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The Student Voice of the University of Central Oklahoma Since 1903

November 6, 2007

Pioneer FOOTBALL PROGRAM HIT WITH PENALTIES reporter speaks at UCO by No Lupov Staff Writer "I believed that women had to outwork the man," Pam Henry, the first female reporter and anchor in Oklahoma said during a speech Oct. 29 in UCO's Communications building. Dressed in a blue Hawaiian shirt sitting in a power wheelchair, Henry was illustrating her colorful biography as she was the producer of a famous late night talk show. The class, which was spread throughout the auditorium, had the chance to meet one of the broadcasting pioneers in Oklahoma. Henry worked as a producer, public affairs program host and capital reporter. She is best remembered as manager of news and public affairs at OETA where she worked for 16 years prior to her retirement. "I had to retire and it broke my heart," she said. Born in 1950 with polio syndrome, as a child she did not let the circumstances take control of her life. "I was a strong swimmer (as fast as the boys) due to the strength in my arms from the crutches," said Henry, adjusting her body in the wheelchair without an effort. Being a poster child for March of Dimes, in the late 50's and meeting famous

see PIONEER, page 5

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

UCO head football coach Chuck Langston tries to motivate the team during a time-out at the Homecoming game at Wantland Stadium Sept. 22. by Hannah Jackson Staff Writer UCO submitted a response to allegations of potential violations of NCAA regulations by the football program on Nov.2. The response included notification that the UCO program will adhere to selfimposed penalties, regardless of the outcome of a meeting with the Committee on

Infractions, which will occur in December. The response included acknowledgement that mistakes were made within the program, especially areas of oversight and program monitoring. The information included in the response was the result of an internal investigation led by university lawyer, J. Brad Morelli. UCO also hired two Oklahoma

City lawyers as outside counsel, Toby Baldwin, to aid the internal investigation and Charlie Babb, who held an advisory position. The information submitted will be used to assist the NCAA in determining the outcome of the allegations. "I am personally committed to the principle of institutional control and am disappointed with what

occurred in our football program two years ago," said UCO President W. Roger Webb. The self-imposed penalties include a 3-year probation of the football program, which will force certain restrictions on the team regarding NCAA play-offs, said Charles Johnson, UCO News Bureau Director. UCO will also voluntarily

forfeit two football scholarships. Johnson explained that UCO, as a Division II school, uses equivalency scholarships. Equivalency scholarships can be divided among players, each getting a certain percentage. For instance, the average UCO scholarship player receives 30 to 50 percent. Therefore, two scholar-

see NCAA, page 4

Immigration law provokes protests Miss Asian UCO to be crowned Nov. 10

by AP Writer OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) Two Catholic priests are comparing illegal immigrants to Oklahoma's early settlers in a new twist to arguments against deporting the illegals to Mexico and other countries. After all, the priests say, the original "Sooners" broke the rules when they slipped into the state early to claim free land on April 22, 1889, ahead of the "Boomers," who stayed at the border until signaled across. The Rev. Michael Chapman and the Rev. Don Wolf evoked Oklahoma history as they spoke to hundreds ofmostly Hispanic legal and illegal immigrants who gathered at the Capitol on Thursday to protest the immigration law's implementation. "You are beginning a new page in the 100-year Boomer-Sooner legacy," said Chapman, pastor of the Holy Angels Catholic Church in Oklahoma City. "We are so proud of our legal-illegal heritage. We've got to find a way to incorporate that into our laws in Oklahoma." Oklahoma "defines itself by those who settled here illegally," said Wolf, pastor of mostly Spanish-speak-

by Lyndsay Gillum Copy Editor Twelve students are on board to compete for the title of The University of Central Oklahoma's annual Miss Asian UCO 2008 scholarship pageant, scheduled for Sat., Nov. 10 at 7 p.m. in UCO's Constitution Hall. The university's Multicultural Student Services and the Asian American Student Association sponsor Miss Asian UCO. The number of contestants, which doubled since 2005, proves there is an increase in participants and shows the pageant's highest participation by Vista photographer Chris Albers rate in its seven-year history. Earlier in October, a fashThree protesters cheer on the capital steps Thursday while an anti-immigration ion show organized by Miss speaker publicly denounces the new immigration law passed by the Oklahoma Asian UCO 2007 Jennifer Congress. Meyers raised $350 to benefit the pageant's scholarship ing parishes in Duncan. form the 46th state in 1907. had in common a quest for fund. In the past, scholarYears before that 1889 The acts of Payne and the "economic freedom," Wolf ship awards for the Miss Land Run, Boomer leader Sooners were civil matters, said at the Capitol rally. Asian UCO pageant have David Payne was arrested just as illegal immigrants are "Obviously, it was the been smaller than those of several times in his bid to defying civil law by entering Sooner who came across Miss UCO, Miss Black UCO open the Unassigned Lands the country without papers. before the Land Run of 1889 and Miss Hispanic UCO. in Indian Territory for white The penalty is deportation. and staked out claims in the According to Meyers, it has settlers. Indian Territory Both the Oklahoma set- cover of night," Chapman been her vision to see the was later combined with tlers and the mostly Hispanic amount of scholarship money Oklahoma Territory to illegal immigrants of today see IMMIGRATION, page 5 increase.

News Central Channel 6 Mon. through Thurs.

at 5 p.m.

"Publication is a selfinvasion of privacy. "

MeShawn Conley, director of UCO's Multicultural Student Services, believes that leadership initiatives such as Meyer's fashion show is a great example of how the students who have held the title have worked to serve as leaders both here at UCO and in surrounding communities, which helps contribute to the growing participation in the pageant. "The increase in interest in this pageant has so much to do with the wonderful young ladies who have served in the role of Miss Asian UCO," Conley said in a statement to University Relations. "They have actively shared their stories with other girls and have become the type of queens that people respect and admire." In a statement to University Relations, Myers, a senior psychology major, said that as Miss Asian UCO she has tried to attend as many multicultural activities on campus as possible so that she can open herself up to all of the different cultures at UCO. "It's so important to educate yourself about other

see ASIAN, page 4

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OPINION

November 6, 2007

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UREA NETS I T NEAP API A 00H RATE AWARDI NG AWOL LANAI S ALTAR TROT DEADLI NE AFRO ESP SENDS CEE I S I S R E LA P S E S TODD ELENA REECHO GOTH EMBLAZON HEAD ABC REEL MATE ROE ODDS 0 R ES

9e) ( THE DEWS "PILE ON" THE BEAST... Cartoon by Jared Aylor

CAMPUS QUOTES: Compiled and photographed by Chris Albers

" If you could be any animal what would it be and why?"

Staff Editorial: Oklahoma's HB 1804 is no good - for anybody to knowingly provide shelter, transportation or employment to illegal immigrants. T h e last time I checked, the U.S. army was inAfghanistan and Iraq, fighting a war to help get a nation on its feet. The efforts are there to enable the country to gain a stable economic system as well as learn to teach and govern themselves.

"A lab, because they are so friendly and carefree and dogs never have homework."

Holly Edwards Graduate student- Dietetics

"I would be a Broncho galloping throughout the campus."

Ryan Thorley Org. Communications- Junior

"Penguin, I like the idea of the man taking care of the egg while the woman hunts for food."

Jessica Garrisons Photography- Freshman

"A Dolphin, they are the smartest creatures next to man and they can defy sharks."

America! Thank by Vista photographer Chris Albers goodness, Hundreds of protesters rallied at the capital Thursday in opposition we're here to save the little to the new immigration law passed by the Oklahoma Congress. people! Please, America - a country that passed an immigration bill please, forfeit prides itself on a rich heri- that intends to remove all your lives to help the Middle tage of multi-cultural back- illegal immigrants from its East, but heaven-forbid an grounds, a place vowed to borders. The bill restricts Oklahoman purchase grocerbe the greatest country in the the ability of illegal immi- ies from an immigrant who world, a melting pot of tradi- grants to receive government has chosen to make sometions - has finally reached its issued identification or pub- thing of his/her life. lic assistance. CNN reports ethnic limit. Antonio Perez, who owns that it also makes it a felony a Mexican grocery store. Oklahoma On Nov. 1,

THEVISTA

Ben Wooldridge Graphic design- Senior

"A lion, because no one really bothers the lion and they are respected."

EDITORIAL

PHOTOGRAPHY

Andrew Knittle, Editor in Chief Steven Reckinger, Co-Editor Aaron Wright, Managing Editor

Chris Albers, Photographer Chris Otten, Photographer Brenda O'Brian, Photographer

Lyndsay Gillum,

Copy Editor

ADVERTISING

NEWS Alisha Harmon Biology- Freshman

Justin Langston, Staff Writer Shannon Hoverson, Staff Writer Nelson Solomon, Staff Writer Abha Eli Phoboo, Staff Writer Hannah Jackson, Staff WriterJana Davis,

"Polar bear, 'cause I have one on my shirt and it looks pretty mean."

staff writer

Undeclared- Sophomore

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Tresa Berlemann

SPORTS Jeff Massie, Sports Editor Alex Gambill, Sports Writer

CARTOONS/ ILLUSTRATIONS Garrett Harkins

Megan Pierce, Ad Director Keith Mooney, Ad Designer

Jared Aylor

ADVISER Julie Clanton

The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and on Thursdays only during summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034. Telephone: (405) 974-5549. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained. EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO.

chain in Oklahoma has seen a loss of about $300,000 per month in sales. Latinos have disappeared from public eye because of their fear of deportation. Many companies that are losing either Latino employment or business are suffering. Employees must remove all illegal immigrant employees by June 2008. Otherwise, the employee could be charged with a federal offense. Even more overwhelming is the fact that housing or transporting illegal immigrants can also lead to a federal charge. Aiding and abetting a Latino — imagine that permanently on your record. "Please don't hire me for this position, because at one point during my life, I thought it necessary to give charity to someone who the majority of Oklahoma wanted to deport." Although the bill seems painful on paper and the economic results could be fearful, I am mostly appalled by Oklahoma as a state. Where are your morals? To those immigrants affected by this bill, thank you for your economic assistance. We'd now like to make you outlaws.

LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters and does not publish anonymous letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 107. Letters can be e-mailed to editorial@thevistaonl ine. com .


November 6, 2007

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Chartwells expands healthy options in their meal plans by Aaron Wright Managing Editor When questioned about the cuisine in the cafeteria, several residential students felt that their options should be healthier. Jennifer Yeaman, director of marketing for Chartwells, the food provider for the university, is dedicated to giving these students what they want. "My goal and my theme this year is to focus on health and fitness," she said. To promote this concept, Chartwells has adopted many new programs. One of the programs, Meatless Monday, encourages students to forego from eating meat for one day a week. Yeaman said this program has already been implemented, but she wants to promote it more to students. This program is a national health campaign in association with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The goal is to reduce consumption of saturated fat by at least 15 percent by 2010. It is not a promotion of the vegetarian lifestyle. Fish and seafood are not taken into consideration as part of this program. Only red meat, poultry and high-fat dairy products are affected. For Super Food Friday, a food that falls under the category of "super food," based on it's nutritional content, is selected and promoted every month. On Fridays, this food is served in a variety of ways. November's super food is

winter squash and December's super food is cranberries. Balanced Choice boards are also available to get students more interested in health. For this program, boards are set up every month in the Central Cafeteria and Central Plaza dining areas with health information. In the pockets of these boards are information about super foods and nutrigrams. Nutrigrams are similar to mini excerpts from newsletters. They contain information on the health benefits of certain foods. During this month, coffee will be discussed. All of these programs are developed by a team of nutritionists and chefs. Their services are available due to a partnership between the company that owns Chartwells and Johnson and Wales, a college of culinary arts. These chefs have also compiled a recipe book with lots of options for educational cafeterias. Specific lists of . healthier recipes are called the balanced choice menu. Chartwells recently completed the Clean Your Plate initiative in October, which encouraged students to reduce the amount of food wasted each week by 15 percent. Each week the goal was met, Chartwells donated cans to Britville Pantry, a partner with the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma. Yeaman said this program not only helped

reduce waste, but also promoted smaller portion sizes. Coming up from Nov. 12 through Nov. 16 is Total Health Week. During this week, food off of the balanced choice menu will primarily be served. This eliminates foods like hamburgers and anything that has been deep fried. "We're worried there's going to be a revolt if we pull all that for a week," Yeaman said. She explained that they are just asking students to reach outside their comfort zone and try new types of food. Along with the balanced choice menu options, Total Health Week will also be celebrated with door prizes and raffles. Yeaman said they are also working on getting one of the cooks from Legends to give a demonstration cooking class. Pulse on Dining is an initiative by Chartwells to give residential dining facilities more of a restaurant feel. UCO wants to adopt this program and make changes for on campus dining. Yeaman said in the next few weeks, students should expect changes concerning the look of the places they eat at. One such change is new dishes which should be here by the weekend after Thanksgiving. She noted that they wanted to eliminate the mix-and-match of plates. "We're trying our best to jazz it up the best we can," she said. Recent changes include

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

From left: Kazumi lnoye and Hiromi Yamaoka wait to serve the next hungry student at UCO's Central Cafeteria. the addition of pictures on the walls of the cafeteria. Some decorative items, such as signs, have to maintain a certain look for corporate standards, but much of the design scheme is open for change. Other future plans for the food service include getting organic food introduced on the menu. Adwalla, a brand of smoothies and meal replacement bars have already been introduced on campus about a week ago. Yeaman said they are selling very quickly. She has already had trouble locating her favorite flavor, the wheat grass smoothie, because they are sold out.

Student opinion is also important to the company as they continue to revamp their dining service on campus. Surveys are continually being given to students to obtain their views. Several additions in the past, such as the implementation of a sushi bar, have been made as a direct result of expressed student wants. "There are a lot of resources we have that I really want to promote," said Yeahman. She voiced that the biggest problem she has is distributing and promoting the information to students who have meal plans. Currently, she uses newsletters, word-

of-mouth, advertising and boards in the dining facilities. She mentioned that she is looking for an intern. "We're just trying to build relationships with different organizations here on campus," she said. Chartwells is a part of a company called Compass Groups. This company services both primary and secondary educational institutes throughout North Am erica and the United Kingdom.

Aaron Wright can be reached at awright@thevistaonline.com .

Pakistan's top military official declares emergency rule by Abha Eli Phoboo Staff Writer Pakistan's General Pervez Musharraf, Saturday night, declared an emergency rule citing dangers posed by extremists in the country. He fired the supreme court judge, suspended the constitution and banned private television news channels and monitored international broadcasts. "Pakistan's sovereignty is in danger unless timely action is taken," said Musharraf in a televised address. "Extremists are roaming around freely in the country and they are not scared of law-enforcement agencies...Inaction at this moment is suicide for Pakistan and I cannot allow this country to commit suicide." Musharraf is Washington's strongest ally in the war against terrorism, yet this new turn of events puts President George W. Bush and the U.S. government in a tight spot. Media reports President Bush calling for a quick return to civilian rule and the release of detainees in Pakistan. "Frankly, there is little the U.S. can do to influence what is going on in Pakistan today. Pakistan is a critical actor in supporting the mission of US and NATO forces in Afghanistan, as well as trying to apprehend remnants of AI-Qaeda. Withdrawing support from Pakistan would put at risk both of those operations. We can seek to influence what happens next, but threatening to end the material support we provide to the

Pakistani government is not a very viable option," says Louis Furmanski, UCO professor of political Science. In his Newsweek column, "Dancing with the Dictator," Michael Hirsch says, "Washington doesn't have many friends left to call on in Pakistan—perhaps the No. 1 generator of anti-U.S. terrorism in the world today." Many political analysts agree that the U.S. stand on Pakistan and Musharraf's actions makes the commitment toward democracy seem hypocritical. "We are, unfortunately, backed into a corner where we are seen as support a military dictatorship at the same time that we say we are promoting democracy in the region. Our hypocrisy is clear for all to see. Hopefully a Pandora's box that could inflame the wider region has not been opened," adds Furmanski. The United States and the United Kingdom have expressed concern over the situation in Pakistan. The BBC has quoted Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice as saying that the declaration of emergency was "highly regrettable and asked Pakistan to hold free and fair elections. British Foreign Secretary David Miliband, to the same news agency, said it was vital that the Pakistani government "abides by the commitment to hold free and fair elections on schedule." Reuters has reported Pakistan's Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz as stating that the national elections will be held in mid-Janu as sched-

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Police officers in plain clothes arrest a lawyer who was protesting against state of emergency imposed by the military ruler President Gen. Pervez Musharraf, Monday, Nov. 5, 2007 in Lahore, Pakistan. Legions of police firing tear gas and swinging batons clashed with lawyers Monday as security forces across Pakistan blockaded courts to quash protests uled despite the emergency rule. Siham Zafar, economics sophomore at UCO, from Pakistan, says, "I don't agree with Musharraf's actions. A lot of people are against him for the steps he has taken. Now, the international community will not consider Pakistan a democracy any more." Musharraf's crackdown has been building up slowly in last few months. This is apparent from the media reports concerning the deportment of Nawaz Sharif, Pakistan's former prime minister, and the hush-hush deal the exPakistani Prime Minister Benezir Bhutto was said to have struck with Musharraf. Speculations of Musharraf's hunger for power has been put into question and as a young democracy, the country's situation is expected to

be volatile. This month itself, Newsweek's international edition put Pakistan on its cover declaring it the most dangerous country in word, a place where "Jihad still lives." "Whatever has happened and what Musharraf is doing

tion rule was imposed on Saturday, Pakistani professionals marched out in protest. Lawyers, journalists and students rallied but were baton charged. According to the New York Times, Pakistani officials have estimated 500 opposition figures as being

"I DON'T AGREE WITH MUSHARRAF'S ACTIONS. A LOT OF PEOPLE ARE AGAINST HIM FOR THE STEPS HE HAS TAKEN. -UCO

STUDENT SIHAM ZAFAR

is certainly not democratic. But the country is so rife with corruption that there perhaps is no other way but to impose martial law. Democracy is still new in Pakistan, it'll take a long time for the country to grasp the concept," said Khusro Iqbal, president of the UCO Pakistan Student Association. Soon after the opposi-

arrested since the weekend whereas analysts say it could be as high as 2,000. Another concern that has been raised is Pakistan as a nuclear power holder. Furmanski says, "While one cannot totally dismiss the prospect of a Pakistani nuclear weapon falling into the hands of non-state actors, it is highly unlikely that this would hap-

pen. Nuclear weapons are the `crown jewels' of any military establishment and their safeguarding is of the utmost importance. Moreover, considerable technical safeguards exist which would prevent an unauthorized detonation of a nuclear device. A more realistic concern would be the government of Pakistan falling under a hard-line Islamist party. But if this were to happen the threat would be felt more by India, than the US." Neighboring India is certainly in the wait-and-watch mode, as Furmanski says, Pakistan's political stability would be in the best interests of both India and the United States.

Abha Eli Phoboo can be reached at aphoboo@thevistaonline.com .


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November 6, 2007

NCAA from page 1 ships is the equivalent of four to five scholarship-athletes. The final self-imposed limitations involved the amount of transfer recruits and the maximum number of football student-athletes. The UCO football program averages 16 transfers a year, but will restrict themselves to eight transfer recruits for the next two years, said Johnson. The maximum number of football student-athletes will also be reduced from around 100 to 90 per academic year. "I remain steadfast in my commitment to ensure that all employees of the University of Central Oklahoma understand and support the serious nature of NCAA compli-

ance," said Webb. UCO first received notification of allegations in September of 2006 but weren't officially notified by the NCAA until August 2007. Almost three weeks after the formal notification, Webb suspended head foot-

ball Coach Chuck Langston. The suspension lasted two weeks, from Aug. 20 to Sept. 3. According to an Aug. 21 press release, Langston was also banned from any offcampus recruiting for one year. In a Nov. 2 press release,

it was stated that around the same time UCO also placed an additional employee in the office of Tami Peck, the university's athletic compliance officer. The press release also stated that a comprehensive system was being developed and implemented to effec-

"I REMAIN STEADFAST IN MY COMMITMENT TO ENSURE THAT ALL EMPLOYEES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA UNDERSTAND AND SUPPORT THE SERIOUS NATURE OFNCAA COMPLIANCE."

-PRESIDENT ROGER WEBB

tively monitor the recruiting process for prospective student-athletes in all sports. "Everyone in the football program and other athletic programs, especially regarding recruiting, will be educated on the NCAA recruiting rules," said Johnson. A comprehensive NCAA rules education process is currently being implemented at the university. "It's all aspects of NCAA compliance," said Johnson, "Coaches and assistant coaches need to be aware and have some kind of training to help in that awareness." Peck has initiated a bimonthly mandatory meeting with coaches from all sports, during which new and proposed legislation is discussed. Monthly head-coach meetings were already in place, but these meetings have been

added for all coaches, including assistant coaches, to discuss relevant topics, said Johnson. "I will not tolerate any action by any employee, within our coaching ranks or elsewhere on campus, that does not support the university's values of civility, community and character. There will be no tolerance for intentional violations of NCAA rules and regulations," said Webb. Webb's presence, along with other university representatives, has been requested at the meeting with the Committee on Infractions to determine the outcome of the allegations. The meeting will be held in Indianapolis Dec. 7 through Dec. 9, 2007. Hannah Jackson can be reached at hjackson@thevistaonline.com.

ASIAN from page 1 countries and cultures," she said. "There's so much out there in the world, and what better way to experience it when diversity is happening right here on the grounds of UCO's great campus." Contestants:

Asuka Yamato Sophomore Platform: Raise awareness of Domestic Violence Among Children 1.

Kaelyn Lu Sophomore Platform: Raise Asian Culture Awareness at UCO and Within the Community 2.

Sayurni Ktibo Senior Platform: Ecology Movement with emphasis on Global Warming 3.

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Sabina Dangal Freshman Platform: Welfare of Women Victimized by their Cultures Misook Chung Freshman Platform: Voting Awareness 5.

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Sony KC Junior Platform: Social and Cultural Awareness 7.

Mary Pearl Allen Freshman Platform: Political and Cultural Awareness between Cultures at UCO 8.

Nancy Kim Pham Junior Platform: Diabetes Awareness 9.

Kaori Sakamoto Junior Platform: Raise Involvement From UCO students

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Lyndsay Gillum can be reached at lgillum@thevistaonline.com .


November 6, 2007

N. Korea disables its nuclear facilities

IMMIGRATION from page 1

by AP Writer SEOUL, South Korea (AP) North Korea was expected to begin disabling its nuclear facilities Monday, marking the biggest step the communist country has ever taken to scale back its atomic program. The North shut down its sole functioning nuclear reactor at Yongbyon in July, and promised to disable it by year's end in exchange for energy aid and political concessions from other members of talks on its nuclear program: the U.S., China, Japan, South Korea and Russia. Disabling the reactor at Yongbyon, north of Pyongyang, would mark a further breakthrough in efforts to convince the North to scale back its nuclear program. The country conducted its first-ever nuclear test in October of last year. "By Monday morning, they will begin their work," U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill said in Tokyo on Saturday, referring to the U.S. team that arrived in Pyongyang last week. "It's a very big day because it's the first time it's actually going to start disabling its nuclear program."

"By the end of the year ... we hope to have arrived at an important milestone, where there is a complete disablement of the Yongbyon facilities." Christopher Hill

It was not clear as of late Monday evening whether the disabling process had begun. The team could not be reached in North Korea. South Korean nuclear envoy Chun Yung-woo said Monday that the U.S. team will determine which specific disablement mea-

AP Photo

U.S. nuclear envoy Christopher Hill speaks to reporters upon his arrival at the Incheon International Airport after visiting Beijing, west of Seoul, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2007. Hill said work on disabling North Korea's main nuclear complex will probably begin later this week, a development that would move the communist country one step closer to disarmament. sures it will take first after considering technical issues and safety concerns. Last week, South Korean Foreign Minister Song Min-soon told reporters the team will carry out about 10 measures to disable the Yongbyon facilities. Chun said he had not confirmed that the U.S. team started the disabling work as scheduled. Hill said the U.S. intends to achieve the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula while President Bush is still in power, and that North Korea — one of the world's most isolated countries — appeared to be opening up. "I'd like to see us get through this in the current U.S. administration," Hill told a news conference in Tokyo. "We started this process, and

I'd like to see us finish it." To disable the program, the facilities must be stripped sufficiently that it would take at least a year for North Korea to start them up again, Hill said. Hill added the U.S. hoped to disable North's uranium enrichment program by Dec. 31, not just its plutonium-production facilities at Yongbyon. "By the end of the year ... we hope to have arrived at an important milestone, where there is a complete disablement of the Yongbyon facilitie2, a full list of additional facilities for disablement, and that uranium enrichment is also resolved to mutual satisfaction," Hill said. The envoy said American lawyers were working with North Korea to prepare to

remove it from a U.S. list of states sponsoring terrorism, but that Pyongyang ultimately needed to meet requirements stipulated under U.S. law. Taking Pyongyang off the terror list, long a key demand of the North, was one of a series of economic and political concessions offered for the country to disable its nuclear reactor that produces plutonium for bombs. "As they participate in the six-party process, I think there is a desire to overcome their isolation," Hill said, warning that the would be slow.

said later in an interview. "That was not following the rules. But we haven't forgotten them and we certainly haven't accused them." While the "Sooner" tag carried a negative connotation in the state's early days, that did not stop the University of Oklahoma from adopting it tl name of their athletic earns. 1/1Witkiithe, according to the OU official Web site, Sooner became a synonym of "progressivism" and a Sooner was known as "an energetic individual who travels ahead of the human procession. He was a prosperous, ambitious, can-do individual. "And Oklahoma was the Sooner State, the land of opportunity, enterprise and economic expansion, very much in the progressive spirit that engulfed the old South in the 1920s." Chapman said the Hispanic immigrants are comparable to "people leaving Ireland or the eastern United States and corning west with the promise of finding a way to make a living. "They made some great sacrifices and faced many obstacles and some of those obstacles were legal obstacles." He said many of today's illegal immigrants are good people who "did one wrong thing. Since they got here, they have established a home and a job and raised kids. They've been good de facto citizens." Rep. Randy Terrill, RMoore, who introduced the anti-immigration measure, said the priests are historically accurate, "but we're not the same country and we're not the same state as we were then." "There are no vast expanses of land in need of settlement and technological advances have made dissolution of old allegiances more difficult," the lawmaker said. Some churches and charity groups that work with Hispanics say the law has

PIONEER from page 1 people also contribute to her love for broadcasting. For over an hour Henry spoke, without a break, about her dedication for journalism. "I grew up in a family that watched news. I was exposed to news," she said. Retired in 2002, Henry continues her active lifestyle as a chair of the Oklahoma City Mayor's Committee on Disability Concern. During her career, Henry met numerous famous

created a lot of fear, leading thousands of immigrants to flee the state. They said they would continue providing services to immigrants, despite a section in the new law making it a felony to harbor or transport an illegal immigrant. Terrill said having illegal immigrants leave Oklahoma "is the intended purpose of the bill." As far as arguments of the priests that the bill in inhumane, he said: "I don't want to engage in a religious debate with these folks. I understand their point of view. I just disagree profoundly with them." Some say the law will present hardships for families by forcing breadwinners to abandon spouses and children, who are legal residents. Terrill said negative consequences always affect families of law breakers. "They have no one to blame but themselves," he said. He vowed not to be put on the defensive on the issue and said he planned to make the law "even tougher" next legislative session. Terrill is considering proposals to permit the seizure of assets tied to harboring or transporting an illegal immigrant and to give law enforcement agencies incentives to join a federal program whereby officers are given training by federal immigration authorities. The Tulsa County Sheriffs Department had 30 deputies trained under the program. The result: 735 arrests of people suspected of being illegal immigrants since July 1, according to Sheriff Stanley Glanz. Other sheriffs departments have not joined the program, with some officials saying they have all they can handle fighting serious crime in their counties. Under the,noy law; all local enforcement agencies now have the authority to detain illegal immigrants for federal authorities if the illegals are charged with DUI or a felony.

with the famous Hollywood actor as a kid. Quoting Bob Burke, another journalism hall of fame member, "I am not doing anything else," said Henry, adding the story when Burke called the defense minister asking him if he was going to retire after a rumor. "Take advantage of the internship," said Henry, advising the students on their future career. Working free on the weekends in a radio station, as a student and then hired as an assistant news editor Henry unnaturally climbed up the latter to be a female anchor at KFOR in Oklahoma City. "The philosophy I had was

"I GREW UP IN A FAMILY THAT WATCHED NEWS. I WAS EXPOSED TO NEWS," SHE SAID. RETIRED IN 2002, HENRY CONTINUES HERACTIVE LIFESTYLE AS A CHAIR OF THE OKLAHOMA CITY MAYOR'S COMMITTEE ON DISABILITY CONCERN. . si

COLLEGE STUDENT PURCHASE PROGRAM www.fordcollegehq.com

MERCURY

Americans at the time, some of whom the young audience had never heard of. "Never assume your audience knows anything," said Henry after a short introduction of famous names such as broadcast journalist of WWII Edward Murrow and CBS evening news anchor Walter Cronkite. "Kirk Douglas told my mom she was beautiful," said Henry with a sense of pride on her face after the encounter

to outwork the other people," she said. According to Henry, hard work can substitute for lack of experience.

No Lupov can be reached at ilupov@thevistaonline.com.


6

November 6, 2007

Spotlight on: Fred Thompson (R Fred Dalton Thompson is an American politician, lawyer, lobbyist and character actor. He represented Tennessee as a Republican in the United States Senate from 1994 through 2002. Thompson is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a Visiting Fellow with the American Enterprise Institute, where he specializes in national security and intelligence. As an actor, Thompson has performed in film and on television. He many times portrayed governmental figures and in the final months of his U.S. Senate term, he joined the cast of the long running NBC television series "Law and Order, playing New York City District Attorney Arthur Branch. On May 30, 2007, Thompson asked to be released from his television duties to prepare for a presidential bid in 2008. On June 1, 2007, he formed a presidential committee regarding his possible 2008 campaign for president. Thompson's bid became official on Sept. 5, 2007, where he announced on the "The Tonight Show": "I'm running for president of the United States." In the 2000 Republican presidential primaries, Thompson initially backed former Tennessee Gov. Lamar Alexander. When Alexander dropped out, Thompson endorsed Sen. John McCain's bid and became his co-chairman and both were contenders to be George W. Bush's running mate in 2000.

Political Positions: O Thompson said that federalism is his "lodestar," providing "a basis for a proper analysis of most issues: 'Is this something government should be doing? If so, at what level of government?'"

Campus Announcements •

Miss UCO application deadline is Nov. 7. For more information, contact missuco@aol.com .

Salsa Dance Classes are being offered on Sunday nights at 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Wellness Center. Cost is $25 for UCO students, faculty and staff.

Free hearing clinics are offered for students, faculty and staff on Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at UCO's Speech and Hearing Clinic located in the library. For an appointment, call 974-5419.

Career Services and Chartwells Dining Etiquette and Business Interview seminar at 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Nov. 6 in Legends. Reservations are required.

Becoming a Non-smoker sessions from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. on Mondays in Rm. 419 of the Wellness Center.

Association for Women in Communications will have an event planner and certified meeting planner speak at their next meeting at 7 p.m. on Nov. 6.

Tinker Air Force Base Federal Civilian recruiters will host information sessions for UCO students interested in employement at 2 p.m. Nov. 7 in the Troy Smith Lecture Hall.

Multicultural Student Services Book Club has invited the author of the book "99 Questions You Must Ask a Man Before Sleeping with Him and Definintely Before Having SEX!" to speak at 7 p.m. Nov. 7 in the Heritage Room of the NUC. For more information, call 974-3588.

Veteran's Day Celebration, hosted by the Transfer Leadership Council and ROTC, will be at 11 a.m. on Nov. 8 on the south side of Thatcher Hall. For more information, e-mail jbobbsemple@ucok.edu..

Open Mic Night, sponsored by Student Programming Board, will be at 8 p.m. on Nov. 8 in the Central Plaza Coffee Bar.

Friday Night Live will be at 7:30 on Nov. 9 in Constitution Hall. For more information, call (918) 470-5535. Admission is free.

The Office of Student Life is looking for sponsors for children for the President's Club Christmas Party. For more information, call 974-2363.

Sigma Xi will host a lecture by UCO's Dr. Michelle Haynie at 12 p.m. on Nov. 8 in Rm. 213 in Howell Hall.

UCO Department of Psychology will host a lecture by Dr. James Grice at 12 p.m. Nov. 9 in Rm. 106 of the Education building.

The deadCenter Film Festival Road Show will come to UCO's campus at 4 p.m. Nov. 14 in Pegasus Theater. This show will feature some of the best short films from the 2007 festival.

0 He says that Roe v. Wade was a wrong decision that ought to be overturned and that he is pro-life, but that states should not criminalize young women for early term abortions. He also would not support a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage, but would support an amendment preserving each state's right to decide the matter for itself. 0 Thompsonhasvoiced skepticism that humanity is to blame for global warming. O He says citizens are entitled to keep and bear arms if they do not have criminal records. O Thompson strongly believes that U.S. borders need to be secured before considering comprehensive immigration reform, and federal law must be enforced in sanctuary cities which currently ban cooperation

between local authorities and federal immigration officials. A full supporter of O the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, and is opposed to withdrawing troops from Iraq, but believes that "mistakes have been made" since invasion.

Issues: 0 National Security O Federal Budget and Spending/Budgetary Reform O Tax Reform O Healthcare O Government Effectiveness O Building Strong Families 0 Immigration 0 Education 0 Appointing Judges Faithful to our Constitution 0 Energy Security O Second Amendment

wwwithevistaonline.com

Prost& is' Children's Christmas Party Wednesday, December 5, 2007 from NUC Grand Ballrooms. *P it up sponsor forms in Student Life, NC 424 starting October M. Sponsor forms due November 6th in Stu 1 nt Lite, NUC 424 Any ruestions niease call Student Life at 9144363.


Arts & Entertainment

November 6, 2007

7

Hollywood writers negotiate for compensation to avoid strike by AP Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) Hollywood writers were back at the bargaining table Sunday in a last-minute push to avoid a strike against TV networks and movie studios over writers' share of profits from DVDs and the Internet. The battle has broad implications for the way Hollywood does business, since whatever deal is struck by the Writers Guild of America will likely be used as a template for talks with actors and directors, whose contracts expire next June. "We'll get what they get," Screen Actors Guild President Alan Rosenberg told The Associated Press. Negotiators were meeting with a federal mediator Sunday evening in hopes of avoiding a strike that writers had set to begin 12:01 a.m. Monday. The guild announced AP Photo sweeping plans to picket every major studio in Los Angeles Picket signs lie in a van at the Writers Guild of America headquarters Sunday, Nov. 4, 2007, in Los Angeles. starting at 9 a.m. Monday, Hollywood writers were back at the bargaining table Sunday in a last-minute push to avoid a strike against TV along with Rockefeller Center in New York, where networks and movie studios over writers' share of profits from DVDs and the Internet. NBC is headquartered. The Alliance of Motion Picture and Television ticular resolve in past nego- deal was struck first was usu- $194 million from selling TV to increase video payments, Producers previously called tiations," said John Bowman, ally accepted by the others. shows over the Web, although even as DVDs have become The guilds are aware that those numbers are expected more profitable for studios a writers' strike "precipi- the WGA's chief negotiator. "The sea change is that this if writers fail to win con- to skyrocket in coming years. than box office receipts. tous and irresponsible." is an enormously galvanizcessions involving DVDs Studios argue that it Unions say they won't Producers believe progress ing issue, and two, that the and the Internet, actors may is too early to know how make the same mistake when can be made on other issues new regime at the guild have to take up the fight. much money they can make it comes to the Internet. but "it makes absolutely no actually has a plan, has an "This is an issue that from offering entertainment "I think we all understand sense to increase the burden of this additional corn- organization and a structure touches every member of on the Internet, cell phones, what a crucial time in hispensation," said J. Nicholas to respond to something." this guild and every mem- iPods and other devices. tory this is," Rosenberg said. The writers are the first ber of the Screen Actors Hollywood unions have "We really feel if we can't Counter, the producer's chief union to bargain for a new Guild as well," said Carlton long regretted a decision made get a fair formula in new negotiator. deal this year. Their conCuse, executive producer in 1984 to accept a small per- media, we'll dig ourselves The guilds have been tract expired Wednesday. of the ABC drama "Lost." centage of home video sales into the same type of hole preparing for these negotiaIn past years, actors have Consumers are expected to because studios said the tech- we've been in with DVDs." tions for years, hiring staff The first casualty of the with extensive labor union almost always gone first, spend $16.4 billion on DVDs nology was untested and that although the Directors Guild this year, according to Adams costs were high. Writers only strike would be late-night experience, and developof America, which is seen Media Research. By conget about 3 cents on a typitalk shows, which are depening joint strategies and as the least aggressive of the trast, studios could generate cal DVD retailing for $20. dent on current events to a harder line than producthree guilds, has sometimes only $158 million from sellThe guilds have tried fuel monologues and other ers have seen in decades. "We haven't shown par- taken the lead. Whatever ing movies online and about and failed for two decades entertainment. Daytime TV,

including live talk shows such as "The View" and soap operas, which typically tape about a week's worth of shows in advance, would be next to feel the impact. The strike would not immediately impact production of movies or prime-time TV programs. Most studios have stockpiled dozens of movie scripts, and TV shows have enough scripts or completed shows in hand to last until early next year. The actors' union has urged its members to join the writers' picket lines during their off hours. If a writers strike lingers and actors show support, producers could try and undermine the writers' position by seeking a more favorable deal with directors. Writers and directors have clashed in the past, mostly over writers' feelings that directors take too much credit for a movie and neglect the contribution of writers. In 2004, the directors' union settled its contract first and backed down from demands for a higher share of profit from the lucrative DVD marketplace. Writers alicl actors then had little choice but to accept a similar deal. "This is a bare knuckle fight and a chess game," said Jonathan Handel, an entertainment lawyer at the Los Angeles law firm of TroyGould. "If producers do reach a deal with the DGA, it would be to cut the legs right out from under the strike. Then the focus shifts to SAG." The DGA said it has not yet scheduled contract talks but was closely monitoring developments. i I

South Carolina votes to keep Stephen Colbert off ballot by AP Writer His announcement came after the South Carolina Democratic Executive Council voted last week to keep the host of "The Colbert Report" off the state's primary ballot. The vote was 13-3. Colbert poses as a conservative talk-show host on the Comedy Central show. "Although I lost by the slimmest margin in presidential election history — only 10 votes — I have chosen not to put the country through another agonizing Supreme

Court battle," Colbert said Monday in a statement. "It is time for this nation to heal." Colbert had said he would run only in his natike South Carolina, a key primary state. He said he planned to run as a Democrat and a Republican — so he could lose twice. Colbert, 43, later declined to file with the GOP, which has a much higher filing fee ($35,000) than the Democrats ($2,500). "I want to say to my supporters, this is not over," Colbert said. "While I may accept the decision of the Council, the fight goes on!

The dream endures! ... And I am going off the air until I can talk about this without weeping." In reality, "The Colbert Report" was going off the air because of a strike by Hollywood writers that began Monday. Many talk shows were expected to be shown in repeats during the strike.

FAITH FOR TODAY PRESENTS

AP Photo

HEAR BEGINS NOVEMBER 10 7:00 P.M_

Grateful Bean Cafe

1039 North Walker Oklahoma City, OK 73102 For more information phone: 405-721-2266 www. aplaceforyou. info

Stephen Colbert poses during the launch party for "Stephen Colbert's AmeriCone Dream", his new Ben & Jerry's ice cream flavor, in this March 5, 2007, file photo in New York. Colbert on Monday, Nov. 5, 2007, announced that he has dropped his bid for president after the South Carolina Democratic Executive Council last week voted to keep the comedian off the state's primary ballot.


8

CLASSIFIEDS

November 6, 2007

MUST LOVE DOGS! Professional couple near Edmond seeks Part-time House Manager/Dog Sitter to care for family's home and dogs. Duties include exercising dogs, running errands, and general housekeeping. Must be dependable, organized, and honest with references. Flexible weekday afternoon hours (approx. 20 hours/week). Great for college student. Occasional overnights/ weekends required. Salary position - avail. immediately. Please fax resumes to 405-285-7597 or e-mail to tiffany@silverstone-homes.com .

THE ATHLETE'S FOOT In North OKC is now hiring part-time employees 12-20 hrs. perweek. Flexible hours, Mon-Sat. Call 848-3232

Deadlines/Pricing DEADLINES: All classifieds MUST be submitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. Prices: Classified ads cost $6/day for the first 20 words and $.10/word thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call 974-5549 or 974-5918 for info.

CARRABBA'S ITALIAN GRILL Now hiring service staff. Apply Mon Thurs., 11a-3p. 3121 W. Memorial Rd. NEED PT JOB? St. Elizabeth Ann Seton afterschool program is looking for someone to work 3pm to 6pm five days a week. The position pays $6.50 an hour. Starting date would be January 2nd or 6th. If interested call the CDC office at 340-1789. Also needing subs between 7am and 6pm on PT basis.

Services EDMOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTE Conveniently located on the UCO campus, offers English as a second language classes for intern. students/individuals. NOW FEATURING a specially designed program with: Strong emphasis in listening and speaking Highly inter. classes, Comprehensive TOEFL program. Enjoy small classes and the campus facilities. Contact us @ (405) 341-2125 or www. thelanguagecompany.com .

HIRING IMMEDIATELY Holiday help to hang Christmas lights. Must be dependable. Parttime & Full-time. $8-9 hr. 340-3914

TOUCHMARK @ COFFEE CREEK Edmond's premier retirement community, is seeking energetic, friendly servers for our upscale resort style dining room. Duties include taking orders from residents, serving food, cleaning dishes from dining room, special event set up and service, and assistance with food preparation and dishwashing. Call Mike Bates @ 340-1975 or apply in person at 2801 Shortgrass Rd. in Edmond.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS! Need to pass the TOEFL, an 1-20 for a friend, or a 12 week cert.? English Language Center can help you! Call (405)348-7602, visit our web site www.elcok.com , or come meet us in person at 1015-C Waterwood Parkway, next to the UCO Universi Plaza on 2nd Street.

WINDOW CLEANER Start immediately. Must have experience, be dependable. $10-$12/hr. Require references, drug testing & dependable transportation. 340-3914 MAID START IMMEDIATELY Experienced only. $9+ hour. Edmond house cleaning company. Require references, drug testing, valid drivers license, reliable transportation. 340-3914

SALES ASSOC. WANTED Mark's Shoe Room is looking for a personable, part-time salesperson for afternoons & Saturdays. Learn sales & merchandising techniques from the best in the industry. Hours flexible to help meet student schedule. Employees receive 40% off shoes. Call Kristy to schedule an interview. 341-3321. Apply Today!

Employment GET GREAT EXPERIENCE WORKING IN A PROFESSIONAL WELLNESS SPA Do you enjoy helping others? Are you calm-natured and health conscious? Have you ever wanted to work in a spa? If so, then this is your opportunity! The Wellness Spa in Edmond has an opening for a Spa Therapist. This position involves performing a wide array of spa treatments in a pleasant and professional work environment. Great experience for the right person. We will provide training. Hours/Days for this position are 1-6, Wed. - Fri. and 10-4 Sat. For more info please call 330-8488.

THERAPIST & CONTACT THERAPIST Therapeutic counseling svcs. to children & families. Req. Master's Soc. Wk/rel. & lic/under super. EOE. Resp w/cov Ittr & res. to Attn: HR, ERI, 601 NE 63rd St, OKC, OK 73105. • f:405/840-1391 111 • @e lei • eo or• RIVER OAKS GOLF CLUB Part-time/Full-time positions available. Beverage cart, event staff & wait staff. Great $$$. Friendly atmosphere. River Oaks Golf Club, 10909 Club House Rd., Edmond, OK. (405) 771-5800. SHOGUN'S STEAK HOUSE Hiring for wait staff, bussers, dish washers, host, bartender. Apply in person at Northpark Mall (NW 122nd & N. May) after 5:30pm. 749-0120.

CHRISTMAS BREAK JOBS The C Lazy U Guest Ranch has employment opportunities from mid-December until Jaunary 6th in the Colorado Rockies. Then stay at the rance free, for an extra week., to ski, snowboard or take advanctage of other winter activites in Grand County. Visit our website www. clazyu.com to download an application or call us at 970-887-3344.

PIT CUSTOMER SERVICE M-F, 8-2, occasional weekend. Apply in person, Edmond YMCA, 1220 S. Rankin. TED'S CAFE ESCONDIDO Hiring servers/hosts. Apply M-F 2-5. 801 E. Danforth, Edmond.

KT SALES/ CUSTOMER SERVICE Will train if you're outgoing and have some work experience. Will work around school schedule. Call Matt Roberts @ 751-1745, Tuxedo Junction. Quail Springs Mall. FLYER DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED Part-time 3-6pm, Monday thru Thursday. Weekends available also. Make $9-$11 per hour. Apply at Pinnacle Fitness, 2137 NW 138th St. 748-4544.

SERVER POSITION Available @ Pearl's Lakeside. Apply within. 748-6113.

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PROMETRIC TESTING CENTER Located at 2224 NW 50th, Suite 196, is searching for college students to assist with proctoring and scheduling National Board exams. The hours will be somewhat flexible during the week and also Saturday. Excellent customer service skills and basic computer skills are required. The position could lead to more hours and even full-time in the summertime. Please fax resume to 405-810-9455 or e-mail resume to dgraves902@sbcglobal.net .

SALES CLERK POSITIONS Available for national postal, business and communications service center franchise. Will schedule around classes. Some retail experience preferred. Must be customer service oriented, well organized and professional. Will train. Wage plus incentives. Apply in person: The UPS Store, 3126 S. Boulevard, Edmond. (405) 348-0334. MOVIE EXTRAS New opportunities for upcoming productions. All looks needed, no experience required for cast calls. Call 877-218-6224. UNDERCOVER SHOPPERS Earn up to $150 per day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and disning establishmentS. Experience not required. Call 800-722-4791. PART-TIME RECEPTIONIST Needed for busy doctors office at Mercy. Must be available to work all day TR. Other hours are possibly available. Please fax resume to 752-4242 TEACHER Needed immediately for Edmond Daycare. FT/PT. Experience preferred, competitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262 PT CASHIER/OFFICE M-W-F. 1:30-6pm, T-TH, 126pm. Every other Sat., 84pm. Call Brenda @ 341-8767. NOW HIRING 2-3 PART-TIME WAREHOUSE WORKERS For a busy Feed & Tack store. Two schedules available: 9-6 Tuesdays/ Thursdays with some Saturdays 10-2, and 9-6 Monday/Wednesday/ Fridays with some Saturdays 10-2. Forklift exp. a plus. We will work around your school schedule. Also have a full-time warehouse manager position available for those anticipating graduation. Please call 405478-3424 and ask for Chris or apply in person at: Red Earth Feed & Tack, 2301 E 1-44 Service Rd., OKC, OK.

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COLLEGE DISCOUNTS AVAIL. Spacious 1 & 2 bed units priced from $450.00-600.00. Limited availability. Call today to reserve your new home. (405) 341-8911. 2BR. AVAIL. IN 4BR. APT. $450/mo. person. All bills paid.

Fully furnished, like new. Call Patti @ 285-5900. ST.

For Sale

MOBILE HOME FOR SALE 2bd, 1bath, 1 mile from campus. Make offer. 405-388-8864.

D.k Buy 2 meals and take $2 off your total bill or buy I meal and

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 11-1-07

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Buy any item (single or meal) at regular price and receive a second item of equal or lesser value half off.

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DILLON PARK APARTMENTS Now pre-leasing for Summer & Fall. Free cable T.V., phone & high-speed internet. Call 285-5900

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ONE BEDROOM APT. Gas and water paid. No Pets! Located near UCO. 1209 N. Roosevelt. $360.00/MO. Plus deposit. 341-9651

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2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH Washer/Dryer hookup, fenced yard, carport. $300 deposit, $600 month. Close to UCO, 1102 Florence Dr. 706-3972.

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THE ACACIA FRATERNITY Located at 217 E. Ayers will be for lease around January 2008. Great location for fraternity, sorority, etc. For more details, contact 590-7719.

SENIOR SERVICES OF OKLA Is looking for students to fill part time positions. Several 9am - 1pm and 1:30 pm - 5:30pm shifts are available for Mon-Fri. We pay $10 per hour for energetic phone work educating senior citizens on healthcare issues. No experience is needed we will train. Business is located at 1417 NW 150th St. in Edmond. Call 8791888 to set up an interview. Ask for Hannah McMahan.

WE OFFER: -Weekly Pay -$8.00 per hour

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FAST LANE SUPERCENTERS Now hiring car wash and oil change attendants. Positions available at 2 locations: . 2220 S. Broadway in Edmond, 844-8084. Or our new location off Penn across from Quail Springs Mall, 608-0570. Advancement & management opportunities available.

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LOOKING FOR A JOB That will work around your school schedule? Well look no further. Papa John's is now hiring all positions at NW OKC & Edmond locations. Whether it's the quick fast money of our delivery drivers or your trying to build your resume by working for our management team. PJs has what's right for your college experience. Call or stop by today. 844-7900

Rentals/Housing

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FRONT-DESK RECEPTIONIST Various shifts. People skills are a must. Dependable, honest, hardworking, happy & responsible adults should apply at Pinnacle Fitness, Memorial & Penn between Toys-R-Us & Hobby Lobby.

Vision Quest Marketing is now hiring!

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NURSING STUDENT Wanted for busy doc tor's office at ercy. Must be available to work all da y TR. Other hours are possibly avai lable to Please fax resume 752-4242.

Want a GREAT JOB making GREAT MONEY?

Apply online at www.vcim.net or call 405-749-0332

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PINNACLE FITNESS Seeking Child Care Associate. Must be experienced, patient & love working w/children. Apply in person, Pinnacle Fitness, N. of Memorial on Penn. next to Toys-R-Us.

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THEVISIA SPORTS

November 6, 2007

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Bronchos ranked 18th by Justin Langston Staff Writer

One of the potential roadblocks for the season was replacing Brown and finding a strong starting center. Last season, Brown was one of the team's top scorers, scoring 27.5 points per game. "Anthony was really our biggest loss," Evans said. "We've got to do the most working to replace him." Finding a replacement for Brown has not been easy, but the team has three potentials that will be filling the center

This year, the UCO Men's Basketball team looks to take it all the way to nationals, starting the season as a nationally ranked team and looking to dominate the competition. Although they will be losing the high scoring center Anthony Brown, who graduated after last season, the team still looks strong, with an excellent opening lineu sand a strong reserve. This season, UCO will begin ranked 18th in the nation. While this is a huge honor for the team, head coach Terry Evans is more concerned with winning the conference and making sure the team plays good basketball than how high the team is ranked. "Rankings are great for recruiting and for the morale of the team," Evans said. "[But they] really don't matter. Since we've got a conference system, Vista Archives I go to win our conference every year. That's what gets Lance Harper dunks the ball during a us to nationals." game in the previous season.

SOCCER from page 10 The Buffs tacked on a pair of goals in the minutes just before halftime, one on a breakaway and the other a deflection. Even with one WW- ,Jeas player being sent off in the 75th minute, UCO was not able to put any more points on the

position for the team. Ronald Hill, a six-foot-eight junior who Evans describes as having "really long arms," Terry Tucker, who averaged just under 15 points per game last season, and Michael Sosanya, a promising freshman. As for the current lineup, Evans sees the team as having a great deal of depth, with a lot of strengths in different areas. The team is confident in their opening line, with Evans saying there are 11 potential starters, which can change from game to game. The only constant in the starting line, as things stand right now, is forward/guard Sam Belt, who led the team in scoring last season, averaging 30.5 points per game. The season looks tough as always, with UCO playing the number four ranked North West Missouri, as well as games against St. Gregory's and New Mexico Highlands from outside of the Lone Star Conference. Although Evans said that UCO had "one of the tougher seasons in the league," he didn't appear to be worried. "We have a lot of depth," Evans said. "And it's going to take the whole team, all of us, to pull together and win." Justin Langston can be reached at jlangston@thevistaonline.com

board, despite taking four for the Bronchos. She was shots in the second half. named the conference's Winning the tournament Academic Player of the Year. gave the Buffalos an automat- She led the team to a 14-3-1 ic bid to the NCAA Division record with her in goal and II National Tournament. was top in the conference in Three Central Oklahoma goals against average, save players, forward Carmen percentage and shutouts. Alli Davis, forward Jenny Miller, Kristen Juroch and Racicot and midfielder Sarah Kasey Mahaffey also received Addison, were named to All-Academic honors. the All-Tournament Team. Goalkeeper Carly Fischer Jeff Massie can be reached at also earned another award jmassie@thevistaonline.com

by Vista photographer Brenda O'Brian

Katie Schult and Courtney Whitlow put up a block against Dallas Baptist and win 3-0 against Dallas Baptist at Hamilton Fieldhouse on Tuesday, Oct. 30.

Bronchos finish strong in conference by Alex Gambill Sports Writer The Bronchos hit hard Thursday and Saturday in Texas to claim victory in their last conference matches in the Lone Star Conference, bringing them to 28-5 and 11-1 in the LSC. UCO colonized the Pioneers of Texas Woman's University 3-1. Central finished 30-23, 30-25, 25-30 and 30-26, which tarnished the Pioneers' record to 6-5 in the LSC. "Texas Woman's is a big rival," UCO head coach Jeff Boyland said. "In the third game, they came out really effective, changing some schemes offensively and we were a little bit slow to adjust to it." Kelsey Reynolds received a season-high of 21 kills in a game. She hit .250 and also churned out eight digs. Lacie Allen had 32 digs, which broke her own single-season digs record in Thursday's match. This brought her to 821 to break the LSC mark of 790 she set last year. Allen now has 2,590 digs in her career. Mari Araujo made 17 kills and helped greatly on defense with 31 digs.

Carolyn O'Connor helped as well with 17 digs. The Bronchos' blocking was , low with only two blocking singles and four blocking assists. Jessica Legako stepped up with 13 kills and kept her errors down to only two. Courtney Whitlow also kept her attack errors low with only one and made 11 kills. Meaghan Wedberg played a smart game setting 56 and making 10 digs. The Bronchos tamed the Lion's Saturday in a five game rumble in the jungle. UCO finished 30-22, 2830, 28-30, 30-18 and 15-10. The Bronchos came out playing a little slow, making 13 kills and 12 errors in the first game. In the second game they kept their errors much lower with only four and made 13 kills, but that wasn't enough compared to the Lion's 16, which won them the game. In the third game the Bronchos made more kills but did not play as clean and racked up 11 errors. "We had a talk after the third game and they were actually playing to make the conference tournament," Boyland said. "They had to beat us for that to happen."

By the fourth game the Bronchos "woke up" and were ready to slay the Lions, finishing 12 points ahead. UCO then kept them down 15-10 in the fifth with only one lead change and three tie scores. "We haven't won a five game match yet this year," Boyland said. "So it was good of them to win that." Araujo claimed 24 kills in the match and Reynolds followed with 15; Legako also helped with 14. Allen kept the Bronchos on path with 42 digs, being the third best UCO match in the number of digs. UCO finished with an astounding 115 digs. Being 11-1 in the LSC, UCO is ranked No. 2 for next week's eight-team LSC Tournament in Canyon, Texas. The Bronchos will face No. 7 Texas A&M-Kingsville at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8. Boyland said the team will watch some films of Kingsville to prepare them for their upcoming match. "If we can win that we will be playing the winner of Midwestern and Cameron," he added. Alex Gambill can be reached at agambill@thevistaonline.com .

Hockey team goes cold by Justin Langston Staff Writer

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The UCO Hockey Club had a tough weekend as they traveled to Phoenix to take on Arizona State where they suf fered two defeats. On Friday night, UCO lost 5-3 with a failed attempt to rally back from a whole game deficit and on Saturday night, UCO dropped the game 5-2 and were simply unable to pick up the pieces and take the win. "We probably played the best game in five games on Saturday," head coach Craig McAlister said. "But things just weren't meant to be." block On Friday, UCO was down every2-0 for most of the first perithing od. They couldn't seem to mount any kind of otir duroffense until late in the ' ing the secperiod when forward AJ ond period. In the Alfrey managed to knock second period, UCO one in. However, in the next mounted up a good offense period, Arizona State shut the when, tying up the game, Bronchos down entirely on Steggles scored off an assist offense, keeping UCO from from Deubel and Jonathon scoring at all. The Sun Devils Cannizzo scored another one still managed to knock one in. while nearly half of the play-

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UCO tried to rally back when forwards Shawn Steggles and Rob Deubel each managed to put points on the board in the third period, but Arizona State sank the puck in two more times, giving them the game. O{ Saturday, McAlister pulled Justin Sgro out of goal and put in Steve Somerfield. Two got passed Somerfield in the first period, but he was able t o

FOOTBALL from page 10 Birmingham 1 e d Broncho backs with 14 carries and 61 yards. The game ended with UCO in possession of the ball 18 yards short of the endzone. The Bronchos attempted no field goals during the game, and it was the first

time they had been shutout since 2000, a 73-game span. Six different players carried the ball for the BulThlos, compiling 143 via 29 rushes. Wide receiver Charly Martin lead the contest with 112 receiving yards, hauling in five catches, two of which went for six. The Bronchos will play their final game of the season this weekend, a home match-up against Northeastern State at 2 p.m.

ers on the ice were confused as to where the puck was. Unfortunately, Arizona State fought back harder in the third period, scoring early on in the period. McAlister replaced Somerfield with Sgro, and he was able to shut down the offense for most of the game, barring a couple of shots. UCO tried to turn the tide, but they never managed to pick up the pieces. "That was [Arizona State's] first game on home ice, so they had a fired up crowd," McAlister said. "These next games though are going to define how we end the year. UCO will be returning home this weekend for a series against the University of Kansas. Next week, UCO will be remaining on home ice when Texas Tech comes calling.

Justin Langston car. be reached at jlangston@thevistaonline.com

Northeastern is 2-7 this season and has the conference's worst scoring offense, averaging a meager 12.8 points per game. The Riverhawks have scored 115 points in nine games, the lowest total in the Lone Star Conference. UCO ranks second to last, having scored 129 points. The Broncho defense, on the other hand, ranks third, allowing only 20.6 points per contest.


10

THE VI STA

November 6, 2007

SPORTS

UCO soccer team gets stunned in the conference finals by Jeff Massie Sports Editor After yielding only one goal to a conference opponent, and going undefeated in Lone Star play, the Broncho soccer team seemed to have lost some of its luster in the conference tournament played in Edmond. UCO, winners of the last conference titles, failed to three-peat when they lost 21 in the finals against West Texas A&M. The defeat came a day after the Bronchos squeeked out a narrow 3-2 double overtime win versus 910-3 Texas A&M-Commerce. Against the Lions, it looked as though UCO would roll early in the game. The Bronchos galloped out to a quick two-point lead with the game not even six minutes old. Midfielder Kasey Mahaffey

and fullback Ashton Morris both scored off of rebounds, the first came from a deflectiOn by the keeper and the second score was set up when the ball ricocheted offthe post. The team from Edmond outshot Commerce 32- 12, but the Lions managed to score three times after the Bronchos two. With the game tied at the break, the Lions added their third and final goal 22 minutes after play resumed. In danger of being bumped in its first game, UCO's Carmen Davis received a pass from Jenny Racicot and took the ball on a breakaway and put the tying ball into the back of the net. The Broncho defense stepped up in overtime as Commerce was unable to get off any shots. Then, in the second extra period, Racicot took an unassisted

shot from 20 yards out and put it past the keeper and into the upper corner of the goal. It was in the finals where UCO crossed paths with the 13-6-1 and sixth seeded Buffalos of West Texas A&M and fell 2-1. The Buffalos went 5-5 in conference this season, including a 2-0 loss to UCO in Canyon, Texas. "Obviously this is an extremely difficult loss for myself and this team," head coach Mike Cook said in a statement to UCO's Media Relations. The game was close with West Texas sporting a narrow 14 to 13 shot advantage. The Bronchos struck first in the contest when Kasey Mahaffey received a pass from Carmen Davis and scored in the 28th minute.

see Soccer, page 9

by Vista photographer Chris Otten

Alli Miller tracks her Texas A&M-Commerce opponent as she tries to take control of the ball.

Buffalos blank the Bronchos by Jeff Massie Sports Editor

by Vista photographer Brenda O'Brian

Jermelle Cudjo prepares to take on a Southwestern Oklahoma State player at Wantland Stadium Oct. 27. UCO won the game 10-7 but lost to West Texas A&M this week 31-0.

West Texas A&M has been tearing through opponents all season and maintained its perfect record after applying a 31-0 beat down on UCO. The Buffalos, ranked fourth in the nation, have won all 10 of their games this season and have clinched at least a share of the conference title with this victory. They have also finished on top of the conference the previous two years. The Bronchos found themselves in a hole early in the game. After a short kickoff and a 15-yard return, West Texas quarterback, Taylor Harris, connected on all four of his passes and led the team into the endzone. The drive accounted

for 58 of Harris' 401 yards through the air. It was Kolo Kapanui who hauled in a 33yard strike for the score; he then ran the extra point in to put the Buffalos up by eight. Harris completed 30 of his 50 throws, including three touchdowns and one interception. After falling behind 15-0, UCO moved the ball inside the 20 yard line and threatened to score twice during the first half. The first drive ended four yards short of pay dirt when quarterback Ryan O'Hara's fourth down pass to Rick Montgomery was deflected by defender Bret Jones. Then on first and 10 with the ball on the Buffalo 17, backup Broncho quarterback Colin Clancy threw an interception. Clancy entered the game

after O'Hara threw a pick, but he finished the game with zero completions on three attempts and one interception. O'Hara saw the majority of the action and connected on 16 of his 28 passes. He also threw an interception during the game that had eight Broncho receivers coming away with receptions. UCO trailed the dominant Buffalos 18-0 at the half and would not move the ball back into the redzone until the fourth quarter when the margin had been expanded to 31-0. Two Broncho fumbles ended a pair of drives on the A&M 17-yard line, the first came from running back Ben Birmingham and the other by De'Marean Pullen.

see Football, page 9

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The Vista Nov. 06, 2007  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Nov. 06, 2007  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.