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www. thevistaonline.com Polling booths will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Nov. 4, 2008

VOTE

The Student Voice of the University of Central Oklahoma Since 1903

Election coverage on Channel 125 UCO students will have a chance to see election coverage from a peer perspective tonight when UCentral, the campus television station, airs election results live. Broadcasting students involved with UCentral will report from local watch parties, break down voter trends and exit polls across the area. Student political analysts will also discuss issues facing the candidates and how these issues will affect them. -Page 5

'Walk This Weigh' underway with grant The Wellness Center has once again been recognized for its forward-thinking approach to health. The Oklahoma City Community Foundation provided a $7,500 Get Moving OKC grant to be used toward a new program, "Walk This Weigh," which will be used to increase physical activity. -Page 3

Features Pianist hits high note From stories about recent dental work to French Operas, conversation and wine flowed at the UCO Jazz Lab Thursday night. Patrons gathered to support the UCO School of Music and listen to Artist-in-Residence Dr. Valery Kuleshov skillfully play masterpieces from Johan Sebastian Bach and Fredric Chopin. With the help of each person in attendance giving a $50 donation to both piano scholarships and the All Steinway-School Initiative, Dr. John Clinton, Dean of Arts, Media and Design announced the school was nearing its goal. -Page 3

Bronchos declaw Tigers, 30-17 UCO shut down East Central's Marcus Johnson-driven offense for their sixth consecutive win this season. The win was fitting for the circumstances, considering it was Senior Day. Sixteen seniors played its last home game in history including defensive stars Matt Gates, T.J. Shaw, K.C. Asiodu, Marcus Martinez and wide receiver Rick Montgomery, along with many others. -Page 6

Current national issues will bring young voters to the polling booths this election By Melissa Dixon Staff Writer

Today, voters across the nation are going to the polls to cast their vote for the 44 President of the United States. "Young people are going to come out in record numbers this election. There are nine million new registered voters," said Erica Williams, policy and advocacy manager for Campus Progress Action. This presidential race is historical for many reasons, including the possibility of either the first African American president or the first female vice president. Both candidates realize how critical it is to reach the young voters in their campaigns. "This election, the candidates are speaking to the younger voters and asking them to vote. Students are taking the time to talk to friends about the issues. This generation is more engaged," Rock the Vote Executive Director Heather Smith

said. Students are paying close attention to Senator Barack Obama and Senator John McCain's issues and plans on how to resolve them. "This young generation has grown up in a different time. We have experienced natural disasters and war. We realize we need leadership," Smith said. Issues that are affecting students include the rise of college tuition, the economy and shopping loan penalties. These issues are very personal to college students and playing a significant role in getting young voters to the polls. "This election is important for young people. Things are bad enough for 18-29 year-olds. They are being left with the debt of college loans and the economic burden is significant," Smith said. Recent polls show 65 percent of current college students surveyed said college being more affordable was an important issue when voting for the next President. In the past 10-12 years student, loans have increased by 900 percent. Budget cuts, both at the state and federal level, have made financial aid scarce. Students are also facing tuition increases and leaving college with significant debt due to student loans. The College Report released earlier this year states tuition for the year climbed 6.4 percent

"Young people are going to come out in record numbers this election. There are nine million new registered voters." --Erica Williams

for in-state students at public four year schools to an average cost of $6,585. Private colleges jumped 5.9 percent to an average of $25,143. On the other hand, Community Colleges were on the decline by 0.8 percent to $2,300. Young voters have been paying close attention to Obama's and McCain's plans because of these statistics facing young voters. Technology has helped many students take the time to educate themselves about the candidates' critical issues and plans. "Young people are coming together to take back their future. They want to be part of the change," Smith said.

Speaker to address presence in Iraq Staff Writer

Retired U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Greg Slavonic will address UCO students on Wednesday about the nation's presence in Iraq as part of UCO's Leader-in-Residence Program. His speech is also part of the Dean's Annual Speech Series, and Slavonic is the leader-in-residence for the College of Liberal Arts. He will be speaking at 6 p.m.

the Pegasus Theater in the Liberal Arts building. "Students who are really interested in hearing about the war in Iraq from someone who's actually been there should really enjoy this lecture," Dean Pamela T. Washington said. Slavonic, who earned his master's degree in education from UCO, served over 35 years in the Navy as a public affairs specialist. He has worked with a number of high-profile journalists during Operation Desert Storm

and Operation Iraqi Freedom. "Some of [my speech] will resonate with students because they've seen this on the news," Slavonic said. He plans to speak next semester about leadership and development, but will focus Wednesday on our situation in Iraq. He said he will provide perspective on events that occurred during the Gulf War in the early 1990s that affect our current position in the Middle East.

see IRAQ, page 5

International Festival brings cultures together By Rebecca Shampay Staff Writer

Cultures from around the globe were celebrated at UCO last Thursday. Representatives from Morocco, Vietnam, Kenya, Malaysia and Iran were just a few of the nationalities taking part in the International Festival inside the Grand Ballrooms in the Nigh University Center. "I love learning about all the interesting little details [about the cultures]," said senior Spanish major Stephanie Broderick. "The food, too, is always good." The day was a celebration of food, art and traditions. There was a performance competition as well as a display contest. Besides display tables, Europe had an entire dining table, full of pastas along with some wine. Sgme grows performed dances, such as 2na and 3ra place groups Nepal and Pakistan. Other countries opted for a different performance, such as a Kenyan student who sang an original song. A vast array of music was played and cheering could be heard throughout the competition.

Japan stole the show, winning the competition for 1st place best performance. There were seven performances throughout the day and more than 15 countries were displayed. "The displays are the biggest I've seen so far at the International Festival. Students this year really put a lot of effort into their work," said volunteer coordinator and junior Kinesiology major Chewy Ong. The 1st place Indian display was one of the largest, with By contributing photographer Chase Brennan an entire walk-in-tent full pf pictures and artwork, dishes, and a hookah. There were also Cultures were celebrated last Thursday as part of the International miniature statues of the Indian Festsival in the Grand Ballrooms in the Nigh University Center. lords Ganesh and Krishna. Biomedical Engineering major, was inside Photos of the Indian Air Force and famous the tent showing people around and Indian classical musicians were displayed answering any questions. as well. "My favorite part of the festival has been Maulik Sharma, Indian Student teaching others about the Indian culture," Association Senator and freshman Sharma said.

Watch it! "You will do foolish things, but Lo them with enthusiasm."

--Colette

Live Coverage of the election on channel 125.


OPINION

Page 2 Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2008

The Vista

The Vista

Comm. Building, Rm. 107 100 N. University DE • Ednbcoll„ OK 73034 5209 405 974 5549. editonalgthevistaaidine.com -

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The lista is published as a newqmper awl public forum by UM students, semi-weekly diking the academie year periods. and except exam and kohl*' ofdy oft Thursdays during the summer, at the Univicsity of Central 4:Alabama. The issue price is free for the first oopy and $1 far each addidonal copy obtained. EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cams. reviews and "es represent the views of the writer or artist and MS necessar4 the views &The Vistaliclitonal ' Board, the Department of Mass COMMardiCatOTI, IMO or the Board of Rftents of +Mahatma Colleges. The Tialstais not an official medium of expresfikift for the Rego= or MO. LETTERS The Vista encourages lenges to the editor. Letters should address issues afrtd, ideas, net personalitie&Letters MINA bE typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 weals, and Meg mule the author's printedname, Maier, "int% and phone WMbez Lewis me subject to eking for Mel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The NIS2 reserves the right not to publish submitted letters_

MANAGEMENT Jana Davis. Co-84W Nets= Solomon, C4:14410. Gag Newbp 4tibm*f asitar •GbrisMiier4Pko Mgr ;:Ad

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Address is to: Editor, The Vista, ADMINISTRATIVE 100 N. Unitersty DE, Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or de era to the ASSISTANT editor in the Communications Build- Trete Berke. ing, Room 107. Letters can be e-maDed ADVI S ER to editoriall@thevklacndialecom. Kelly &Wray

Editorial: Gas conservation needed regardless of lower prices Gas prices are on the decline, with Athens experiencing a typical inflated $3.19 per gallon yesterday, while the rest of Ohio enjoyed an average of $2.90. But flocking to the gas pump is not the answer for keeping prices low. While the decrease in oil prices is not purely based on a lower demand for crude oil, it does play a part. As demand goes down, there is a larger supply. With a larger supply, the price goes down. With peoples' wallets stretching as $4 per gallon seemed imminent, the drop has probably been a welcome relief. But when the price is low, people become more comfortable falling into old habits. Whether it's stocking up on gasoline in case the price skyrockets or being more casual about how much one drives, people aren't as conscious of how much they purchase or use. In order to keep prices low, people need to keep the conservation mind-set. Yes, the gasoline is there and it's 50 cents cheaper, but do you have to use it? It would be more cost- and fuel-efficient to continue our habits — which have helped decrease the amount of driving in the United states for the first time in 20 years — while reaping the benefits of the saved dollars. If the market really can be swayed by supply and demand (although obviously we don't live in a purely freemarket economy), keeping demand from accelerating is a key to continued lower gas prices. Buying SUVs and large trucks is still as counterproductive as ever — they increase the demand for gas because they are less fuel efficient, and they cost the consumer more in terms of filling up at the pump. A fear of mine is that people will see the decrease in prices as a sign that the increase in gas prices was a bump in the road, rather than something that was going to be steadily increasing no matter what. According to an IBM study, 22 percent of respondents said they would seek options other than driving their personal cars if gas prices reached $4, and that number increased to 66 percent as prices hit $5. While it's obvious that people's driving habits have changed, it is worrisome that around Ohio we really didn't often cross the $4 barrier. People saw $4 as a sign that driving habits really needed to be changed, and a lot of gas stations kept their unleaded fuel prices at $3.99 for as long as possible; that penny kept people from having to really think about the true cost of $4 per gallon gasoline. Some predict gas prices will drop to below $3, but hopefully that will not deter people from purchasing smaller cars, demanding more fuel efficiency and seeking alternative modes of transportation when available. Greenhouse gases might not be an incentive to change driving habits for everyone, but money definitely is. For the sake of the environment, people ought to ccifttinue decreasing their demand and use of gasoline. History exists so people can learn from their mistakes, and relying on SUVs and cheap gasoline for all our needs was not the wisest decision. Let's decide what's best for us and let the market feel the effects, rather than rely on what the market dictates to us.

BY NELSON SOLOMON "Obama on the left, tory, a moment where votMcCain on the right, we can ers decide who will shape talk politics all night, and the policy of this nation for you can vote however you the next four years. But if you choose not to like, You can vote however exercise your right as a U.S. you like, yeah." These are lyrics from the citizen to vote and make now-famous song "You can your voice heard, you have vote however you like" by no right to complain if the the kids from Atlanta's Ron winning candidate makes Clark Acaderny„inspired by changes or decisions that are xapper T.k?s . hit -"Whatever at odds with yombeliefs.,-_:, Yotrttike." - Let's face it, .=tee` have The video has blasted been inundated with camacross the Internet and is- paign information for the increasingly popular, and to past few years and it has all put it simply, the kids have led up to this point. a great point. Now is the time to make a stand and let your opinion You can vote. It's Election Day, and be known, even if you are in we're at a crossroads in his- the minority

It's not popular right now to be a conservative or to be a supporter of Sen. John McCain and Gov. Sarah Palin, but if your views fit in with their ideology, vote for them. Don't let the media's popular choice of Obama deter you from voting the way you feel, after you have examined all the issues in this election. It is very likely that people who did not choose to vote will end up complaining after the elections about who won or lost. It is these people who need to take a stand now and do something about their beliefs. And if you simply choose not to care, I urge you to reconsider and realize that you -are, very likely to be affected by the decisions of the next president. The next resident of the White House will likely make nominations for the Supreme Court that will affect the way controversial issues like abortion and gay marriage influence our government. ,

Their administration's decisions will also affect the state of the economy as well, especially your retirement. Also, vote because you have the ability to. At this moment, there are a quarter-million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Africa who are displaced due to recent fighting in the area. And in the Darfur region of Sudan, genocide is taking place and over 400,000 people have lost their lives, according to a September 2006 article. Voting is certainly not an easy task in the Congo and not even an option in Sudan. Meanwhile, you have the freedom to get in your vehicle or ride your bike to your local polling center and make your voice hearcl., Your greatest concerrus,ae long lines at the polling center. Bottom Line: Appreciate your rights as an American and go to the polls. If you choose not to, then don't complain about the actions of the next administration.

Whoever wins, this election is special Oklahoma hasn't gone to a democrat in a presidential election since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964. In 1968, we elected Nixon (for better or for worse) and haven't looked back since. So what, you may ask, is the point in voting? Two things: First, there are 11.6 percent more registered democrats in the state of Oklahoma than republicans. Both of our senators are republican, as well as four out of our five representatives. Our governor, Brad Henry, and Representative Dan Boren, however, are Democrats. Just because we haven't elected your candidate recently doesn't mean

that it's not going to happen. Second, the republicans don't have our state election in the bag. This year, more than ever, people are showing up to vote. I heard on the news the other day that Obama has been gaining popularity in Oklahoma City and Tulsa, even though McCain still has a strong grasp on the majority of the voters in our two biggest cities, as well as most of our rural areas. That means if you stay home on election day because you think the state will go red with no contest, you're running the risk of giving the election to the opposition. Saying your vote won't

count is absurd. Voting is not merely a right, it's a responsibility. This election is historical on more than one level. On the one hand, you have Barack Obama who, if elected, will be the first African American to be president. Even though he's technically only 50 percent African American and has some serious question marks in the moral department (see: partial-birth abortion and Jeremiah Wright) he's had a good run. On the other hand, you have John McCain who, for better or worse, chose Sarah PalM as his running-mate. While you may not agree with everything she says,

she's poised to become the first woman to be elected to the office of vice president. Oh, and in case you had forgotten, she's not running directly against Obama, so stop comparing the two. Free elections have been a staple of the American democratic process for years. Your demographic group may not have always had that right, but many people have fought for and even died for the right in order for you to have it today. Apathy is no excuse for shirking your most important civic duty. Go vote! Greg Newby, Managing Editor

Student voice: Election Day epitomizes our democracy

G Here it is Election Day, and I am yet again awed and humbled by this sysitem of government that we call democracy. More than Independence Day, I -,count Election Day as the most patriotic of holidays. To cast a vote is to maintain this great nation and pay homage to those who The Post have secured our right as Ohio Liniversily Americans to determine our

destiny as a nation. Every four years, the most powerful office in the land is up for grabs. When the new president is inaugurated on January 20, 2009, we will see the forty-fourth peaceful exchange of power. We take for granted today something that was unsure in the early days of our new country. Today we will see many

political signs, and the way we cast our vote will seem to separate us. While I am a staunch supporter for John McCain for president, and will continue to have conservative views regardless of the outcome of this election, I want to put partisanship aside for today. There has been enough to divide us in these twenty one long mcnths since campaigning

first began. I want to focus on the much greater cause that unifies us: the cause is for the triumph of democracy. This is the cause that all of us should take up as our duty and privilege as Americans. Vote!

Bonnie Brown Senior, Economics

CAMPUS QUOTES: "What celebrity do people say you look most like?" Photographed and compiled by Chris Albers Ins ector Clouseau"

`Edison Chen, Chinese ctor and inger."

other lead guy in he movie Drumline."

"Ashley Simpson"

nard Roberts)

Stefano Tarantini Bio Med Engineering - Sophomore

an eong Finance - Junior

K.C. Asiodu

Jessica Gurule

Political Science - Graduate

Criminal Justice - Freshman


Page 3 Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2008

NEWS

The Vista

'Walk This Weigh' underway with grant By Laura Hoffert

Senior Reporter

The Wellness Center has once again been recognized for their forward-thinking approach to health. The Oklahoma City Community Foundation provided a $7,500 Get Moving OKC grant to be used toward a new program, "Walk This Weigh," which will be used to increase physical activity. The Wellness Center staff wrote and submitted a grant application to the OCCF to be considered for the award. . Modeled after the Oklahoma Turning Point Council's program with the same name, participants are encouraged to walk 10,000 steps a day at least three times a week. "The program will be free to all participants," Danielle Dill, assistant director, Fitness & Health Promotion said. "As part of the program, the first 500 participants will receive a pedometer. All participants will receive the 'Passport to Health' book which includes the walking log as well As weekly goal setting opportunities and health information related to fitness and nutrition." The "Walk This Weigh" initiative includes

raising public awareness through fun exercise while reducing individual weight and advocating healthy nutrition and physical activity in schools, worksites and governmental units. In 2007, America's Health Rankings listed Oklahoma as 47m in the nation for overall health of its citizens. Within the same report, Oklahoma ranked 30 in per capita spending to support public health and prevention programs The UCO Student Health Advisory Committee will host the eight-week program, starting March 2009. Those who complete the 10,000 Step Challenge earn an official t-shirt. Students, UCO staff and citizens of Edmond and Oklahoma City will be able to sign up on-line at ucohealthycampus.com, in person at the Wellness Center or different Edmond businesses. "Specific locations will be determined over the next few months prior to launching the program," Dill said. The OOCF Web site also includes suggested places to walk. In Edmond, located on Covell between Kelly and Santa Fe, J.L. Mitch Park has a five-and-a-half mile paved walkway surrounding the park. Students living in Oklahoma City,

Bethany, Yukon and Midwest City can find other walker-friendly locations at www.occf.org/ greatplacestowallc html. Students living on campus can walk campus paths such as the Bronze trail, Blue trail, or Broncho trail, pathway maps can be found online at www.ucok. edu / wellnesscenter / f_ trails.htm under "Outdoor Campus Walking Trails." "Just try, you are worth it, do it for you and for your family," Dill said. "It's not too late to start by Vista photographer Chris Albers exercising." OCCF, the metropolitan area's non-profit pub- The Wellness Center, located on University Drive. lic charity, was founded in 1969 to work with individuals to meet the charitable needs of the Foundation funds, initiates and leads procommunity through the development and grams that benefit the community in the administration of permanent endowment areas of arts, education, health and human funds for non-profit organizations, scholar- services, beautification and community development. ships and other charities. Through its Community Program Grants, the Oklahoma City Community

The ghost of Halloween's past

First annual drive-in on Chowning By Lauren Lubbers

Staff Writer

by Vista photographerChris Albers

Fraternity brother Chase Blondell poses as a ghastly ghost on Halloween to scare traffic outside the Acacia fraternity house on University Drive.

Artist-in-residence hits high note at Lab By Laura Hoffert

Senior Reporter

From stories about recent dental work to French Operas, conversation and wine flowed at the UCO Jazz Lab Thursday night. Patrons gathered to support the UCO School of Music and listen to Artist-inResidence Dr. Valery Kuleshov skillfully play masterpieces from Johan Sebastian Bach and Fredric Chopin. With the help of each person in attendance giving a $50 donation to both piano scholarships and the All Steinway-School Initiative, Dr. John Clinton, dean of Arts, Media and Design announced the school was nearing its goal. The initiative's objective is to supply the school with Steinway pianos and replace current pianos that are not of that brand. "Steinway is one of the few piano makers that still makes pianos by hand," head of Piano / Keyboard Studies Division Dr. Chindarat Charoenwongse said. "We value such an excellent craftsmanship that provides our students and faculty the best instruments to make music with." With the price of Steinways increasing every year, the school is doing everything in its power to meet its goal soon to ensure its students have the best equipment. UCO students Brian Cook, Timothy Hsu and Ashlley Notham proved to be among the best as the Chamber Trio entertained the audience until Kuleshov took the stage. A silent auction was also held, with items such as a piano lesson with UCO Director of Jazz Brian Gorell and a weekday stay at the Two Hearts Inn located on Edmond Road. Dinner with Kuleshov, Clinton and their wives was also up for auction. The Blue Note Membership seemed to be a popular

item, the winner of which would be allowed access to all Jazz Lab "Violently pounding away, performances for one year. Boulevard Steakhouse served yet maintaining the beauty of decadent desserts, while some the song, the maestro gave audience members sauntered those in attendance a clear up the stairs, hopping to get a better view of Kuleshov's hands picture of what a performer pressing the keys, while bringing should be." the spirit of Bach to the packed house. At 8:15, the maestro casually walked on stage, adjusted his chair several times and began his first His second Etude, Op. 10 No. 3 caused piece, Organ Concerto in D Minor the entire room to smile knowing they BWV 596. Leaning into the Steinway were in the presence of greatness. as he swiftly glided through the song, Ferociously beginning the third Etude, his audience silently watched, no one C-Sharp minor, Op. 10 No. 4, most of sipped their wine; they instead savored the audience didn't expect the quick, each note. Kuleshov dramatically raised sharp twists and turns Kuleshov had in his arms after hitting certain keys, and store, yet he pulled it off perfectly. Few can segue from lunging at the when those in attendance looked disappointed the song was ending, however, piano, striking at the keys and invadhe played on, focused on the ivory and ing the small space with thunderous sound into the soft and beautiful E-Flat, black keys. Pumping the pedals and nodding his minor, Op. 10, No. 6. Of the six etudes head every so often, the maestro was in Kuleshov played, he was able to give, his own world. Wiping his forehead the audience variation and keep the; and adjusting his gold-framed glasses, concert lively and quickly paced. ' For his fifth, E-flat major, Op. 10 he led into his second song, melodically weaving high and low notes together; No. 11, he began playing lightly as he ending Kuleshov finished adjusted his had in No. 6, but his skill and mastery glasses again and dove into his third kept the audience enthralled. At times, appearing to talk to himself, he finsong. Violently pounding away, yet main- ished, adjusted his glasses one last time taining the beauty of the song, the mae- and began to tackle his final song. C minor, Op. 10 No. 12 was a beautistro gave those in attendance a clear picture of what a performer should be. ful and graceful mixture of fast-paced As he raised his eyebrows and shook progression and intricate notes sweetly his head, Kuleshov seemed as though swarming the keyboard. The audience immediately gave he was delighted to be playing classics, Kuleshov a standing ovation with a not obligated. Finishing his Bach set, he stood, roar of applause that was so loud; bowed, adjusted his chair, studied the passers-by must have felt envious of piano briefly and dove into Fredric the amount of pure talent they missed. Humbly walking back on stage for Chopin's Etude Op. 10, No. 1. Playing the entire range of the piano quickly his encore, he entertained the audience and flawlessly, the maestro drew no once more. In the true spirit of having applause, rather a quiet acknowledge- the best, Kuleshov may be UCO's bestment of admiration from the audience. kept secret.

Wednesday was the first annual Sigma Kappa Sorority Drive-in. The parking lot of the Sigma Kappa house was turned into a large projection screen to give the effect of a drive-in. The movie, "The Strangers," was shown in celebration of Halloween. The event was given the name "Nightmare on Chowning." The entire campus was invited, but most attendants were from the local Greek community. All sororities and most of the fraternities were represented. Sigma Kappa's public relations representative, Kandace Rodgers, was responsible for putting on the event. "It was a lot of fun because we rarely all get to come together as a whole and just spend

time with each other. It was nice to be able to visit with friends from other houses," Rodgers said." We made hot chocolate, popcorn and we had candy corn as well. Everyone lined up their trucks and laid down blankets and pillows in the beds of the truck. It was just a nice time to sit back, relax and enjoy a scary movie with everyone. Kappa Sigma pledge Vince Davis said he thought the drive-in was a really good idea and said it was neat how they hung white sheets from the back of the house to make it look like a movie screen. "It turned out pretty cool," Vince Davis, Kappa Sigma pledge, said. "It was the first time we put on an event like this, but I hope to make it an annual event," Rodgers said.

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EARN EXTRA MONEY! Students needed ASAP. Earn upto $150 aday being a mystery shopper. No experience required. Call 1-800-722-4791. HANDY STUDENT WANTED Carpentry, painting, lawn maintenance. Must be self-motivated, trustworthy. 641-0712. SERVER POSITION Available @ Pearl's Lakeside. Apply within. 748-6113 CUSTOMER SERVICE HELP M F 4:45AM - 9AM. Occasional weekend shift. Apply in person. Edmond YMCA. -

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PT CASHIER/ STOCKER NEEDED Heavy lifting required. Must be 21. Please apply in person @ Edmond Wine Shop, 1520 S. Boulevard. BIG SKY BREAD CO. Has a part-time position available. Duties include helping customers, slicing bread, and some cleaning. Please fill out an application at 6606 N. Western Ave. EDMOND FAMILY NEEDS AIDES FOR 21 Y/0 YOUNG MAN WITH AUTISM Assist with daily activities, play, community outings. Weekdays 4pm - 8pm and weekends 8am - 8pm. Training provided. References required. Email kathy@earplugstore. corn or call 844-4578. RIVER OAKS GOLF CLUB Is looking for friendly, energetic person to fill weekday shifts and/or weekend shifts in the Bar and Grill. Located 10 minutes from UCO. $8.00-$12.00 per hour. Call Chris or Cindy @ 771-5800 for appointment or stop by 10909 Clubhouse Road, Edmond, to fill out an application. BUSINESS STUDENTS $$ NEED CASH? $$ For Gas-Fun-Plus??? 3-9 hrs per week. Hourly pay Plus Computer/Internet experience helpful. Earning potential excellent. 623-2857. HELP WANTED for Front Desk. Apply in person. Stafford Inn. 1809 E. 2nd St. Edmond, 73034 THE IBROW STUDIO SALON & SPA Is hiring PT receptionist/hospitality specialist. We are looking for custmer service oriented individuals for this position. Available shifts: 10-2, 2-6 and all day Sat. Please apply at 2000 W. Danforth, Suite 124. NEED SOMEONE AVAILABLE AFTER 3PM On Tues., Wed., & Thurs. to care for my 2 boys ages 10 and 13. Must have good driving record and overall good moral character. 650-5779. PT TEACHERS Needed at brand new child development center. Call My Small Wonders at 285-7752 or apply online at www. mysmallwonders. corn Read The Vista classified Ads

UCO Student Newspaper

Editor In Chief Are you ready to help lead one of the most exciting and innovative student organizations on campus? The University of Central Oklahoma student newspaper is seeking a hands-on, well-rounded Editor in Chief to lead our newsroom and manage all aspects of our editorial department. The Vista updates online each weekday and publishes print editions each Tuesday and Thursday. The Editor in Chief is responsible to ensure that all tasks, from planning to distribution, are completed. The editor is responsible for seeing that The Vista comes out, on time, every issue as scheduled, with content thoroughly covering the UCO community, fairly and thoroughly reported, wellwritten and presented, free of error.

Primary Duties • Coordinates and oversees the organization of the staff and the assignment of tasks so that the paper is published in an orderly manner and by deadline. • Responsible for developing work schedules for reporters, photographers, and page designers. • Supervises all positions to ensure the fulfillment of job responsibilities; explains and enforces all deadlines and policies with the staff. • Holds regularly scheduled meetings for all staff and acts as chair at these meetings. • Works with Vista photographers and graphic designers to achieve the best possible design. • Maintains orderly and timely computer folders. • In collaboration with other editors, decides the content, placement of content, and design for each issue. • Motivate and maintain entire staff by assisting the other editors and managers in creating and facilitating an open and inviting atmosphere.

Qualifications Good leadership, organizational, and management skills are required, along with a passion for quality journalism. The successful candidate should display strong skills in news page design and copy editing and have thorough knowledge of Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop. In addition, he or she should exercise strong attention to detail and should show an ability to motivate, teach, and inspire the newsroom staff to perform at its best. To be considered, candidates must have successfully completed Newspaper Reporting. Preference will also be given to those candidates who have passed News Editing.

Apply online at UCOK.EDU

44 WATCH SPORTS AS CLOSE TO BEING PAID TO

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The Vista

SHOGUN'S STEAKHOUSE Hiring for wait staff, bussers, dish washers, host, bartender. Apply in person at Northpark Mall (NW 122nd & N. May) after 5:30pm. 749-0120 TEACHER NEEDED IMMEDIATELY for Edmond Daycare. FT/PT. Experience preferred, competitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262 SENIOR SERVICES OF OKLAHOMA Is looking for students to fill part time positions. Several 9am - 1 pm and 1:30 pm - 5:30pm shifts are available for MonFri. We pay $10 per hour for energetic phone work educating senior citizens on healthcare issues. No experience is needed we will train. Business is located at 1417 NW 150th St. in Edmond. Call 879-1888 to set up an interview. Ask for Hannah McMahan.

Services EDMOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTE Conveniently located on the UCO campus, offers English as a second language classes for international students/ individuals. NOW FEATURING a specially designed program with: Strong emphasis in listening & speaking, Highly interactive classes, Comprehensive TOEFL program. Enjoy small classes and the campus facilities. Contact us at (405) 341-2125 or www. thelanguagecompany. corn INT'L STUDENTS! Need to pass the TOEFL, an 1-20 for a friend or a 12-week certificate? English Language Center can help you! Call us at (405) 348-7602, visit our website www.elcok.com or come meet us in person at 1015-C Waterwood Pkwy, next to the UCO University Plaza on 2nd Street.

Student Newspaper

Managing Editor Become a leader for the most exciting and innovative student organizations on campus. The University of Central Oklahoma student newspaper is seeking a hands-on, well-rounded Managing Editor to help lead our talented reporting staff. The Vista updates online each weekday and publishes print editions each Tuesday and Thursday. The managing editor supervises the writing staff, assigning stories and, in conjunction with the editor in chief, planning the content for each issue of the paper, assuring coverage is thorough and includes all segments of the UCO community.

Primary Duties • Maintain a maser calendar for planning news coverage and follow-up articles on a timely basis. • Assigns and edits stories for each issue of the paper, specifically eliminating wordiness, protecting and polishing the language, correcting spelling and grammar errors, correcting inconsistencies, making certain the story is complete and fair. • Works with writers as needed, toward completion of their assignments and improvement of their skills • Enforces reporters' deadlines, and fills out missed deadline reports as needed. • Assists editor in chief and other editors in final copy review, editing, and alterations • Supervises section editor positions to ensure the fulfillment of job responsibilities. • Reports and writes stories as needed.

Qualifications Good leadership, organizational, and management skills are required, along with a passion for quality journalism. The successful candidate will display strong news judgment and copy editing skills. He or she should also have a tremendous ability to generate article and photo ideas. Strong leadership and communications skills are a must. In addition, he or she should show an ability to motivate, teach, and inspire the news writing staff to perform at its best. To be considered, candidates must have successfully completed Newspaper Reporting. Preference will also be given to those candidates who have passed News Editing.

Apply online at UCOK.EDU

Lost/Found FOUND: DIGITAL CAMERA Call to prove ownership. (405) 808-2505.

Read The Vista classified ads to find the best in jobs, services, and deals. Look in The Vista classified pages each Tuesday and Thursday. The new Vista online coming soon at thevistaonline.com

vistardedinyahoo,com 405/914.5911


Page 5 Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2008

NEWS

The Vista

Live election coverage on 125 By Stephani Tobin Staff Writer

UCO students will have a chance to see election coverage from a peer perspective tonight when UCentral, the campus television station, airs election results live. Broadcasting students involved with UCentral will report from local watch parties, break down voter trends and exit polls across the area. Student political analysts will also discuss issues facing the candidates and how these issues will affect them. "The [UCO] students are our primary audience and our team is always striving to cater to them," Micah Nasrra, co-anchor at UCentral, said. Nasrra also said they plan to cover both national and local elections. Their team received election practice when they covered the Super Tuesday primary in February. Nasrra and co-anchor Brandon Richards will provide election updates every half-hour until 11 p.m. Alicia Raymond will manage the board with states and electoral votes, Lauren Seabrook will be a

political analyst and Bryce Beckley will moderate the panel of student analysts. "For those who have not ever seen one of our newscasts, I think [they] would be greatly impressed by what we put on," Nasrra said. "I am expecting Nov. 4 to be a big night for UCentral." Beckley, the panel moderator and UCentral student, said the students on the panel are all involved in at least one political science group on campus, including the College Republicans, American Democracy Project and Young Democrats of Oklahoma. "It's very rare that we get to hear the opinions of average students on campus, much less let them debate the issues," Beckley said. The panel will include an equal number of Republicans and Democrats, including UCOSA President John Bobb-Semple. Beckley said American citizens have a responsibility to use freedoms to question the motives of politicians and political candidates. He also said people can write letters to media outlets and contact local representatives with concerns. "The time is now for the future

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He said his speech will focus on a number of areas, and he plans to give a "broad brush presentation" of information and subjects that may interest students. Students of political science and history specifically may find themselves intrigued by his speech, Slavonic said, because he will be discussing ancient Babylon. He also said that journalism and mass communications students would be interested because of his work in public affairs. "This subject is timely in the sense that even though we're not talking about Iraq as much, we're still focused on Afghanistan," S1 s id !- "It Will'be-a 'region' i e world that will be in the news every day.'' He predicts the U.S. military will be in the Middle East for a number of years, citing

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Members in the audience included older PIKE members, all campus sororities, several fraternities and other local students. "I was in a group with three of my other pledge brothers," Jack Daneshmand, a PIKE pledge, said. "Me and one of the guys dressed up as nerds competing in a championship chess tournament and the other two dressed up as our overly competitive chess boot camp coaches. "It was hilarious. Our coaches had squirt bottles, whistles and knee high socks. My group was the second highest bidding price. "We sold for $350. It was a lot of fun and I will always remember the experience we all shared. I can't wait to see our next pledge class's auction."

Last Tuesday , Pi Kappa Alpha raised over $5,600 for the 2008 Nu pledge class of UCO's Lambda Iota chapter of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. All 35 young men were auctioned off to raise funds for their initiation fees. Each new member was in a group anywhere from two to five people. They performed humorous skits such as commercial reenactments, the Backstreet Boys dance and lipsync performances and nerds playing in championship chess tournaments. The bidding for each group started at $30 and went as high as $705. The entire pledge class was sold as a whole at the end of the auction for $3,000.

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Page 6 Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2008

SPORTS

The Vista

Wrestlers ranked 6th, aim to exceed expectations tinues to workout and get at 197 pounds, also returns. better daily in preparation Edison said there are 47 wrestlers on the team this for the season. "I'm hoping we can put year and that means a lot of The UCO men's wres- together a good team...that competition. fling team comes into the will be in the thick of things "It's like the saying, 'iron 2008-09 season ranked and will make a run," he sharpens iron,'" Edison said. No. 6 in the nation by the said. NCAA Division 11 National The Bronchos are among If anything, the rankCoaches Association after a group of four or five teams ings serve as motivation for a sixth-place finish at last that can contend for the some like Robinson. season's NCAA Division II national title, James said. "I don't like the rank As the season approach- ings," Robinson said. "I by Vista photographer Chris Albers Wrestling Championships. While the recognition es, the team's first goal is don't think they show how was well received by coach- identifying the best 10 start- good we can be, but it's not Quarterback Brandon Noohi dodges a defender Saturday afternoon during UCO's last home game of es and wrestlers, the team is ers, he said. a big deal." the season against East Central University. The Bronchos won the game, 30-17. ready to finish even higher. "That's gonna take a little Elliot said the team's goal "I don't mean disrespect, bit of time," James said. "We is to win a national title this but rankings in preseason have three All-Americans year. are a little suspect," said back from last year." "Last year's finish was David James, UCO wres- He said these are senior unacceptable," Elliott said. tling head coach. "Certainly Tim Elliot at 133 pounds, "We've got a good shot we have high expectations junior Colby Robinson at to win the title this year," and want to finish high- 149 pounds and junior he said. "We've got all the er than what a preseason heavyweight Dustin Finn. pieces, but we're not put ranking is." Sophomore Jarrett Edison, together yet." James said the team con- a national qualifier last year By Matt Caban Staff Writer

Bronchos declaw Tigers, 30-17 By Kaylea Brooks Sports Editor

UCO shut down East Central's Marcus Johnsondriven offense for its sixth consecutive win this season. The win was fitting for the circumstances, considering it was Senior Day. Sixteen seniors played their last home game in history including defensive stars Matt Gates, T.J. Shaw, K.C. Asiodu, Marcus Martinez and wide receiver Rick Montgomery, along with many others. East Central came out explosive in the first quarter, threatening the Bronchos with powerful offensive drive. But the Bronchos drew first blood with a touchdown by Da'Marean Pullen at 9:23. A little over a minute later, the Tigers scored with a drive consisting of four plays lasting a minute and 21 seconds. UCO blocked the kick, holding back ECU by one point. Later in the first quarter, Kendell Hendrix caught a 24-yard pass from Brandon Noohi to start the Bronchos on quick drive to the goal. A holding penalty prevented the Bronchos from counting a touchdown, but Daniel Morrell caught a pass at the five-yard line. UCO succeeded in adding

another touchdown to the scoreboard, ending the first quarter 14-6. In the second quarter, the Bronchos scored once again with a run-in by Noohi at 14:29. UCO's Code Red Defense prevented the Tigers from scoring in the second quarter and had three interceptions in the second quarter alone. The Tigers did not make it easy on the Bronchos, though. The Tigers only allowed the Bronchos a field goal for the last score of the first half. The Tigers powered up for a comeback in the second half and UCO made mistakes in the third quarter, including two turnovers, that gave ECU momentum. Several holding penalties cost the Bronchos yards and two touchdowns. ECU scored first in the third and added a two-point conversion in a well-given effort to regain ground. The Bronchos finally scored a touchdown with a pass to Morrell, but the Chad Susman's extra point kick was blocked. The score at the end of the third quarter was 14-30. UCO failed to score in the fourth quarter, but they succeeded in holding off ECU. The Tigers scored a field goal, but it was not enough to bridge the two-touchdown gap. The game ended with the Bronchos triumph-

ing, 30-17. Noohi topped in rushing yards with 63, Jason Palmer was second with 44, and Pullen came in third with 32 yards. Ryan Gallimore received six passes for 56 yards, Rick Montgomery received five for 66 yards and Hendricks caught three for 44 yards. Morrell also caught three passes for 39 yards. Marcus Martinez, K.C. Asiodu and Matt Gates all tied for first in tackles this week with 11 tackles each. Martinez assisted in a sack and Asiodu had three sacks for the game. Terry Hardeman had 9 tackles and assisted in a sack. Head coach Tracy Holland said he was proud of his team, despite the lackluster second half. "They kept fighting away. I give them a huge amount of respect and credit," he said. He commended the defense for preventing a comeback by the Tigers. ECU's quarterback, Marcus Johnson, was the Lone Star Conference's Offensive Back of the Year last year, and the Broncho defense pushed into Johnson's comfort zone, shaking the quarterback up. "The defense put them in the hole," said Holland. "It was a championship game."

Thunder rolls for first win in 2nd OKC outing By Kaylea Brooks Sports Editor

OKLAHOMA CITY-- I n light of the Oklahoma City Thunder's lackluster inaugural game last Wednesday, fans are grateful for Sunday's win against the Minnesota Timberwolves, 88-85. Over 19,000 fans poured into the Ford Center for the season opening game, only to watch the Thunder lose to the Milwaukee Bucks, 98-87. None of the big star players broke past 15 points for the entire game. Chris Wilcox topped the shooting game with just those 15 points and Russell Westbrook followed with 13. Last year's NBA Rookie of the Year, Kevin Durant, only put 12 points on the board. The game started with back-and-forth baskets by both teams. Earl Watson scored the first basket in Thunder history by driving in a layup and scored off a jump shot later in the period. Chris Wilcox and Desmond Mason both put points on the board with jump

shots. With those scores and free throws in between, the Thunder stayed close behind the Bucks. The period ended with the Bucks leading 24-14. The game continued to remain close in the second period with the Thunder scoring to keep within a 10-point range of Milwaukee. Towards the end of the first half, the Bucks began to pull away, putting space between them and the Thunder. In the third period, the Thunder briefly rallied in a last-ditch-effort comeback, but they could not keep the Bucks from scoring. Fan and local storeowner, Lisa Patterson, said she was impressed with the fans' enthusiasm. "Downtown, there was an awesome atmosphere," said Patterson. "I was impressed with the opening. It was pretty cool." David Stern, NBA commissioner, opened the inaugural game accompanied by light flashes and stereos blaring rolls of thunder in the background. With 19,000 fans cheering, the

team gathered on the floor. But when it came to the actual play of the Thunder, Patterson admitted the team was subpar. "We're really bad," she said. "The players didn't play enthusiastically. But the fans got into it a little." After a loss to the Rockets in Houston on Saturday, Sunday's win against the Timberwolves lifted the heads of Thunder fans, proving that the team can hold its own. Westbrook gave the Thunder momentum to pull the scraping victory, scoring 13 unanswered points to put Oklahoma City ahead, 86-85, with 2:19 left in the fourth period. The Thunder held back the Timberwolves for the remaining time and Nick Collison made the last shot with only 16 seconds left in the game. The win was controversial, due to Milwaukee's Ryan Gomes missing a three-point shot because of a foul. The basket would have tied the game, but the foul did not count because it occurred after the game was over.

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The Vista Nov. 04, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Nov. 04, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.