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iiiv crsity

of Central Oklahoma Since 1903

Faculty and students share insight on the next four years After a highly-anticipated presidential election, students and faculty at UCO have strong and varied opinions on the outcome. Oklahoma carried Sen. John McCain in the Electoral College, but Presidentelect Barack Obama won the election with 364 electoral votes and 52 percent of the popular vote.

Winner takes center stage Peer Educators reach students The Wellness Center and University Health Services are teaming to promote the Healthy Campus Initiative to students at UCO. With the recent announcement of. the UCO Peer Educators program, students will have access to health care information through other students that have been trained by the Health and Wellness Center Education staff.

Committee recognizes UCO employee

-Page 3

Opinion What should Blue do for you? My jawbone will be broken in four places in 55 days. Over the years, my jaw has shifted into a position that the doctors say may only get worse. They said my jaw is like a growing tumor, which could stop, but, most likely, will not. I have migraines that penetrate the front of my head, like I am continuously sticking my head in a freezer or drinking a slush drink too fast. -Page 4

Sports

Wrestling makes it look easy UCO conquered Grand Canyon University with ease Saturday afternoon, 42-3. The No. 6-ranked Bronchos won nine straight matches, only losing at 174 pounds and having two forfeits. The Antelopes drew first blood in the 174-pound match, with Cody Rowell succumbing to Daniel Garay, 3-5. -Page 8

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State regents propose a tuition freeze By Ryan Croft Staff Writer

-Page 5

A UCO employee was recently awarded the Public Personnel Employee Award by the Oklahoma City Mayor's Committee on Disability Concerns. Kimberly Fields, assistant director for UCO's Disability Support Services, was presented the award on Oct. 28.

History professor Dr. David Webb said eight years of the Bush administration has exhausted its welcome and ideas in Washington, D.C. and. Obama will "give us a lift for a more foreseeable future."

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Taylor Upson performs a lyrical dance to the song "On My Own" at the 33rd Annual Miss UCO Scholarship Pageant at Constitution Hall on Saturday night. Upson was crowned this year's Miss UCO.

Upson named the 2008 Miss UCO on Saturday By Lauren Lubbers Staff Writer

Former Miss UCO Ashley Edwards passed down her crown to the 2009 first place winner, sophomore Taylor Upson of Sigma Phi Lambda Sorority at the 33rd annual Miss UCO Scholarship Pageant this weekend. The theme of this year's pageant was "The Beauty of UCO." The new Miss UCO has won both cash and UCO tuition waiver scholarships totaling almost $8,000. She will also have the opportunity to continue on to the Miss Oklahoma Pageant and even as far as Miss America. Upson is an Elementary Education major from Owasso. First runner up was freshman and public relations major

Stephanie Villanella of Skiatook followed by second runner up freshman Emily Weeks of Lawton with a major in dance. All contestants that placed were awarded a $1,200 tuition waiver. "It was the best pageant I have ever been in, the board was amazing and extremely helpful," Villanella said. "Being able to represent UCO is an amazing opportunity and Taylor will do a great job." The pageant took place at the Nigh University Center's Constitution Hall late Saturday evening. There were seven judges present, one whom was former Miss Oklahoma. The pageant consisted of 12 contestants including eight freshman, one sophomore, one junior and two seniors. See UPSON,

Your tuition costs may not go up next year, thanks to a proposal from the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. The regents voted Friday to request that tuition and mandatory fees for the 2009-2010 school year be frozen at their current level, according to an OSRHE Friday press release. The proposal comes as part of OSRHE's Chancellor Glen Johnson's "Putting Families First" initiative. "I think the...'Family First' program makes a lot of sense," UCO President Roger Webb said in a Friday address to the State Regents. "Particularly in these uncertain economic times." emphasized Johnson the importance of freezing the tuition and fee costs. "It is becoming very clear that our state will need to increase its investment in higher education," Johnson said in the press release, "in order to keep higher Glen Johnson education within reach of Oklahoma's working families." As part of the proposed freeze, OSRHE is also requesting $80 million to pay universities' operational needs, according to the release. "'Putting Families First'...provides our institutions the funding they need to operate," Johnson said. "And provides students and their families with significant financial relief to allow them to focus on their education." The release also stated the OSRHE will discuss increasing student financial aid in the coming legislative session. The increases would bring an extra $450,000 for state scholarship programs, according to the press release. OSRHE Director of Communications Ben Hardcastle said Thursday he does not believe the U.S.' rollercoaster-like economy will have an immediate impact on students' ability to afford attending a public college.

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see FREEZE, page 5

Internationals voice opinions on Obama By Abha Eli Phoboo Senior Reporter

President-elect Barack Obama's victory was closely watched the world over. In Kenya, the feeling of elation was overwhelming as the country declared a holiday to honor "Our son," as Obama is fondly called in the African nation. Obama's father was a scholar from Kenya. World leaders have overextended themselves to congratulate the new American leader. For international students here at UCO, the 2008 U.S. election results meant new hope for change in policies and a renewal of relations between countries. Obama has spoken many times about ending the war in Iraq. "I really hope that he will end the

wars in Iraq and handle things better," Di lshoda Sharifzoda, from Tajikistan, said. With the world facing a period of financial crisis, it will be crucial for Obama to handle things carefully and seek to work with other countries. His presidency faces many challenges. "Times have totally changed," Koichi Sakamoto, from Japan, said. "I'm really excited to see how they'll handle things, the team they'll put together in Washington and how they'll deal with the economy. Obama's presidency also puts the minorities and ethnic communities in America in an entirely new light." Obama's victory also signals a change in direction in America's policies. People view it as America growing less isolationist and more progressive.

see OBAMA, page

AP Photo

In this Nova 7, 2008 file photo, President-elect Obama responds to question during a news conference in Chicago as vice president-elect Joe Biden, right, listens. Obama is putting hope on hold. He is using most of his time out of the public eye to study up and prepare for the new pressures he faces, a limited period where he has the luxury of putting on the cloak of the presidency without yet taking responsibility for the country's 3 ills.

Watch it! "We don't know who we are until we see what we can do."

Monday through Thursdays at 5 p.m. on Cox --Martha grimes on channel 125


FEATURE Page 2 Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2008

The Vista

Odds & Ends/

Schedule of Events

Want to contribute to The Vista? Did you know The Vista was originally a literary journal devoted to showcasing UCO's creative minds? We've decided we'd like to get back to that. We're looking for poems and short stories from UCO students to publish in upcoming issues of The Vista Weekend. Due to space limitations, we can only print one per issue, and submissions must be shorter than 500 words in length. Send them by e-mail to vistastudentfiction@ yahoo.com and look for your work in the next issue!

Ice skating fundraiser tonight to benefit Feed the Children Ministries An ice skating fundraiser to benefit Feed the Children Ministries will be held from 7:15 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. tonight at the Arctic Edge Ice Arena, on Kelley between 33rd St. and Memorial. Admission is $6, and there will be prizes for participants.

UCO Jazz Lab

News of the strange From the Associated Press

Miguel Zenon: Jazz, UCO Jazz Lab, Special Event, Ticket Info: 231-2472 Friday, Nov. 14

Percussion Concort: UCO Jazz Lab, 7:30

Brigade: Bluegrass, 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., $7

Chamber Orchestra: UCO Jazz Lab, 7:30

Texas councilman tells teens to hoist saggy pants

p.m., Donations accepted Monday, Nov. 24

DALLAS -- Dallas Councilman Dwaine Caraway is on a mission: He wants those wearing low-hanging, baggy pants to pull them up. As part of his ongoing campaign against saggy, underwear-exposing pants, the mayor pro tem held a summit Saturday. More than 100 adults, children, students, ministers, law enforcement officers and representatives from local organizations attended the hours-long derriere affair. Local youth counselor Calvin Glover, a 29-yearold former sagger who still admits to an occasional offense, said kids today have taken the trend too far, exposing too much of their backsides. "Come on, man," he said disgustedly. "I don't want to see your dirty boxers that you've had on for two or three days. I mean, really" Most listened. Others seemed still groggy from the early morning wakeup. Inside the chamber, Caraway allowed that it was OK to sag sometimes. "You can do anything, but do it appropriately" he said. "I know I'm preaching, but even if we reach one, that's good enough," Caraway said.

p.m., Donations accepted Tuesday, Nov. 25

for adults, $5 for children 12 & under Saturday, Nov. 15

Big G: Blues, UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to 10:30

Harry Tonchev (Guitar): UCO Jazz Lab, 7:30

pm., $7 for adults, $5 for children 12 & under. Friday, Nov. 28

p.m., Donations accepted Monday, Nov. 17

Michael Summers: Jazz, UCO Jazz Lab, 8

The Jazz Company feat. Brian Gorrwll and Shane Conaway: Jazz, UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to

p.m. to 10:30 pm., $7 for adults, $5 for children 12 & under. Saturday, Nov. 29

10:30 pm.,$7 foradults, $5 for children 12 & under. Friday, Nov. 21

For more information: 100 E 5th St Edmond, OK 73034 (405) 359-7989 www.ucojazzlab.com

AJ & Why Not: UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to 10:30

p.m., $7 for adults, $5 for children 12 & under. Saturday, Nov. 22

Photo of the Week

Pegasus Astronomical Society to meet today The Pegasus Astronomical Society (PAS) will meet at 3 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11, in Room 109, Math/ Computer Science. Light refreshments will be served. PAS President April Foltz will present "Mythology of the Stars: A History of the Constellations." The group also will discuss topics for the December meeting and the next star party.

Avoid parking citation fees Parking citations must be paid by the following dates during the semester the citations were issued, or they will incur a $15 late payment fee: Dec. 1 for the Fall Semester; May 1 for the Spring Semester; and August 1st for the Summer Semester.

`Gratefulness' Character First Breakfast, Nov. 13 A campus Character First Breakfast on "gratefulness" will be from 9-10 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, in Room 201, Nigh University Center. Register at http:/ /blue.uco.edu:8080/ ertrng/registration.asp or by telephone at 974-2655.

Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night,' Nov. 13-16, 20-23 The Department of Theatre, Dance and Media Arts will stage Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 13-15, 2 p.m. Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 20-22, and at 2 p.m. Nov. 23, in Pegasus Theater, Liberal Arts. (The play was moved to Pegasus due to construction at Mitchell Hall Theater.) After the opening night performance on Nov. 13, David Macey, Ph.D. and chair of the English Department, will host a panel discussion at approximately 10 p.m. The panel will include UCO professors who teach Shakespeare. All are welcome. Tickets are are $14 for adults, $10 for senior citizens and UCO faculty and staff, and $4 for UCO students. To reserve tickets, call 974-3375. For a complete schedule of UCO College of Arts, Media & Design events, visit http: / / www.camd.uco.edu / events.

`Brighten the Night' Entry Forms Available Entry forms for the "Brighten the Night" holiday decorating contest are now available in the Office of Commuter Student Services (Room 115, Nigh University Center) and are due back by 5 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1. "Brighten the Night" is a holiday, home decorating and lighting contest that challenges off-campus students to get into the spirit of the season. Students decorate the exterior of their homes with lights and anything else to display their holiday spirit. Homes will be judged based on five categories: Clark Griswold Award (Most Lights); Broncho Light Show (Most School Spirit); Best Apartment; Best Greek House; and Best House. Winners will be announced at Winterglow on Thursday, Dec. 4, and will receive a prize package and a plaque. For more information, contact Nathan Box, coordinator of Commuter Student Services, at 974-3655 or nbox@uco.edu .

Discount 'Nutcracker' Ballet Tickets The Tulsa Ballet is offering group pricing for upcoming "Nutcracker" performances at Midwest City's Rose State Performing Arts Center.' Performance dates are 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 6, and 7 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 7. To purchase tickets and receive special pricing, call Charlotte Brown at 405-8087970 and mention UCO.

A magic wand, a fishing rod or a royal scepter?

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

The International Student Association's World Cup futbol toumament came to an end Friday afternoon at East_Field. Iran prevailed as the ultimate fOtbol champions.

New Yorkers trying to save historic Tin Pan Alley By Verena Dobnik

Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP)-- A group of New Yorkers is fighting to save Tin Pan Alley, the half-dozen row houses where iconic American songs were born. The four-story, 19th-century buildings on Manhattan's West 28th Street were home to publishers of some of the catchiest American tunes and lyrics — from "God Bless America" and "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" to "Give My Regards to Broadway" The music of Irving Berlin, Scott Joplin, Fats Waller, George M. Cohan and other greats was born on Tin Pan Alley. The buildings were put up for sale earlier this fall for $44 million, with plans to replace them with a high-rise. The construction plan fell through amid the turmoil in the economy, but the

possibility of losing the historic block hastened efforts to push for landmark status for Tin Pan Alley "The fear of these buildings being sold for development crystallized their importance, and the need to preserve them," said Simeon Bankoff, executive director of the Historic Districts Council, a nonprofit preservation organization aiming to secure city landmark status for the buildings, which would protect them from being destroyed. The Landmarks Commission is "researching the history of the buildings and reviewing whether they'd be eligible for landmark designation," said Lisi de Bourbon, a spokeswoman for New York's Landmarks Preservation Commission. No date has been set for a decision, which she said depends on "a combination of historical, cultural and architectural significance."

Poet Maya Angelou feels new Obama poem coming, sees America changing By Allen Breed

Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)-- Upon his election in 1992, Bill Clinton — affectionately referred to as the nation's first black president — asked Maya Angelou to compose a poem and read it at his inauguration. Angelou feels a new poem welling up inside her following Barack Obama's election, but she does not expect another command performance. "I'm sure Mr. Obama, president-elect, will have them bring his own poet," the 80-year-old writer said Friday from her home in Winston-Salem, where she holds a professorship at Wake Forest University. "I was somebody else's poet." Angelou raised some eyebrows when she decided to support Hillary Rodham Clinton iii the Democratic primary over a fellow African-American. But when Clinton withdrew, the writer threw her support behincilbama, "thumping the drum" on his behalf and introducing his wife, Michelle, at an event in Greensboro in September. The poet and author of such books as "I Knot,ke/hy the Caged Bird Sings" said she had visceral, physical reaction when Obama was declared the winner late Tuesday. "First I laughed," she told The Associated Press in a telephone interview. "Before I could finish laughing, I wept. Then I shook. I mean, I trembled. You know, the old meaning of the word 'thrill' has a physical aspect. It's like, 'Brrrrr!' My body started shaking."

The lowlystick, a universal plaything powered ; by a child's imagination, landed in the National Toy Hall of Fame on Thursday along with the Baby Doll and the skateboard. The three were chosen to join the Strong National Museum of Play's lineup of 38 classics ranging from the bicycle, the kite and Mr. Potato Head to Crayola crayons, marbles and the Atari 2600 video game system. Curators said the stick was a special addition in the spirit of a 2005 inductee, the cardboard box. They praised its all-purpose, nocost, recreational qualities, noting its ability to serve either as raw material or an appendage transformed in myriad ways by a child's creativity. "It's very open-ended, all-natural, the perfect price — there aren't any rules or instructions for its use," said Christopher Bensch, the museum's curator.

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Page 3 Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2008

NEW

The Vista

OKC Committee recognizes employee Kimberly Fields By Kyndall Vaughn Contributing Writer

A UCO employee was recently awarded the Public Personnel Employee Award by the Oklahoma City Mayor's Committee on Disability Concerns. Kimberly Fields, assistant director for UCO's Disability Support Services, was presented the award on Oct. 28. The Oklahoma City Mayor's Committee on Disability Concerns honors outstanding public agency employees for contributing to the removal of social, attitudinal and environmental

barriers for people with disabilities in the agency in which they work. "There are a whole lot of people who are deserving," Fields said. "I don't think I am as deserving as they made me feel." Fields has won awards for leadership, alumni groups, and being an outstanding senior, but this was her first award for disability concerns. "I just serve people with disabilities," Fields said. "To me, it's just about being human. As with any job it is our main goal to make sure students get the help they need to succeed."

Fields has been helping students at UCO for six years. There are 1,300 students registered with Disability Support Services at UCO. "We have a really strong organization, and with that comes great leaders," Fields said. "To get to advise the leaders is probably one of the most awesome experiences I have ever gotten to have. They teach you, you don't teach them." The Disability Support Services is committed to serving all students with disabilities so everyone can have equal access to higher education.

Calling

Faculty and students give election insight By Stephani Tobin Staff Writer

a nation are "immense" but will involve bold government action and the end of laissez-faire. After a highly-anticipated presidential "I think [Obama's] biggest contribution election, students and faculty at UCO will be that he will inspire a nation like my have strong and varied opinions about the heroes did," Baker said. outcome. American government professor Oklahoma carried Sen. John McCain in Deborah Ferrell-Lynn said many voters the Electoral College, but President-elect were caught up in the "excitement and Barack Obama won the election with 364 fervor" of the Obama campaign and they electoral votes and 52 percent may not know very much of the popular vote. about the man himself. History professor Dr. David "Conservative Webb said eight years of Republicans and the Bush administration has Democrats will have to exhausted its welcome and work hard to overcome ideas in Washington, D.C. and the cult of personality that Obama will "give us a lift for a proved to be the winning more foreseeable future." formula this year," she "As trite as it is, I believe said. Obama will bring change to Freshman psychology [Washington, D.C.] and hope major Aaron Langston to a war-weary and cynical said Obama's win should world," Webb said. be less of a race issue, and Barack Obama David Johnston, a senior there should be a great history major, was at a friend's deal of focus on his ability house when CNN called the to lead the country. election for Obama. Johnston "I don't think this said he remembered the 2000 achievement will presidential election and he ultimately change things would "believe nothing" until for African-Americans," he heard a concession speech. Langston said, "but I do He said he was moved by think that this will be the McCain's concession speech right step for all minorities and that he "bowed out and for politics." with grace," but Obama's He also said Obama has acceptance speech moved him the charisma and public to tears. speaking skills to unite the "Never in my life have I country and help people heard a man speak whom through hard times. John McCain I have total respect and April Clark, a junior confidence in," Johnston said. philosophy major, was sad when McCain History professor and historian Jim lost, because she said he was a nice guy Baker said he remembers when Dr. who ran his campaign well. Martin Luther King, Jr., President John F. "I'm a little wary of all politicians and Kennedy and Sen. Robert Kennedy were their promises," Clark said, "so I would assassinated, and it led him to believe that love to see [Obama] prove me wrong and "we would never have a dream again, or a actually bring about the change he talks sense that we would need to serve." about." Baker said the problems America face as

Obama Continued from page 1 "He's set an example and made history," Nihal Issari, from Morocco, said. "For America to choose an African American with a background such as his shows that the country is making progress. We can't really predict how he will act, but hopefully he will end the wars and create a better approach toward the Middle East." Third world nations that

have been plagued by conflict are impressed with America's decision but are aware that it will not make much difference to them. "It's good to have such a change," Kovoor Pieris, from Sri Lanka, said. "The United States has not had a minority member in leadership, but honestly, he won't make much of a difference to countries like mine."

Students of other nationalities are waiting and watching to see what policies will be enacted and how they will affect their nations. But for most, the war in Iraq and Afghanistan are still priority. "I hope he'll do better, that he'll bring change in policies involving wars," Imran Siddique, from Pakistan, said.

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OPINION

Page 4 Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2008

The Vista

The Vista Comm_ Building, Rm. 107 100 N. University Dr • EdMind, OK 73034-5209 405-974-5549 • alitotial@thevistamIiiie..00M The Vista is published as. a new public forum by tra stale semi-w-eekly dizift the academie year egicept maim and holiday periods, and onty on Thursdays during the suramer, at the University of Central Oklahoma. The kin* price is free for the first c-plt., and. 81 for each additional copy

MANAGEMENT Jam Davis. Co-eddisir Nelson Scslarisca4 CooZtator Gin NeWhy, .14notos attar azisAlsen Aloft BOW Keith Maxey, miter

EINTORIAL anviasiomaitywor KastAkchAvaolialar

obtained_. EDrTORIALS AttimKtidb.4100411Fotair Opinion columns, editorial cannons, Attabanokoritoratir reviews and commentaries represent inalbrefutorapor the views of rae writer or artist and not Lt./4m, Yew...wily the views of Tbe Vista Edi- imembitiemkafir torial Board, the pmt of M2ISS Aim Amor COttriltilliCatiOre, 1:I orthe Board stallacemizAPiro RebamSbrw, aponsuaivst &Regents of Oklah.oma Colleges. The. Vista is not an official theditiM1 of MelissammoCalwigweirat expression for the Regents e UCO. PHOTOGRAPHY LEL LERS aratelliezy.pit. The Vista eqteoszaps letters to the DESIGN ecritor 1Let.rs should address issties iirtiDat anui ideas, not personalities, Letters KaykliAdianek must be typed, double-spaced, with AmiewKorde a .maisicram -hi 150 words, .and must fader:ha include the author's printed name, title, CARTOONIST CAR major, classifica tion and phone num- LuedAylor her. Laws are subject to editing for ii L clarity and -.space, or to eliminate, AD SALES statements of questionable taste. The Stacy McIntire Ailsta reserves the right not to •publith Tim Croak admitted letter. CIRCULATION • alit Abort Address letters to: EttiteiT., The Vista, 100 S. Universitv r . Edmond, OK ADMINISTRATIVI 73034' 5209, or deliver in person to the ASSISTANT editor in the Communications Build- Trea Berkisam Room 107 Letters ean be e-maaled ADvi s ER t1.1 editaiam tbevistaunlihe.con. Kelly S.Wray

What's the point? What should Blue do for you?

Cartoon by UWIRE

Billy Graham: A legacy in the making America's evangelist, Billy Graham, turned 90 last Friday. And what a life he's lived. I first heard of him at an early age, and have turned to his ministry time and time again for spiritual help and biblical resources. His name has been synonymous with people turning their lives to God ever since his first crusade. Many have a tale of hearing him speak on television or in person and making the decision to start a relationship with God. If you heard that Billy Graham was coming into town, you knew that the stadium would be packed, as it was in Oklahoma City in 2003. His last crusade took place in June 2005 in New York City. Former Oklahoma City Mayor Kirk Humphreys is a beneficiary of Billy Graham's first OKC crusade in 1956, according to a January 2003 article from The Oklahoman. Humphreys said the crusade's profound effect on his father, and subsequently, his entire family. According to a June 2002 Cincinnati Post article, his lifetime audience, including radio and television broadcasts, has topped two billion. He has had his negative moments, such as in 1972, when he told former

President Richard Nixon that the Jewish "stranglehold" of the media was ruining the United States and must be broken. He apologized for the remark in 2003. "Although I have no memory of the occasion, I deeply regret comments I apparently made in an Oval

7 AP article. His son Franklin Graham said in an AP interview that his father's mind remains sharp even as his body continues to fall. "My father feels like his time and day for that is over," Franklin said. "But he would certainly like to

The Bottom Line Office conversation with President Richard Nixon some 30 years ago" Mr. Graham said in a statement released by his Texas public relations firm. But if he didn't have scars on his record, he wouldn't be the spiritual leader that he is, for what leader is truly flawless? He has had a personal audience with every sitting U.S. president beginning with Eisenhower, but does not plan on mentoring President-elect Barack Obama in the next administration, according to a Nov.

meet [Obama] and pray with him." Graham's health is fragile. He was hospitalized overnight last month after falling over his dog while trying to pet it. He had elective surgery earlier this year to update a shunt that controls excess fluid on his brain. The shunt was first installed in 2000 and drains fluid from through a small tube, relieving excess pressure that can cause symptoms similar to Parkinson's disease. He was hospitalized last year for nearly two weeks

after experiencing intestinal bleeding, and he has also had prostate cancer. But Graham has still outlived doctors' expectations and some of the doctors themselves. He still writes and remains engaged in the planning and direction of the ministry he founded. But privately, he struggles with the loss of his wife Ruth and has been working on a book about aging, trying to put his late-life lessons into context for those soon to follow him. "He's always been ready to die," Franklin Graham said. "But nobody's prepared him for getting old." According to the Billy Graham Center, Billy Graham was converted in 1934 during a series of revival meetings in Charlotte which were led by evangelist Mordecai Ham. And since then, he's done his part to turn the world upside down. When Billy Graham reaches his threshold, he can say he's lived a well-rounded and purposeful life. In fact, he already has. Undoubtedly, there are millions of people who will serve as the legacy of his ministry and whose lives will have been changed forever by the passion of this dairy farmer's son from Charlotte, North Carolina.

My jawbone will be broken in four places in 55 days. Over the years, my jaw has shifted into a position that the doctors say may only get worse. They said my jaw is like a growing tutnor, which could stop, but, most likely, will not. I have migraines that penetrate the front of my head, like I am continuously sticking my head in a freezer or drinking a slush drink too fast. Some days, I wake up and I can't hear out of my right ear because my shifted jawbone is putting too much pressure on the canal. So on the '5 of January, which happens to also be my birthday, I will close my eyes for four and a half hours while a doctor hacks away at my jaw. Blue Cross Blue Shield refused the claim four times, callng it "elective surgery" I found ou t at the doctors office last week that this is not an uncommon scenario. Many insurance companies find this type of surgery elective, or preexisting. Our insurance company told us five or six times they refuse to pay for this Recently, we at The Vista have had a few complaints surgery because "TMJ" is not covered under their plan. regarding our Nov. 6 weekend edition and the ['his surgery, however, only half deals with the TMJ bone. placement of a front-page story about President-elect The point of insurance companies seems to be unnecBarack Obama's Nov. 4 victory. essary, to some extent. It seems like a scam. "Hey, give The paper featured two stories on the front page, the the this money and I will pay for any problems you may Obama story and another story about a one-of-a-kind have." When the time comes to need the money that you academic music program, which focuses on popular have faithfully forked over, it is discovered in the fine music, being implemented at UCO with the help of print that anything to do with the jaw is "elective." We The Academy of Contemporary Music based in Great give them money because they guarantee to pay for things Britain. that may not happen, rather than the things we need more We placed the latter story in the top more prominent urgently. position and the Obama story below it. If we were speaking strictly money, it would almost While we respect the reasoning for these complaints, seem more beneficial for the insurance company to pay and appreciate the feedback we would like to offer once for the surgery to fix the headaches and effects of the an explanation of our news judgment regarding the jaw, rather than to pay for all of the doctors visits to control issue. the issue. The placement decision was based on a combination My case is not unique, I am sure. There have been count- of two things: timeliness and locality. In the rapidly less stories of insurance companies refusing coverage that changing environment of journalism, timeliness has people need, and, often times, extremely more seriously become more and more prominent in the consideration than I do. of news placement. With the advent of online We need to figure out the root of the problem and why, journalism and the 24-hour news cycle, news becomes ve continue to hand over money to a company that only old fast. Our university newspaper is distributed only half-promises you coverage. It's like the father that promtwice a week, and by the time our post-election issue ises his child he will show up to his soccer game, but then hit the news racks, the Obama story was already two AP Photo calls to say he has other more important and "elective" days old. We felt the story was no longer informative things to do.. but did merit front-page exposure. Second, we assume President Bush and President-elect Obama walk along the West Wing I am tired of begging a company that I pay for 1Q,,cover most readers do not look to The Vista as their primary Colonnade of the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 10, 2008, the things that I need and to show up when I need them. source of national news, therefore we felt the music prior to their meeting in the Oval Office. Something needs to change. story merited more local prominence. Again, we always appreciate student feedback.

A NOTE FROM THE STAFF: Regarding the post-election issue

• b

CAMPUS QUOTES:

Of you could add a new major to UCO what would it be?''

Photographed and compiled by Chris Albers 4,Greg Newby "Native American Studies."

Sean Duty Nursing - Sophomore

"Stressology."

Kinsey Howerton Nursing - Sophomore

"Phobiology, the study of weird fears."

"Aviation with emphasis in skydiving."

Elizabeth Martin

Tyler Butler

Early Childhood Development

Undecided - Freshman


Page 5 Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2008

NEWS_

The Vista

Upson The contestants' talent competition included lyrical dances, tap dances, vocal performances, and guitar performances. The Mistress of Ceremonies was Caroline Sanders with the special help of Miss UCO 2008. "Being Miss UCO has given me a new confidence in myself and has been a real dream come true - definitely the best experience of my life," Edwards said, according the pageant press release. "It's been such an honor to represent the university that has given so much to me. Giving this title away is going to be very hard." The 12 candidates are listed alphabetically below: Anna Marie Bomar, Brandi Davison, Mary Lou Deter, Laura Michelle Harris, Heidi Heineman, Heather Don Maloney, Anna Prieto, Chasity Renae Ross, Maryann Stewart, Taylor Upson, Stephanie Villanella and Emily Weeks.

Continued from page 1 The audience was filled with friends and family members who were there to support the 12 contestants. "Me and several ladies of Sigma Kappa are here to show our support for my little sis, Stephanie Villanella. We will proud of her no matter what and I'm sure all the contestants will do great," Katie McConnell of Sigma Kappa Sorority said. Contestants shared each of their platforms, including self-esteem for youth, breast cancer awareness, the fight for life and the Children's Miracle Network. The pageant consisted of five overall competitions, including the contestants' individual and private interview worth 25 percent of the overall score, an onstage question worth 5 percent, a swimsuit competition worth 15 percent, the talent portion worth 35 percent and the final evening gown competition worth 20 percent.

Freeze

Continued from page 1

"Looking into the [future] years, we will hear from the state of Oklahoma what the revenue picture looks like," Hardcastle said. "I have no reason to believe [the economy will have] an effect at this point." Hardcastle said this, despite the OSRHE press release issued the next day about the requests for the tuition freeze and the $80 million. In his address to the State Regents, Webb said tuition has averaged a 9 percent increase over the last two years. -‘1fAy&'can avoid that average increase next year, students on campuses like UCO would save an average of $380 for the year," Webb said. The State Regents are also requesting

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Taylor Upson gets crowned at this year's 33rd Annual,4iss UCO Scholarship Pageant. Last year's Miss UCO Ashley Edwards is placing the crown. q

"The cost of higher education [will] an additional $1,425,000 for various other constantly increase," she said. "Really, the financial aid programs. Hardcastle also said he does not see "any cost of everything goes up." "No economy's recession-proof," indication" that Oklahoma's education Bordelon said. "What we have in budget will cut any financial aid funding.. OSRHE is requesting a total of $86,874,880 Oklahoma is an economy that lags the for the 2010 fiscal year, according to the national economy." She explained that because Oklahoma's Friday press release. Every $1 of state-appropriated funds economy takes longer to be affected by spent on higher education puts $5.15 back the national economy than other states, into the state economy, an analysis from it is seemingly less affected by national economic ups-and-downs. Regional Economic Models Inc. indicates. Hardcastle said universities' ability to By that math, if OSRHE gets the almost $87 million it seeks, in the long run it could keep tuition costs down depends greatly potentially' returri -ovet $448 'million back bn what roienue Oklahoma can generate t '[ter educitan: 'RAI, end to Oklahoma. "Usually, when the economy suffers, Jeannie Bordelon, adjunct professor of economics at UCO and legislative director people aren't spending as much, which for the Journal Record, put tuition increases means ... tax revenue is not coming in," Bordelon said.. in a practical economic perspective.

She explained that budget cuts are made when revenue is down, but the government will often spare the education budget as much as possible. "[The government] really tries to not let bad economic times cause our educational system to suffer," Bordelon said. "But that doesn't mean there won't be cuts ... there could be. It's all speculation at this point." "If the legislature approves this request, it would be a powerful signals to everyone that higher education is a priority in Oklahoma," Webb said. "We need to make the case for [the students]... they are worth this investment ... offering hope and help in these difficult times ... is, indeed, worth more than the sacrifice."

Peer Educators reach to students on campus By Laura Hoffert

Senior Reporter

11 -\110%1A t flY

The Wellness Center and University Health Services are teaming up to promote the Healthy Campus Initiative to students at UCO. With the recent announcement of the UCO Peer Educators program, students will have access to health care information through other students who have been trained by the Health and Wellness Center Education staff. "We are already infiltrating the campus community with the positive message of health and wellness," Tim Woods, health educator, said. "We are presenting the facts [and] we are promoting healthy choices."

With educational programs already in place, such as "Reconstructing Barbie," regarding having a healthy self-image and "Sexposure," which is on the subject of Sexually Transmitted Infections, student groups and residential halls can sign up to have the Peer Educators come speak. "Peer Education can take place in a variety of venues," Woods said. "Students [can] participate in class lectures, present a dorm program or simply encourage their peers to make healthy choices. "If you care about people and want to make a positive difference in someone else's life, you are a peer educator," he said. Consisting of five members, the peer

educators must have a vast knowledge of different topics ranging from goal setting, time management, finances, exercise, eating disorders and cold and flu awareness. To request a presentation or training session, call 974-2330 to get connected with a professional health educator. "The UCO Peer Educators are taking the lead on our campus to create an atmosphere of health and wellness," Woods said. "Our numbers are growing, we have students coming to us and asking if they can be a part of this exciting program. If you want to join our efforts, you are welcome [to]."

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mitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. PRICES: Classified ads cost $7/day for the first 20 words and $.10/vvord thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call 974-5549 or 974-5918 for info

Great Advancement Management Opportunities Available!

FRONT DESK @ FITNESS CLUB Eves, wknds. Work around school schedule. 14701 N. Kelly, 405-752-1233. www. transformationfitness .com *Free membership with employment* EARN EXTRA MONEY FOR THE HOLIDAYS At Christmas Tree Farm. Great for students. Call 405-340-5488 for interview. NOW HIRING FOR CHRISTMAS HELP At UPS Store. Must be available between 12-7. Apply in person, 1050 E. 2nd St. RIVER OAKS GOLF CLUB Is looking for friendly, energetic person to fill weekday shifts and/or weekend shifts in the Bar and Grill. Located 10 minutes from UCO. $8.00-$12.00 per hour. Call Chris or Cindy @ 771-5800 for appointment or stop by 10909 Clubhouse Road, Edmond, to fill out an application. BUSINESS STUDENTS $$ NEED CASH? $$ For Gas-Fun-Plus??? 3-9 hrs per week. Hourly pay Plus Computer/Internet experience helpful. Earning potential excellent. 623-2857. HELP WANTED for Front Desk. Apply in person. Stafford Inn. 1809 E. 2nd St. Edmond, 73034 PT TEACHERS Needed at brand new child development center. Call My Small Wonders at 285-7752 or apply online at www. mysmallwonders. corn EARN EXTRA MONEY! Students needed ASAP. Earn up to $150 a day being a mystery shopper. No experience required. Call 1-800-722-4791. HANDY STUDENT WANTED

Carpentry, painting, lawn maintenance. Must be self-motivated, trustworthy. 641-0712.

UCO Student Newspaper

Editor In Chief Are you ready to help lead one of the most exciting and innovative student organizations on campus? The University of Central Oklahoma student newspaper is seeking a hands-on, well-rounded Editor in Chief to lead our newsroom and manage all aspects of our editorial deF partment. The Vista updates online each weekday and publishes print editions each Tuesday and Thursday. The Editor in Chief is responsible to ensure that all tasks, from planning to distribution, are completed. The editor is responsible for seeing that The Vista comes out, on time, every issue as scheduled, with content thoroughly covering the UCO community, fairly and thoroughly reported, wellwritten and presented, free of error.

Primary Duties • Coordinates and oversees the organization of the staff and the assignment of tasks so that the paper is published in an orderly manner and by deadline. • Responsible for developing work schedules for reporters, photographers, and page designers. • Supervises all positions to ensure the fulfillment of job responsibilities; explains and enforces all deadlines and policies with the staff. • Holds regularly scheduled meetings for all staff and acts as chair at these meetings. • Works with Vista photographers and graphic designers to achieve the best possible design. • Maintains orderly and timely computer folders. • In collaboration with other editors, decides the content, placement of content, and design for each issue. • Motivate and maintain entire staff by assisting the other editors and managers in creating and facilitating an open and inviting atmosphere.

CUSTOMER SERVICE HELP M-F 4:45AM - 9AM. Occasional weekend shift. Apply in person. Edmond YMCA.

SHOGUN'S STEAKHOUSE Hiring for wait staff, bussers, dish washers, host, bartender. Apply in person at Northpark Mall (NW 122nd & N. May) after 5:30pm. 749-0120 TEACHER NEEDED IMMEDIATELY for Edmond Daycare. FT/ PT. Experience preferred, competitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262 SENIOR SERVICES OF OKLAHOMA Is looking for students to fill part time positions. Several 9am - 1 pm and 1:30 pm 5:30pm shifts are available for Mon-Fri. We pay $10 per hour for energetic phone work educating senior citizens on healthcare issues. No experience is needed we will train. Business is located at 1417 NW 150th St. in Edmond. Call 879-1888 to set up an interview. Ask for Hannah McMahan.

Apply online at UCOK.EDU

Managing Editor Become a leader for the most exciting and innovative student organizations on campus. The University of Central Oklahoma student newspaper is seeking a hands-on, well-rounded Managing Editor to help lead our talented reporting staff. The Vista updates online each weekday and publishes print editions each Tuesday and Thursday. The managing editor supervises the writing staff, assigning stories and, in conjunction with the editor in chief, planning the content for each issue of the paper, assuring coverage is thorough and includes all segments of the UCO community.

Primary Duties Services EDMOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTE Conveniently located on the UCO campus, offers English as a second language classes for international students/individuals. NOW FEATURING a specially designed program with: Strong emphasis in listening & speaking, Highly interactive classes, Comprehensive TOEFL program. Enjoy small classes and the campus facilities. Contact us at (405) 341-2125 or www. thelanguagecompany.com INT'L STUDENTS! Need to pass the TOEFL, an 1-20 for a friend or a 12-week certificate? English Language Center can help you! Call us at (405) 348-7602, visit our website www.elcok. corn or come meet us in person at 1015-C Waterwood Pkwy, next to the UCO University Plaza on 2nd Street.

• Maintain a master calendar for planning news coverage and follow-up articles on a timely basis. • Assigns and edits stories for each issue of the paper, specifically eliminating wordiness, protecting and polishing the language, correcting spelling and grammar errors, correcting inconsistencies, making certain the story is cornplete and fair. • Works with writers as needed, toward completion of their assignments and improvement of their skills • Enforces reporters' deadlines, and fills out missed deadline reports as needed. •Assists editor in chief and other editors in final copy review, editing, and alterations • Supervises section editor positions to ensure the fulfillment of job responsibilities. • Reports and writes stories as needed.

Qualifications

Qualifications Good leadership, organizational, and management skills are required, along with a passion for quality journalism. The successful candidate should display strong skills in news page design and copy editing and have thorough knowledge of Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop. In addition, he or she should exercise strong attention to detail and should show an ability to motivate, teach, and inspire the newsroom staff to perform at its best. To be considered, candidates must have successfully completed Newspaper Reporting. Preference will also be given to those candidates who have passed News Editing.

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Good leadership, organizational, and management skills are required, along with a passion for quality journalism. The successful candidate will display strong news judgment and copy editing skills. He or she should also have a tremendous ability to generate article and photo ideas. Strong leadership and communications skills are a must. In addition, he or she should show an ability to motivate, teach, and inspire the news writing staff to perform at its best. To be considered, candidates must have successfully completed Newspaper Reporting. Preference will also be given- to those candidates who have passed News Editing.

Apply online at UCOK.EDU

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Find what you're looking for. THEVISTA

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To place an ad, call (405)974-5918 or email visiamedia@yahoo.com today.


Page 7 Tuesday, Nov, 11, 2008

ENTERTAINMENT

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'Fable II': a world of technical problems For every choice, a different destiny. Such is the driving concept behind Lionhead Studio's new release of "Fable II," sequel to the critically acclaimed "Fable." Essentially, what this means is that your hero in "Fable II" will be unique in an extremely diverse number of ways, including gender, height, clothing, appearance and morality. The customization is perhaps the best feature, and I'm glad to say it works splendidly. Unfortunately, I'm sad to see the rest of the game hasn't panned out so well. I couldn't help but wonder why this game, which should have added to and improved upon "Fable's" designs, was so frustrating and well ... broken. There were so many bugs and glitches, I couldn't help but wonder if somehow I had picked up an unfinished beta build. Enemies fell through the level. My hero fell through the level. Quests became literally impossible to complete. Speech glitched. And sweet jeebus, navigation. In "Fable II," you're almost constantly led around the world of Albion by a glowing golden trail of sparkles. The problem with this is that with the added bloom and lighting effects, the path can be nearly impossible to see outdoors, during

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Page 8 Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2008

SPORTS

The Vista

Bronchos setting sights on the highest prize By Matt Caban Staff Writer

by Vista photographer Chanel Henry

The temporary OKC Thunder practice facility in Edmond between Memorial road and 33rd street on Lincoln avenue.

Edmond houses Thunder practice facility By Matt Caban Staff Writer

Welcome to the neighborhood. That's what some businesses in south Edmond are saying since an NBA team moved in to the former Performance Sports Center building on north Lincoln Boulevard. While most folks are aware of the newly relocated Oklahoma City Thunder, some did not know the team practices near the southern edge of Edmond. Wendy Hunt, bookkeeper for Marble Designs on NE 15th Street, said she had no idea the team practiced so close. "I think it's cool," Hunt said. The facility itself is in Oklahoma City city limits but has an Edmond address. That is the case for addresses south of North 150th Street, said Jerry Roper, store manager for the nearby Country Flooring & Area Rugs. A quick drive by the building won't show any signs of an NBA team. "There aren't any signs over there, but maybe they

want it that way," Hunt said. Roper said he has seen a lot of activity at the building since the team purchased it this past July, but he said he hasn't seen any players out and about. "I'm here every day and I'd remember a basketball player," Roper said. "But I could have talked to one of their wives and not known it." Lisa Peterson, sales team member at Lifestyles Stores on West 33rd Street, said her store hasn't seen any new business because of the team yet. "I certainly hope we see some players or their wives in the store," Peterson said. "Some of them may get homes in the area and hopefully we can help them find new furniture or lighting." While some of the Thunder's new Edmond neighbors are yet to see any economic impact, others expect to come in time. "There should be an impact on real estate, restaurants and shopping," said Toni Weinmester, associate director of the Edmond Economic Development

Authority. "There may be further impact depending on if they have kids or families." Diana Robles, owner of Bouncin' Craze on North Lincoln Boulevard, said she hopes the team impacts her and other nearby businesses. "We haven't dealt with the team too much, but we've given some people directions to the building," Robles said. "We hope they'll bring their families by though." Jared Miller, a UCO advertising senior, works for the team as a media host assistant. He said while practices have had a low profile, a group of the players live in north Oklahoma City and up into the Edmond area. "I know they go out and do shopping locally," Miller said. "I had one guy ask me where the best place to buy shoes was, so I sent him to my friend at Foot Locker." The team's arrival is a great thing all around for the city, Miller said. "It's the first chance for everyone to get behind one team," he said.

A close 127-124 loss to Augusta State in the Elite Eight round of last year's NCAA Division II Tournament was a bittersweet ending to an otherwise solid season for the Bronchos' men's basketball team. Head coach Terry Evans said the loss was tough because the team had a shot at the national title and won the most games of any team in school history (28). "It was disappointing how we ended our season," Evans said. "We felt like we should have won that quarterfinal game." Towards the end, the team got a bit too comfortable, said Lance Harper, senior forward. "We had a lead," Harper said. "We should have taken care of the lead, but we made some mistakes. They got it to overtime and in the end we couldn't get over the hump." Senior guard David Thomas said the team is starting this year where they left off. "We're gonna bring it hard," Thomas said. "I plan on winning every game, going undefeated

and going back to the Elite Eight and winning the national championship in my last year." Thomas isn't the only one with such lofty goals. Harper said the rest of the team, including the coaches, followed suit. "Win conference, win regionals and go from there," Harper said. "I don't have personal goals. I just want to do whatever for our team to win." Evans agrees that the team has set high goals for itself. "Get back to the Elite Eight and win our last game," Evans said. "That would be the national championship. "We feel like we have an opportunity to do that with the guys we have." The team returns four of its top five scorers, Evans said. They are junior guard Eric Cazenave (10.8 points per game), Harper (10.6 ppg), sophomore forward Michael Sosanya (10.2 ppg) and Thomas (7.1 ppg). Overall, the team returns eight players who saw a lot of action last year, Evans said. Although the team will be missing leading scorer and All-American Sam Belt and a couple of other key contributors, such as John

Neal and Brian Walker, they should be strong, he said. "We've got a chance to be strong at the guard position and have the forwards to rule the league again," Evans said. Harper said last year's success did teach the team. "We learned we can be on the top teams," he said. "We knew were good, but not how good. Now we know we can be one of the elite teams in the country." The Bronchos open their season Saturday with a twogame set at the Washburn Classic, which is hosted by Washburn University in Topeka, KS. But before the Bronchos begin the championship quest, they must first test their mettle in the Alumni Game at 7 p.m. tonight inside Hamilton Field House. Coach Evans said the Alumni Game should be great. "Some of our past greats are returning to try and beat our current team," he said. "Players like Sam Belt, Anthony Brown, John Neal and Brian Walker will be there." Evans said the Alumni team will have more talent, but he hopes the current team is in better shape.'

Wrestling makes it look easy

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Junior Colby Robinson attempts a pin at a match Saturday against Grand Canyon University at Hamilton Field House. UCO wrestlers won, 42-3. By Kaylea Brooks Sports Editor

UCO conquered Grand Canyon University with ease Saturday afternoon, 42-3. The No. 6-ranked Bronchos won nine straight matches, only losing at 174 pounds and having two forfeits. The Antelopes drew first blood in the 174-pound match, with Cody Rowell succumbing to Daniel Garay, 3-5. Then the Bronchos put

down the Antelopes with easy wins, with a 10-2 win by Scott Berens at 133, and a 16-0 technical at 149 by Colby Robinson. Kelly Henderson and Mikey Morgan picked up wins in 157 and 165 respectively. UCO wrestling will attempt to carry on its winning tradition as 15-time National Champions. This weekend's match is the earliest match to be scheduled in several years, said head coach David James.

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"Having a dual that early, there were some concerns," said James. "With five out of the 10 starters being new, I was worried if we would be ready. But it was a positive winning 42-3." James said that he was glad about the bonus wins of Saturday. "We had four bonuspoint wins, and that's always good," he said. The Bronchos will take on the Oklahoma Sooners in Norman Thursday at 7 p.m.

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By Kaylea Brooks Sports Editor UC O conquered Northeastern State, 24-13, to take the Lone Star Conference North Division Championship Saturday afternoon. The Bronchos' Chad Susman scored a field goal after the first offensive drive came up short of a touchdown. The RiverHawks also scored a field goal at the end of the first quarter. UCO's K.C. Asiodu broke the tie with an impressive interception return at the end of the first quarter. The Bronchos entered the second quarter with a touchdown lead.

At 10:00 in the second quarter, Da'Marean Pullen ran in a touchdown, upping the score, 17-3. Central Oklahoma held back NSU until the last 35 seconds of the half, when NSU scored off an interception run. The Riverhawks came into the third quarter struggling to make a touchdown, but settled with yet another field goal. The Bronchos did not score in until 6:11 in the fourth quarter when Jason Palmer caught an 11-yard pass from Brandon Noohi. Despite the win, the 13 ,3achos did not improve offensively, beating out NSU with only 215 total offensive yards.

The offensive yards were a combined 108 rushing and 107 passing, down from previous games. Jason Palmer was the offensive star, rushing for 97 yards. Pullen rushed for 13 yards to come in second. Ryan Gallimore received six passes for a total of 38 yards, followed by Daniel Morrell who received three for 49 yards. On the defensive side, Terrence Hill came out on top with a total of 11 touchdowns, Asiodu came in second with eight tackles with one sack, Freddie Harris and Terry Hardeman both had seven tackles and a sack. Ellis White sacked the quarterback twice.

The Vista Nov. 11, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Nov. 11, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.