and will be supervised by defensive coordinator Steve Patterson, Webb said. Langston, the football program and UCO have all been under investigation by the NCAA since 2006. The university received official

with Kristin Figart on the second section of the film. Parrott was mostly interested with chemistry Professor John Davis who taught at the school during that period. He also taught photography as an extra-curricular activity. "He taught the students how to use chemicals and develop pictures," said Parrott. "All of the pictures around campus were taken by him and his students." Davis and his students took most of the pictures of UCO and Edmond between 1900 and 1919, said Parrott. The third section documents the 1920s through 1945 and the fourth section documents 1945 through 1970. The students all interviewed the same people but asked questions regarding their time-section. Patty Lofton, the archives director at UCO, knew a lot about the history of UCO, and Stan Hoig, a retired UCO professor, knew a lot about the history of Edmond, said Micah Manalo who worked on the final section of the documentary. Alberta Edens was one of Manalo's most interesting interviews. Manalo covered the Civil Rights Movement, and Edens was the first black student at UCO. She said it was her father's mission that she succeed and finish college. "She remembered only one instance of racial injustice at the school," said Manalo. "Two guys bumped into her and made her drop all of her books." Manalo also interviewed Georgia Sparks who has lived in Edmond since the 1940s

"For the future of the program, I believe a change must be made." President Roger Webb

notification from the NCAA on Aug. 2, including a laundry list of infractions the football program, Langston and the university allegedly committed between 2005 and 2007. UCO plans to start looking for a new head coach right away, Webb said. by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Students in the Hibiki-Japanese drumming Club gave a preview Tuesday near Broncho Lake of what to expect at the Hibiki Drumming Night performance tomorrow. The performance will be at the Baptist Collegiate Ministries and starts at 6:30 p.m.

Andrew Knittle can be reached at aknittle@thevistaonline.com .

www.thevistaonline.corn

and graduated from UCO. Sparks talked about taking the trolley into the city for fun on the weekends. She also remembered the boys making a pulley system into Murdaugh Hall to get cheeseburgers after curfew. She joined them for a midnight snack and was caught once, but the punishment was tough enough that she never did it again. "It was unique to interview people who have lived

"We have been airing one piece a day, for the centennial, for the history of UCO and Edmond." Micah Manalo

in Edmond all their lives," said Manalo. Manalo, Parrott, Figart, Jessica Coody, Julie Hoang, Janee Delancey and Nathan Box all began work on this documentary in January. The first couple of months the students did research, made contacts and set up interviews. From early March through April, they started to film and gather archived pictures and information. The documentary was put together in early April so that they finished before finals. They waited until now to finalized the film so it would be completed in time for the Statehood Day and the Centennial. "We have been airing one piece a day, for the centennial, for the history of UCO and Edmond," said Manalo.

Hannah Jackson can be reached at hjackson@thevistaonline.com.

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COLUMNS

Convictions of the Socially inept Thanksgiving is upon us. And that usually means one thing: Black Friday. Now, I realize Black Friday is a glorious 'holiday' for many Americans. It helps those wanting to save a tremendous amount of money on Christmas gifts to feed the jaws of commercialism. Why bother spending $300 on that new Microsoft Zune mp3 player when you could wait and save $200 off the original price? What's there to lose? Of course, there is always a catch. You have to be willing to wait in line at 2 a.m., hours prior to store openings. If you don't mind standing next to a rugged, smelly man who didn't bother to bath before setting out on his shopping

expedition, then there isn't much to concern yourself with. When you step across the threshold that brings you into consumer hell, it's easy to realize the shopping that will devour several hours of your life will not be your typical experience. It becomes a battle, a bloodbath among your countrymen, fighting for your very life to obtain that last Tickle Me Elmo doll (or whatever's popular right now). Black Friday was given that name for a reason. It's a day when people unleash their inner desire to commit despicable acts of malevolence. It's a time when people summon the forces of darkness in an

effort to defeat their neighbors' triumph of filling their shopping carts with plastic goodies and colorful, woven mittens. In exchange of inexpensive merchandise and fantastic deals, all you have to do is sell a piece of your soul. Not too much to ask, right? With the Internet booming the way it is, the public may not want further access to the various shopping arcades spread across the cities. More and more Web sites are adapting to the holiday season by offering just as good, if not better, deals online for people to just point and click their way to transaction bliss. One, two, three, and you're done. Of course, you'll have to wait a few weeks before

you receive the merchandise, and then you run the risk of your family members who you bought the gifts for, to find out where you bought it from by the mailing label on the package. At least, you don't have to worry about standing in line for two hours at a store, only to buy a few things that don't cost more than $30. If the thrills connected with Black Friday are ones you look forward to every year, then God bless you, because the amount of work and strain that goes into a normal shopping day isn't nearly as frightening as the day after Thanksgiving. And if your violent nature only comes out during this time, my advice to you would be don't forget to bring your pepper spray, or your taser, or whatever else you need to neutralize your opponent. At least, there's a greater chance to get what you stood in line for in the freezing cold for five hours.

ANDRO I DTA I NMENT

JUSTIN LANGSTON I don't like writing about music. The reasons people like music are intangible and are often so personal that the slightest offense towards a person's favorite music could be seen as a personal insult.

But music is important, especially in movies. Music speaks directly to someone's heart and soul. It does things to our emotions. Certain notes will evoke certain feelings and images in a person. It's easy to over do this. I saw "Lions for Lambs" over the weekend, and in addition to the weak political aspect of the movie, one thing the movie really messed up with was the music. When used effectively in a movie or television show, music will subtly pull an emotion from the audience. In "Lions for Lambs," the music tried to force the emotions of the audience, which misses the point of using music altogether. It makes the scene

GUEST COLUMNIST TYLER SANDERS ON PRO-GAMING I am so tired of pro gaming. It isn't that I dislike garners getting paid for what they are doing, but I do dislike how commercialized it is. I know what you are thinking... "Everything is commercialized and there isn't much we can do about it." There may not be a lot, but identifying the problems may be a start. I think one of the biggest problems with pro gaming, at the moment, is the games that are getting picked to be 'pro games'. Games like CounterStrike, Quake 4, and World of Warcraft PVP battles are some of the biggest. Are you kidding me? Why didn't we ever see a pro gaming league for any Battlefield game? Why hasn't a great series like Unreal Tournament become a mainstream pro game? It is because the games that are getting chosen are the games that have the biggest companies behind them. Quake. Quakecon. Enough said on that subject. CPL? They might as well call it the Counter-Strike Professional League. Another big problem with this whole 'pro gaming' industry is that no one cares. You might say that it is a niche market, but so is football. America is a nation that may or may not have played football, but loves watching it on TV (I should know...I

am one of the people who watch). I am a gamer. I play games every day, write about games every week, watch gaming TV channels like G4, and go to gaming conventions every year. I love gaming and I don't give a crap about pro gaming. It isn't that I don't like the coverage of gaming. In fact, I think it is wonderful that gaming is getting so much attention. But what I think is missing is the fan base that all other sports have. I don't care about the PMS clan or Jonathan 'Fatal 1 ty' Wendell. And why should I? There are just so many different teams and people popping up constantly, it's hard to care. Consistency is also something that needs to be looked into. A lot of People are also viewing this whole 'pro gaming phenomenon' as just some kids getting paid to play video games. That isn't the case at all and the commercialization of the entire industry overshadows it. These teams, kids, and people train for months to be the best. Where are these giant companies telling me how hard these people train to win a little bit of their money? Let's not even get started on Fatal 1 ty. It seems to me that the media heard something about pro gaming, sent one of the brainless reporters

feel cheap. It can ruin a whole scene. If someone dies, a certain type of music is expected but to simply place sad sounding music in the scene isn't enough. The music has to match the mood completely. There can't be too much or too little. Of course, balance is key, and finding balance is going to be supremely difficult. Loud Wagnerian music with an epic horn section and fast strings might be appropriate for a battle scene in a medieval fantasy, but even then the music can't overtake the battle itself. If the music is too important, than the battle is going to become too cluttered and no one is going to

care. Context is what's really important. It's important to really look at a scene before throwing music in willy-nilly. Unfortunately, it seems to be what we're getting a majority of the time. The disappointing part is the music is close but not quite enough. It's kind of the "uncanny valley" of music. If it gets too close without being right on, it's going to sound just as out of place as polka might at a funeral. The music of a piece isn't something to be taken lightly, ever. It's not an afterthought. It's a part of the scene and it's not something to be underestimated or overdone.

out to see what's going on, found ONE guy who is good at a few games, and decided that he was going to be the face of gaming. Jonathan Wendell is not the face of gaming. He is the face of the Fatal I ty product line. What is the face of gaming? The answer is that it doesn't have a face. It has an enormous community and if you are reading this, then you are probably a part of it. So how do we change things? I think the first place to start would be to look at online gaming. This is where everyone starts as a competitive gamer. People start in small clans and communities. They start playing because it's fun. They aren't trying to pay off a car or mortgage. They are just playing because competing with games is something enjoyable to do. I am sure that now you are expecting some amazing closing paragraph calling you all to action. I am not going to do that. I wouldn't even know where to call you to.

What I will say though is that things need to change if pro gaming is to go anywhere. Will it? Who knows, but I am still going to keep playing the games that I enjoy to play and not what I am told I will enjoy by IGN, ID, Slash Damage, Gamespy, Gamespot, and so on. P.S. Quakewars was not worth the wait and I guarantee we will see it become the next big competitive game. Tyler Sanders is an advertising Junior here at UCO that started a gaming review site (www. LGRNexus. corn) in 2004. He has been dealing with the gaming industry for five years now and regularly attends gaming conventions such Quakecon and CPL as press for his website. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns for Tyler, you can e-mail him at Tsanders32@gmail. corn.

November 15, 2007

5

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Rendezvous, the Japanese break dance group, has always been popular at UCO because of their sheer talent and skill. The ease with which they made even revolving on one's head look like a piece of cake astounded the audience and, won them a local following. If Rendezvous is performing, the audience forgives and forgets easily the technical difficulties and goof-ups that came before. So it was with bated breath and high expectations that the audience cheered Rendezvous on stage at the Miss Asian

of what sells is often an indication of people trying to sell something while clutching at straws in desperation. Talent needs no advertisement, it gains fame by sheer wordof-mouth. A beautiful painting needs no gilded frame to catch attention. The audience is always smarter and has higher ethical standards than the seller assumes. Take a look at the polls, Facebook and social networking sites are more popular than porn. That's why it is sad gifted groups such as Rendezvous and other talented young

Talent needs no advertisement, it gains fame by sheer word-of-mouth. A beautiful painting needs no gilded frame to catch attention. UCO Scholarship Pageant last week. That was perhaps why one couldn't help feeling a twinge of disappointment when they abandoned their trademark moves for sexual innuendoes. A painted silver machine man strode on stage to metallic music that fit his performance. But as the show progressed, Rendezvous seemed to be coming lose at the seams with the usually bold dancers making bold moves in quite the other direction. People often underestimate the audience and box them in the mass-market category of what "sells," managing to offend their sense of aesthetics. The misconstrued notion

people abandon the beauty of their performance to flash too much skin and vulgarity. Desperation takes on a new form and becomes apparent to the audience. When newspapers do the same, they are often termed "rags" and are easily dismissed or eventually die a natural death. However, the option of living is easier: set a higher standard and showcase talent for what it is. It doesn't take much to gain respect from the audience. You are capable of it. All we are looking for is the best that you can give.

www.thevistaonline.com

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a


CLASSIFIEDS

'November 15, 2007

Deadlines/Pricing

NANNY/HSKPR In Edmond for 2 boys, 11&6. Must be reliable, cheerful and like outdoor activities. Need refs, clean background and driving record, and a reliable car. Flex schedule of 20-40 hrs per your need, but MUST be available M-F, 2:00-6:00 pm. Call 819-0503.

DEADLINES: All classifieds MUST be submitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. Prices: Classified ads cost $6/day for the first 20 words and $.10/word thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call 974-5549 or 974-5918 for info.

SERVERS & 1-10STESSES Dos Gabachos Grill & Cantina is now hiring servers and hostesses. No experience required. Apply Mon - Fri 2-5pm. 840 W. Danforth, Edmond. 216-9494.

Services

BENNIGAN'S Now hiring waitstaff & cooks. Apply in person, 2-5 Mon - Fri. May & Memorial. Call 752-7600.

EDMOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTE Conveniently located on the UCO campus, offers English as a second language classes for intern. students/individuals. NOW FEATURING a specially designed program with: Strong emphasis in listening and speaking Highly inter. classes, Comprehensive TOEFL program. Enjoy small classes and the campus facilities. Contact us @ (405) 341-2125 or www.thelanguagecompany.com .

CARRABBA'S ITALIAN GRILL Now hiring service staff. Apply Mon Thurs., 11a-3p. 3121W. Memorial Rd. CUSTOMER SERVICE/ RECEPTION PT Evenings & Saturdays. Flexible schedule. Pay based on experience. Start training immediately. Fax resume to 405-722-4521, attn: Shelley, or come in and fill out an application. CSA, 8494 NW Expwy„ just west of Council Rd.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS! Need to pass the TOEFL, an 1-20 for a friend, or a 12 week cert.? English Language Center can help you! Call (405)348-7602, visit our web site www.elcok.com , or come meet us in person at 1015-C Waterwood Parkway, next to the UCO Universit Plaza on 2nd Street.

PART-TIME WORK 10-15 hrs. per wk., w/Residential & Commercial cleaning service. Avail. 9:30 am - 2:30 pm, MF. Must have own trans. & good references. Hourly + 348-4697.

Employment

UPS STORE Is hiring seasonal help. Must be available between 12-7pm. 1050 E. 2nd St., next to Denny's. Apply in person. No phone calls please.

BEST WESTERN GUTHRIE Now hiring front-desk clerk. Day, evening & night shifts available. STUDY DURING DOWNTIME! 20 minutes from UCO. Take I35 north, Exit 157. Apply in person or fax resume to 282-2100.

TED'S CAFE ESCONDIDO Hiring servers/hosts. Apply M-F 2-5. 801 E. Danforth, Edmond.

PT NANNY NEEDED 9-6 M & W; 7:30-6 TUE. Pref. Early Childhood Major. Near Bryant & Waterloo. Send resume to Tiffany. McGowen @ roberthalf . corn

GET GREAT EXPERIENCE WORKING IN A PROFESSIONAL WELLNESS SPA Do you enjoy helping others? Are you calm-natured and health conscious? Have you ever wanted to work in a spa? If so, then this is your opportunity! The Wellness Spa in Edmond has an opening for a Spa Therapist. This position involves performing a wide array of spa treatments in a pleasant and professional work environment. Great experience for the right person. We will provide training. Hours/Days for this position are 1-6, Wed. - Fri. and 10-4 Sat. For more info please call 330-8488.

CONSTRUCTION WORK Hiring laborers now. No experienbe necessary. Part-time or full-time carpentry experience preferred. 824-8954 EDMOND FINANCE CO. Is seeking a Part-Time Front Desk/ Data Entry Clerk. M-F 9:00 - 2:00. Must have phone and computer experience including Word, Excel, and 10-key by touch. Paid holidays and vacation. Email resume to mpecinosky@abcfllc.com or fax to 405-715-5735.

SERVER POSITION Available @ Pearl's Lakeside. Apply within. 748-6113. NEED PT JOB? St. Elizabeth Ann Seton afterschool program is looking for someone to work 3pm to 6pm five days a week. The position pays $6.50 an hour. Starting date would be January 2nd or 6th. If interested call the CDC office at 340-1789. Also needing subs between 7am and 6pm on PT basis. TOUCHMARK @ COFFEE CREEK Edmond's premier retirement cornmunity, is seeking energetic, friendly servers for our upscale resort style dining room. Duties include taking orders from residents, serving food, cleaning dishes from dining room, special event set up and service, and assistance with food preparation and dishwashing. Call Mike Bates @ 340-1975 or apply in person at 2801 Shortgrass Rd. in Edmond. WANNA WORK IN ADVERTISING? If so...then The Vista needs you! We're looking for a motivated student (preferably an Advertising/PR major) who's interested in doing advertising sales for UCO's one and only student newspaper. Excellent experience for the right person, and this will look great on your resume! Come by our office today, located in the Communications Bldg. PROMETRIC TESTING CENTER Located at 2224 NW 50th, Suite 196, is searching for college students to assist with proctoring and scheduling National Board exams. The hours will be somewhat flexible during the week and also Saturday. Excellent customer service skills and basic computer skills are required. The position could lead to more hours and even full-time in the summertime. Please fax resume to 405-810-9455 or e-mail resume to cigraves902@sbcglobal.net .

CHRISTMAS BREAK JOBS The C Lazy U Guest Ranch has employment opportunities from midDecember until Jaunary 6th in the Colorado Rockies. Then stay at the rance free, for an extra week., to ski, snowboard or take advanctage of other winter activites in Grand County. Visit our website www. clazyu.com to download an application or call us at 970-887-3344. TEACHER Needed immediately for Edmond Daycare. FT/PT. Experience preferred, competitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262 MUST LOVE DOGS! Professional couple near Edmond seeks Part-time House Manager/Dog Sitter to care for family's home and dogs. Duties include exercising dogs, running errands, and general housekeeping. Must be dependable, organized, and honest with references. Flexible weekday afternoon hours (approx. 20 hours/week). Great for college student. Occasional overnights/ weekends required. Salary position - avail. immediately. Please fax resumes to 405-285-7597 or e-mail to tiffany@silverstone-homes.com . THERAPIST & CONTACT THERAPIST Therapeutic counseling svcs. to children & families. Req. Master's Soc. Wk/rel. & lic/under super. EOE. Resp w/cov Ittr & res. to Attn: HR, ERI, 601 NE 63rd St, OKC, OK 73105. f:405/840-1391

erjobs@eagleridgeok.oro MOVIE EXTRAS New opportunities for upcoming productions. All looks needed, no experience required for cast calls. Call 877-218-6224.

*Convenient to UCO, Shopping & Dining

Buy 2 meals and take $2 off your total bit or buy 1 meat and

lake $1 off.

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9th & Broadway 348-1

NAFIfICUTS! ID) MON-FRI: 9AM TO 9PM SAT: 9AM To 7PM

(WITH YOUR UCO STUDENT

Men, Women & Children Hair Caro

17, '77)1

2ND & BRYANT (BY SUPER TARGET) IN EDMOND*330-CUTS

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LOOKING FOR A JOB That will work around your school schedule? Well look no further. Papa John's is now hiring all positions at NW OKC & Edmond locations. Whether it's the quick fast money of our delivery drivers or your trying to build your resume by working for our management team. PJs has what's right for your college experience. Call or stop by today. 844-7900

For Sale 1983 PORSCHE 944 Bright red, 17" chrome Porsche mags. PW, sunroof, Posi rear end. AC/Heat. Daily driver. $4900.00 OBO. Ph: 312-9891. '94 OLDS NINETY-EIGHT 4dr, V-8, loaded. Leather seats, new trans., tires, brakes, much more. Great school car. See across from Mitchell Hall. $2500. 405-330-5422.

Rentals/Housing ONE BEDROOM APT. Gas and water paid. No Pets! Located near UCO. 1209 N. Roosevelt. $360.00/MO. Plus deposit. 341-9651 DILLON PARK APARTMENTS Now pre-leasing for Summer & Fall. Free cable TV., phone & high-speed internet. Call 285-5900 COLLEGE DISCOUNTS AVAIL. Spacious 1 & 2 bed units priced from $450.00-600.00. Limited availability. Call today to reserve your new home. (405) 341-8911. HOUSE FOR RENT 4-plex, 2bd/1bath. CH&A, all appliances. Half-block from UCO. $550/mo. Newly remodeled. 824-8954/348-9405.

$8.00/hr NOW HIRING: Car Wash & Oil Change Attendants

-Commission & Bonuses -Benefits -Flexible student scheduling -Earn up to $100 sign-on bonus

Openings available at 2 Locations:

2220 S. Broadway, Edmond 844-8084 Quail Springs/N. Penn., OKC 608-0570

stlane ,„,,, R(I A I 1:11(

Apply online at www.vqm.net or call 405-749-0332

$2 OFF ANY 2 MEALS

•No deposit with look and lease. See office for details.

PERFECT JOB FOR CREATIVE COLLEGE STUDENT Receptionist position, part time @ the hottest salon in OKC! Personality, style & computer skills a must. Call 752-5556 or apply @ Salon Rebel, 9419 N. May Ave., OKC. Salon Perks.

Advertise with the

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348-2431 1920 E. 2nd

*Computer Center with Free-WiFi

FRONT DESK RECEPTIONIST Various shifts. People skills are a must. Dependable, honest, hardworking, happy & responsible adults should apply at Pinnacle Fitness, Memorial & Penn between Toys-R-Us & Hobby Lobby.

NOW HIRING AT GYMBOREE Fun, energetic and enthusiastic teachers at Gymboree Play & Music of Oklahoma City. Call 755-3445 for details!

WE OFFER: -Weekly Pay -$8.00 per hour

*Pool & Hot Tub

*Washer/Dryer in Every Apartment

NURSING STUDENT Wanted for busy doctor's office at Mercy. Must be available to work all day TR. Other hours are possibly available. Please fax resume to 752-4242.

Vision Quest Marketing is now hiring!

*Studio, 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms

Oxford Oaks

PINNACLE FITNESS Seeking Child Care Associate. Must be experienced, patient & love working w/children. Apply in person, Pinnacle Fitness, N. of Memorial on Penn. next to Toys-R-Us.

UNDERCOVER SHOPPERS Earn up to $150 per day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and disning establishments. Experience not required. Call 800-722-4791.

Across

*Tennis Court

cy. Must be available to work all day TR. Other hours are possibly available. Please fax resume to 752-4242

SENIOR SERVICES OF OKLA Is looking for students to fill part time positions. Several 9am - 1pm and 1:30 pm - 5:30pm shifts are available for Mon-Fri. We pay $10 per hour for energetic phone work educating senior citizens on healthcare issues. No experience is needed we will train. Business is located at 1417 NW 150th St. in Edmond. Call 8791888 to set up an interview. Ask for Hannah McMahan.

Want a GREAT JOB making GREAT MONEY?

SHOGUN'S STEAK HOUSE Hiring for wait staff, bussers, dish washers, host, bartender. Apply in person at Northpark Mall (NW 122nd & N. May) after 5:30pm. 749-0120.

*State of the Art Volleyball Court

PART-TIME RECEPTIONIST Needed for busy doctors office at Mer-

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Great Advancement Management Opportunities Available(

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THEVIS IA

SPORTS

November 15, 2007

7

Peterson gets sidelined I typically try not to focus on other collegiate activities and instead keep my attention on the happenings of UCO or the professional world, but I know what the people want and I am a man of the people. Just a few weeks remain in the college football season, and once again there are many teams jockeying for the top two positions. And just like in past years, a few are going to be left out in the cold like an orphan begging for porridge. This is exactly why our current BCS format and not a playoff is the best way of determining who will play in the national championship game, because now every game matters. That's right I said it, I know it's unpopular, but I've always played by my own set of rules. Just like if it were up to me we would still be using VHS tapes and not lame DVDs. Why? Because you can't scratch a cassette tape, they never skip and you don't have to sit through those annoying chapter menus. But back to the subject at hand. In just under two months, Kansas will beat LSU and then be crowned as national champions. You think I'm crazy? I'm not. Let me explain. The University of Oklahoma is going to win its remaining games leading up to the Big 12 Championship. The Sooners have always had Tech's number; disregarding the game the referees screwed oU. Bob Stoops understands and knows how to stop Mike Leach, his former assistant. They will then go on to beat OSU. Being a fan of the Cowboys is kind of like dating a girl that cheats on you. You like her because you're dating her, and you get excited about things because sometimes you get glimpses of greatness (like a massive upset) and you convince yourself that this time things are going to be different. In the end though, it's the same result it has always been, and you can only be mad at yourself because you should have seen it coming. So that will set up Oklahoma's showdown with Kansas in the conference championship. The Jayhawks will have to go through fifth

ranked Missouri first, but that win will just add another marquee victory to their record. Following the border war game with Mizzou, Kansas' win over Oklahoma, currently No. 4 in the BCS, will catapult them past Oregon regardless of how the Ducks finish out the season. I'm no expert on how the computer formulas work, but you can't logically leave an undefeated team with back-to-back wins over top five opponents out of the championship. I guess you could say that's why we need a playoff, but if that were the case then OU's loss to Colorado wouldn't matter at all, and it should. One-loss Oregon's three reaming games — Arizona, UCLA and Oregon State — will hurt their computer ranking as these teams are a combined 15-15 this season. LSU, whom I predict to win the SEC, will earn their championship spot due to a reasonably tough schedule. It should be pointed out though that the Tigers have only had two tough road games, a loss at Kentucky and a win at Alabama that should have been a loss. On Tuesday night, a monster point was made on ESPN Radio that most people seem to be forgetting. The team that is actually going to determine the national champion is Michigan. Yes, the same Wolverines that lost at home to Appalachian State are going to determine the king of college football. LSU coach Les Miles has a special clause in his contract that allows him to leave if the job at Michigan opens up, and it will. Michigan has been stagnant recently under coach Lloyd Carr and the athletic department will be looking to make a change and hire LSU's Miles. It will be hard for him to focus on the task at hand knowing his dream job has just opened up. We all remember what happened last time Miles covertly switched posts; his OSU Cowboys were blasted 33-7 in the Alamo Bowl. Jeff Massie can be reached at jmassie@thevistaonline.com

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the team's 1,551 yards rush- the NFL in rush offense, but ing and eight of the team's are 31st in passing offense 10 touchdowns rushing. and have flip-flopped The No. 7 overall draft pick quarterbacks all season. Brooks Bollinger became out of Oklahoma broke the single-game rushing record the third quarterback to start two weeks ago against San this season in Sunday's loss Diego, racking up 296 yards to Green Bay, and Childress to put him on pace to smash said he will go with Tarvaris Jackson against the Raiders. Eric Dickerson's With the Packers keyed record for almost solely on stopping yards rushPeterson, the dazzling runner ing by a was limited to 45 yards rookie in a on 11 carries before single season. he was hurt. The Now the Vikings had just Vikings will 17 plays in the turn to vetfirst half thanks eran Chester to Bollinger's Taylor, who struggles in the passing topped 1,200 yards game, and had no chance rushing last season and has been solid in spot duty after falling behind 20behind Peterson this year. 0 early in the second half. For the immediate future, Taylor is averaging 5 yards per carry in a backup role. at least, the Vikings must find "He obviously has a a way to generate intensitrack record," Childress ty without the player who said. "We just expect some- galvanizes them on offense. Childress lauded Taylor's body to pick up there." Peterson took over as acceptance of the backup the starter after rushing for role and said he was con224 yards in a victory over fident the former starter Chicago on Oct. 14. The would pick up the slack. "He handled it like a Vikings scored 34 points that week, and the only man," Childress said of the AP photo by Morry Gash other time they've topped 30 demotion. "There's nobody Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson walks off points in a game this sea- more competitive than son was during Peterson's Chester is. It's a quiet, kind the field after an NFL football game Sunday, Nov. 11, 2007, in historic performance in of fiery competitiveness. Green Bay, Wis. The Packers won 34-0. "Did he like it? No. their 35-17 victory over the Did he accept it? Yeah ... Chargers two weeks ago. brilliant rookie season. by Jon Krawczynski He's come to work every An unbalanced attack on "This is not one of AP Writer day and has still been a offense is mostly to blame. those," Childress said. Minnesota Vikings runPeterson was injured in the The Vikings rank No. 1 in great resource for Adrian." ning back Adrian Peterson third quarwill miss Sunday's game ter Sunday. against Oakland with a torn Packers corligament in his right knee. nerback Al Coach Brad Childress said Harris hit Monday that Peterson tore him in the his lateral collateral ligament knee just as in the Vikings' 34-0 loss to Peterson was Green Bay. Peterson will not about to make require surgery, Childress said. a cut down"The good news is that field, and the the knee is otherwise stable star rookie and the injury is isolated to writhed in that ligament," Childress pain for sevsaid. "I'm told that's a eral mingood healing ligament." utes in a Childress said this is not scary scene. a season-ending injury, but Losing the he did not talk about when only offenPeterson might be back. sive star it "I'm real hesitant to has will be put a timeline on that a devastatthing," Childress said. ing blow to a Peterson was hurt just a unit that has week after he set an NFL struggled in single-game. rushing every game record with 296 yards in Peterson has a victory over San Diego. not topped Team doctors told 200 yards Childress that with ligament rushing this tears graded on a three-point season. It's scale, with three being the been a oneAP photo by Morry Gash worst, Peterson's tear is "two- man show in plus." It's not as serious as an Minnesota, Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson (28) is hit by Green Bay anterior cruciate ligament tear, with Peterson Packers cornerback Al Harris during the second half of an NFL football game which would have required accounting Sunday, Nov. 11, 2007, in Green Bay, Wis. Peterson left the game after the play surgery and ended Peterson's for 1,081 of and did not return. The Packers won 34-0.

WRESTLING from page 8 Sarette and Paul Mayfield met in the quarterfinals where Mayfield advanced after a 10 decision. After that victory, Mayfield was sent to the other side of the bracket by Robinson. Sarette and Mayfiled each lost in the semis of the loser's bracket before locking horns again for fifth place. This time, Sarette was the winner by default. Jason Leavitt reached the semifinals at 157 pounds before losing back-toback contests. Leavitt was defeated in his battle for fifth place by Oklahoma State's Ryan Freeman. This weekend the team will travel backto the Show Me State for the Missouri Open, another tournament likely to feature many Division I wrestlers. "Got to get ready for the Missouri Open and see what we can do, we'll get better," Coach James.

Jeff Massie can be reached at jmassie@thevistaonline.com


November 15, 2007

TH EVI S TA

SPORTS

Volleyball ready for Regionals by Alex Gambill Sports Writer

UCO Volleyball is on the road again this weekend for another tournament, but not just any tournament, the Southwest Regional part of the NCAA Division II Volleyball Championship in Kearney, Neb. "We are seated fourth [in the eight-team Southwest Regional] we moved up from fifth to fourth in the region," UCO head coach Boyland said. The bronze and blue are 31-6 for the year and are looking to beat the fifth-seeded, Fort Lewis, in the first round at 5 p.m. who are 21-7. The match will take place in the Health & Sports Center at University of Nebraska at Kearney. "We are at 31 wins right

now and I'm just very proud of the way we've mainly handled ourselves," Boyland said. Top-seeded tournament host UNK will play No. 8 Mesa State in the first round. West Texas A&M, No. 2 seed, will go against Midwestern State, and ColoradoColorado Springs, No. 3, against Metropolitan State. "We've played a lot of matches this year, we've been banged up but we're looking forward to the long journey to Nebraska," Boyland said. If UCO wins the first match, it will play the winner of the UNK/Mesa match at 7:30 in the semifinals. The winners of the semifinals will play for the regional title at 3 p.m. Sunday. There are seven other regional tournaments, each with eight teams that will be

held at several other campus sites this weekend in different parts of the country. The eight regional champions from this weekend will advance to a campus site yet to be determined for the quarterfinals, semifinals and finals the weekend of Nov. 29-Dec. 1. All seating is general admission and the tickets can be purchased at the UNK Ticket Office (303-865-1563). Tournament passes are currently on sale. Adult passes cost $22 and tickets for senior citizens and spectators under the age of 18 are $15. Single-session tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and minors, and $4 for college students. Alex Gambill can be reached at agambill@thevistaonline.com.

Vista Archives

Two wrestlers face off during a dual at Hamilton Field House during the 2007 season.

Nine place in Missouri by Jeff Massie Sports Editor

After a couple ofintrasquad exhibitions, the wrestling season has officially begun. The road to another national championship began in Warrensburg, Mo. at last weekend's Central Missouri Open. No Bronchos took home the gold, but nine placed overall in the open tournament that had nearly 300 entries, coming from both Division I and Division II, according to UCO Media Relations. Classified as an "open" tournament, any team could compete and schools weren't limited to one entry per weight. Weights had varying numbers of entries, as some divisions required as many as six wins to be crowned champion. The big story of the day was 141-pounder Kyle Evan's five-point loss in the finals to Oklahoma State's Nathan Morgan. Morgan is ranked third in Division I and dominated his opponents en route to the finals. He won the first two rounds by tech fall and then three major decisions before the colossal showdown with Evans. Evans, last year's Division II national champion and No. 1 ranked this season, hadn't experienced a loss in over a season, winning 43 matches in a row. by Vista photographer Brenda 0' nan

Kelsey Reynolds assists the Lady Bronchos to a 3.0 win over Dallas Baptist at Hamilton Fieldhouse on Tuesday, Oct. 30.

In addition to Evans, Colby the semifinals. Coach James Robinson earned the silver noted how Sikes was winand was defeated in the 149- ning his match with around pound finals by an Oklahoma 45 seconds left, but fell victim State grappler. The Cowboy's to a five-point move to lose. At 174 pounds, Kenny Quentin Fuentes major decisioned Robinson 10-2. Meredith suffered a fate simiOf the other nine placers, lar to Sikes. It was another the Bronchos had three ath- Cowboy who sent him to the letes finish fourth, two came losers bracket after a semifinal in fifth and another sixth. loss. Meredith advanced to "Overall our team's per- the consolation finals but was formance was about a C or C- pinned in the third period by an opponent from minus," head Oklahoma City coach David James said. "Our performance University. The Bronchos will "Our perfor- was very average meet up again mance was at best." with OCU very averon Dec. 4th. age at best. Heath The positive, -Coach James Jolley, at 184 we did place pounds, lost nine guys." his first match Zach Sikes of the tournawon his first three matches and advanced ment, but went on to win the to the semifinals at 165 next five to advance for a shot pounds before losing a one- at the bronze medal. Jolley point decision to Oklahoma was defeated 8-1 in his final State's Kyle Griffin. Sikes match, losing to a Division won his next match and met I wrestler from Stanford. No. 1 Ranked Tyler up with another Division I wrestler in the consolation Zukerman reached the semififinals, this time it was the nals before he too was defeated University of Oklahoma's by an Oklahoma State wresRyan Smith. Sikes suffered tler. Zukerman lost his next another one-point loss in this match as well before beatmatch, as he was defeated 6-5. ing his opponent from Central Coach James commented Missouri for fifth place. At 149 pounds, two addion how impressed he was with Sikes' performance, he felt he tional Bronchos placed in really should have won in addition to Robinson's second place finish. UCO's Brent

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The Vista Nov. 15, 2007  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Nov. 15, 2007  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.