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October 2, 2007

UCO, DELL INK EDUCATIONAL DEAL by Andrew Knittle Staff Writer In a move designed to expand opportunities for UCO students, President Webb and Dell, one of the world's leading computer makers, formally announced an educational partnership Sept. 27 in the President's Office. "This new program will help ensure that our students graduate with relevant, cutting-edge theory and practical application-based learning experiences," Webb said. "It will also promote the development of leadership attributes, which is central to our university academic goals." The UCO-Dell Professional Selling Program will operate out of the College of Business Administration, which offers several undergraduate and graduate degrees. The program will serve as a means to fulfill a minor in Professional Personal Selling and will offer enrolled students an opportunity to participate in "for credit" internships at Dell. Dell will also provide professional • mentors for students enrolled in the program and bring in guest speakers to broaden the avenues of communication between the company and its students. The timing of the new program couldn't come at better time for UCO students. In 2006, Dell announced revenues of $56 billon, a 14 percent increase from the previous year. The company also operates a fast-growing call center in the heart of Oklahoma City, which has grown precipitously since it was opened in October 2004. In a recent interview with The Oklahoman, Jay Martin,

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

President Webb and a representative from Dell Inc. signed a partnership agreement Thursday, Sept. 27. The agreement included a minor in Professional Personal Selling offered within the College of Business Administration.

the new site leader of the Oklahoma City campus, was asked what his biggest challenge is at his new job. "Continuing to manage the growth. I've only been here six months, seven months, and just during that time we have grown almost 25 percent just

from a people standpoint," Martin said. "Just managing that growth every day, making sure that we have the right facilities, down to the food we serve in the cafeteria." The call center was originally designed to house around 400 employees,

but now more than 1,000 people work in the facility. "What it has come to be over the last three years is pretty exciting, because it has moved from something that is very tactical to something that is extremely strategic to the company," Martin said.

"The fact is that we now have four support operations here. If Oklahoma City were not to be here Dell would have a hard time operating each day." For more information about the UCO-Dell Professional Selling Program, call Dr. John Camey,

Assistant Dean and Director of Undergraduate Programs at the College of Business Administration, at 974-5339.

Andrew Knittle can be reached at aknittle@thevistaonline.com .

Sociologist talks about the decline of American culture by Nelson Solomon Staff Writer

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

George Ritzer, author of "The Mcdonaldization of Society", spoke Wednesday night at Constitution Hall in the Nigh Center. Ritzer's book is a commentary on the Mcdonalds business model and how it has affected our everyday lives.

News Central Channel 6 Mon. through Thurs. at 5 p.m.

"I don't care what is written about me as long as it isn't true." — Katherine Hepburn

George Ritzer, acclaimed author, sociologist, and presently Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland, gave a lecture on what he called "The McDonaldization (or is it Starbuckization) of Global Culture" on Sept. 26 in Constitution Hall. He appeared as part of the College of Liberal Arts' Dean's Speaker Series. Ritzer defines McDonaldization as the process by which the principles of McDonald's are affecting more sectors of our society and more and more societies around the world. Ritzer was introduced by Dr. David Ford, chairman of the Sociology and Human Services, Criminal Justice, and Substance Abuse Studies department. In the brief introduction, Dr. Ford noted that in all of Ritzer's accomplishments, he "doesn't have any degrees in sociology," despite being a noted sociologist. Ford said that Ritzer is a sociologist "in the best

VISTA REVIEWER GIVES 'ACROSS THE UNIVERSE' A PERFECT SCORE. -PAGE

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use of the word and brings sociology alive to the modern, postmodern world." Ritzer started his lecture by asking a question he would later address, concerning whether or not he would not change the name of the book to "The Starbuckization of Global Culture" as opposed to the latter, considering the enormity and impact of Starbucks around the world today. Ritzer began writing about the topic of McDonaldization in 1983, when he wrote an article about the issue, but that work went unnoticed and was primarily read by his mother. "It was a number of years later, that this topic seemed to resonate with people, and it was in the early '90s that I decided to expand on it and write a book about it," Ritzer said. People other than his mother actually read this work, much to Ritzer's gratification. Ritzer pointed out that he started working on this book long before some commonly known works out today, including "Fast Food Nation" by Eric Schlosser and Morgan

see MCDONALDS, page 3


OPINION

October 2, 2007

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HOW SOME UCO STUDENTS DEAL WITH THE SMOKING ISSUE...

Cartoon by Jared Aylor

CAMPUS QUOTES:

Editor's Note: Swastikas aren't "Why is talk cheap, that big a deal, are they? but free speech isn't?" Compiled and photographed by Chris Otten

"It's easy for people to say what they feel or believe, but when they actually stand up for it, they are not as willing to follow through when they must show a result." Katie Comtois Elementary Education, Junior

"I could sit all day and talk about political issues, but if I went public with that, it could have serious consequences." Allen Finley Studio Art, Senior

"Because free speech carries a connotation of deep meaning, but you can really talk all you want and it does not mean anything." Karly VanKley Music Performance, Senior

"Free speech isn't cheap because anyone can say what they feel, but cheap talk is something you have to follow through with in order to show your actions."

In a country where millions of children go to bed hungry every night, the U.S. Navy has allocated $600,000 to alter the aerial view of some barracks at its base in Coronado, Calif. Just in case you've been living under a rock or something during the past few days, you probably heard or saw something relating to the Google Earth image that shows what appears to be a large swastika, at least from the heavens. While this may be kind of troubling, especially if you're sensitive to other, similar images, it's really not that big a deal. In fact, these images have been floating around on You Tube and other sites for a while now. What is troubling, though, is the amount of press this odd situation has received from the sometimes halfwitted TV news channels. In between other, more serious stories, pretty much every big guy out there â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from CNN to Fox News â&#x20AC;&#x201D; has devoted more than ample airtime to resolving the "problem." The simple, inescapable fact of this inane story is this: Who cares what these buildings look like from space. The barracks were built in 1970, and they weren't all done at the same time. The first building was "L" shaped, and the designers liked the way it fit into the building site, so they simply repeated

EDITORIAL

PHOTOGRAPHY Chris Albers, Photographer Chris Otten, Photographer Brenda O'Brian, Photographer

Lyndsay Gillum, Copy Editor

NEWS

Studio Art, Senior

Shannon Hoverson, Staff Writer Nelson Solomon, Staff Writer Abha Eli Phoboo, Staff Writer Hannah Jackson, Staff WriterJana Davis, staff writer

"Freedom of speech hasn't been utilized in a long time, because to be thought of seriously, you have to stay in little politically correct boxes." Ben Howard Criminal Justice, Junior

the process three more times. If you look at the aerial photos, you can see that the Navy was using the space provided in the most efficient, eye-pleasing manner possible. So, what's the big deal? Before Google Earth and the other satellite im'aging services out there made their horrific discovery, life went on as usual despite the fact that a giant swastika could be seen from space. Nobody felt any ill effects pre-Google, so why is

Andrew Knittle, Editor in Chief Steven Reckinger, Co-Editor Aaron Wright, Managing Editor

Justin Langston, Staff Writer

Amanda Kuhn

The image of the barracks in Coronado, Calif., have been floating around the Internet for years, but have only recently become controversial.

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"Because anyone can say anything, but saying something important has ramifications."

Image: Google Earth

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everybody freaking out now? Surely, that $600,000 could be spent in more responsible manner. The U.S. Navy is, after all, involved in a variety of conflicts throughout the world. Couldn't they use that money to fight the War on Terror or the War in Iraq (are these two things the same?)? Regardless, the power of public relations and the power of the press, two extremely powerful and sometimes absurd entities, have joined The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and on Thursdays only during summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034. Telephone: (405) 974-5549. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO.

forces to bring about more changes we really don't need. The Navy will no doubt spend at least $600,000 to disguise the aerial horrors of the barracks, but we all know the U.S. military is about staying within budget. In the future, it would be nice if the press uses their powers to bring about social or economic change, not a change in landscaping.

LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters and does not publish anonymous letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 107. Letters can be e-mailed to editorial@thevistaonline. corn.


October 2, 2007

MCDONALDS from page 1 Spurlock's popular 2004 documentary "Supersize Me." "One of the differences between what I'm interested in and what Schlosser and Spurlock is that they are interested in the fast food restaurant, particularly in McDonalds. And I am only interested in the fast food restaurant, McDonald's, for what it says about the larger society," Ritzer said. Ritzer said the basic principles of McDonaldization are efficiency, simplification of the product and predictability. "One of the reasons we go back to them over and over is that they are so predictable," Ritzer said, explaining how customers go back to McDonald's time and time again, because everything about the experience is so predictable. The opening of the first McDonald's restaurant in 1955 was in the world's popular culture, a revolutionary development and changed much of America's society, according to Ritzer. And today it has become a global phenomenon which has affected many countries around the world. And it goes beyond the restaurant business, according to Ritzer. Aspects of our culture ranging from education to the court system to the church have all been McDonaldized. "There has been a McDonaldization of almost anything you can think of," Ritzer pointed out. Ritzer said his model for this social theory originated from German social theorist Max Weber, who was interested in this process of rationalization of society and used the bureaucracy of a large-scale bureaucratic organization as his model. But looking into the .. century, he realized the 20th model had changed while the principle remained the same. "Instead of the bureaucracy, a better example was the fast-food restaurant. And so I was interested in exploring the fact that this process continued to exist," Ritzer said. He then pointed out a few examples of why McDonald's has become a global phenomenon. One example was an incident that took place when an American ambassador to Israel was officiating at the opening of the first McDonald's in Jerusalem. The ambassador was wearing a baseball cap with the McDonald's logo on it. "This is what happened: An Israeli teenager walked up to the ambassador, carrying his own McDonald's hat, which he handed to the ambassador along with a pen and asked, `Are you the ambassador? Can I have your autograph?" The ambassador replied, "Sure, I've never been asked for my autograph." As the ambassador prepared to sign his name, the teenager commented, "Wow, what's it like to be the ambassador for McDonald's, going around the world, opening McDonald's restaurants everywhere?"

The ambassador looked at the teenager and said, "No, no, I'm the American ambassador, not the ambassador from McDonald's." The ambassador then asked the teenager if he still wanted the autograph, and the teenager said "No, I don't -want your autograph" and took his hat back and walked away. Ritzer said that is one example of the significance of McDonald's being more important in this context than the United States, when it is apparently more important to be an ambassador of McDonald's than of the U.S. Ritzer said Starbucks has taken the basic principles of McDonaldization, but added a "show" element to the mix. While 90 percent of Starbucks customers step in and buy their drinks and leave, there are the 10 percent who are the "free performers" in the show who sit in the chairs and use their laptops. This gives the feeling to those in line running in and out that they are welcome to stay at Starbucks as long as they want, unlike McDonald's, which wants customers to leave as soon as possible, according to Ritzer. This is considered a "show" because the truth is that not all their customers can sit in the shop and lounge around, because Starbucks needs most customers to run in and out of the store to make more money, according to Ritzer. Ritzer pointed out how much McDonald's has been effective in changing cultures around the world, specifically citing the difference made in Japan. "Japanese culture used to discourage eating with the hand, but McDonald's stepped in, and that changed very quickly," he said. Ritzer said a key point to understand is that what McDonald's does is "go to other cultures and impose itself — its food, culture, etc. — on that culture." Ritzer answered his initial question by saying that he would not change the name of the book to include "Starbuckization." "Despite the great success of Starbucks, we have to remember that their formulas of success go back to McDonald's," Ritzer said. The fifth edition of his work, "The McDonaldization of Society," will be released in 2008. The first edition was published in 1993. In conclusion, Ritzer noted a common sociological quotation, "We create the social world we live in, and we can recreate the social world." "If you accept the basic premise of my argument, the question then for you is do you want to recreate this McDonaldized world or do you want to create a different kind of world?"

Spotlight on: Chris Dodd (D) Senator for Running for President Currently: Serving as Senator for Connecticut "It's indefensible that they would allow this war to go on for another six years and become the longest war in American history, at tremendous cost in terms of human life and to our treasury."- Senator Dodd Background: Chris Dodd was born on May 27th, 1944 in Willimantic, Conn. His father was a senator and a lead prosecutor during the Nuremberg Nazi war crimes tribunals. In 1966, after graduating from Providence College, Chris joined the Peace Corps where he built a school and a maternity clinic in the Dominican Republic. During his time there, he also learned to speak Spanish. After returning home from the Peace Corps, Dodd enlisted in the Army National Guard. He also spent time serving in the Army Reserves. Dodd graduated from the University of Louisville School of Law in 1972 with a law degree. He left his law practice in 1974 when he was elected to Congress. There he served three terms in the House of Representatives before joining the Senate in 1980. He has served there for five terms at present. During his time in the Senate, he serves as the chair of the Senate Banking Committee and Housing and Urban Affairs Committee. An advocate for children, Dodd formed the first Children's Caucus in the Senate. Senator Dodd originally voted for the USA Patriot Act in 2001 and 2004. He now opposes the war. Dodd voted no on Vote 181: On the Motion, which primarily would extend funding for the war. Dodd voted yes on the previous bill which would provide funding to the war with a timetable to removal dates.

cent Make investment o in biofuels and other clean energy on farms Make high-efficieno cy automobiles affordable Require that governo ment vehicles be hybrid Give a Production o Tax Credit permanent standing for clean sources of energy Increase access to o mass transit systems. • Promote the new American Community Initiative to encourage public service • Education End Corporate o Welfare on Student Loans Raise Pell Grant o Spotlight raising o tuition costs Protective students o by manipulative lenders Implement universal o pre-school Reform No Child o Left Behind Entice National o Board Certified teachers Enact across the o board standards in education

Platform: • Iraq War Wants a complete o redeployment by April 30, 2008 • Wants to introduce Restoring the Constitution Act of 2007 • Seniors and Retirement Security Universal 401 K o Expand affordable o senior housing Less costly prescripo tion drugs • Environment Reduce 80 percent o of greenhouse gas emissions Enact Corporate o Carbon Tax Increase efficiency o standards for consumer products Raise fuel standards o to 50 mpg Increase standards o for construction of new coal plants Increase renewable o energy standards Increase renewable o electricity standard by 20 per-

Provide funding for o schools to have extended learning after school Modernize school o and reduce class size Getting children on o track for college Fund online learno ing Reorganize philano thropic donations to schools • Health Care Implement Universal o HealthMart Offer universal, o affordable coverage Lower costs for o employers when signing up with HealthMart Reward people who o take preventative steps Save money by fixo ing inefficiencies in the systern now. • Labor/Economic Opportunity o Restore freedom to form unions o Enhance Family Medical Leave Act o Increase child and elder care assistance Safeguardpensionplans o Make workplace safer o Enforce trade laws o • Rural America o Ensure ranchers and farmers get a fair price and have safety net Open new maro kets for American products Promote o homegrown, renew sources able energy busio Get nesses to rural areas Implementingnationo al rural broadband initiative America's • First Responders Staffing each fire and o police station to its capacity Ensuring equipment o and-training for first resp onders o Enforcing strong health and safety standards Providing stao tions with state-of-the-art communication systems Provide benefits for o families of first responders Protect retirement o security for first responders Offer affordo able health care for retired responders

Spotlight on: John McCain (R) Present occupation: Senior Senator from Arizona (1987present) Formerly a member of the House of Representatives from Arizona (1983-1987)

Nelson Solomon can be reached at nsolomon@thevistaonline.com.

Navy Admirals. McCain was trained as a naval aviator eventually becoming a naval flight attack pilot. McCain married model Carol Shepp and adopted her two sons. They divorced in 1980. While McCain was fighting in the Vietnam War, his plane was shot down and he became a prisoner of war. McCain was tortured as a POW for six years before finally being released in 1973. Shortly after his release McCain became naval liaison to the Senate. He retired from the service in 1981 as a captain. McCain was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1983 and then moved on tol, the U.S. Senate in 1987 in an office he still holds. In 2000 McCain ran as a republican primary candidate, losing to George W. Bush. In 2004 McCain supported President Bush in his re-election, publicly praising him. ,

Background:

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John McCain was born August 29, 1936 in the Panama Canal Zone (U.S. territory). Both His father and his grandfather were U.S,

In the Senate, John McCain has had a very consistent voting record, and is rarely absent when the senate convenes. McCain is not without controversy. At a 1998 fundraiser he reportedly made a joke about Chelsea Clinton saying, "Why is Chelsea Clinton so ugly? Because her mother is Janet Reno." McCain has also received criticisms from the Asian community for continually referring to Vietnamese people as "gooks". McCain said he reserved that reference only for his captors. Additionally McCain is criticized for making statements regarding Iraq safety that are contradictory to all other iteports.

• He believes global warming is a significant threat and it must be countered. • He is against gun control. • McCain believes that we must not fail in Iraq: "Succeeding in the cause of helping the Iraqi people build a stable, secure, representative state is essential to achieving an enduring peace in a region of the world central to American prosperity and national security. Failure in Iraq will endanger America for generations to come. America has a vital interest in a secure, democratic Iraq, at peace with its neighbors, to help stabilize a dangerous and critical region." John McCain.

Platform: • John McCain is prochoice. • He is a strong proponent of removing social security from the national budget.

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Arts & Entertainment

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October 2, 2007

'Across the Universe,' 'Tekkon Kinkreet,' a blend of East and West a stylish, musical trip by Steven Reckinger Co-Editor

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by Justin Langston Staff Writer When "Across the Universe" was being advertised during the summer, the trailers made it look like it was going to be a movie with a lot of flash and style, but would ultimately miss the point. This movie isn't bland semipsychedelic pro-hippie propaganda narrated by butchered Beatles songs. Instead, it's an intelligent, well-written musical about love and finding oneself while chaos and uncertainty rage in the background. "Across the Universe" follows the story of Jude (Jim Sturgees), a dockworker from Liverpool who signs up to work on a ship. Once he makes it to America, Jude jumps ship to look for his father, who turns out to be a janitor at Princeton University. While staying in the janitor's closet, Jude

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lent. The movie is partially narrated by the characters singing Beatles songs as a kind of inner monologue. The trailers really didn't do the movie justice. Each rendition of the song, while not quite as good as the original, is very powerful and helps the audience examine the character's psyche at the time when they're thinking. One of the innovative parts of the movie is that while the movie is a musical, all of the singing and dancing scenes aren't really happening. With a couple of exceptions where actual musicians are playing music, the scenes featuring the singing really take place in the heads of the characters. All of the psychedelic, trippy parts of the movie are really in the mind's eye of the characters, which is actually really neat. Another innovative part of the movie is the fact that there is almost no exposi-

ONE OF THE INNOVATIVE PARTS OF THE MOVIE IS THAT WHILE THE MOVIE IS A MUSICAL, ALL OF THE SINGING AND DANCING SCENES AREN'T REALLY HAPPENING. makes friends with student and complete slacker Max (Joe Anderson). Max invites Jude home for Thanksgiving where he meets Max's sister Lucy (Evan Rachael Wood). After the holidays, Max drops out of Princeton and moves to New York with Jude. After Lucy's boyfriend dies while serving in the National Guard, she moves to New York to be with them. From there, Jude and Lucy fall in love, Max is drafted into the Vietnam war and things get more complicated from there. "Across the Universe" is probably the most visually appealing movie of the year. Beautiful colors, excellent cinematography and extremely impressive use of visual effects all combine to make an absolutely gorgeous film. While it may be difficult at first to tell which part of the movie is a dream, hallucination, reflection of the characters mind or real life, it's impossible to deny just how good the movie looks. For example, the scene where Max is at the draft office is perhaps one of the most impressive scenes in a movie all year. It manages to really underscore how terrifying the idea of being drafted really is for Max. The faceless GI's with their mindless grins and impossibly chiseled chins just expands how creepy the whole scene is. The music is also excel-

With Japanese animation becoming more popular in America, it seems to make perfect sense for the two countries to collaborate on an ambitious project. "Tekkon Kinkreet" is the end result, and the product is a strange, but satisfying journey into the surreal. Based on the comic book "Black and White" by Taiyo Matsumoto, the feature-length movie is American filmmaker Michael Arias' directorial debut. His credits include producer of "The Matrix"inspired short film collection, "The Animatrix," and a visual effects artist for "The Abyss." Although he is American, he has been working in Japan for more than 15 years. "Tekkon Kinkreet" can be an unusual story, but may also feel a bit familiar in some ways. It centers on two adolescent street thugs known as Black and White. They live in an imaginary place called Treasure Town, a mirror image of Tokyo, and eventually get into trouble with the Yakuza (Japanese mafia). Many of the plot elements are derived from action, drama and science fiction stories, while trying to maintain its own originality. Physics are overlooked in this movie, since the two boys have the ability to fly through the air. It certainly has a comic book feel to it, and seems to borrow a lot from superhero stories and martial art films like "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon." The film is more avantgarde than your typical animated feature. The story goes from being a standard coming-of-age tale to philosophical imagery and symbol-

ism. Those who are familiar with anime may recognize a lot of these metaphysical expressions, considering Japanese storytelling integrates these kinds of ideas. But it gives rise to some interesting visual poetry that becomes a great addition to the characters' emotions. There are several scenes where we grow emotionally connected with White, who tends to have a strange perspective on life. When the two boys become separated due to White falling into police custody, we get a glimpse at the significance of their relationship. Black transforms into a violent, bloodthirsty lunatic who goes after every gangster he knows. With White being his crutch, Black loses all faith in his existence. The plot is a bit thin, but the profound nature of the characters makes the movie worth watching. There are several characters to keep up with, but we are able to get into the minds of most of them. There's a subplot involving genetically engineered assassins who are commanded by

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tory dialogue. All of the plot points that bring the character together aren't really explained. We don't know what happened to Lucy's first boyfriend or how a little boy died during the 1967 Detroit race riots, which acted as a catalyst for bringing Martin Luther McCoy's character to New York. While this causes a lot of confusion early on in the movie, none of it really matters. What does matter is that things happened to bring several people to New York and they now have to work to sort out their lives. The only real problem with the movie is that it's kind of confusing early on. It takes about an hour before things really start to get underway, and for a movie without any expository dialogue, it spends a lot of time setting things up. "Across the Universe" is one of the most amazing films of the year. It's engaging, entertaining, beautiful and very impressive. This is not a movie that should be missed.

a fabricated language that only one of the head mobsters can speak. Then there's the strange behavior of White himself, always talking to himself about random philosophical ideas. It can be a strange viewing, but the eccentricity gives it charm. The art design is a bit different than your typical anime. The jagged character sketches are incorporated effectively into the lush, detailed backgrounds and computer-generated imagery. There are no Disney-esque models to drool over, but the rich colors and unique style helps this one feel fresh. The English dub is surprisingly good for this film. We don't get big Hollywood names, but the English voice actors are just as competent. The original Japanese language track is also outstanding, so the viewer gets the best of both worlds. The DVD release comes with a few extra features that are worth checking out. There's a running audio commentary with director Michael Arias, a 40-minute

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documentary on the making of the film, a short interview with the British band Plaid that provided the atmospheric soundtrack and a few trailers from Sony Pictures. Sony Pictures is known for releasing accessible foreign films, including animated pictures. "Tekkon Kinkreet" is an admirable attempt to converge American and Japanese talents into a single project. For anyone who thinks anime is nothing more than mindless drivel about catching monsters in magical balls and superhuman ninjas should consider taking a look at the more independent motion pictures. Just like anyone else, the Japanese are fully capable of revealing the dramatic side of human nature.

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Steve Reckinger can be reached at sreckinger@thevistaonline.com .

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October 2, 2007

5

deadCENTER now taking submissions by Hannah Jackson Staff Writer

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Baghdad, Iraq—Air Force Tech. Sgt. Vance Clark, son of Dr. Terry Clark of UCO, poses in front of the UCO flag hanging in the chow hall at Camp Liberty. The UCO physical plant provided the flag at Sgt. Clark's request. Also serving in Iraq is Staff Sgt. Matt Prykryl, of the First Marine Division, the son of Jill Kelsey of the Mass Communication Department. The Vista knows many people at UCO have friends and relatives serving in Iraq, and requests their names, ranks and service in order to feature their service to the country.

'Bronze Key' chapter rewarded for efforts by Hannah Jackson Staff Writer

The Bronze Key Chapter of Mortar Board was awarded the Silver Torch Award and the Project Excellence Award at the Mortar Board National Convention this summer. Mortar Board is a National Honor Society that recognizes college seniors who exemplify scholarship, leadership, and service. The honor society was founded in 1918 with four chapters and now has 223 chapters across 47 states. Fifty-one chapters received the Silver Torch Award which honors the collegiate chapters who meet certain requirements outlined in Mortar Board Bylaws. The chapters must meet necessary deadlines throughout the year and the selection process also reviews National records to determine eligibility. "Last year was the first year we won these awards," said Jared Lamb, current President of the UCO chapter. The Project Excellence Award is received by those chapters who complete an outstanding event or project. The Bronze Key Chapter at UCO held a book driVe to raise books for underprivileged children. The books were collected throughout the fall semester until Nov. 30. Mortar Board set up a booth in the Nigh Center the week of Nov. 13. Mary Ellen Roberts, president of the Bronze Key Chapter last year, said the book drive was made into a competition to bring in the

The eighth annual deadCENTER Film Festival is accepting entries for next year's festival. The five-day event has been named one of the top regional festivals by "The Ultimate Film Festival Survival Guide," and over 5,000 film enthusiasts are expected to attend. The deadline for screenplay entrants is Feb. 15, 2008 and March 1, 2008 is the deadline for films. Registrations submitted before Dec. 1, 2007 will receive a discounted application fee. Feature length narrative and documentary application fees are $40, short films, animations and screenplays are $30, and student films are $20 if submitted by the December deadline. Applications received after the early deadline will cost an additional $15 in each category except high school films which are accepted free of charge. All projects are submitted through www.withoutabox.com . A link directly to the deadCENTER film application can be found at www.deadcenterfilm.org . A $2,500 cash prize will be

awarded to the Best Narrative Feature. Films will also be selected from the following categories: documentary feature, narrative short, documentary short, animation, student, Oklahoma film and feature length screenplay. The student category include high school and college projects. Winners from each category will receive a oneof-a-kind award made by Joe Bohrer, a local artist known as "Utopia Joe". "It's funky artwork that you can turn into a trophy or award ... a little sculpture." Bohrer said. Screening locations include the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, The Oklahoma City Downtown Library, IA0 Gallery and Harkins Bricktown 16. There will also be special screenings, parties and workshops which will be announced in the spring. "We announce the schedule for the festival sometime in mid April," said Kim Haywood, Operations Manager for deadCENTER. She said the films will also be announced in April. Hannah Jackson can be reached at hjackson@thevistaonline.com .

Mound Campus

most books. Different organizations on campus could compete as well as individuals. The American Society of Interior Designers won $75 and three individual students also won prizes. Brandon Thompson, Kristen Johnston and Arvin Pourtorkan received gift certificates to the Tropical Café for donating the most books. The President's Christmas Club Party, which is held in early December, donates gifts to underprivileged children. Volunteers pair up and buy presents for a specific child, and then students and organizations put them together in backpacks. Mortar Board added the donated books to the backpacks. "We raised well over our goal of 300 books," Roberts said. The chapter raised over 500 books and donated the extra books to local schools in Edmond and Oklahoma City. Only 24 chapters won the National Project Award. The UCO project was so successful that the Bronze Key Chapter has decided to keep the book drive as its annual project. "This past year the UCO chapter of Mortar Board made its presence known on the campus and in the Community," Roberts said. "Thanks to everyone that helped make that happen."

by Vista photographer Chris Otten

Hannah Jackson can be reached at hjackson@thevistaonline.com.

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Non-traditional student, not your typical nominee by Aaron Wright Managing Editor When Stephanie Dodge informed her husband that she was one of the candidates for Homecoming queen, her husband's only concern was what happened if she received the crown. "Do you have to kiss somebody?" he asked. When Dodge said no, her husband, Jason Green, was happy to help her campaign. Dodge, a married mother of two and a 33-year old UCO student said she only submitted her application for queen so her organization could receive the 50 points for the Homecoming competition. She never even imagined she would get past the interview portion of the selection process. But when she found out she had made the top five, however, she decided to stay in the race. Dodge said she knew the campaign would help promote the Community Health Club, the organization that sponsored her for queen and where she serves as president. She was also encouraged by her other non-traditional friends. They told her it was her chance to break the age barrier. "It shows that just because women are wives and moms, they can be beautiful," said Dodge. Seizing every opportunity offered to her is a life practice Dodge adopted at a young age. At the age of 12, Dodge put herself in foster care. She grew up living with her grandmother and abusive mother, where she took care of and practically raised her two younger sisters. "I was just really stressed. I wasn't sleeping. I wasn't studying," said Dodge. She said she often fell asleep in class because she was so exhausted. Her best friend's mother asked Dodge one day if she needed help. "It was an opportunity and I took it," said Dodge. It was then that she requested help for the first time. The next day she was taken out of her home and put in the foster care system. At 17, she emancipated herself and took custody of her sisters. During her senior year of high school, she rented a room for her and her two siblings and worked two jobs. They included cleaning a Lutheran church and serving food at Long John Silver's as

Photo Provided

Stephanie Dodge, a married non-traditional student with two children, recently ran for UCO Homecoming queen. well as acting as co-captain of the school color guard. After graduation, Dodge moved to Richmond, Va.

Her next move was to Los Angeles, Cali. As a drama lover, she wanted to get a glimpse of the industry.

"It shows that just because women are wives and moms, they can be beautiful." -STEPHANIE DODGE where she learned and taught ballroom dancing. She spent her time as a 19year-old swing dancing and portraying the `cha cha cha.'

"I j ust wanted to go out there and see what is was like," she said. She decided she enjoyed the lifestyle and wanted to go back to get a degree in it.

Tensions still high in Myanmar by Abha Eli Phoboo Staff Writer The United Nations envoy, Ibrahim Gambari, was stalled yet another day from meeting Senior Gen. Than Shwe on Oct. 1. Gambari, is in Myanmar (also known as Burma), to express concern about the crackdowns and violence the military junta government employed to suppress the unrest in the country last week. Shwe, Myanmar's military junta leader, instead had Gambari sent to a remote northern town for an academic conference on EUASEAN relations, according to the Associated. Press. However, Gambari has been "granted" an appointment with Shwe for Tuesday in Naypyitaw, which Gambari said he is looking forward to. Gambari did have the chance to talk to detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi in Rangoon, Myanmar's capital on Sunday. He was the first foreigner allowed to meet

Dodge said she became interested in drama after staying with one particular foster mother. When she moved in

her in 10 months. Suu Kyi, Nobel Peace Prize recipient of 1991, has been under the junta government's supervision for 18 years, 11 of which she was kept from the public. The details of Suu Kyi's meeting with Gambari have not yet been released. The UN Information Center merely said, "Mr. Gambari met Daw Aung San Suu Kyi for more than an hour. He also consulted with the United Nations Country Team and the International Committee of the Red Cross." There is clear indication that the people of Myanmar want a change in government as one of the rallies marched past the house where Suu Kyi has been detained. What began as protest against the fuel price hikes on Aug. 15 has now grown into a pro-democracy movement. The hike in fuel prices affected the Burmese people since it meant increase in public transport and other necessities also. Pro-democracy activists began protests in the capital city, Rangoon,

but on Aug. 19, it had become the "largest demonstration in the military-ruled nation for several years," with more than 400 people. The last time a popular uprising of such magnitude swept Burma was in 1988, when the government devalued the curreney and created economic crises in individual lives. Around 3,000 people are said to have lost their lives then. Myanmar's monks are respected people since the majority of the population are Buddhists. On Sept. 5, they joined the protests but government troops used force to break up the peaceful protest, hurting three monks. Monasteries demanded apologies, but the government retaliated with silence. The agitation in the country has grown since then. Troops and riots started in Rangoon on Tuesday and curfew was imposed from dawn-to-dusk. The next day, government forces baton charged at Shwedagon

see UN, page 7

the house, this lady looked at her and said that there were two things that had to be done in that house. One was sewing. The other was

facing fears. She informed ing a massage therapy class Dodge that she needed to for only $85. Because of the work on public speaking. money back guarantee, Dodge It wasn't long before enrolled in the class and it is Dodge found herself as the what she has been doing since. second place winner at a "The crazy thing is, it's national public speaking com- the thing I should've been petition. The next year she doing all along," said Dodge. became involved in theater. At that point, health became "She probably changed an important issue to her. While studying the art my life," Dodge said. Dodge continued to of massage, Dodge also study theater after return- worked at Metro Bar and ing from Los Angeles at Grill. It was there that she Tulsa Junior College, now met her second husband, Tulsa Community College. Jason Green. Dodge rememHer theater experi- bers them being inseparable. "He is my peace," she said. enced landed her a position in an off-Broadway play The two are now currently in New York City where raising a son, Elijah. Green she lived for six months. serves as a stay-at-home dad, The play was called "Blue as well as attending classes Moons Always Happen." at UCO while Dodge works. To replenish her income, She said she originally went Dodge spent time dancing at back to school to study psya club in New York City. chology. She wasn't even When she got tired of aware that community health "The Big Apple,' she returned existed. That is part of the to Oklahoma. During this reason she wanted to get the move, she met her first hus- Community Health Club band, Tad. Together, they had involved in Homecoming. Joshua, Dodge's first son. "I didn't know what During a separation in it was all about," she said their marriage, Dodge had about Homecoming. She a friend that asked her to saw a flier, went to the first accompany him to a wed- meeting and returned to her ding in Venezuela. By the organization with all the time she returned from the rules and event informaceremony, she had already tion. While she admitted that fallen in love with the coun- being a part of Homecoming try. She took her infant son was a little overwhelming, and moved there. She taught especially for a non-Greek English in an English school; organization, she said overthat is how she earned enough all it was a good experience. "Homecoming is the to rent a small room and provide childcare for her son. big picture," she said. "Our Dodge mostly remembers clubs are the small picture." She said she enjoyed the generosity of the people. "I really got a sense for meeting new people durwhat family was supposed ing the week. She even to be like," said Dodge. met people who could help Because of her time in fos- her with her next big projter care, she feels like she ect, Pounds for Poverty, missed getting a really good which encourages people to example of family life. loose body fat percentage. After returning to the "I got to know so many key United States to continue pur- people that make the wheels suing an acting career, Dodge of our school turn," she said. faced one of the most difficult She feels the average student times in her life - divorce. As doesn't get that opportunity. After graduating in May she fought for custody against her husband for their son, she of this year, Dodge said lost most of the $10,000 she she wants to continue purhad accumulated in savings suing a master's in public for a trip to Los Angeles to health. Eventually, she would find acting jobs. Ultimately, also like to obtain a Ph.D. the court found her career Her dream job would be as an actress, her lack of to write legislation about money and her childhood health for the president. in foster care as grounds to She also plans to congrant custody to her husband. tinue taking every opporWith only $1000 in her tunity that comes her way. bank account and only a car to live in, Dodge knew she had to find employment. She opened the phone book Aaron Wright can be reached at to an advertisement promot- awright@thevistaonline.com .

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October 2, 2007

UN from page 6 Pagoda, Rangoon's holiest shrine, and used tear gas. Clashes have continued since. On Sept. 21, according to BBC reports, the monks have "pledged to continue their protests until they had 'wiped the military dictatorship from the land of Burma'." Mass rallies were carried out and violence broke out on a massive scale. Several monasteries were raided and monks were beaten and killed. The New York Times stated that there was still "no word on more than 1,000 people, including 700 Buddhist monks, who have been arrested." Around 4,000 monks have now been detained and being held at a "disused race course and a technical college" say BBC reports. Many monks have been disrobed and shackled, but even in such circumstances, the monks have protested by refusing to eat. The White House expressed concerns about "continued reports of violence and intimidation" in Myanmar. Spokeswoman Dana Perino said, "The United States is committed to working with countries around the world to make sure that the region

moves Burma towards peaceful transition to democracy." The military junta government has cracked down on the media and closed off the country from outside influence. All Internet connections have been closed and local journalists harassed or arrested. Reporters without Borders and the Burma Media Association reported that around "10 Burmese reporters have been physically attacked or prevented from working, including reporters for Reuters and Agence France-Presse." Japanese photographer, Kenji Nagai, was shot and killed last week, which has drawn the Japanese government to consider sanctions to protest the violence. The official media has warned Burmese people from working with or using foreign news outlets. A television message on Monday referred to the BBC, Voice of America, and Radio Free Asia as "assassins on air." Hopes are pinned on Gambari's visit, but it is yet to be seen what card Than Shwe plays.

7

What is 'Work For Students' anyway? by Jana Davis Staff Writer It starts with sidewalk chalk. You can read it on the way to class or step around it. It reads, "Work For Students," but when asked, a lot of students had no idea what it is. The difficult part about "Work For Students" is the seemingly simple Web site and phone numbers given on the sidewalk. Checking on-line for what "Work For Students" is has proven a more challenging task than some students would care to admit. "I went (on-line) for my friend and it was just a bunch of links, it was very confusing," Briana Picard, English creative studies freshman, said. Stephanie Weiser, sales department specialist of Vector Marketing, explained that "Work For Students" sells CUTCO, which is a "line of high-end cutlery knives." "Having a good sales background is going to be effective for anything in life," Weiser

Abha Eli Phoboo can be reached at aphoboo@thevistaonline.com .

by Vista photographer Chris Otten

Several signs are posted on bulletin boards to entice students in need of work to be employed under various work conditions. said. If a student looking for a job is interested in great skills that will carry them far in life, according to Weiser, CUTCO is the place to start: Sales representatives who

work for Vector Marketing and sell CUTCO are independent contractors, each selling their own share and earning their own commission through one -on- one

interviews with customers.

Jana Davis can be reached at jdavis@thevistaonlinecom.

UCO LENDS A HAND

•BAGHDAD (AP) — U.S. and Iraqi forces killed more than 60 insurgent and militia fighters in intense battles over the weekend, with most of the casualties believed to have been alQaida fighters, officials said Sunday. The U.S. Embassy, meanwhile, joined a broad swath of Iraqi politicians — both Shiite and Sunni — in criticizing a nonbinding U.S. Senate resolution seen here as a recipe for splitting the country along sectarian and ethnic lines. YANGON, Myanmar (AP) —A U.N. envoy failed to meet with Myanmar's top two junta leaders in his effort to persuade them to ease a violent crackdown on anti-government protesters, but was allowed a highly orchestrated session Sunday with detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The military government, meanwhile, flooded the main city of Yangon with troops, swelling their numbers to about 20,000 by Sunday and ensuring that almost all demonstrators would remain off the streets, a diplomat said. Scores of people also were arrested overnight, further weakening the flagging uprising against 45 years of military dictatorship. The protests began Aug. 19 when the government sharply raised fuel prices, then mushroomed into the junta's largest by Vista photographer Chris Albers

challenge in decades when Myanmar's revered monks took a

Buddy Broncho and UCO cheerleaders helped support children and adults struggling with Downs syndrome at the Buddy Walk located at the Bricktown Ballpark Saturday.

leading role. ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — The social networking Web site Facebook has been warned that it could face a consumer fraud charge for failing to live up to claims that youngsters there are safer from sexual predators than at most sites and that it

Tournament to benefit UCO program

promptly responds to concerns, a spokesman for New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo said Sunday. "We expect an immediate correction eliminating the dangers exposed by our investigation," said the spokesman, Jeffrey Lerner. Cuomo announced last week that he had subpoenaed Facebook after he said the company did not respond to "many" complaints by investigators who were solicited for sex while posing as 12to 14-year-olds on the site. Officials from Cuomo's office met with Facebook on Friday after they said Facebook took three days to answer calls and e-mails from state investigators.

by Lyndsay Gillum Copy Editor A golf tournament fundraiser, hosted by the College of Business Administration, will benefit UCO's Professional Golf Management Program (PGM), the Center for Economic Education and the university's College of Business Administration. The tournament will take Monday, Oct. 8 at Gaillardia Golf Club in Oklahoma City and is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. As part of the fundraising efforts, the 18-hole scramble will feature door prizes, a silent auction and prizes for the top three teams.

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are required to complete 137 total credit hours, 37 of which are dedicated to specific PGM course work. Teams of four players are encouraged to participate with an entry fee of $600 per team. Registration begins at 11 a.m. with lunch following at 11:30 a.m. Gaillardia Golf Club is located at 5300 Gaillardia Boulevard in Oklahoma City. For additional information and/or to register, contact Reagan Hamlin at 974-2822.

Lyndsay Gillum can be reached at Igillum@thevistaonline.com .


CLASSIFIEDS

October 2, 2007

Deadlines/Pricing DEADLINES: All classifieds MUST be submitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. Prices: Classified ads cost $6/day for the first 20 words and $.10/word thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call 974-5549 or 974-5918 for info.

Services

EDMOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTE, Conveniently located on the UCO campus, offers English as a second language classes for intern. students/individuals. NOW FEATURING a specially designed program with: Strong emphasis in listening and speaking Highly inter. classes, Comprehensive TOEFL program. Enjoy small classes and the campus facilities. Contact us @ (405) 341-2125 or www. thelang uagecompany.com . INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS! Need to pass the TOEFL, an 1-20 for a friend, or a 12 week cert.? English Language Center can help you! Call (405)348-7602, visit our web site www.elcok.com , or come meet us in person at 1015-C Waterwood Parkway, next to the UCO University Plaza on 2nd Street.

Employment

PERFECT JOB FOR CREATIVE COLLEGE STUDENT Receptionist position, part time @ the hottest salon in OKC! Personality, style & computer skills a must. Call 752-5556 or apply @ Salon Rebel, 9419 N. May Ave., OKC. Salon Perks. APPT. SETTER Needed for local cleaning co. $6-8/per hr. + commission. Call 340-3914, ask for Roger.

EARN GREAT MONEY And work around your school schedule cleaning windows. $7-9/per hr. Call 340-3914, ask for Roger. AN UPSCALE SALON/ DAY SPA IN EDMOND Is seeking a friendly, dedicated Hospitality Specialist who wants to be part of their team. Are you the member they seek? Strong human relations skills, two way communicator, giving, caring, sincere, organized, structured, purposeful and loyal are all descriptions of this person. Managing incoming and outgoing calls, customer care, software management, scheduling appointments, typing, filing, product and service sales, front desk representative, and staff support are all within the responsibilities of this person. Well, are you the person they seek? If you are and want professional growth, a rewarding work environment, and a chance to make a difference, send a letter about yourself and current resume to: The (brow Studio 2000 West Danforth Road Suite #124 Edmond, OK 73003 DELIVERY DRIVER WANTED Part-time. Apply at 1425 S. Santa Fe, Ste. C. Designs by Tammy, "Your" florist. PART-TIME SWIM COACH For Chesapeake Swim Club. $16 per hour. Competitive swimming and/or swim lesson experience required. Call Jessica @ 204-9989. MELODY HOUSE Need part-time office clerk. Answer phones, file, misc. Afternoon hours M-F. Call for appointment: 840-3383. LOOKING FOR ADA THERAPIST For special ed. students. $7.00/hr. Call 330-7849 or lookingforschool@aol,com SERVER POSITION Available @ Pearl's Lakeside. Apply within. 748-6113

PART-TIME POSITION For child home. October 15 thru December 15, M/W only. 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm. Please call Cassandra Moore, 286-3162. KIDZSTREET HOURLY PLAY CARE Growing business now hiring teachers for our Edmond & new Moore location. Seeking Early Ed and Child Development Students. Applicants with previous child care experience also accepted. Visit either location to apply: 610 S. Kelly in Edmond or 2735 S. 1-35 Service Rd. in Moore. Learn more about us at www. kidzstreet.biz CHARLESTON'S Now hiring for hostess, server and busser positions. Servers must have at least 2 lunch shifts available Mon. - Fri. Please apply in person between 2-4 pm @ 3409 S. Broadway, Ste. 400., Edmond, OK 73013. (405) 478-4949. ROUTE DRIVER Part-time. Ideal for student, $80 per day - 5 to 6 hrs. per day, 2 to 3 days a week. You must have economical pick-up truck and clean driving record. Call Rick @ 341-7017. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE CLERK Part-time 15-20 hours per week. $10.00 per hour. Flexible hours between 8am and 5pm. OJT-task includes opening mail, matching invoices to PO logs, recording vendors numbers, etc. Please call Caliber Management, Inc. for an appt. at 405-844-7111 x24. NEW HORIZONS Child development now hiring PT teachers. Apply in person at 1909 SE 15th in Edmond. 405-348-1491. EOE. EXPERIENCED COMPUTER TECHNICIANS Needed in Edmond, FT or PT, Immediate opening, E-mail to resume goodtechnician@gmail.com .

MOVIE EXTRAS New opportunities for upcoming productions. All looks needed, no experience required for cast calls. Call 877-218-6224. UNDERCOVER SHOPPERS Earn up to $150 per day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and disning establishments. Experience not required. Call 800-722-4791. TEACHER Needed immediately for Edmond Daycare. FT/PT. Experience preferred, competitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262 PART-TIME RECEPTIONIST Needed for busy doctors office at Mercy. Must be available to work all day TR. Other hours are possibly available. Please fax resume to 752-4242 NURSING STUDENT Wanted for busy doctor's office at Mercy. Must be available to work all day TR. Other hours are possibly available. Please fax resume to 752-4242. PINNACLE FITNESS Seeking Child Care Associate. Must be experienced, patient & love working w/children. Apply in person, Pinnacle Fitness, N. of Memorial on Penn. next to Toys-R-Us. FRONT-DESK RECEPTIONIST Various shifts. People skills are a must. Dependable, honest, hardworking, happy & responsible adults should apply at Pinnacle Fitness, Memorial & Penn between Toys-R-Us & Hobby Lobby. SHOGUN'S STEAK HOUSE Hiring for wait staff, bussers, dish washers, host, bartender. Apply in person at Northpark Mall (NW 122nd & N. May) after 5:30pm. 749-0120.

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43. Infinite time. 45. Pulp fiction character. 46. Dressed skin of a large animal. 47. Rapturous delight. 51. Horror novel by Simon Maginn. 54. Monetary unit of Thailand. 55. Contend for superiority. 56. Role. 57. Greek muse of lyric and love poetry. 59. Tale. 60. In addition. 61. Jumble. 62. Strives. 63. Never. 64. Use up. 65. Plot of ground. Down 1. Moderately warm. 2. Exorbitant rate of interest. 3. Casual oxford shoes made of buckskin, often in white or a neutral color. 4. Someone who copies the behavior of another. 5. Dense elaborate spider web that is more efficient than the orb web. 6. Central stage. 7. Jokes. 8. Extreme leftist Greek terrorist group. 9. Monetary unit of Japan. 10. Business visitor. 11. Referring to the olive. 12. Building in which a single family lives. 13. Formerly.

21. Solely. 22. Game that was popular from the early to mid-1990s. 24. Buddies. 25. Abrasive mineral. 26. U. S. liquid unit equal to 16 fluid ounces. 28. Completely. 29. Inspires with reverence. 30. Family of young animals. 31. Motorcycle trick also known as the stopple. 32. Ordered. 33. Leave. 34. Acting in conformity. 35. Make happy. 38. Water-soluble compounds wit a sour taste. 39. Thread bit. 41. Cut with swift strokes. 42. Exploit. 44. Orator. 45. Repeated. 47. Was consumed. 48. Be of use. 49. Main antagonist of the Mega Man X video game series. 50. Something that is a catalyst for change. 51. Limited space of time. 52. Robust. 53. Of Gaelic. 54. Large bundle bound for storage. 57. Abbreviation for east by south. 58. Transversely corded fabric. 59. Deep, covered trench that leads to an enemy fortification.


rummsuk SPORTS

October 2, 2007

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Soccer team splits in Texas by Jeff Massie Sports Editor

Three times the No. 13 Broncho soccer team has traveled past the Oklahoma border for a pair of games, and each time has resulted in the same outcome — a win and a loss. The latest endeavor took the team to San Antonio where they lost their first game by one in double overtime to Incarnate Word, but then went on to canonize St. Mary's 9-2. "This is a tough loss to swallow," head coach Mike Cook said about the 1-0 double overtime loss in a statement to UCO Media Relations. The Bronchos sputtered out of the gates, and managed only a pair of shots in the first half. Fortunately for UCO, they had Carly Fischer, the division's reigning defensive player of the week, in goal. She saved all six of the Cardinal's first-half shots. In the second half, the Bronchos stepped up their offensive output, but was still not able to get a shot past Incarnate's keeper, Ashton Caffrey. She had nine saves during the contest. Four different Bronchos took shots during a 12-minute stretch, but all were saved. Midfielder Kasey Mahaffey almost put the game away in the 86th minute when her strike got past the goalkeeper but was denied by the crossbar. Time then expired in regulation and the game went into its first overtime. In the extra period, UCO continued its surge and out shot the Cardinals five to nil. Caffrey stopped three of the attempts. Then in the second and final overtime, Incarnate managed one more shot, but unlike the rest, this one scored and

the Cardinals soared to victory. The goal was unassisted and came in the 100th minute from Sarah Hernandez. The Bronchos took 16 shots compared to the Cardinal's • 13. Incarnate pressed many attacks that led six offsides, but the attacking style came through in double overtime. A dozen fouls were called during the game, but no cards were given. In the second game of the trip, UCO rose to the challenge and dominated St. Mary's 9-2. It was the most single-game goals the team had scored all season. Coach Cook described the win as a nice way to rebound in a statement to UCO's Media Relations. The first goal came when the game was just two minutes old when Moriah Chinnock's cross deflected off a defender and went into the net. Within 10 minutes, UCO had extended its lead to two. The second score came from Ashton Morris who had three goals during the game. The Bronchos held a 2-1 advantage going into halftime. After play resumed, the Rattlers evened the score in the 59th minute. UCO then began its offensive onslaught after briefly being tied. Within three minutes the Bronchos added another three goals, two coming from penalty kicks. UCO would then go on to completely control what proved to be a physical game. The visitors had 13 fouls called on them and St. Mary's earned 18 whistles and three yellow cards. The Bronchos stomped the rattlers in terms of shooting. UCO's 25 shots were almost double the 13 that the Rattlers managed. Rebekah Svensson stepped in at goal

Photo Services

Sarah Addison steals the ball from a Midwestern State University player during a game at Tom Thompson Field on Sept. 19. UCO won the game 3.0 and has compiled a record of 8-3-1.

and made five saves but also surrendered a pair of goals. In addition to Morris' three goals, Carmen Davis, Moriah Chinnock, Lacy

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Williams, Teagan Breslin, Sarah Addison and Vallan Burk all scored. Williams, Breslin and Jenny Racicot all tallied assists as well.

UCO returns to Edmond Texas Women's University this week for a pair of before hosting Texas A&Mgames against conference Commerce on Sunday. foes. The first match-up Jeff Massie can be reached at will be on Friday against jmassie@thevistaonline.com

A knight in Edmond; new twist on an old sport by Alex Gambill Sports Writer

Over the weekend I rekindled the medieval sport of jousting, but with a slight twist. Considering I live in Edmond and I do not own body armor, a horse, a shield or a joust, I had to make a slight improvisation to this wonderful sport. During a lazy Saturday, I decided to get medieval on my twin brother's ass after a few beers and a failure to beat him at poker. We took two bicycles and two brooms to the street. For body armor we had nothing and we made a rule not to hit each other above the neck because we did not have helmets available and could not afford manslaughter on either one of our consciences.

Before I get into the details of my Saturday activity, I would like to offer a little background about this sport. According to historians, the first jousting tournament was staffed in 1066, but did not gain popularity until the 13th century. The sport was only granted for the nobles of Europe to compete. Jousting is usually held in sets of three and could have a variety of weapons such as the commonly known tilting with a lance, strokes with a sword and/or dagger and blows from a battle-ax. Like most competitive games, such as paper rock scissors, they would play the best of three. Like many other martial arts, this sport is not dead but kept alive by many fes-

tivals and passionate connoisseurs of macho sports. Ring jousting is the official state sport of Maryland. After the poker game we were talking about what sports would be a great addition to the Olympic games. Since the Olympics were admitting odd sports like curling that seem to come out of nowhere, we thought jousting would be perfect. Being that it would be for the Olympics, it should not include a horse, but a bicycle. The original spirit of the ancient Greek Olympics was to accentuate what the human body was capable of performing in a competitive sport. With the history readily known in my mind and while I had several intoxicating doses of liquid courage, I set out to

conquer my twin. So, I then set out to reclaim my pride after a disastrous move of going allin at poker, a sport I am clearly not known for winning. We decided to go best of three. The first round we both missed each other because I fell off of my bike. We then decided that would just be a practice-round while we were just trying to get our bearings at this unfamiliar sport. So, we set out about 60 paces from each other trying to pedal as fast as we can and at the same time keeping in mind that we really needed to strike one another. Never the less, my opponent took me down. I took it like a man and grabbed some of my medieval elixir, Boulevard Pale Ale, and came back for a second round.

In the second round I came at him like a real mad man, like when Jim Caney came after Mathew Broderick at the Medieval Times restaurant in the movie "The Cable Guy." Coming at my brother with full force and with a little thrust from my broomstick lance, I must have scared him. He then tried to steer his tenspeed steady out of the direction of my lance, but it was too late. I knocked him off of his bike and bruised his royal ass. He to took his defeat like a gentleman and got up to re-saddle for the third and decisive round. After the second round I got a little too confident and did not go out as fast in the third. My brother saw this as an opportunity to get me back by going out

stronger than I had in the second. I took a heavy blow to the right shoulder and left my bike to travel down the street until it hit the curb. When I got up and realized what happened, my brother was already doing his victory roar like a silverback gorilla that just took over the role as troop leader. When we got into the house and iced down our bruises, we decided if we were going to do this sport again, we would need padding. If I had to do it again, I would. I also recommend this sport to anyone that can take a beating.

Alex Gambill can be reached at agambill@thevistaonline.com .

Bronchos sail in windy city; win two by Justin Langston Staff Writer

The UCO Hockey Team traveled to Chicago over the weekend to take on Robert Morris College in a two game series. UCO beat out Robert Morris in both games, earning an 8-2 victory on Friday night and a 5-4 victory on Saturday night. "It was pretty good for us Want a GREAT JOB making GREAT MONEY?

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to win on our first game on the road," head coach Craig McAlister said. "It was a pretty rough game and they tried to go out and intimidate us on the first game. On the next night, they realized that wouldn't work and tried to out skate us." For 13 of the team's players, this was something of a homecoming, since they were from the Chicago area. As such,

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to the team it was almost like they hadn't gone anywhere for the game. The team had it's own fans screaming and chanting for UCO's victory. The first game opened up with a single goal from forward Jason Thibodeau for the first period. Things were quiet until the second period when UCO scored four times. In the third period, Robert Morris attempted a

comeback and scored twice, Colonials managed to score but UCO knocked them two more goals, one during back with three more goals- —4he ilast three seconds of the Saturday night was just as game, but they were unable to brutal, with UCO out-scor- topple the UCO juggernaut. ing Robert Morris 5-0 for The second game was the first two periods. Robert heavy on the power plays, Morris finally made a couple with UCO scoring on of goals in the third period two out of three of them. before Thibodeau managed "You've got to make them to knock in the last Broncho pay when they get a pengoal of the game. The alty," McAlister said. "And

FOOTBALL

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man Corey Lewis led the team with two sacks. The Bronchos also tied their season high in tackles for Buy any item (single or meal) loss and turnovers with nine at regular price and receive and three, respectively. It was a second item of equal or also the fourth time in five lesser value half off. games that linebacker Will I,p. V.11 /07

Saturday, that's what we did." Next weekend, the team will travel to Champagne, Ill. to take on the number two-ranked University of Illinois. UCO will return home on Oct. 21' to take on Arizona State University. Justin langston can be reached at jlangston@thevistaonline.com

as his feet did not play as much of a factor in this game. The Bronchos will travel to Ada to battle East Central on Thursday night. The Tigers are 1-5 this season and have surrendered a league high 241 points, almost 100 more than Southwestern Oklahoma State who ranks second from last.

Clewis led the defense in tackles; he had 15 in this contest. UCO quarterback Colin Clancy completed seven of 14 attempts for 57 yards and was intercepted once. He was also sacked twice and Jeff Massie can be reached at rushed for negative yards jmassie@thevistaonline.com


10 rffiEvisrA SPORTS October 2, 2007

King of the jungle; Bronchos topple Lions by Jeff Massie Sports Editor

After a three game losing streak, the contest against Texas A&M-Commerce could have been seen as a crossroads for the Bronchos, but the football team took a step in the right direction, winning 21-20 in overtime. "We had our backs to the wall a lot of times tonight, but our defense stayed strong and came up with some big stops and we did what we had to do to pick up a big conference win on the road," head coach Chuck Langston said in a statement to UCO's Media Relations. It was the first game either team played against a north division foe. Win, and your team is off on the right foot and in control of its own destiny. Lose, and you'll be playing with your backs against the wall for the rest of the season, fighting for a chance at the division and conference crown. No team has established itself as a dominant power in the Lone Star Conference North Division. The 2-3 Bronchos are now tied with Northeastern State (Okla.) for the lead in the division. In the first overtime action the team has seen this season, UCO responded brilliantly.

Ben Birmingham

The team from Edmond won the toss and elected to play defense first. In college football, both teams take turns receiving the ball on the 25 yard line while the opposing team's defense tries to stop them. Electing to play defense first can be beneficial because it can let the team know if they need a field goal or a touchdown to stay in the game. That proved true in the game. When the Bronchos took their turn on offense, they trailed by six after the Lions had missed their PAT wide left. On fourth-and-inches, UCO knew they needed to convert to win the game, and quarterback Colin Clancy in his second start of the season kept the ball up the middle and gained the crucial one yard to continue the drive. Two plays later, mnning back Ben Birmingham busted through the middle and scored on a 13-yard run. Kicker Alex Weaver then came through in the clutch, splitting the uprights and allowing UCO to escape Commerce with the win. Birmingham, the team's leading rusher, carried the Bronchos to victory, accounting for 198 of UCO's 240 yards. The offensive line also did its part opening up holes as Birmingham averaged 6.6 yards per carry and was only stopped for a loss once. He also scored on the Bronchos' first possession of the second half when he burst through the middle for a 92-yard touchdown run that put UCO up 14-7. In the first half, UCO found itself trailing the Lions when Commerce put together an 11-play touchdown drive punctuated by Nabi I ElAmin's 2-yard score. The drive spanned 52 yards and ended with two and a half minutes left on the clock. Realizing the importance

Photo Services

Five Broncho football players gang tackle an Eastern New Mexico player during a game at Wantland Stadium on Sept. 22. UCO lost the game 7-21.

of not going into halftime trailing, defensive back T.J. Shaw came up with a crucial interception at the UCO 40. It was the first of a pair of picks, and he returned this one to the Commerce 35-yard line with 2:55 remaining in the first half. Quarterback Colin Clancy would then hit Rick Montgomery on a 28-yard pass that moved the ball to the four yard line. Maurice Little then came through with the score and tied the

game at seven. Little had his lowest production of the season against the Lions, carrying the ball just six times for nine yards, but he did provide the pivotal score. After halftime, Birmingham cranked out his huge run, but the Lions countered quickly. El-Amin took the ensuing kickoff 97 yards to the house and evened the score at 14. ElAmin led the Lions in rushing with 86 yards on 24 carries.

It was also El-Amin who ended Commerce's final fourth quarter scoring threat after he fumbled the ball away five yards short of the endzone. UCO would then go on to defeat the home team in overtime. The Broncho defense came up huge in the game, limiting the Lions to 292 yards. Only two of Commerce's touchdowns were scored against the defensive unit and the other came on special teams.

Shaw's play led to him being named the Lone Star Conference North Division's Defensive Player of the Week. His two interceptions set up one Broncho touchdown and the other ended a Commerce drive just five yards away from scoring. In the game, UCO set season highs in sacks with seven and passes broken up with nine. Defensive line

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The Vista Oct. 02, 2007  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Oct. 02, 2007  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.