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ANTI-ABORTION GROUP MAKES PRESENCE FELT by Andrew Knittle Staff Writer

20-25 The percentage of American women who choose abortion in the nation's 6 million documented pregnancies annually. Half of these pregnancies are unintended.

15-40 The percentage of known pregnancies that end in spontaneous abortions. Spontaneous abortions occur naturally and are also called miscarriages.

1973 The year the Supreme Court ruled on Roe v. Wade. The Court's decision made abortion a legal practice throughout the nation.

18006 Although abortion was commonly practiced by Native Americans and early colonists, the practice was made illegal in the mid1800s due to crude and unsafe medical practices. Source: Planned Parenthood

One of the nation's touchiest subjects reared its hotbuttoned head on campus Monday as anti-abortion group Justice For All set up shop, complete with gutwrenching photos of dead fetuses, just north of Broncho Lake. As to be expected, opinions fell on both sides of the fence. Umair Rafique, a design junior, is pro-choice and said he didn't agree with the way Justice For All communicated its position on abortion. "It's not a very balanced way to present abortion," Rafique said. "They should show more from both sides." Rafique believes that Justice For All, a national group funded solely through private donations, doesn't take in to account factors like rape, age or adoption as they present their hard line stance on one of the most debatable topics in the world. "If a woman has the right to procreate, then she has the right to get rid of the life, too," Rafique said. "I think the activists and their display could make people feel guilty if they've had an abortion." Mandy Fulling, a senior at Christian Heritage High School in Del City, was bused in to see the Justice For All display and said that although the ads were a little disturbing, she still doesn't support abortion. "I think it's definitely an in-your-face display," Fulling said. "I think that life is valuable and through the pictures you can definitely tell it's a person. I am a

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by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Students at illegal.

a pro-life exhibition on campus Monday were asked to write their position on making abortion

Christian and believe that God created us and it's a logical conclusion, as well as by the evidence shown." Gut Wrenching Photos -

As part of its presentation tactics, Justice For All displays large, high-quality photos of aborted fetuses in various stages of development. Factoids, many of which are debatable, accompany the graphic pictures. Tammy Cook, a full-time

employee of the group, travels the country with Justice For All. When asked why Justice For All uses such sensitive photos, Cook compared her group's display to the funeral of Emmett Till, a young black man who was brutally beaten to death in Money, Miss., in 1955. "Emmett Till's mother insisted that her son's casket be open, because she wanted to open the casket on racism," Cook said. "We're open-

ing the casket on abortion." Eva Dodlez, a philosophy professor at UCO, set up a pro-choice booth. across from Justice For All along with Will Andrews, the web designer for the College of Liberal Arts. According to Dodlez and Andrews, Justice For All uses skewed stats and misleading information to get its point across. "I don't have any problem with the shock stuff," Dodlez said. "What I do object to

POVERTY SHOWCASED DURING SHACK-A-THON

is the fact that they're presenting falsehoods. You're not entitled to tell lies in the middle of the debate." United For Pro-Choice, the newly formed group founded by Dodlez and Andrews, asserts that many of the statements made by Justice For All are based on skewed studies and biased statistics, including the fact that abortion causes the fetus pain and that women who have abortions may suffer

see ABORTION, page 5

Festival Promotes Culture by Abha Eli Phoboo Staff Writer

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Kelly Sanders, senior, helps construct a cardboad shack by Broncho Lake on Sunday for UCO's "Shack-a-Thon." The event is to help kick off Poverty Awareness Week on campus.

The International Festival this year is scheduled 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., October 25 at Nigh University Center. The event is free and open to the public. Organized by the International Student Council (ISC), the festival is among the top five signature events of UCO and the biggest production of the international community on campus. This year, there are around 13 country student organizations and three non-country organizations participating in the event. "The international festival has been a success in the previous years and we hope to continue that formula for success," said Jonathan Nazari, president of the ISC. The organizing committee expect around 2,000-3,000 visitors. "We expect a large attendance since we have

see FEST, page 5

News Central Channel 6 Mon. through Thurs. at 5 p.m.

Seventy-seven percent of antiabortion leaders are men. 100% of them will never be pregnant. —Planned Parenthood advertisement

UCOSTUDENTLANDS ART EXHIBIT PAGE 4


OPINION

October 16, 2007

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Cartoon by Jared Aylor

CAMPUS QUOTES: Compiled and photographed by Chris Albers

"What are your thoughts on abortion?" "Babies are a gift. from God. Life begins at conception and you should make the best of the situ-

Katy Wilson Undeclared, Freshman

"I believe there should be more life than death. It's all a part of nature but abortion can be controlled." David Nguyen Business Management Senior'

"Abortion is murdering a human being. We need to protect and show what is happening to the unborn."

Shalayne Dulan Journalism - Junior

"It's murder. It's graphic seeing the actual photos and shows you how wrong it is."

PRO-LIFE OR PRO-CHOICE? POINT Imagine the grotesque imagery of extracting a bloodspattered mass from your body; a clump of flesh that once had a beating heart and developing brain. It becomes the reality of enduring the silence of a once-living entity, ripped from the loins of an indifferent individual, whose mind wanders about random things to avoid the emotional conflicts dwelling inside her head. Abortion is not a pretty picture. Even the thought of it conjures images that reflect a thoughtless society, consumed by negligence and obligation. Like political and religious beliefs, abortion falls into a category that will never see resolution among the entire population. It's been around for centuries, tracing back to Ancient Greece where basic instructions had women perform violent acts that would result in the abortion of their children. Now, advanced civilizations use surgical methods, clean, sanitized and clear-cut. Even if America decides to ban the procedure, the rest of the world will still have the responsibility of choosing whether or not it's right for them. Different views on different matters achieve similar results. People are afraid of change and that is what keeps reform from occurring.

The mental outcome of having an abortion carried out depends on the person responsible for signing that sheet of paper that allows the process to take place. In some countries where abortion is illegal, they will still authorize the procedure if the female was involved in rape, incest or had dangerous health issues. From a biological standpoint, it only seems rational that an abortion is allowed if it threatens the female's life. There's no reason to jeopardize two lives when one of them can easily be saved. If a woman is raped, that one can prove a bigger challenge. Many people would say it's better to abort the child, than be forced to live with something that would constantly remind her of her tragic incident. It turns into a lose-lose situation, one that could be the most difficult someone would have to suffer. There really is no right or wrong answer to something this sensitive. The philosophy on abortion stems from environmental influences, religious beliefs, political intervention and personal ideas. There are more negatives to the practice than positives, but it's also a practice that will never cease to exist as long as people fail to realize the accusations involved with committing fatal acts.

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Daniel Johnson Marketing, Junior

EDITORIAL

PHOTOGRAPHY

"It's not our right to decide when someone's life is to be taken."

Andrew Knittle, Editor in Chief Steven Reckinger, Co-Editor Aaron Wright, Managing Editor

Chris Albers, Photographer Chris Otten, Photographer Brenda O'Brian, Photographer

Jenny Tophoj

Justin Langston, Staff Writer Shannon Hoverson, Staff Writer Nelson Solomon, Staff Writer Abha Eli Phoboo, Staff Writer Hannah Jackson, Staff Writer-

Lyndsay Gillum, Copy Editor

NEWS

Communications, Senior

Jana Davis, staff writer

"What give you the right to kill a fetus? It's still a mother's choice but I don't think it is morally correct."

Broadcasting, Sophomore

Megan Pierce, Ad Director Keith Mooney, Ad Designer

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Tresa Berlemann

SPORTS Jeff Massie, Sports Editor Alex Gambill, Sports Writer

CARTOONS/ ILLUSTRATIONS Cecilia Contreras

ADVERTISING

Jared Aylor

ADVISER Julie Clanton

COUNTER POINT There are no easy answers to the many questions raised by the abortion issue; there may not be any answers at all. Both sides have good arguments, but I can't help but notice that the pro-life side relies heavily on God to make their point, because if you believe in God then life should be considered sacred. But if you don't believe in any God, then you have no basis to consider life sacred. That's why we, the U.S., let women make that choice for themselves. I think the best pro-choice argument is probably the one made by the U.S. Supreme Court during Roe Vs. Wade in which they ruled that aborThe Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and on Thursdays only during summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034. Telephone: (405) 974-5549. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained. EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO.

tions are permissible for any reason a woman chooses, up until the "point at which the fetus becomes 'viable,' that is, potentially able to live outside the mother's uterus, though with artificial aid. Viability is usually placed at about seven months (28 weeks) but may occur earlier, even at 24 weeks." (Roe vs. Wade 410 U.S. 113 1973) If we overturn this right, whether we like it or not, people will still have abortions as they always have. Unlike murder and other criminal activities if abortion was made illegal it would be impossible to enforce, and it would encourage women to practice abortions without safety standards.

LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters

should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters and does not publish anonymous letters. Address letters to:

Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 107. Letters can be e-mailed to editorial@thevistaonline. com .


October 16, 2007

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University of Texas students survive ordeal in cave by AP Writer Three college students exploring a cave got lost but were rescued and declared uninjured Sunday, more than a day after they entered the cavern, authorities. The two women and one man, found in a 500-foot-long crawl space about the width of a sewer pipe, waited there knowing search teams would arrive, said Lt. Matt Cox of the Austin Fire Department. "They did everything right," Cox said. "They came out safe and sound, and they're going to school

call for help if they weren't back by midnight, Cox said. "They accounted for something like this happening," Cox said. Jarvis Brown, whose 20year-old son Jeff was among those in the cave, said his son had been cave exploring before. "We're very elated, for sure, and thankful that God protected them," said Brown, of San Antonio. The narrow, 12,000-foot long cave is one of the most difficult for cave explorers in Austin and an easy place to become disoriented, authorities said.

"THEY DID EVERYTHING RIGHT. THEY CAME OUT SAFE AND SOUND, AND THEY'RE GOING TO SCHOOL TOMORROW."

-LT. MATT COX tomorrow." The University of Texas students emerged from Airman's Cave tired and hungry Sunday night but with no injuries. They had left a trail of leaves during their exploration so crews could find them if they got into trouble, Cox said. The group went into Airman's Cave on Saturday morning and told friends to

The "keyhole" entrance to the cave, which is in a greenbelt area about five miles south of downtown Austin, is less than 18 inches across. Many places in the cave can be accessed only by crawling, authorities said. During the search, crews found water bottles and cell phones apparently left behind by the students. Rescuers had left food, water and medical supplies throughout the cave.

AP Photo

Jill Baggerman, left, 19, Jeff Brown, 20, right, and a third unidentified woman, middle, talk to the media after the three were rescued from Airman's Cave on Sunday Oct. 14, 2007, in Austin, Texas. The three University of Texas students who had not emerged from the cave after nearly 30 hours were found alive and uninjured Sunday.

Students produce new quiz show Oklahoma author to Video Magazine Production. "U-CO Quiz Show" offers Staff Writer randomly selected students TV game shows have the opportunity to compete intrigued audiences for years with one another and test and play a prominent role in their wits in various subjects American culture. Their catch such as pop-culture, music, phrases have become part of movies and UCO trivia. our vernacular, the hosts in It works like this. The some cases become media game consists of three rounds, icons and the content of some,,,„,;:(4 ,,,,,, of -these- programs simply= ,,-. bring . families and friends „„ together and ultimately gen- I H erate a true bonding experience A group of UCO students recognized the impact game shows have on society and developed their own game show for a class project in by Cody T. Peterson

order to settle the dispute, the contestants that simultaneously rang their cowbells must enter into a game of rock-paper-scissors. The winner then gets to answer the question. In round two, contestants answer questions pertaining to video clips, followed by music trivia name,

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J Th e show is a good way for students to come together and create quality entertainment.

the first containing questions that are geared toward trivia, particularly, pop-culture trivia. Contestants "ring" in by using cowbells (the ones often seen at UCO sporting events) and then give their answers. When two contestants ring in at the same time, a "Cowbell Challenge" is declared. In

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-Brian Ward that-tune and finish-the-lyrics in the third and final round. "U-CO Quiz Show" is so fun to watch! Everyone from the crew, to the contestants, to the spectators has had a blast watching it come together!" said Stacy Johnson, the shows promotions director. "U-CO Quiz Show" will

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consist of four half-hour episodes, the first etf which was taped last Tuesday in the Nigh University Center near the food court, also the location for the three remaining episodes. The crew will be shooting the second episode on Thursday, Oct. 25, around 2:00 p.m. and students are i.irget)toscli=Op by and pOsSibLy begorne' a 'Contestant. If ch'o=: sen tO'paAieipate in the show, contestants will have the chance to win fun prizes and quite possibly the title of "UCO Quiz Show Champion!" "The show is a good way for students to come together and create quality entertainment," said Brian Ward, the producer for the upcoming episode. "U-CO Quiz Show" is scheduled to air its first episode Thursday, Oct. 18, at 5:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. on KUCO.

Cody T Peterson can be reached at cpeterson@thevistaonline.com .

speak at book club by Jana Davis Staff Writer

The centennial year is bringing Oklahoma authors to the Read and Lead book club that meets twice a semester for a free lunch and book- discussion. The book club started a couple of years ago, Melissa Ingram, leadership central office graduate assistant said. It started as a "round-table discussion," she said, but it will be different this year because it is the centennial. For the next book discussion on Nov. 7, Ingram hopes to bring in Amanda J. Cobb, the writer of "Listening to our Grandmothers' Stories," a book about Cobb's recollection of the Chickasaw Nation and its education. The book club will meet in Evans Hall, Ingram said. The purpose of this book Jana Davis can be reached at club is to develop leaderjdavis@thevistaonline.cotn. ship skills through reading

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these books, •Cyndi Munson, senior political science major, said. Anyone on campus can read the book, given freely by the Leadership Central offices, eat a free lunch and discuss the book with other students, Munson said. "It gives me an opportunity for leadership outside of what I'm typically used to," Munson said, "It gives me an opportunity to find out who I am." She said that reading these books gives her the chance to sit quietly and read a book. It is a relaxed atmosphere, Ingram explained, where "(we) learn from each other's experiences. Students can signup in the Administration Building in Rm. 104. For more information, contact Emily Overocker at eoverocker@ucok.edu .

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October 16, 2007

Art exhibit showcases student

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Senior Jerrod Smith exhibits his artistic craft Thursday at a student art show at the Nigh University Center.

by Aaron Wright Managing Editor "Anatomy of the Dilemma," an exhibit featuring art by one UCO student and one UCO alumna, opened in the Donna Nigh Gallery on the fourth floor of the Nigh University Center on Oct. 11. Jerrod Smith, art senior, describes his art as thrifty. "It's all very collective," he said. "It's very mixed media." Smith explained that much of his materials come from old newspapers, old books and photos from antique shops. Smith said the past couple years he's had his art shown in various venues. He started by portraying his art at student shows with Dr. Bob Palmer. From there, he was able to show in places like Shoe Gypsy and Blue Seven. Following those, his art began showing up in restaurants like Trattoria it Centro, Flips and Mind Bar. Since then, he has had shows in more professional galleries like the Firehouse Gallery in Norman, Individual Artists of Oklahoma (IA0) Gallery and the a.k.a gallery in the Paseo district. "I have a nice following in OKC that comes

to shows," Smith said. different image. She does this Some of his buyers are by using metallic tones. repeat customers who often Baresel credits much of come to shows to look for her artistic ability to growing new art, Smith said. However, up with a grandmother who he said much of his work was an artist. Her grandfais purchased by people ther would frame all of her who happen to be present paintings. She remembered at the show. Smith noted that each of them had their he tries to add at least one own studio or work area. new piece to his collection She is excited that her for each showing of his art. 1-year-old daughter and 3From the Panhandle in year-old son will also be Guymon, Okla., Smith said able to grow up in a similar he grew up in a creative environment. Baresel said and crafty family. His dad that whenever she paints enjoyed building furniture in her studio at home, her and also dabbled in painting. children paint with her. Upon graduation, he Baresel's motivation plans on attending a graduate comes from the realization school. Smith said he hasn't that she has created somedecided on a specific school thing original. yet. "What I think is cool about Joy Baresel graduated art is that a piece wouldn't magna cume laud from UCO exist unless some artist with a degree in fine arts painted it," she said. Baresel in 2004. Since then, she has said that thought is what become a mother of two keeps her painting. children and works as an Baresel's work has artist. Baresel said most of been shown at Oklahoma her art is painting, although Watercolor exhibits, IA0 she also uses mixed media. Gallery, 50 Penn Place Abstract-figurative is how Gallery and the Momentum Baresel describes her artwork. exhibition. "I really try to use not only paint to show color, but also light," she said. Baresel explained that for some of her pieces, looking at them in Aaron Wright can be reached at a different light will reveal a awright@thevistaonline.com .

Medical progress lowers death rates for cancer by AP Writer WASHINGTON (AP) _ Good news on the cancer front: Death rates are dropping faster than ever, thanks to new progress against colorectal cancer. A turning point came in 2002, scientists conclude Monday in the annual "Report to the Nation" on cancer. Between 2002 and 2004, death rates dropped by an average of 2.1 percent a year. That may not sound like much, but between 1993 and 2001, deaths rates dropped on average 1.1 percent a year. The big change was a two-pronged gain against colorectal cancer. While itremains the nation's No. 2 cancer killer, deaths are dropping faster for colorectal cancer than for any other malignancy — by almost 5 percent a year among men and 4.5 percent among women. One reason is that colorectal cancer is striking fewer people, the report found. New diagnoses are down roughly 2.5 percent a year for both men and women, thanks to screening tests that can spot precancerous polyps in time to remove them and thus prevent cancer from forming. Still, only about half the people who need screen-

ing — everyone over age 50 — gets checked. "If we're seeing such great impact even at 50 percent screening rates, we think it could be much greater if we could get more of the population tested," said Dr. Elizabeth Ward of the American Cancer Society, who co-wrote the report with government scientists. The other gain is the result of new treatments, which are credited with doubling survival times for the most advanced patients. In 1996, there was just one truly effective drug for colon cancer. Today, there are six more, giving patients a variety of chemotherapy cocktails to try to hold their tumors in check, said Dr. Louis Weiner, medical oncology chief at Philadelphia's Fox Chase Cancer Center and a colorectal cancer specialist. "I can tell you the offices of gastrointestinal oncologists around the country, and indeed around the world, are busier than ever because our patients are doing better," he said. Among the report's other findings: —Cancer mortality is improving faster among men, with drops in death rates of 2.6 percent a year compared with 1.8 percent a year for women.

—Lung cancer explains much of the gender difference. Male death rates are dropping about 2 percent a year while female death rates finally are holding steady after years of increases. Smoking rates fell for men before they did for women, so men reaped the benefits sooner. —Overall, the rate of new cancer diagnoses is inching down about one-half a percent a year. —New breast cancer diagnoses are dropping about 3.5 percent a year, a previously reported decline due either to women shunning postmenopausal hormone therapy or to fewer getting mammograms. The report includes a special focus on cancer among American Indians andAlaskan natives. Overall, cancer incidence is lower among those populations than among white Americans, except for cancers of the stomach, liver, kidney, gallbladder and cervix. The annual report is a collaboration of the American Cancer Society, National Cancer A Institute, Centers for D ase Control and Preven pn, and North Americ* Association of Central Cancer Registries.

Scott Leger from the The Scott Leger Band, performs at the Rock the Block cancer prevention concert Thursday Oct 11.

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October 16, 2007

FEST FROM from page 1 reached out to the Edmond community by informing elementary schools, high schools, businesses, radios, newspapers and other media," said Nazari. Unlike previous International Festivals, this year's event has no specific theme and will be open to participant's ideas of expression for culture and diversity. "Last year's kite theme was a bit confusing but very admirable. The competition will be based on both booth design and perform ance," sai d N azari. Not all countries with tables and booths will be performing. According to Nazari, there will be guest performers to keep the festival smooth. "The international festival is a team effort and we've worked hard on this all year through a committee. It is free for everybody because we want to make it easy for people

to share and experience different cultures," added Nazari. One of the main features of the success of the international festival is that it brings many different cultures and traditions under one roof and gives students from various countries, the opportunity to work together. "People will have the chance to learn about places they never thought existed, see and hear about their history and experience of the place," said Nazari. The International Festival is also an effort on the ISC's part to reach out to the Edmond community, which, as Nazari says, has been very responsive. This event will be an attempt to provide the "spice and variety" to the city of Edmond, said Nazari.

ABORTION from page 1 future reproductive problems. "It's so easy to present half truths, to use dubious studies, and to be deceptive like these groups," Andrews said. "It does nobody any good to present skewed opinion as fact." Surprisingly Calm All and all, the response to Justice For All's first day of on-campus activi-

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Abha Eli Phoboo can be reached at aphoboo@thevistaonline.com .

A student converses the abortion issue with one of many volunteers from the Justice For All organization that set up the exhibit. Justice For All is a national organization who makes stops at many of the nation's universities and colleges. The group is funded through individual donations.

"Nobody has so much as raised their voice since I've been here." Officer Michael Crowel

ties was far from volatile. DPS officer Michael Crowel, who sat in his patrol car during a portion of the events as a security measure, said he was a bit shocked at the passive mood of the crowds surrounding the display. "It's been pretty peaceful here so far, which is kind of surprising," Crowel said. "Nobody has so much as raised their voice since I've been here." Cook said that peaceful demonstrations and open dialogue are both part of Justice For All's main objectives when they stop at college campuses, which are the only venues the group utilizes as it treks across the country. "The students here have been very respectful and we've had some great dialogue here today," Cook said. "We try to treat all people in a respectful manner. Andrew Knittle can be reached at aknittle@thevistaonline.com .

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Arts & Entertainment

October 16, 2007

SOULAR TO HEADLINE AT UCO JAZZ LAB after Soular's performance. Dameon and Gabe Aranda, brothers from Oklahoma City both play guitar and sing in their band, Aranda. They believe the competition they give each other has been the best reinforcement to improve. "We made each other better by having that competitive. spirit," Gabe says. "We don't think about who's the better singer. We think about who is going to sound better on this part, whether this song is screaming for a wailer, a rock singer, or maybe a more soulful voice." Luma is made up of Hunter Goodman, vocals, Stephen Collins, guitar, Marcus Collins, bass, and Adam Chamberlain, drums. They won "Rock Band of the Year" for 2007 in the Oklahoma Gazette and were also voted into the top eight in 94.7 The Buzz's 2006 "March Bandness" competition. The show will begin at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 at the door and $6 in advance. Tickets can be purchased at okctickets.com by clicking the JA77 Lab link or by calling the Ja77 Lab at 359-7989, ext. 1. Doors will open at 6 p.m. and food will be provided by Hideaway Pizza.

by Hannah Jackson Staff Writer The "epoch rock" band, Soular, will be performing at the UCO J877 Lab on Oct. 20, with local bands Luma and Aranda. Soular is based in Albuquerque, N.M., but spends most of their time touring around the country. The group formed in 2002 with two members, but grew to consist of Jared Ashcraft playing bass, Marsh singing vocals and Ian Byrd on the drums. Brian Lee, guitarist, joined the band after the release of Soular's first album, "Time and Space" in 2005. Soular claims an original sound that has been influenced by the Beatles, Radiohead, U2, Queen and Led Zeppelin. They have even performed with such household names as Liz Phair, Vertical Horizon and The Fray. Their music has also been featured on "CSI: New York," MTV's "Road Rules" and "The Real World: Denver," "The Simple Life 5," HBO's "Inside the NFL" and Spike Network's "Murder." Accordingly 'titled "Love Crash Heal," Soular's newest release contains a range of lyrics and melodies seemingly related to relationships. "It's kind of life experiences we've had, some of them are fictional and some are non-fictional," said Marsh, "It's usually an expe-

Photo Provided

Rock band Soular will perform Oct. 20 at the UCO Jazz Lab, along with local bands, Luma and Aranda. rience, something that happens that inspires the song. The song can be autobiographical but not obvious." Soular's sound has been described as classic rock with an upbeat, modern influence. Lead singer Marsh said although classic bands have been influential, they aren't

necessarily comparable. "Our influences between the four of us are really varied," said Marsh, "The sum of the parts makes the whole. It's about rhythms and melodies and ultimately the songs mean something to us. We write the songs not just for us, but for other people."

"Every night that we play is different, so no one knows what's going to happen," said Marsh. Aranda and Luma, two Oklahoma City rock bands, will be joining Soular onstage. Aranda will begin the night with an acoustic set and Luma will complete the evening

Soular's set will be comprised of songs from the "Love Crash Heal" album, as well as a couple of older songs and some unreleased songs. Both "Love Crash Heal" and "Time and Space" will be on sale for $10 each or both for $15, along with band T-shirts, hoodies and other items.

Hannah Jackson can be reached at hjackson@thevistaonline.com.

Documentary educates students on Hungarian Revolution by Lyndsay Gillum Copy Editor Today when many nations are still faced with the challenge of fighting for their civilized existence, fighting for freedom and democracy, we here in America fall short of truly understanding and being thankful for the freedom and democracy we are fortunate to possess. Recurring problems in our world should prompt us to seek documented sources of inspiration and courage of the individu-

it's a story about fighting for democracy, fighting for freedom," Adams explained to the audience. "It's also a story of bravery. A tiny little country standing up to a superpower." The 1956 Hungarian Revolution was a spontaneous nationwide revolt against the Communist government of Hungary and its Sovietimposed policies, lasting from Oct. 23 until Nov. 10, 1956. As seen in "Torn from the Flag," it began as a student demonstration, which attracted thousands as they

"No other day since history began has shown more clearly the eternal unquenchability of men's desire to be free, whatever the odds against success, whatever the sacrifice required." -John E Kennedy als who risked their lives to earn the respect and dignity they so much deserved. The English-language documentary film titled "Torn from the Flag", shown last Tuesday, Oct. 9 in Pegasus Theater, was about the Hungarian Revolution and the Freedom Flight of 1956, and its significant international consequences. This world history event served as a vital forerunner of the future downfall of communism and later political and economic reorganization of the world. George Adams, the film's associate producer was present to introduce "Torn from the Flag," and answered questions from audience members. Adams has more than 15 years experience serving as producer, director and editor on several independent films, documentaries and television projects. "I thought this was an important story that needed to be told on several levels. One,

marched through central Budapest to the Parliament building. The revolt spread quickly across Hungary, and the government fell. As "Torn from the Flag" portrays, the 1956 Hungarian Revolution showed all Hungarians from all walks of life rise up against insurmount-

able odds to fight the brutal Soviet-installed Hungarian communist government. Around 3,000 individuals lost their lives fighting for their freedom and around 2,200 were injured, others tortured and executed, while many others were forced to flee. "October 23, 1956, is a day that will forever live in the annuals of free men and free nations. It was a day of courage, conscience and triumph," John F. Kennedy was quoted on the first anniversary of the revolution. "No other day since history began has shown more clearly the eternal unquenchability of man's desire to be free, whatever the odds against success, whatever the sacrifice required." Adams said that there is a political aspect in "Torn From The Flag," which shows individuals in a country that was picking up arms and fighting the Russians and asking for help and they didn't receive any. "President Eisenhower at the time was more concerned with winning his reelection than he was with this country," Adams said. After the documentary had finished, Adams opened up the discussion with the audience members, and one question that he first asked was if any of the audience knew about the Hungarian Revolution. "It (Hungary) was a little country, 10 million people, held off the Soviet army for 13 days. The people that took place in the revolution were your age and they wanted to make a change in their coun-

by Vista photographer Chris Often

"Torn from the Flag," an English-language documentary that entailed the Hungarian Revolution and the Freedom Flight of 1956, was shown on Oct. 9 in Pegasus Theater. wide commemoration of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and the Freedom Flight is another benefit. This documentary exposed information to Americans and other nationalities on Hungary that they probably never would have heard about. "As an American, in my perspective, I can only empathize what it must have been like to not have those freedoms, to not be able to get up

try," he explained. "They didn't like what was going on and they wanted to change it." "They felt for them picking up arms and fighting was the only way that they could make a change. So they took a stand for freedom." The benefits of showing "Torn from the Flag," is that generations will be able to reach back to the film; another benefit is education. Using the film as part of the world-

in the morning and say what you feel," Adams explained. "This generation needs to know. If we don't remember our pasts, if we don't remember what mistakes we've made, we can't go forward."

Lyndsay Gillum can be reached at Igillum@thevistaonline.com .

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October 16, 2007

7

'We Own the Night' is a must-own viewing experience by Justin Langston Staff Writer

Serious cop movies seem to have an inherent feature of needing to walk the line between intensity and melodrama. Some of them can be tense and thought provoking without pushing the limits of drama too far. Others get so wrapped up in the drama that the movie just isn't believable. "We Own the Night" from writer/director James Gray is a movie that falls somewhere in between those two types of movies. It is intense and really doesn't lose its sense of realism, but at the same time, parts of the movie practically drown itself in melodrama. "We Own the Night" starts in 1988 where a new brand of Russian cocaine dealers has swept New York City. In its wake some of the most brutal crime the city has ever seen has come. Bobby Green (Joaquin Phoenix) is the manager of a Russian nightclub where the police think the gang-

tal tragedy. Bobby's story is about growing up and finally taking responsibility. For the most part, the movie is quite entertaining. It's got some of the most intense, hold-your-breath action sequences in recent

sters are doing business out of. The problem is Bobby's brother Joe Grusinsky (Mark Wahlberg) is the police captain who is in charge of the narcotics investigation squad. Joe, along with their father, police chief Burt Grusinsky (Robert Duvall), wants to bring Bobby in to help bring down the drug dealers. Bobby, who's already using his mother's maiden name so the people he works for won't think he's a narc because of his family, refuses the offer. When Joe raids Bobby's nightclub, the mob retaliates by shooting Joe in the face and bombing his car. Although Joe looks ready to recover, this is what shakes Bobby out of apathy and leads him on a path to redeem him. Bobby decides he wants to shut these dealers down and agrees to go undercover, against his father's wishes, to do so. It's a pretty straightforward story of a family coming together over the backdrop of horrible, bru-

It is intense and really doesn't lose its sense of realism, but at the same time, parts of the movie practically drown itself in melodrama. memory. There's always a sense of danger each time someone pulls out a gun. The tension is always palpable. The plot is also quite entertaining. It's nice to see Bobby grow up and become a real man, rather than the hedonistic jerk he starts out as. The interactions between him and Joe are some of the best parts of the movie.

Wahlberg and Phoenix have amazing on-screen chemistry. The movie isn't perfect though. Everything in this movie is important; there's no break. It just beats the audience over the head with the melodrama at times. It almost chokes itself with how serious it takes itself Further, Eva Mendes' character, Amada, really only exists to serve as Bobby's girlfriend. She's not important on her own, and is pretty much the definition superfluous. Nothing would have been gained or lost, quality wise, from taking her out of the movie entirely. Overall, the movie's good, but it can get a little dramatic at times. Still, it's worth seeing if you're only in to see some intense action sequences that are long over due.

Justin Langston can be reached at jlangston@thevistaonline.com.

Sorority fundraising events can be a tasty treat by Jeff Massie Sports Editor

It's only here for a single night once a year. The anticipation builds for weeks as the women of Alpha Gamma Delta sorority are ever present around campus peddling tickets for their philanthropy, the Alpha Gamma Delta Foundation. The foundation's focuS is combating diabetes through research, education and awareness. The event, known as "Oodles of Noodles," is $5 for an unlimited spaghetti buffet. Oodles is actually a unit of measurement that is more than a lot, but less than a ton. As I walked up to the entrance after scouring the area for a parking spot, I was greeted by friendly faces and warm embraces. The line snaked out the door and into the parking lot as it was obvious that I wasn't the only one who finds $5 to be a bargain for delicious food in a house full of ladies. I waited patiently until I made my way to the front of the line; finally it's food time. Laid out across tables was in fact oodles of noodles (which is where the event gets its name). Two tubs of spaghetti were available, with reserves waiting in the wings for when the troughs flirted with famine and needed to be replen-

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

dining hall of the sorority house were rows oftables with chairs packed closely around them ready to necessitate the hordes of hungry people. The food did not disappoint; the spaghetti was spectacular, the salad was nutritious and the bread sticks were indeed never ending. I had two plates of the delicious helpings and washed it down with a delightful pink lemonade, a very manly drink. If there's one thing I enjoy more than eating it's being a good citizen and helping my fellow man (or woman). Fortunately, I was able to accomplish both on this night. The food was lovely, if it were an actual restaurant I would gladly eat there often, and I was able to do a small part by giving to a good cause. According to Facebook, 247 people RSVP'd "yes" to this event, and it's not a stretch to believe that they were all there. The Alpha Gamma Delta sorority truly did accomplish their goal of raising awareness for diabetes and raising funds that can aid in the research while providing good eats and a festive atmosphere.

Alpha Gamma Delta hosts its annual Oodles of Noodles fund-raiser Wednesday. ished. I was both pleased and delighted to see that the noodles were small and not overwhelming. I've always prided

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a barbarian where the sauce inevitably goes everywhere. Also laid out on the smorgasbord was a bounty

of salad, two kinds of bread and an array of desserts. My plate was full and my appetite was strong. In the

Jeff Massie can be reached at jmassie@thevistaonline.com .

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WORLD NEWS

Security company Blackwater may be expelled from Iraq by AP Writer BAGHDAD (AP) _ U.S. and Iraqi officials are negotiating Baghdad's demand that security company Blackwater USA be expelled from the country within six months, and American diplomats appear to be working on how to fill the security gap if the company is phased out. The talks about Blackwater's future in Iraq flow from recommendations in an Iraqi government report on the incident Sept. 16 when, Iraqi officials determined, Blackwater guards opened fire without provocation in Baghdad's Nisoor Square and killed 17 Iraqi citizens. The Iraqi investigators issued five recommendations to the government of Prime Minister Noun alMaliki, which has since sent them to the U.S. Embassy as demands for action. PointNo. 2 in the report says : "The Iraqi government should demand that the United States stops using the services of Blackwater in Iraq within six months and replace it with a new, more disciplined organization that would be answerable to Iraqi laws." Sami al-Askari, a top aide to al-Maliki, said that point in the Iraqi list of demands was nonnegotiable. "I believe the government has been clear. There have been attacks on the lives of Iraqi citizens on the part of that company (Blackwater). It must be expelled. The government has given six months for its expulsion and it's left to the U.S. Embassy to determine with Blackwater when to terminate the contract. The American administration must find another company," he told AP.

In talks between American diplomats and the al-Maliki government, al-Askari said, the U.S. side was not "insisting on Blackwater staying." He was the only Iraqi or American official who would allow use of his name, othem said information they gave was too sensitive. Al-Askari said the Americans have been told that another demand, Blackwater payment of $8 million in compensation for each victim, was negotiable. "With the investigations and reviews ongoing, it would be clearly premature to say that any definitive determinations have been made about the future of the Blackwater contract," a senior U.S. official in Baghdad said. Another diplomat, speaking privately, said he did not see how the State Department could insist on keeping Blackwater in place given how "tainted" it had become after the Sept. 16 incident and several others. In an interview to be broadcast Monday on PBS, Charlie Rose asked Blackwater chief Erik Prince about the issue. "We'll do what we're told and, you know, make the transition as smooth as possible," Prince said. A Shiite lawmaker who sits on parliament's security and defense committee said al-Maliki has complained that the United States embassy had not briefed the Iraqis on what was learned when Blackwater guards were questioned. He said two Iraqi security officials were briefly allowed to sit in as observers on two questioning sessions of the Blackwater guards. The Iraqi government investigative report said Blackwater guards had killed 21 other Iraqi citizens and wounded 27 in a total

AP Photo

A private military contractor gestures to colleagues flying overhead in a helicopter as they secure the scene of a roadside bomb attack in Baghdad, Iraq in this Tuesday, July 5, 2005 file photo. U.S. and Iraqi officials are negotiating Baghdad's demand that security company Blackwater USA be expelled from the country within six months, and American diplomats appear to be working on how to fill the security gap if the company is phased out.

of seven previous incidents, including a shooting by a drunk Blackwater employee after a 2006 Christmas party. Congress is investigating whether the government relies too heavily on private contractors who fall outside the military courts martial system. Whit the Blackwater name A-ray be removed from securityfoperations surrounding U.S diplomats in Iraq, American officials and members of the security cornmunity in Baghdad said the company's men and other assets in Iraq would likely be taken over by one of the many security companies currently working in Iraq.

They said DynCorp, which already has security contracts with the State Department to guard officials working outside Baghdad, appeared poised to take over the Blackwater role. Under the terms of the department's Worldwide Personal Protective Security contract, which covers privately contracted guards for diplomats in Iraq, Blackwater, Dyncorp and Triple Canopy are the only three companies eligible to bid on specific task orders there. Dyncorp and Triple Canopy are both based in Washington's northern Virginia suburbs. Blackwater works from a huge cornplex in Moyock, N.C.

While DynCorp and Triple Canopy already work in Iraq, neither company is believed to have the infrastructure in place to take over Blackwater's responsibilities in the sixmonth period demanded by the al-Maliki government. The FBI has taken over an investigation of the Sept. 16 shooting and questioned Iraqi witnesses to the shooting Saturday at the Iraqi National Police headquarters about 500 yards from Nisoor Square. Prince says reports he has indicated one of the four Blackwater gun trucks involved in the shooting came under fire. He said the company reports say the truck had bullet pockmarks and was

damaged badly enough that it had to be towed. No other witness, those interviewed by AP or Iraqi government investigators, told of gunfire on the Blackwater vehicles or of one being towed. Other witnesses said Blackwater helicopters arrived over the square during the shooting and opened fire. One of them was 20-yearoldAhmedAbdul-Timan, who works as a guard at the tunnel that runs under the square. He told AP that the initial U.S. investigative team tried to intimidate him into changing his story about the helicopters firing. He said the interrogation lasted three hours. "Four or five days after the incident," Abdul-Timan said, "there was a second investigation but the questioning was done by a U.S. Army major. It was much easier. They videotaped what I said, took my phone number and address. The major tried to comfort us, saying he and his men love the Iraqi people and want to help them." Abdul-Timan's account squares with others that indicated the first investigation by State Department personnel appeared to be an attempt to vindicate the Blackwater guards. The U.S. military conducted the second investigation and was more sympathetic. Estimates of the number of private security workers in Iraq have fluctuated greatly. In June 2006 the U.S. Government Accountability Office said there were 181 security companies with 48,000 employees in Iraq. The more recent Congressional Research Service report said there were as many as 30,000 security workers.


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October 16, 2007

9

Spotlight on: Barack Obama (D) Spotlight on: Mike Huckabee (R)

AP Photo Present status: Junior Senator from Arizona (2004 Present) Previous public service: Illinois Senate (1997-2004) Education: Columbia University and Harvard Law School Background: Born to an African American father and a Caucasian mother, Barack Obama was born on August 4, 1961 in Hawaii. His father, Barack Obama, Sr., was born and raised in a small village in Kenya. His mother, Ann Dunham, grew up in small-town Kansas. They met while attending the University of Hawaii; his mother became a student there, and his father had won a scholarship that allowed him to leave Kenya and pursue his dreams in America. Barack's father eventually returned to Kenya, and Barack grew up with his mother in Hawaii, and for a few years in Indonesia. Later, he moved to New York, where he graduated from Columbia University in 1983. Remembering the values of empathy and service that his mother taught him, Barack put law school and corporate life on hold after college and moved to Chicago in 1985, where he became a community organizer with a church-based group seeking to improve living conditions in poor neighborhoods plagued with crime and high unemployment. The group had some success, but Barack had come to realize that in order to truly improve the lives of people in that community and other communities, it would not just take a change at the local level, but a change in our laws and in our politics. He went on to earn his law degree from Harvard in 1991, where he became the first African-American president of the Harvard Law Review. Soon after, he returned to Chicago to practice as a civil rights lawyer and teach constitutional law. Finally, his advocacy work led him to run for the Illinois State Senate, where he served for eight years. In 2004, he became

the third African American since Reconstruction to be elected to the Senate. It has been the rich and varied experiences of Barack Obama's life - growing up in different places with people who had differing ideas - that have animated his political journey. Amid the partisanship and bickering of today's public debate, he still believes in the ability to unite people around a politics of purpose - a politics that puts solving the challenges of everyday Americans ahead of partisan calculation and political gain. In the Illinois State Senate, this meant working with both Democrats a n d Republicans to help working families get ahead by creating programs like the state Earned Income Tax Credit, which in three years provided over $100 million in tax cuts to families across the state. He also pushed through an expansion of early childhood education, and after a number of inmates on death row were found innocent, Senator Obama worked with law enforcement officials to require the videotaping of interrogations and confessions in all capital cases. In the U.S. Senate, he has focused on tackling the challenges of a globalized, 21st century world with fresh thinking and a politics that no longer settles for the lowest common denominator. His first law was passed with Republican Tom Coburn, a measure to rebuild trust in government by allowing every Amerkan to go online and see how and where every dime of their tax dollars is spent. He has also been the lead voice in championing

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ethics reform that would root out Jack Abramoffstyle corruption in Congress. During his time in office, Obama has voted consistently with his party, and is mostly present at votes. Obama was raised secular, but has a working knowledge of world

religions and was baptized as an adult in the Trinity United Church of Christ. Obama's ancestry can be traced to Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy. Obama has been a longtime critic of the Iraq war. In October 2004, he said that invading Iraq was a bad strategic blunder and he said in February 2007 that the war was a waste of resources. In April 2007, he called for withdrawal beginning on May 1, 2007 and ending on March 31, 2008. He also said in April that the open-ended Iraq occupation must end and that there is no military solution. Obama and Hillary Clinton's feud is well known. Music and film producer David Geffen helped to publicize this fight, when he criticized Clinton for her vote on going to war in Iraq and also took a stab at former president Bill Clinton. Clinton's campaign asked Obama to return Geffen's $2,300 donation and

Former Baptist Minister, Mike Huckabee, a conservative Presidential nominee has stated recently that he will not run in the Christian conservative party. Although his campaign relies heavily on religion and conservative beliefs, he doesn't believe it will help him win the election. Huckabee, who was Lt. Gov. ofArkansas from 1993 to 1996 and Governor of Arkansas from 1996 to 2007 believes that a third party candidate will only help Hillary Clinton, or another "pro-abortion" candidate win the election. During a debate at the University ofNew Hampshire on Sept. 6, Huckabee stated that he would support a constitutional amendment to ban abortion. He believes that an amendment similar to the Arkansas Constitution which states that, "we believe life begins at conception and that we ought to do everything in the world possible to protect it until its natural conclusion. Fifty-two-year-old Huckabee is well known for his efforts to trans form the

U.S. health care system. As a former diabetic and author of the book, "Quit Digging Your Grave with a Knife and Fork," he understands the

importance of knowledge when it comes to health care. While he was governor in Arkansas, he designed and signed a law which required schools to measure students' body mass indexes and send the data home to parents. "We really have an incredible problem because our system is upside down. It focuses on [medical] intervention at the catastrophic level of disease rather than really focusing on prevention [of illness]," Huckabee said Another health care reform that Huckabee is most interested in is making the system consumer-based and not employer based. He believes that the current system allows businesses to be non-cornpetitive and also increases spending on health care costs. He believes that because the party paying for the health care (often the employer) and the party using the health care (the employee) are different, the consumption goes up. Basically, when a product, like health services, is essentially free, it is generally used more often. Huckabee believes that consumer-based, but not socialized medicine, is the answer. The other two most important issues in the 2008 campaign are the war in Iraq and the U.S. budget. Huckabee prides himself on how well he has spent his limited campaign money and believes that other candidates show their incompetency with bookkeeping in their own campaign financing. In his third quarter, Huckabee raised only $1 million in comparison to, for example, Clinton who raised the most, with $27 million, and McCain who raised $6 million. He believes that his budgeting during campaigning provides proof of his ability to spend efficiently in the White House. "The way that we have budgeted, we are doing what we need to do to keep our feet

on the ground," he said, "We try to be as careful with the campaign money as I would be with the taxpayer's money if I were president. I think a lot of people start thinking that if a person spends recklessly with campaign money, they'd probably spend recklessly with taxpayer money if they were president. One of the candidates who's spent tens of millions of dollars is three points ahead of us in the Washington Post poll that was released yesterday," Huckabee said, referring to Romney. "If you've spent that much money, and you're only three points ahead of a guy that's raised a million bucks this quarter, I'd be sitting in a warm tub with some razor blades in both hands." The reverse opinion is simply that Huckabee is not gaining enough public support, and this is reflected in his campaign fundraising. Finally, Huckabee's stance on the war: complete support. The following information can be found directly on Huckabee's Campaign Web site: "Setting a timetable for withdrawal is a mistake. This country has never declared war until "a week from Wednesday," we have always declared war until victory. I am focused on winning. Withdrawal would have serious strategic consequences for us and horrific humanitarian consequences for the Iraqis." In summary, Mike Huckabee, a Baptist and aRepublican candidate who was raised in Hope, Arkansas, the same town as former president Bill Clinton, supports the following issues in his platform: • Pro-Life Education Reform Health care Reform • Plans to eliminate federal income and payroll taxes • Anti-gay marriage • Plans to achieve energy independence by his second term. Protect 2nd amendment rights Other issues can be found at www.mikehuckabee.com .

AP Photo

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Services EDMOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTE, Conveniently located on the UCO campus, offers English as a second language classes for intern. students/individuals. NOW FEATURING a specially designed program with: Strong emphasis in listening and speaking Highly inter. classes, Comprehensive TOEFL program. Enjoy small classes and the campus facilities. Contact us @ (405) 341-2125 or www. thelanguagecompany.com . INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS! Need to pass the TOEFL, an 1-20 for a friend, or a 12 week cert.? English Language Center can help you! Call (405)348-7602, visit our web site www.elcok.com , or come meet us in person at 1015-C Waterwood Parkway, next to the UCO University Plaza on 2nd Street.

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IFIEVISA SPORTS

October 26, 2007

11

UCO skates past two teams; but falls to the Mountaineers within the first 10 seconds of the game and setting a UCO record of fastest goal in hockThe UCO Hockey team ey. UCO dominated for most traveled this weekend to take of the first and second periods. However, during the end part in the American Collegiate Hockey Association Showcase of the second period, Niagara hit a surge and where they took on Niagara, "These guys stepped took the lead. Within 68 secWestchester and West up and played some onds, UCO went from Virginia, defeat- extremely good a 2-0 lead to ing Niagara and hockey." being down Westchester, 4-2. In the but falling short in a tough -Coach McAlister third period, Niagara scored battle against again, but West Virginia. "These guys stepped up UCO refused to give Niagara and played some extremely the victory. UCO took off good hockey," head coach and scored five more times Craig McAlister, said. before the final buzzer. "We dominated most of The first game on Friday night was against Niagara, the night," McAlister said. with UCO taking a 7-5 victo- "I'd say the puck was in their ry. Rob Deubel made his first ice 80 percent of the game." The " next night, UCO goal of the season by scoring by Justin Langston Staff Writer

www.thevistaonline.corn Match Up

Alex

Jeff

Justin

Arz +7 @ Wash

Wash

Wash

Arz

Atl @ NO

NO

NO

NO

Balt -3 @ Buff

Balt

Balt

Balt

Minn +9 @ Dal

Dal

Dal

Dal

took on the 10th ranked Westchester, which ended in UCO giving Westchester a brutal 7-1 beating. Although Westchester opened with a goal, UCO made them pay for it. The Bronchos ended the first period with a tie, pulled ahead in the second and finished the game off with five more goals in the final period. In the last game against West Virginia, the UCO juggernaut was finally taken down. UCO went down fighting with a 3-2 loss. West Virginia opened up with another goal, which they held for the first period. The Bronchos came back in the second and held a tie for a while, but eventually, West Virginia took the lead and won the game. by Vista photographer Alex Gambill "We out shot them," McAlister said. "But Freshman Ashton Morris maintains control of the ball past her Texas A&M-Commerce defendthey just got passed us." er. UCO won the game 6-0. UCO is looking forward After play resumed, UCO lied another shutout, her sixth. from page 12 to their return home after a It will be back to Edmond added a little insurance to its month on the road. They will and the aggressive lead when Davis scored her this weekend, as the play Arizona state this Sunday gameplay, the team from third goal of the two-game Bronchos will host a couple at the Arctic Edge Ice Arena. Edmond finally managed to stretch. West Texas out-shot of games against conference take the lead when Ashton UCO 18-5 in the second half, opponents. They will battle Justin Langston can be reached Morris' goal put UCO up but the Bronchos held on to Abilene Christian on Friday at jlangston@thevistaonline.com 1-0 just before halftime. earn the 2-0 win and Fischertal- and then return to action on

Soccer

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Around the league

AP-There's no slowing down the New England Patriots. NE NE -17 @ Miami NE NE About the only people not particularly impressed by SF @ NYG SF NYG SF New England's 48-27 rout of the Dallas Cowboys on TB +2 @ Det TB TB TB Sunday were the ones wearing Patriots uniforms. To everyTenn @ Hous Hous Tenn Tenn body else, it was vivid proof that the unbeaten Pats are the KC +2 @ Oak Oak KC KC class of the league right now. "The reality is we got a win on the road and we're NYJ +6 @ Cin NYJ NYJ Cin 6-0. That's what is important," Tom Brady said after another record-setting perChi +5 @ Phil Phil Phil Chi formance. "Any time you win you're doing just fine. StL @ Sea Sea Sea Sea It's another step in the process. We have to continue Pitt -3 @ Den Den Pitt Pitt to make improvements." Indy -3 @ Jax Brady threw a career-high Indy Indy Indy five touchdown passes in 6-4 4-6 5-5 Last Week handing the Cowboys their first loss in six games. He Season 39-40 41-38 30-49 went 31-of-46 for 388 yards. NOTE: Due to fall break picks had to be made on z His five TDs tied a franchise record and gave him an NFL 'Monday and point spreads are subject to change. mark with at least three in each of the first six games of the season. He has an NFL-best 21 this year; the league record is 49 by Peyton Manning. 48, Cowboys 27 Even with Brady's heroics, the game at Texas Stadium

OUR

SECRET

was tight until D oi nte' Stallworth went 69 yards with one of the quarterback's precise throws. It catapulted the Patriots to their sixth straight blowout win and their highest point total this season. New England also gave up its most points of the season and trailed in the second half for the first time. Wes Welker caught 11 passes for a career-high 124 yards and two touchdowns. Stallworth had seven catches for 136 yards. The Cowboys were hurt by their continuing trend of slow starts and by racking up 12 penalties. "It's almost a blessing in disguise," cornerback Terence Newman said. "It's the sixth game of the season, not even halfway done yet. So that just gives us incentive to work that much harder." Packers 17, Redskins 14 At Green Bay, Wis., Charles Woodson returned a fumble 57 yards for the goahead touchdown in soggy conditions on a day when Brett Favre set the NFL record for career interceptions. Favre became the interception king with an errant pass

picked off by Redskins safety Sean Taylor in the third quarter. It was the 278th interception of Favre's career, breaking a tie with George Blanda. "We won the game. I'm glad it's over, just like the other records," Favre said. "We're 5-1, so it feels a lot better than having no picks and being 1-5." Vikings 34, Bears 31 At Chicago, Adrian Peterson, the first running back taken in this year's draft, had 224 yards rushing on 20 carries and scored on runs of 67, 73 and 35 yards. He broke Chuck Foreman's club-record of 200 yards rushing set in 1976. Still, the Vikings (2-3) needed a career-best 55yard field goal from Ryan Longwell on the final play after Chicago's Brian Griese hit Devin Hester for an 81yard TD pass to tie the game. Hester also returned a punt 89 yards for a TD in the first quarter for Chicago (2-4), his third kick return for a score this season after setting an NFL record with six kick return TDs a year ago. Jaguars 37, Texans 17 At Jacksonville, Fla.,

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Maurice Jones-Drew had 260 all-purpose yards and David Garrard threw two touchdown passes as the Jaguars (4-1) won their fourth straight. Houston (3-3) had won four of the previous six meetings between the AFC South clubs. But the Jaguars dominated this one, and it could have been worse had they not fumbled three times. Jones-Drew had a 7-yard TD run early in the fourth period, making it 23-9. Paul Spicer sacked Matt Schaub on the ensuing possession, causing a fumble that Daryl Smith returned 77 yards to seal it. Chiefs 27, Bengals 20 Tony Gonzalez set the NFL record for touchdown catches by a tight end. Gonzalez, the eight-time Pro Bowler, caught Damon Huard's 3-yard pass in the first quarter and broke Shannon Sharpe's record of 62 TD catches. Then, Gonzalez snared a 26-yard scoring pass from Huard in the fourth. period and wound up with 102 yards receiving. Larry Johnson, who had not scored a touchdown after sitting out all of training camp, got 119 yards on 31 carries against a defense that had been giving up 152, yards on the ground. Two series after his fumble cost the host Chiefs (33) a touchdown in the second quarter, Johnson slipped into the end zone on an 8-yard run. T.J. Houshmandzadeh caught eight passes for 145 yards and two touchdowns for Cincinnati (1-4). It was the fourth straight loss for the Bengals, who have gone 17 since being 8-5 last year and holding a one-game lead in the wild-card chase. Saints 28, Seahawks 17 At Seattle, Reggie Bush gained 141 yards, Drew Brees threw for 246 and receiver David Patten had eight catches for 113 yards, lifting the Saints to their first victory. It was a breakout day for New Orleans (1-4), which hadn't scored more than 14 points in four dispiriting losses that brought back chilling memories of the Aints of days past. In this one, the Saints had three touchdowns by the middle of the second quarter. It was a second straight pathetic effort forthe Seahawks (3-3), who were coming off a 21-0 loss at Pittsburgh.


12 October 16, 2007

ThEVISTA

SPORTS

Bronchos mess with Texas, win two by Alex Gambill Sports Writer

UCO Volleyball kicked butt and took names on Thursday, Oct. 11, at home against Texas A&M-Kingsville and again on Saturday against Tarleton State, giving the Bronchos 12 straight wins and bringing them to 6-0 in the league. The Bronchos sent the Kingsville Javelinas squealing home after a three to one victory. The first game ended 24-30, but the Bronchos kicked it up a notch to hog-tie Kingsville in the remaining games 30-25, 30-18 and 30-26. Mari Araujo and Kelsey Reynolds both made 15 kills in the match and Meaghan Wedberg with 11. Wedberg also made 35 digs and hit .316. Reynolds helped get things rolling in the second game while UCO was tied six times in the game and had four lead changes. It was a close game, but UCO made use of the Javelinas' service error and two hitting errors to bring UCO from 27-25 to winning 30-25. "Kingsville has some tremendous athletes and they gave us a lot oftrouble," UCO coach Jeff Boyland said in a statement to UCO Media Relations. The Bronchos got a well deserved win in the third, making 14 kills and lowering their attack errors from nine and 10 in the previous games to only six. Jessica Legako made three kills and three blocks in the third and Araujo made the final four kills to end the game. Lacie Allen shined like always by making almost impossible saves to help keep the Bronchos on top. Allen made 25 digs while Araujo made 16 and the team finished the match with 70 digs. The fourth game was quite a spectacle with nine gut-wrenching ties. The game was close throughout until Kingsville had a ball-handling

Lacie Allen

error and then UCO stepped up to score the final four points to end the game. UCO finished with 56 kills to Kingsville's 52. Saturday's game against Tarleton State was a much shorter match compared to Thursday's. UCO beat them with a sweep of 30-20, 30-18 and 30-28. "Tarleton didn't have an answer for Kelsey and Mari and we took advantage of that," Boyland said in a statement to UCO Media Relations. "It was a good win for us and we've just got to stay focused and not start looking ahead." The only game that seemed like trouble was the by Vista photographer Chris Albers last; due to 10 ties and four Freshman Courtney Whitlow works to defend the Tarleton State block on Saturday at Hamilton Fieldhouse. The Bronchos won the match lead changes; 3-0. Like Thursday, the Bronchos made 56 kills second game with 9-0 . lead. ingly close with 10 ties, four the Bronchos tied at 11. But Carolyn O'Connor with 14. Reynolds delivered lead changes and only win- it was then tied again at 12, Wedberg greatly contributbut Tarleton didn't fare so well, just making 37. three aces and a kill in the ning with a spread of two. 13, 16, 17, 23, 24, 25, and 27. ed 40 assists and six kills. The Bronchos' errors were Reynolds racked up 17 UCO played a great first second game to help the The UCO volleygame hitting a .304 with 19 kills Bronchos finish the game only six, but Tarleton decided kills, Araujo made 16 and ball team will play next and having only five errors. before you could finish your to bring the heat to lose with Legako nine to shine in against West Texas A&M The Bronchos came out order of Broncho nachos. some dignity in the end. The the match. Allen made 26 in a conference match The third game was annoy- TexAnns led early 10-6 until digs, .Araujo made 18 and Oct. - 18 in Canyon, Texas. mean as ever, starting the

Soccer silences the opposition by Jeff Massie Sports Editor

If there's one thing better than a loss, it's a win. If there's one thing better than a win, it's two wins, and that's exactly what the Broncho soccer team received on their recent road trip. UCO is currently ranked 15th in the nation and hasn't lost a single game in conference play while compiling an overall record of 12-3-1. Two of the losses have been onepoint defeats to top 10 teams. Over the weekend, the team did add a couple more victories to the win column.

The first was a 2-0 defeat over Eastern New Mexico, and the second success came against West Texas A&M by the same margin. "This road trip really tested this team and we came away with two quality wins," head coach Mike Cook said in a statement to UCO Media Relations. Playing their first game in the land of enchantment against the Eastern New Mexico Zias, UCO managed two late-game goals from Carmen Davis to garnish the win. The game was scoreless at the half despite the Bronchos attempting twice

as many shots. The stalemate continued before finally seceding in the 73rd minute when Davis took a pass from Lacy Cooley and scored . her first goal of the game. Then, just five minutes later, the Bronchos put the game out of reach when forward Lacy Williams delivered a pass that Davis one-touched into the back of the net. Davis leads the team with 11 goals.

In addition to the assist, Cooley attempted two shots, both of which were on goal. Sarah Addison and Kasey Mahaffey also had a couple of shots on goal, but Zia goalkeeper Stephanie Sanchez made eight saves. Carly Fischer was flawless in goal for the Bronchos. Her four saves led to her registering her fifth shutout ofthe season. The Lady Buffs of West Texas A&M would provide a much tougher test for the Broncho defense. West

Texas managed a remarkable 31 shots compared to UCO's 15. The home team managed 11 shots on goal, but none made their way to the scoreboard. Fischer accounted for 10 of the saves. UCO only put up a trio of shots on goal, but unlike the Lady Buffs, they were able to score, putting two into the net. "West Texas has always been one of our biggest rivals and it's always nice to go into their place and beat them," Coach Cook said in a statement to UCO's Media Relations. With an abundance of shots see SOCCER, page 11

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The Vista Oct. 16, 2007  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Oct. 16, 2007  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.