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a Kang's Asian Bistro and Lottinville's food review See page 6

a Lady Bronchos enter season with No. 19 Nov. 13, 2008 ranking See page 9

Smoking n up In the air By Laura Hoffert Senior Reporter

hen there's a problem on campus, UCOSA is the go-to group to get it solved. Recently, the association surveyed students to find out if they thought allowing tobacco use on campus was a problem. At the meeting last month, UCOSA members were in favor of a tobacco-free campus, 878 to 413. Former UCOSA President Jason Hines and Representative Matt Blubaugh began the movement to become tobacco free while attending the Oklahoma Student Government Association congress earlier this spring. Though the measure passed, it did not represent the views of the entire campus. Current UCOSA President John Bobb-Semple has carried on Hines' work and has been making strides of his own in making the campus tobacco free. Working with the Wellness Center and the Community Health Club, Bobb-Semple is hoping to have UCO tobacco free by July 2009. The campus will be surveyed Nov. 18-20 to see where students stand on the issue. He is hoping to gain support throughout the campus by speaking with student groups. "We are partnering with different student organizations that reach a wider variety of students than the immediate students UCOSA is able to reach out to," Bobb-Semple said. "We are also extending our advertising to include night-time students." However, Babb-Semple is not looking to rid UCO of tobacco entirely. "I hope that the proposal as it relates to the Healthy Campus Initiative in its entirety gains traction," he said. "As it relates to a smoking ban, I want to become a smoke free campus with the exception of smokeless tobacco.

see SMOKING, page 3

Photo by Vista photographer Chanel Henry

Pick your healthy poison Rice students begin development of "Bio-Beer" By Laura Hoffert Senior Reporter

After work and school, tests and term papers, students enjoy relaxing with their friends, getting together and having a drink. Their beverage of choice is usually beer; a beverage that, for many years, has been said to cause liver and kidney disease as well as weight gain. However, students at Rice University have begun the development of what they are calling "Bio-Beer," which they say may potentially have the same

heart-healthy affects as red wine. In 2005, resveratrol, an antioxidant found in red wine, was found to increase HDL cholesterol and prevent blood clotting. Earlier this year, the students began working on creating a strain of yeast that would ferment beer while and generate resveratrol simultaneously. Their thinking was if there were a healthy beer on the market, college students would buy it. "Most people drink for taste, not for health. Ever heard of the term beer belly?" Laura Lyles, public relations

senior, said. The team consists of eight graduate and undergraduate students who gathered for the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) Jamboree, Nov. 8-9. The students said the idea of genetically engineering beer with resveratrol came to them after last year's iGEM competition, but was only seriously considered this past spring when they found enough research to guide them along.

see HEALTHY, page 3

Refunds on the fly College students find use for new Broncho debit card By Stephani Tobin

Staff Writer

Photo illustration by Chris4lbers

UCO students can handle their tuition and financial aid more conveniently, and also manage their money, with the new Broncho Spirit Card, which will be implemented this month. Higher One, a bank based in New Haven, Conn., that helps universities and colleges assist students with financial disbursements, will work with UCO on this card. "It's a win-win for students and the university," Adrienne Nobles, director of communications and marketing at UCO, said. Students will receive their cards in the mail by the end of November after they verify their current address through UCONNECT. When their address is verified or updated, they are entered in daily prize drawings for Starbucks and iTunes gift cards. When students receive their card, they can choose how they receive their tuition and financial aid refunds, Nobles said, whether it be through a transfer to a third party ba\ak, a

mailed paper check or a direct transfer to their OneAccount through their Broncho Spirit Card. Nobles said it is important for students to update their address and their refund preference because the Higher One will handle refunds at the beginning of the spring semester. "With the current economic situation," Nobles said, "students will no doubt appreciate the opportunity to receive their refund the same day it's processed." Students can use the Broncho Spirit Card anywhere a Debit MasterCard is accepted, and money can be deposited into their OneAccount through the Web site, BronchoSpiritCard.com . Nobles said the university chose Higher One because it exclusively provides this type of service for higher education, and the cost of a local bank would have been placed on the students' back. She also said it streamlines the process of depositing refunds, which saves money and helps the campus go green on paper printing. University employees can also work more directly with students through this process.

see REFUNDS, page 3


The Vista Thursday, Nov. 13. 2008 Pi oc

Deputies investigate battery claim against `Raymond' actor

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Sneak eak of holida season

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -- Authorities are investigating battery allegations against Emmy-winning actor Brad Garrett in an incident involving a photographer in West Hollywood. Los Angeles County sheriff's Sgt. Kristin Aloma said the 48-year-old Garrett has not been arrested in the incident that occurred late Tuesday or early Wednesday. She did not provide further details. A video posted on celebrity gosAP Photo sip site TMZ.com shows photographers shooting and taping Garrett for about three minutes as he left a restaurant. As he approached his vehicle, Garrett briefly chased one photographer, then pushed the video camera of another paparazzo. In the video, the man immediately claims Garrett broke his camera, although it shows him holding it up like he is still filming. The men exchange words and Garrett appears to challenge the paparazzi to a fight, but no punches were thrown. A message left for Garrett's manager, Glenn Robbins, was not immediately returned. Garrett stars in the Fox sitcom "'Til Death." He snagged three best supporting actor Emmys for his role in the comedy "Everybody Loves Raymond."

Photo by Vista photographer Chris Albers

A peek at this year's Winterglow Festival. Pitzer's Lawn Management Inc. tested some preliminary lighting schemes on Old North Tuesday night in preparation for the holiday season.

Fan of Abdul found dead Santa now appearing at Bass Pro Shop for all the support, Bass Pro Shop have about 50 Christmas trees, reinnear 'Idol' judge's home Executive Larry Whiteley said. deer and snow on display, and "A By Angela Morris

Staff Writer

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -- A fan of Paula Abdul whose failed audition for "American Idol" aired in season five was found dead in a car near the home of the pop star and judge she admired, authorities said Wednesday. Police indicated that Paula Goodspeed, whose rendition of "Proud Mary" was roundly criticized by Simon Cowell and AP Photo rejected by Abdul and Randy Jackson, had possibly committed suicide, said Ed Winter, assistant chief of the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner. An official cause of death had not been determined. Authorities found Goodspeed's body Tuesday evening in a car that photos show bearing the vanity license plate "ABL LV" in a Los Angeles Lakers frame. Her parents had reported her missing hours earlier and expressed concern that she might hurt herself. Los Angeles police spokeswoman Julianne Sohn says officers responded to a call about 6 p.m. Tuesday and arrived in the Sherman Oaks area to find the body. "I am deeply shocked and saddened at what transpired yesterday," Abdul said in a statement released by her publicist, Jeff Ballard. "My heart and prayers go out to her family." Goodspeed's audition was aired during the season that began in January 2006. She told the show's host, Ryan Seacrest, how she was a huge fan of Abdul and created life-size paintings of the singer and former Laker Girl; she also called Abdul "beautiful" after Cowell said he noticed a resemblance between Goodspeed and Abdul. But Cowell also made light of Goodspeed's braces and bloggers trashed her appearance, which she noted in a MySpace posting months after the show aired. "American Idol" producer Fremantle Media North America declined comment. Ventura County Sheriff's Capt. Ross Bonfiglio said relatives hadn't seen the woman since about 11 p.m. on Monday and were concerned she might try to hurt herself. In June, the department checked on the woman at her home in Thousand Oaks after deputies received a tip from Los Angeles police that the woman might be at risk of selfharm, Bonfiglio said.

Shatner invites Takei to his 'Raw Nerve' talk show Associated Press

NEW YORK -- William Shatner is continuing to feud with former "Star Trek" co-star George Takei. In his latest online video, Shatner says: "George has been mean to me for a long time — I mean, decades and decades." Shatner complained in a previous video that he wasn't invited to Takei's September wedding to Brad Altman. Takei and Altman have said Shatner was invited; AP Photo S. :atner says he didn't receive the invitation. Says Shatner: "I would not expect him to invite me to a place where he wanted to be surrounded by love and he'd see my little red face poking out there, and look at me and feel whatever enmity he feels for whatever reason I do' not know." He then invites Takei to appear on his Biography Channel talk show, "Shatner's Raw Nerve."

OKLAHOMA Y - Santa arrived last Sunday at Bass Pro Shop's Christmas and Santa Wonderland. Children can come in and take a free picture with Santa or participate in some of the other free games and activities, such as playing in the soft gun arcade, shooting in the laser range, racing remote control trucks, or watching the old-time train sets. Bass Pro Shop is one of a few stores that saw sales growth in 2008, so this wonderland provides the store an opportunity to give back to the customers; a way of saying "thank you"

Bass Pro Shop will also hold a "Toys for the Kids" Drive. Anyone can come by the store during open hours and drop off a toy for a good cause, said Melinda Roberts, assistant general manager. Every weekend from now until Christmas, Bass Pro Shop will be having free family weekend activities from noon to 5 p.m., which range from making tree ornaments or reindeer hats to cookie decorating. "We want to take back the good old days of Christmas," Roberts said. In addition to the various activities and games, the store will also

Christmas Story" will be shown continuously on several TVs throughout the wonderland. The entire wonderland was built from the ground up in two weeks by in-house staff, Roberts said. Bass Pro Shop also hired an additional 30 employees to serve as Santa's little helpers while he is in town, Roberts said. To check out Santa, the activities, or games, go to Bass Pro Shop located at 200 Bass Pro Drive, off of Reno, in Bricktown.

Supreme Court referees religious monument dispute regarding Ten Commandments display By Mark Sherman

Associated Press

WASHINGTON-- The Supreme Court warily confronted a case Wednesday that mixes limits on free speech with issues of church-state separation. The justices engaged in lively arguments over a small religious group's efforts to place a monument in a public park that already is home to a Ten Commandments display. The court seemed reluctant to accept the arguments put forth by the religious group known as the Summum that once a government accepts any donations for display in a public park, it must accept all. "I mean, you have a Statue of Liberty; do we have to have a statue of despotism? Or do we have to put any president who wants to be on Mount Rushmore?" Chief Justice John Roberts asked, acknowledging his examples might go a bit far. Yet the court also was uncomfortable with the position of Pleasant Grove City Utah, which rejected the Summum's request to erect a monument similar to the Ten Commandments marker that has stood in the city's Pioneer Park since 1971. Justice David Souter wondered how the city could accept the Ten Commandments display and then say, "'We will not on identical terms take the Summum monument because we don't agree with the message...' Why isn't that a First Amendment violation?" The Salt Lake City-based Summum wants to erect its "Seven Aphorisms of Summum" monument in the park. The Summum, formed in 1975, say the Seven. Aphorisms were given to Moses on Mount Sinai along with the Ten Commandments. Moses destroyed the tablet containing the aphorisms because he saw the people weren't ready for them, the Summum say. The Summum argued, and a federal appeals court agreed, that Pleasant Grove can't allow some private donations in its public park and reject others. Pleasant Grove officials are supported by federal, state and city governments, plus veterans organizations. They worry that a ruling for the Summum would allow almost anyone to erect a monument in a public park, including people with hateful points of view, or lead to the removal of war memorials and other longstanding displays. The Justice Department lawyer who took part in. Wednesday's arguments in support of the city said governments act almost as museum curators when they

decide to place some monuments in public parks and not others. "Of course the government can select the content and viewpoint of monuments on the National. Mall and in other public parks across the country," Deputy Solicitor General Daryl Joseffer said. "The Vietnam Veterans Memorial did not open us up to a Viet Cong memorial. When the Martin Luther King Memorial is completed on the Mall, it will not have to be offset by a monument to the man who shot Dr. King." Even that position drew skeptical questioning from Justice John Paul Stevens, who asked whether the government could choose to omit from the black granite Vietnam memorial the names of gay soldiers. Yes, Joseffer said, the government could leave off those names and not run afoul of the First Amendment. But doing so could present other constitutional problems, he said. The Ten Commandments marker in Utah is under the control of the city, even though it was erected by the Fraternal Order of Eagles. The city "can modify it, destroy it, drop it to the bottom of the ocean or sell it on eBay," Joseffer said. The case appears to raise questions of government favoring one religion over another, which is prohibited by the First Amendment's establishment clause. But the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals resolved the dispute on free speech grounds. Some religious and civic groups want the justices to order the appeals court to review the case by looking at the religious freedoms issue. The court ruled in a pair of cases in 2005 that historical displays of the Ten Commandments — like the one outside the Texas capitol that also was donated by the Eagles — do not violate the establishment clause, while those that are overtly religious may not be put up or maintained by governments. Some justices wondered Wednesday whether the issue of government endorsement of religion was lurking behind the case. Pamela Harris, arguing for the Summum, said the city could be open to such a challenge. Jay Sekulow, representing the city, said the Ten Commandments display in Utah was much like the courtsanctioned monument in Texas. A decision is expected before the summer.

The case is 07-665, Pleasant Grove City v. Summum.

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Healthy

Continued from page 1 The group began working with Houston's Saint Arnold Brewing Company and used a strain of yeast that is found in most common wheat beers. After modifying the strain and splicing it with three genes, the beer is not yet drinkable due to the amount of other chemicals that have been used. The students said their goal was to bring the health benefits of wine to a younger and larger audience, because beer sales and consumption overshadow that of wine. Despite of this, the question of taste and cost of the developing beer still remains. "While most people drink for the taste of beer, adding a beer to the market that tastes good and is healthy for you would probably fit in with the health craze in America," Lyles said. Resveratrol is found in a limited amount of foods, such as peanuts and blueberries, but they believe Bio-Beer could gain enough of an audience to affect people's long-term health. Yet, with more than 85 registered teams at the iGEM Jamboree in Cambridge, Mass., the team lost to a group of students who genetically engineered a vaccine for the bacteria that causes stomach cancer and ulcers. The Rice students have not released any word on whether the team plans to continue their research.

Refunds Protection of data is also a great concern to the university, Nobles said. UCO will retain banking information for students who choose to transfer their refund to a third party bank, and they will follow Federal Trade Commission and Regulation E-rules.

the mail. She also said the university will keep students informed about the card through e-mails, postings on UCONNECT and a Web site. "We expect questions along the way," Nobles said, "and we are prepared to help students during the transition."

Smoking Continued from page 1 "Beyond that I want to be able to prepare the student body to go forward with an opportunity to make our university more and more distinctive in the way we are encouraging our students and our eventual alumni to lead healthy lifestyles." UCOSA is prepared for resistance and welcome those in opposition to speak with them about the information. "As a whole, we have seen opposition to many of the details and some in the entirety of the Tobacco-Free Campus," Bobb-Semple said. "Many students will agree, but for the few who do not I want to insure that we do our very best to reach them with information." Others are not as much opposed to becoming tobacco free, as they are upset, thinking certain rules are being forced upon them.

"Some of the students who are against the measure seem to have a problem with the [Healthy Campus Initiative] because they see it as the administration pushing a lifestyle on them as opposed to their peers," Bobb-Semple said. "Other have problems due to a lack of understanding and while many do not like it because of issues with freedoms they believe are in jeopardy" For students who want to become involved in promoting a tobacco-free campus, BobbSemple urges students to contact their UCOSAsanctioned student organization senator or UCOSA Representative and tell them to vote for the measure. "They can also contact the Community Health Club or Danielle Dill at the Wellness Center to become a part of the Healthy Campus Initiative." Dill, Assistant Director, Fitness and Health Promotion, can be reached at (405) 974-3140.

Professor recruits students, educating on economics By Stephani Tobin

Staff Writer Photo illustration by Chris Albers

CO chapter of Order of Omeg the Greek/um-or society, wishes t congratulate our new members w ere initiated November 5 2008

Amor rilisporpow vow lownsor Brandy Woodward, Della Daniel Stockton, Pi Kappa Alpha Diontrey Thompson, Alpha Phi Alpha jarrog Sandra; Sigma Nu laTashia Knighten, Delta Zeta Lindsay Armstrong, Alpha XI Delta Nelisa Banks, Alpha Xi Della Michael Silellabarger, Pi Kappa Alpha Nonta Johnson, Alpha Xi Delta Tyler Francis, Pi Kappa Alpha Honorary Initiates: Jordan Smith, Acacia Lyndsay Holder, Sigma Kappa

Higher One has disbursed more than $5.7 billion in refunds for their clients, which includes students, faculty and staff at higher education institutions across the nation, according to their Web site. Nobles said students should update their information through UCONNECT by Nov. 21, and they will be required to update their refund preference once they receive their card in

Continued from page 1

Economics professor Dr. Joseph Johnson wants to recruit economics students, and he gave a presentation on Tuesday to do exactly that. Johnson spoke at a UCO Economics Club meeting on Monday with about 20 students in attendance. The presentation, titled "What Makes Hiring Sensitive to Wage Hikes?" outlined different variables affecting hiring practices, raising and lowering wages and supply and demand. "I think every society needs people who are educated in how the economy works," Johnson said. "They can help explain changes in economic decisions and provide some leadership in policy decisions." Johnson said his goal was to help recruit and retain economics students, because there is a need for people who understand finances and the economy. He said even if they don't take jobs as economists, accountant and financial adviser jobs are necessary. The important question to ask, Johnson said, is what accounts for sensitivity in an employer's demand for labor? He said many people are losing jobs in fields that are sensitive to price increases,

"I think every society needs people who are educated in how the economy works." --Dr. Joseph Johnson

such as oil and luxury items. Johnson used calculus in his presentation, stating it was the most effective way to describe the elasticity of various employers' labor demands. He also used rules and derivations from Alfred Marshall and John Hicks, two early 20 century economists, to help outline his presentation. Johnson teaches labor economics at UCO, and he said it is most pertinent to what we're concerned about in our everyday lives. "The current economy has many problems, many more than usual," Johnson said. "One of the few good things to come out of it is the way it gives economics professors so much to talk about." Johnson said students who are interested in public affairs should consider majoring in economics, especially those who are interested in analyzing data in constructed models.

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Show information at: www,webplaystudio.com Email: tarsplacegeox.net "A Gatheri does contain adult. situations.


The Vista Thursday, Nov. 13, 2008 Pdge 4

The Vista Comm. Building, Rm. 107 100 N. University Dr. • Edmond, OK 73034-5209 405-974-5549 • editorial@thevistaonline.com The Vista is published as a newspaper MANAGEMENT and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and only on Thursdays during the summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO.

LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications

Jana Davis, Co-Editor Nelson Solomon, Co-Editor Greg Newby, Managing Editor

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EDITORIAL Chase Dearinger, Copy Editor Kaylea Brooks, Sports Editor Matt Caban, StalWriter Andrew Knittle Sonor Reponer Abha Phoboo, Senior Reporter Laura Hoffert, Sembr Reporter Greg Newby, StalWriter Ryan Croft, StcfWriter Lauren Lubbers, SkiWriter Angela Monis Sin/Writer Stephani Tobin. Staf Miter Rebecca Sharnpay, Staff Writer Melissa Dixon, Surf 114-iier

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Obama should do what he promised

Stacy McIntire

CIRCULATION Chris Albers

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Tresa Berlemann

ADVISER Kelly S. Wray

Excogitate

Group projects cause individual problems We're in the crunch-time of the semester, the time when peple are stressed to the max with studying and trying to get caught up on all the things they put off until later. And group projects. Group projects in a class- "The problem is, room setting are just an allaround bad idea. It's pretty there are some clear to me that the intent people who don't do of a group assignment is what they say they'll good, but, just like socialism, the actual implemen- do ... the one person tation of such an assign- who actually did the ment just never works out the way everyone wishes work ends up doing it would. the whole thing I understand the fact that one of the biggest rea- anyway." sons teachers assign group projects is to encourage teamwork. These kinds of projects are intended to --Greg Newby build skills that are necessary to work on collaborative projects in a real-world work-environment. The problem is, there are some people who don't do what they say they'll do. They always come up with some kind of excuse and some crazy thing always happens and they're not able to do whatever it was they were supposed to do. Plus, the one person who actually did his work ends up doing the whole thing himself anyway. To remedy this problem, many teachers include a peer-review as part of the grading process. If one of the members of your group doesn't do his part, he gets a bad grade. At that point, one person ends up doing the work of several, and the group project becomes an exercise in futili e I do admire the intentions of the teachers that assign these kinds of projects, please do us all a favor. Next time you want to include one, don't.

One word has been tossed around endlessly this past election cycle, and will continue to be heard and spoken for the next four years. That word is change. President-elect Barack Obama endlessly discussed his goal to bring change to Washington, specifically from the Bush policies of the last eight years. And he defeated Republican candidate John BY NELSON SOLOMON McCain by a landslide on his mandate of change. rose to new heights in racial equality. When watching the elecBut on a different level, my hope tion returns and the ensuing celebrais that these supporters' expectations tion of Obama's victory, what caught my attention were the faces on which are not met by the actions of the Obama administration. tears of joy were streaming. With a Democratic-led Congress I can understand why people and the support of the majority of were cheering, especially African Americans, for the ceiling that pre- the country Obama clearly has the vented blacks to rise to power in this momentum to bring about true nation was broken and this nation change.

But which claims and promises that he made during the campaign were simply political rhetoric and which were legitimate promises that could in fact be enacted during an Obama administration? The fact is, promises of change, especially from politicians, are just that, promises. And we all have experiences with promises that have not been kept, with different individuals in our lives. There is a reason there is 4 such distrust for politicians in today's society, and it stems from a lack of keeping promises that were made during campaigns. Bottom Line: I hope that Obama will make at least one change, that he will be a politician who keeps his word and points this country in a positive direction.

The Bottom Line

STAFF EDITORIAL: Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson says bad mortgages will not be picked up Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson announced some changes in the federal government's $700 billion bailout of the nation's financial institutions Wednesday morning, including a decision to not buy illiquid assets belonging to banks and other lenders. Even though the provision to purchase these assets — which consist primarily of mortgage-related assets — was part of the original Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) approved by Congress a few weeks ago, Paulson wisely said Wednesday that absorbing these holdings "is not the most effective way to use TARP funds." Paulson was right to make this decision, even though millions of Americans will continue to struggle making payments on homes they can't afford and probably shouldn't be living in to begin with. House "flippers" and other real estate speculators probably will feel the effects as well, but that's part of the dangerous game they play. Why should American taxpayers bail these gam-

blers out when the tables are turned? Do these speculators, regardless of how long they've been doing it or their sob stories, not understand the flipside of making money in the real estate market? But the government will still be "injecting" cash into the banks responsible for these loans, hoping the huge investments they're making will stabilize the financial institutions and give them a chance to revise and improve their lending practices. Is this a good idea? Sure, the government will be gobbling up huge chunks of preferred stock in companies like Citicorp and AIG, but let's hope the Feds aggressively monitor and, possibly, control who these banks lend money to in the future. Bankers aren't the most trustworthy rascals out there. All and all, the decision to not purchase these "toxic" mortgage-backed securities is a good one. People will suffer, no doubt about that. Some of the sufferers will be good folks, just trying to ekk out an existence with-

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out paying someone else's mortgage. To those people, the best of luck to you and hopefully, down the road, the government will do something to help you out. Don't hold your breath, though. But to the speculators and house "flippers," glamorized on several cable channels in shows like "Flip this House," you're going to get what's coming to you. After years of raking in the dough and selling houses to people for far more than they were worth, it's only fitting that speculators reap what they've sowed. Maybe those same networks that feasted on producing shows about "flippers" and how they "seized" the moment in real estate can do some documentaries about what's happening to these guys now. They could call it "The Foreclosures," or something like that. That way, maybe the gamblers could make a little extra cash to pay those loans back to the American people.

...

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CAMPUS QUOTES: "What do you do for intellectual stimulation?" Compiled and photographed by Chris Albers "Research and reading"

"I try to keep a high component of arts in my life."

"I read The Economist."

"Sometimes I get on Wikipedia and browse. from article to article."

Lauren Ukleya

Kimberly Powell

Campus Goose

Adam York

Nursing - Freshman

Director of Produdians - KCSC radio

Advertising - Senior

Criminal Justice - Senior


The Vista Thursday, Nov. 13 Pa9-,e 5

New Plains expands horizons By Chase Dearinger

Copy Editor The newest issue of New Plains Review will be available at the magazine's launch party at 7 p.m. on Nov. 17 at Pegasus Theatre in the Liberal Arts Building. The launch party will feature readings from fiction writer Richard Weems and creative nonfiction writer and editor of Fourth Genre Michael Steinberg as well as readings from UCO faculty and staff. Copies of New Plains Review will be available at the discounted price of $8. Doug Goetsch, executive editor of the magazine and the English department's artist-in residence, believes these presenters are integral to the new direction of the magazine. "It's fitting to bring them in because they represent a new direction, which is putting the writing of our school within the context of a greater conversation," he said. Goetsch is excited about this semester's issue, which has undergone quite a few changes since previous issues. "I was delighted to see how many quality writers from all over the country were interested in publishing in our journal," Goetsch said. The new editor had two goals for this issue of New Plains Review: to make it more "literary" and to publish more work from a national pool. Goetsch believes that UCO should play a larger role in the national discussion. "Clearly there's a role that we can play and a dialogue that involves our campus but that is far bigger than our campus," he said. Efforts to expand the journal's role in this national dialogue have been successful. The newest issue includes work by two-time national poet laureate Billy Collins and Pulitzer Prize winning poet Stephen Dunn. The theme for this issue is "How Writers Learn" and includes submissions from people all over the nation as well as UCO faculty and students. "We've got a lot of good writers," Goetsch said. "Some of them are famous, some of them aren't, but they're from all over the nation. Stacy Kastner, the magazine's fiction editor and a UCO student, said she wasn't completely sure about the magazines new direction at first. "I was nervous at first, when Doug Goetsch told us his idea of opening the New Plains nationally, because I worried that UCO students wouldn't be able to compete," Kastner said. Kastner believes, however, that holding UCO students to the same standards as nationally

Second 'Madagascar' leads pack with $63.1M By The Associated Press

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known writers turned out to be a good thing for students. I think it pushes UCO students to a higher standard that challenges them to create work of great quality. I look forward to UCO students reading through this semester's journal and pushing themselves to work very hard on their submissions for next semester," Kastner said. And that's just what editors got: a smattering of writers that placed UCO students right alongside writers from around the country. Next week they will begin work on next semester's issue, which deals with the theme of "service." This issue will contain articles on anything related to service and will even contain a section devoted solely to letters on the subject. The launch party will last between one or two hours and will feature an array of free refreshments. Doug Goetsch said that if he had to promise one thing about the event it would be this: "It won't suck." For more information on New Plains Review, visit www.libarts.ucok.edu / english I newplains.

LOS ANGELES -- "Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa" created a box-office stampede as the animated comedy about zoo animals in the wild took in $63.1 million over opening weekend. The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by Media By Numbers LLC ,Nw;;Awft4 1."Madagascar Escape 2 Africa," Paramount, $63,106,589, 4,056 locations, $15,559 average, $63,106,589, one week. 2. "Role Models," Universal, $19,167,085, 2,792 locations, $6,865 average, $19,167,085, one week. 3. "High School Musical 3: Senior Year," Disney, $9,159,523, 3,464, locations, $2,644 average, $75,573,993, three weeks 4. "Changeling," Universal, $7,252,940, 1,855 locations,$3,910 average, $20,559,497, three weeks. 5. "Zack and Miri Make a Porno," Weinstein Co., $6,274,530, 2,735 locations, $2,294 average, $20,686,907, two weeks. 6. "Soul Men," MGM, $5,401,615, 2,044 locations, $2,643 average, $5,401,615, one week. 7. "Saw V," Lionsgate, $4,067,071, 2,829 locations, $1,438 average, $52,187,337, three weeks. 8. "The Haunting of Molly Hartley," Freestyle Releasing, $3,318,694, 2,576 locations, $1,288 average, $10,063,348, two weeks. 9. "The Secret Life of Bees," Fox Searchlight, $3,089,467, 1,481 locations, $2,086 average, $29,902,363, four weeks. 10. "Eagle Eye," Paramount, $2,541,602, 1,407 locations, $1,806 average, $96,348,829, seven weeks. 11. "Beverly Hills Chihuahua," Disney, $2,518,049, 2,359 locations, $1,067 average, $88,258,841, six weeks. 12. "Max Payne," Fox, $1,789,136, 1,476 locations, $1,212 average, $38,653,498, four weeks. 13. "Fireproof," Samuel Goldwyn, $1,585,555, 872 locations, $1,818 average, $28,327,659, seven weeks. 14. "Body of Lies," Warner Bros., $1,537,219, 850 locations, $1,808 average, $36,950,974, five weeks. 15. "Rachel Getting Married," Sony Pictures Classics, $1,505,507, 391 locations, $3,850 average, $5,415,820, six weeks. 16. "Pride and Glory" Warner Bros., $1,293,389, 1,340 locations, $965 average, $14,381,710, three weeks. 17. "W.," Lionsgate, $1,120,600, 839 locations, $1,336 average, $24,231,628, four weeks. 18. "RocknRolla," Warner Bros., $1,047,334, 526 locations, $1,991 average, $4,373,979, five weeks. 19. "Appaloosa," Warner Bros., $668,415, 735 locations, $909 average, $18,658,697, eight weeks. 20. "Religulous," Lionsgate, $423,273, 274 locations, $1,545 average, $12,125,806, six weeks. On the Net: www.mediabynumbers.com

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The Vista Thursday Nov. 13, 2008 Page 6

Lottinvilles prices out of sync with food quality By Daviyion Johnson and Ryan Kolb Restaurant Reviewers

Our primary duty is scouting out restaurants to find places that are new to you, our readers. Sometimes, these are places you may never try because of either price or cuisine, but that's why you have us. This week's choice may fall under the aforementioned categories. Lottinville's Wood Grille was on Kelly Avenue between 2nd and 9th Streets, but since writing this, it's location has moved to the corner of 15th and Kelly Avenue. Oh, and the owner also owns Flatire Burgers. The initial thought upon entering this wooden palace was what to expect. We had researched beforehand that a dress code was loosely enforced and knew the menu prices would be out of our college-

friendly comfort zones. We wanted to showcase the diverse eateries of Edmond, so we took one for the team. The atmosphere is the best one we've experienced thus far, but sadly, we were greeted by a 15 minute wait time, which, though expected, is never fun. While we waited, we indulged in the complementary lime mints in the lobby. We looked at the menu and vowed we would NOT get a burger. We felt that ordering a burger or sandwich would cheapen the experience of eating at a really nice restaurant. After getting a table, water, and bread (delicious bread, mind you), we decided to pick the evening's main course. Ryan opted for the Sourdough Chicken Fried Steak, which set him back $16. Daviyion chose the Smoked Chile and Cheddar Meatloaf, which left a similar

dent of 16 bucks in his wallet. Now, of course, we were not at peace with this, but had to suck it up. Never, as long as were both in college and sane, would spending 16 bucks for any meal make sense, but Lottinville's caters to a different breed of Edmondites. So, three baskets of tasty bread and 35 minutes later, our food arrived and it looked amazing. Ryan's chicken fry was large and came with a side of mashers (mashed potatoes). It was slightly above average quality, but not worth the $16. The red-eye gravy served on top provided a unique taste to the chicken fry that, while good, was not the little piece of heaven on earth that Ryan expected for the price. Daviyion fared much better with his juicy and tender meatloaf, which came with mashers and a scrumptious jalapeno

corn muffin. The meatloaf was so delicious and the mixture of the cheese and chipotle tomato sauce created a symphony of joy and bliss on Daviyion's taste buds. Overall, Lottinville's was a decent meal experience with the wait times being the biggest drawback. Ryan gives Lottinville's Wood Grille a tepid 3.5 out of 5 stars. The atmosphere was excellent, but the average service, long wait and prices will keep him from visiting anytime soon. Simply because of cost, Daviyion would only frequent Lottinville's for a special date and maybe then still lean towards the $10 burger vs. the tempting meatloaf, but if you can convince your parents to take you out for fall graduation, this is the place to go.

Retaurant's food, decor makes for zen atmosphere By Rebecca Shampay Staff Writer

There is a hidden gem east of Bryant on 2nd Street in Edmond. Even though Edmond seems to have way too many Asian restaurants, . I guarantee that Kang's Asian Bistro is one of the best. The place is not too expensive and may best serve as a good spot to take a date. Kang's has everything to offer from food to atmosphere to entertainment. The food was to die for. First of all, it has a huge variety of Asian food, including Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, and Thai. it has noodle bowls such as Pad Thai, which was excellent. It also has a big variety of rice bowls boasting such flavors as Thai. Coconut Curry and Mongolian Beef, which, according to the menu, is marinated beef tossed in a sweet garlic oyster sauce with scallions. Despite such a wide diversity, the staff makes some of the best sushi I've ever had. Their sushi is amazing, especially the Baby Gecko, one of their specialty rolls and biggest sushi sellers. It has cream cheese,

There are decorative pillows to sit on and lean against and magnificent soft lighting to really make you feel comfortable and secluded at your own table. If you're 21, the other option is the Buddha Lounge located towards the back of the restaurant. As you walk inside there is a Photo provided sleek little bar on the right and some tables jalapeno, salmon, spicy mayo, eel sauce, directly behind, imitating the green onion, and masago. Besides their specialty rolls, they also style of the main part of the offer more basic rolls, as well as Nigiri and restaurant. To the left is a series of benches and stools in cool Sashimi. Another menu option worth mentioning soft lighting and surrounded is the specialties, including duck, salmon, by magnificent atmosphere. It is by far the most attractive and quail. No matter what you decide to and relaxing place in the get, you'll enjoy the atmosphere. As you enter through the double doors restaurant. • you are greeted by a huge waterfall at the "Despite such a wide front desk. All around you are the tables and if you decide to sit in the front then diversity, the staff makes Photo provided you will be surrounded by Eastern art and some of the best sushi decor. Kang's Asian Bistro is east of Bryant of 2nd street and features The main color in the place is red, a color I've ever had." the Buddha Lounge for those 21 and older. which the Chinese believe scare away evil --Rebecca Shampay spirits and bad fortune.

Show to exhibit local ink and art By Ryan Croft Staff Writer

Vanilla-and-chocolate-twist ice cream, Diet Coke with Lime and Starsky and Hutch are all proof that "combos" have long been an American tradition. Hudson Tattoos will continue that tradition Thursday with the opening reception of its first art show. "It'll be cool to...mesh both worlds: people...interested in tattoos and also people that are interested in art," Hudson Tattoos assistant Mary Stover said. Thursday's opening will feature local visual artist Ruth Ann Borum. Borum's work has been displayed in recent local shows, including this year's "The Girlie Show," as well as "Curiously and Wonderfully Made: The Miraculous Creatures Expo," in Chicago's Medicine Park. "I don't really know how you'd describe [Borum's] art," Stover said. "It's definitely modern...and she has cool color schemes to her art." Stover said one of the main goals of the show is to attract the attention of people who would not necessarily go to a "highclass" art gallery. "There are a lot of people who are interested in tattoos, but they wouldn't necessarily want to go to...a 'highbrow' gallery," Stover said. "[They would] feel like it's uptight...there's a lot of artists our age that kind of feel the same way." Cassie Stover, Hudson Tattoos' owner and lone tattoo artist, said Borum's modern, urban art is the kind of "alternative art scene" she wants to promote at Hudson Tattoos. "[Born m's art] has a lot of... feminine, celebratory things and then she'll combine it with skulls and death," she said. "So, you get eerie [an] Photo Provided feeling." One of many pieces by artist Ruth Cassie Ann Borum that will be exhibited at Hudson Tattoos' art show Thursday Stover night between 8-10. explained ,

Photo Provided

One of many pieces by artist Ruth Ann Borum that will be exhibited at Hudson Tattoos' art show Thursday night between 8 p.m. - 10 p.m.

her initial inspiration behind Thursday's art show. "I've been tattooing for a while and I felt like I was...a little bit absent from the art community," she said. Cassie Stover said she felt like using her tattoo studio to showcase local artists was the solution. "I'm a tattoo artist and I have my art degree from [The University of Oklahoma]," she said. "I wanted a way to combine both worlds." "[Cassie Stover] has a really strong background in tattooing and in the Oklahoma art scene," Mary Stover said. Hudson Tattoos opened in September 2008, after Cassie Stover left another Oklahoma tattoo shop, First Amendment Tattoo Company. "It's...always been a dream of mine," Cassie Stover said. "To have a [studio] space and to...share a little bit of my world too." Mary Stover said tonight's opening will be the first "Featured Artist" showing, which could be held monthly. "Our focus is on...artists that have more of an urban appeal," she said. "We're just trying to get their artwork out there." Borum's art will showcase at Hudson's Nov. 13 — Dec. 10, with the opening reception running tonight from 8 p.m. till 10 p.m. Hudson Tattoos is at 1210 N. Hudson in Oklahoma City. Those interested in attending the show can contact Hudson Tattoos at 405-601-5591.

UCO to host workshop on Water Laws The University of Central Oklahoma will host the Oklahoma Department of Libraries (ODL) workshop, "Water in Oklahoma: Present and Future," from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday, Nov. 17, in UCO's Max Chambers Library, located on the UCO campus. As a result of many Oklahoma citizens and their representatives in government calling for revisions, amendments and new legislation on existing state and federal water laws, students, academics, environmentalists and the general public are invited to attend the threepart workshop to, take an active role in addressing some of the issues. Workshop discussions will be led by Jeri Fleming of the Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute and Clif Broadworth and Steve Beleu of the ODL. From 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., revisions to Oklahoma's Comprehensive Water Plan that are currently under consideration will be discussed.

From 10 a.m. to noon, participants will learn how to search Oklahoma statues for laws concerning water, tracking state and federal legislation that affects water resources and finding Attorney General opinions about water issues. Hands-on instruction in using federal and Oklahoma online water databases will be available from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Handson access to computers is limited to 45 participants, so registration is encouraged, but not required. The ODL is the official state library of Oklahoma, serving government and the general public with specialized collections and programs. UCO's Max Chambers Library is located on the southeast corner of University Drive and Ayers. Off-campus workshop participants can park in the visitor's lot of UCO's Nigh University Center for $1.00 per vehicle. For more information and to register, call (405) 974-2549.

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Sports Writer The University of Central Oklahoma student newspaper is looking for someone who loves sports and loves to write. If you're that person, this is your chance to combine those two passions. As a sports writer for The Vista and thevistaonline.com , you can make extra money by watching ballgames, talking to athletes and coaches, and writing about the entertaining world of sports. The Vista covers all UCO sports. Some NBA in OKC coverage may be included.

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INT'L STUDENTS! Need to pass the TOEFL, an 1-20 for a friend or a 12-week certificate? English Language Center can help you! Call us at (405) 348-7602, visit our website www.elcok.com or come meet us in person at 1015-C Waterwood Pkwy, next to the UCO University Plaza on 2nd Street.

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The Vista Thursday, Nov. 13 2008 Page 9

UCO's Alli Miller elected to Regional Team By Kaylea Brooks

Sports Editor

The Bronchos' Alli Miller was named to the Daktronics NCAA Division H All-South Central Regional Team on Tuesday. Miller played fullback for the Bronchos and has been named Lone Star Conference Defensive Player of the Week and also chosen for first-team All-Lone Star Conference honors for a third year in a row. She will also be considered for All-American honors. The junior fullback was the leading defender for the team, along with the top in the conference. Miller is looking forward to the spring season in which her team can play together and get more comfortable with each other for next season. "This year was a very different year," she said. "We

bonded very well, but we just didn't have very much experience." This is the first time in three years the soccer team did not make it to the Division II National Tournament. "We were finally starting to click towards the end of the season," Miller said. "But this spring is going to be huge for us. We're losing some seniors, so it'll be good to play together and get more experience as a team." Nineteen of the 24 players were underclassmen, and 16 of those were freshmen. She hopes, to push her team to be better, especially the younger girls. "It's important for me and my team to be in shape." But, despite the slight letdown of this year, Miller is hopeful about next year, her senior year. "I'm going to embrace it," she said. "Soccer has been my life, since first grade. It's

Women's basketball has high hopes By Kaylea Brooks

Sports Editor

The Lady Bronchos basketball team will be entering the season with a No. 19 ranking in the USA Today and ESPN Division II preseason polls. They also will be ranked No. 1 in Lone Star North Division. Head Coach Guy Hardaker is expecting a good year with a team that is returning three upperclassmen starters and two sophomores. But, the team will be debuting seven new girls, all of which are from Oklahoma except two. Despite the new faces, Coach Hardaker is expecting a winning season from his group. The team's star, senior Lizzie Brenner, averaged 17 points per game last year. Fellow senior Mallory Markus was also a point leader with her 3-point shots. She averaged nine points per game. Junior point guard Cristina Yarbrough will join the starting lineup, as well. The two sophomores who started for the Bronchos last year, Ashley Beckley and Kasey Tweed, will also continue to be factors for the Bronchos. Among the new faces this season is Junior College All-American Rose Anderson, who is originally from Portobello, Scotland. Kristin Goodspead is also from out of state, a forward from

Argyle, Texas. Other players are Traci Murphree—a transfer from Oklahoma Christian University, Krista Beaty—a fast freshman who can touch the rim, Alyssa Fuxa—a 6-foot back-up post, and two shooting guards, Brianne Grisham and Courtney Allen. The Bronchos will be redshirting 6-foot-2 center Alex Richardson, a transfer from Oklahoma State. Central Oklahoma is one of two basketball teams representing the LSC in top-25 preseason rankings. The other is No. 6-ranked powerhouse West Texas A&M. Coach Hardaker said that if there were a team rival, WT would be it. "They have the best in the Lone Star Conference, Emily Brister, coming back this year," he said. "But every team is good and well coached. There isn't any particular rival." The Lady Bronchos recently defeated Oral Roberts University 84-79 in an exhibition game. Already, four players of the team are scoring in the double figures. The top scorers of that game were Brenner with 20, Murphree with 16, and Markus and Beckley with 12 points each. UCO will contend with the Oklahoma Flyers in an exhibition game Thursday at 7 p.m. Their first regular season game will be on the road against Oklahoma Panhandle State University in Goodwell, Okla.

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No national tournament for Bronchos

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

The UCO girl's soccer team takes a rest between periods during a rainy October 15 match against Texas A&M International. By Kaylea Brooks

Sports Editor

UCO soccer lost to West Texas A&M, 5-1, in semifinals of the Lone Star Conference Championship Tournament Friday, preventing them from making it to the Division II National

Tournament. West Texas is No. 1 in the LSC, which allowed them to host the championships this year. The Bronchos kept up with the Lady Buffs for the first half of the game, and were only behind one point. The first half ended with the WTAMU in the lead, 2-1.

In the second half, West Texas took over and added three more shots to the scoreboard, while simultaneously preventing the Bronchos from scoring another point. The Buffs made five of their nine shots on goal, putting to shame UCO's one shot made out of seven. Katelyn Cropp kicked

in the only point that the Bronchos made all game, making it a tie in the 21st minute of the first half. The Lady Buffs beat UCO to compete in the finals against Texas A&MCommerce on Sunday.

UCO Golf moving up through ranks Women's Men's NEW YORK, N.Y. (Nov. 12) – Central Oklahoma moved up a couple of spots in the final Golf World /NGCA Division Women's II Coaches' Poll of the fall season, it was announced Wednesday. The Bronchos earned 76 points in coming in 15th in the rankings, up from a tie for 17th. Florida Southern topped the poll, followed by Nova Southeastern, Grand Valley State, Lone Star Conference rival Tarleton

State and California (Pa.). Two other league teams were in the top 25, with Northeastern State and West Texas A&M tying for 22nd. UCO put together a stellar fall cam paign, winning o n e tournament and finishing runnerup in two others. The Bronchos start their spring season on March 2 at the St. Edward's Invitational.

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NEW YORK, N.Y. (Nov. 12) – A highly-successful fall campaign moved Central Oklahoma up to No. 2 in the Golf World /Nike Golf Division II Men's Coaches' Poll that was released Wednesday. The Bronchos received six first-place votes and finished with 418 points in the final poll of the fall, trailing top-ranked South CarolinaAiken by 12 points. Florida Southern, Sonoma State and Columbus State rounded

out the top five. Abilene Christian was the only other Lone Star Conference team in the top 25, coming in 16th. The Bronchos won three of their five fall tournaments, finishing second and third in the other two. UCO's biggest win came at the Division II Preview Tournament at the site of the 2009 NCAA Division II Championships in Bellingham, Wash. Over a loaded field.

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The Vista Thursday 'Nov. 13, 2008 Page 1()

Broncho alumni defeated: Where are the By Matt Caban Staff Writer

While the current UCO Bronchos beat their Alumni predecessors 90-80 in an exhibition match Tuesday night, the Alumni players were glad to make a game of it for their successors. UCO head coach Terry Evans said the game was meant as a way to honor the players who helped build the foundation of today's program. "They did it right on the court and off the court," Evans said. "We've had two or three teams in the past that could've made it to the Elite Eight like last year's team. They're all doing it off the court." Evans said the program has graduated 30 players in his six years as head •coach. "That's something we're most proud of," he said.

Brian Walker guard, with team from 2006 to 2008. Graduating with general studies degree in December. Life after college: I've been recovering from an injury for the past few months. I'm going on a three-week tour of Mexico to by and make a team down there. Take on the game: This was a chance for me to see how much I've recovered from a recent injury. It went well.

now?

Jason Greene: guard, with team from 2004 to 2006. Graduated with a degree in world studies. Life after college: My degree was in world studies, but I opened up two clothing stores and I got a clothing line. That's what I'm doing. It's called Trendsetters. One store is in Dallas and one is in Arlington, Texas. I've been in the clothing business since high school so when I got out of school I knew what I was going to do. Take on the game: This was good for us. I guess we need the vacation. It was good for the players so they could see what we used to look like cause I know they were studying film. We should've won the game. We didn't take it too serious. They're gonna mil with those medicine balls tomorrow.

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

UCO men's basketball played an exhibition game Tuesday night against an alumni team at Hamilton Field House. The Bronchos beat the alums, 90-80. Aundrae Grayson: guard, with team from 2005 to 2006. Graduated with a general studies degree. Life after college: I'm a teacher and coach at my alma mater Tulsa Rogers High School. I teach reading to kids with reading deficiencies. We've got a strong Hispanic population, so we have a program that really helps called Reading Plus. I've seen kids that have come from Mexico that speak no English at all that become fluent in English. I have two kids my son Aundrae, Jr., 4, and my daughter Jaela, 3. Take on the game: It was great to come back to see the guys and lace them up one more time.

Sam Belt: Guard/ forward, with team from 2004 to 2008. Graduated with degree in kinesiology. Life after col lege: I'm helping the team out up here. I just signed a contract in Australia so I'll be going there in February. Been working part-time and waiting to get out of here. The name of the team is the Ringwood Hawks [of Australia's professional Big V league]. I'll be there from _February until about August. I'm trying to live the hoop dream. Take on the game: It was fun. We almost beat them.

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John Neal: Guard, with team from 2006 to 2008. Graduated with a degree in business administration. Life after college: Working and bought a house. Making house payments and being broke. Live back home in Okmulgee. I'm working on taking over the family business in Okmulgee. It's J & S Furniture, a little family-run business. Take on the game: It was fun. Like seeing a bunch of old brothers. It was a good time.

Michael Currin: Guard, with team from 2004 to 2006. Graduated with a degree in finance. Life after college: I am an account in Dallas, Texas for Baylor Healthcare. Being in the workforce isn't bad, but I wouldn't mind playing basketball instead. Take on the game: Tonight was good. It was good for the community and good for the team. It keeps the past players current with what's going on now at the university. It probably should be a tradition on a Friday or Saturday.

Anthony Brown: forward, with team from 2005 to 2007. Life after college: Last year I was in Spain (playing professionally). Here soon I'm supposed to be going to Taiwan to play. The season doesn't start until December. Just wanna keep playing as long as I Can. Take on the game: It was all in fun. Just coming in here playing hard. It started getting serious towards the end and everybody was trying to win.

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The Vista Nov. 13, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Nov. 13, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.