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III Inside: Enista highlights Constitution Week -See page 3

III 'New restaurant and movie reviews See page 5 Sept. 25, 2008 -

Murdaugh mold is not a threat, housing says By Ryan Croft Staff Writer

Students living in Murdaugh Hall are safe from dangerous mold and bacteria, said University Housing and Food Services Director Josh Overocker. UCO's Environmental Health and Safety Department conducted air-quality tests in six different areas throughout Murdaugh Hall and one outside the building, according to a report issued last week. "There's mold in my office, there's mold outside, there's mold in your home," Overocker said. "The concern is always the levels of mold and the types of mold." "There's nothing that rises above the

levels that would indicate that there's a concern for [residents'] health," Overocker said. He said the test results also show an absence of harmful molds such as stachybotrys, as well as very low levels of other molds like penicillin. Overocker said the university followed a stringent sample-testing process, starting with collecting the samples and ending with the Housing and Food Department's evaluation of the results. After the EHSD finished taking the readings, UCO turned them over to QuanTEM Labs, a certified mold-testing laboratory, to determine the air-quality. Overocker said the air-quality wa s determined by comparing the amount of

each individual types of mold present in a room to the amount of the same mold in the sample taken from outside, Where those same mold and bacteria grow naturally. Mold in a room only poses a health threat when the amount bacteria present in a room reaches levels significantly greater than the levels of those same bacteria outside, according to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Web site. The Web site also asserted that regardless of whether or not the mold present at the time of testing is harmful, the underlying source of the growth — wetness — must be dealt with or bacterial re-growth will OMIT.

"Emphasis should be on ensuring proper

repairs of the building infrastructure, so that water damage and moisture buildup does not recur," according to the NYCDHMH Web site. "[The housing department] told me they're doing everything they can, " said Murdaugh Hall resident Jonathan LeClair. "But in order to get the whole problem fixed, they have to pretty much re-pipe the whole building." "Mold typically prefers moist environment ... and yes, we have a condensate pipe running through [Murdaugh Hall]. There's going to be what could be referred to as mildew, mold or other growth," Overocker said.

see Mold, page 8

A nation in suspense Clockwise from top to left: Barack Obama, John McCain, Treasurer Henry Paulson and Sarah Palin.

Palin cries y depression

Illustration by Chris Albers

By AP Writer

NEW YORK -- Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin said Wednesday that the United States could be headed for another Great Depression if Congress doesn't act on the financial crisis. Palin made the comment in an interview with CBS evening news anchor Katie Couric while visiting New York to meet foreign leaders for the first time in her political career. As Palin sought to establish her credentials in world affairs, first lady Laura Bush said that Palin lacked sufficient foreign policy experience but was "a quick study." Recent surveys have shown that Palin's popularity, while still strong, has begun to fade. Earlier this month, an Associated PressYahoo News poll showed more people viewing Palin favorably than unfavorably, 47 percent to 28 percent. But an ABC NewsWashington Post poll released Wednesday showed that in a two-week period, the number seeing Palin positively dropped 6 percentage points while 10 points more see her unfavorably. On Monday, a CNN-Opinion Research Corp. poll said her favorable rating dropped 4 points and her unfavorable rating rose 8 points over two weeks. Palin has been. in New York this week for a series of meetings with foreign leaders, part of an effort by Republican John McCain's presidential campaign to counter criticism that the former small-town mayor lacks the experience to be vice president, let alone president in an emergency. The CBS interview was just her third major

Congress

considers solutions By AP Writer

interview in nearly four weeks on the GOP presidential ticket. Asked whether there's a risk of another Great Depression if Congress doesn't approve a $700 billion bailout package, Palin said, "Unfortunately, that is the road that America may find itself on." Palin said the answer to the financial crisis doesn't necessarily have to be the bailout plan that the Bush administration

WASHINGTON -- Democrats won a key concession from the White House on the financial bailout plan Wednesday and sought to drastically slash the $700 billion size of the rescue. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson agreed to demands from critics in both parties to limit the pay packages of Wall Street executives whose companies would benefit from the proposed bailout. "The American people are angry about executive compensation and rightfully so," Paulson told the House Financial Services Committee. "We must find a way to address this in the legislation without undermining the effectiveness of the program." The issue has been a much-debated point in the struggle to win congressional approval of the historic rescue of the financial industry, though the "golden parachute" money involved would be relatively insignificant compared with the huge sums being talked about.

see Congress, page 8

see Depression, page 8

Worry over economy may claim first presidential debate By AP Writer

NEW YORK -- Republican John McCain said Wednesday that he wants to postpone Friday's debate to deal with the nation's financial problems, but Democrat Barack Obama said "it's more important than ever" that the country hear from its next president. The White House rivals maneuvered to claim the leadership role on the financial crisis that has overshadowed their campaign, leaving the question of whether they will hold their first debate in doubt. Obama said he would continue ahead with his debate preparations, while McCain said he would stop all advertising, fundraising and other campaign events to return to Washington and work for a bipartisgan solution.

"It's my belief that this is exactly the time when the American people need to hear from the person who, in approximately 40 days, will be responsible for dealing with this mess," Obama said at a news conference in Clearwater, Fla. "It's going to be part of the president's job to deal with more than one thing at once." Their dueling positions came after the two senators spoke privately, each trying to portray himself as the bipartisan leader at a time of crisis. But McCain beat Obama to the punch with the first public statement; saying the Bush administration's Wall Street $700 billion bailout proposal seemed headed for defeat and a bipartisan solution was urgently needed. If not, McCain said ominously, credit will dry up, people will no longer be able to buy homes, life savings will be at stake at businesses will

not have enough money to pay workers. "It has become clear that no consensus has developed to support the administration's proposal," McCain said. "I do not believe that the plan on the table will pass as it currently stands, and we are running out of time." McCain said he had spoken to President Bush and asked him to convene a leadership meeting in Washington that would include him and Obama. .Eveil.,4as McCain said he was putting thud of the country ahead of politics, his surprise announcement was clearly political. It was an attempt to try to outmaneuver Obama on an issue he's trailing on, the economy, as the Democrat gains in polls. He swiftly went before TV cameras minutes after speaking with Obama and before the two campaigns had hammered out a joint statement, expregsing : that

Congress act urgently on the bailout. And while McCain's campaign said he would "suspend" his campaign, it simply will move to Washington knowing the spotlight will remain on him no matter where he is. Obama repeatedly stressed at his news conference that he called McCain first to propose that they issue a joint statement in support of a package to help fix the economy as soon as possible. He said McCain called back several hours later, as Obama was leaving a rally in Florida, and agreed to the idea of a statement but also said he wanted to postpone the debate and hold joint meetings in Washington. Obama said he suggested they first issue a joint statement showing bipartisanship. "When I got back to the hotel, he had gone on television to announce what he was going to do," Obama said. Li


Call o Serve

PIC OF THE DAY/Drawing in the Corn

• Student president hopes to inspire others By Chase Dearinger

Copy Editor

In a dark corner on the first floor of the Nigh University Center, John Bobb-Semple is doing his best to ensure the voice of the student body is heard. He spends nine to 10 hours a day in the office performing his duties as student body president. He works there, he studies there, and sometimes he sleeps there. "It takes a lot to manage the student voice and to make sure that we're doing it well," BobbSemple said. He's always looking out for ways to do this better. In fact, he and a group of UCO Student Association members are planning a trip to attend the American Student Government Bobb-Semple Association's national conference in Washington, D.C. for just this purpose. Bobb-Semple, a senior political science major, has been involved in student government throughout his time in college. He got his start, he said, as the president of the Oklahoma Student Government Association. He began college in 2004 at Tulsa Community College and transferred to UCO in 2006, where he spent his first year as executive assistant to the president. He is also a member of Sigma Nu fraternity and on the Transfer Leadership Council, an organization that works with transfer students. The foundation and inspiration for his career in leadership and student government did not originate in Oklahoma, however. Bobb-Semple is from Hammond, La., a small town located an hour outside of New Orleans. A first generation college student on his father's side, Bobb-Semple looked to his father for advice on leadership. His father is from Guyana, South America, and has high hopes for his son. "Being an immigrant," Bobb-Semple said, "he likes to dream of his son running for president, which I never intend to do." This didn't stop his father from instilling values in his son that Bobb-Semple believes have made him the leader he is today. "I think there's an innate desire inside me, that I got from my dad, to know my purpose and to realize that my purpose is to serve people," he said. He put this purpose to use while working for the Boy Scouts of America in Tulsa. The program, Scoutreach, is an inner-city program that takes kids from north Tulsa to summer camp every year and reaches out to them in their schools. "That really added to my reasons for wanting to go into public service," he said. Public service ., provides Bobb-Semple with an opportttivty to fulfill the purpose that his father instilled in him. "Your purpose is to take whatever gift you have and to maximize that gift to give to other people," Bobb-Semple said." My gift is the ability to speak and to communicate a vision, to take that vision and grow it. "At the end of the day, I'd like to see that gift or potential in others come out. Whatever that is, I'd like to see them at their best." :

(AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac)

An image of American Idol television star David Archuleta titled "Archuleta 4 President" provides the design for the 13th Annual Cornbelly's Corn Maze and Pumpkin Fest at Thanksgiving Point on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2008, in Lehi, Utah. The site opens to the public Friday.

PEOPLE IN THE WA'S/David Blaine, Keanu Reeves & Rock

Blaine's new trick hanging upside down From The Associated Press

NEW YORK -- What's David Blaine up

to? Oh, just hanging around. The magician-daredevil proclaimed, "I'm doin' all right," after starting his latest endurance challenge Monday — 60 hours hanging upside-down, without a net, above Wollran Rink in Manhattan's Central Park. Blaffie — oliffitling nasal from sinus pressure ell smiling while describing the "enor plush of blood" that made it feel like his head was "about to explode." As • a child, he was intrigued when Harry Houdini dibgled from a crane by his ankles while escaping a straitjacket. Said Blaine: "ThOlegs go pin and needle very fast." StrechiW— kind of an upsidedown sit-up—secilA to help. Blaine, 35, is' 44duled to exit from his perch at the climakil a live, two-hour ABC special, "David Blaine: Dive of Depth," on Wednesday.

Reeves Innocent of Assault Claims LOS ANGELES -- Keanu Reeves may have pulled off some daredevil stunts onscreen with a speeding bus, but a judge ruled Monday that his driving didn't warrant assault and battery clairils by a pho-

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tographer. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Elizabeth A. Grimes ruled that paparazzo Alison Silva cannot seek punitive damages against Reeves, whose films include "Speed" and "The Matrix." Silva claimed he was struck by Reeves' Porsche while photographing the actor in March 2007, causing serious injuries. Reeves' attorneys argued in court documents that Silva placed his hand on the actor's car and tripped over his own feet. Grimes ruled Monday that Reeves didn't act maliciously as he moved his car forward to leave a parking space in a residential area about 30 miles south of downtown Los Angeles. "They offered no evidence that the car Mt Reeves was driving touched Mr. Silva," said Reeves' attorney, Mark Williams. "We're confident that should this case go to a jury, they'll find in favor of Mr. Reeves." Silva can still pursue a negligence claim, which Reeves did not contest. Silva's attorney, Joseph Farzam, said the ruling, while a setback, would not deter the case from going to trial in late October. "Mr. Silva is still entitled to fully recover his damages for the injuries he sustained," Farzam said. "It's much easier to prove that someone was being careless," Farzam said, "than to

prove that Mr. Reeves intended to harm Mr. Silva." Farzam said the fall to the pavement fractured Silva's wrist and that he has already undergone one unsuccessful surgery. Another surgery is scheduled, but Farzam said Silva could remain partially disabled even if it is successful. In a signed declaration, Reeves said he stopped the car after Silva fell and brought the photographer water. He recounted Silva as saying, "I am a paparazzo. He is a movie star. It was an accident!" according to court documents.

Run-D.M.C., Earns Nomination CLEVELAND -- Run-D.M.C. could "Walk This Way" into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The 1980s rap act, along with Metallica and the Stooges, are among the nine nominees for next year's hall of fame class, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation announced Monday. The other nominees are guitarist Jeff Beck, singer Wanda Jackson, Little Anthony and the Imperials, War, Bobby Womack, and disco and R&B group Chic. Jackson, a native of Maud, Okla., lives near Oklahoma City.

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What You're Watching & Listening To

Enista encourages young a By Stephani Tobin

From the Associated Press

Staff Writer

The message was clear: Young adults need to register to vote and have an active voice in politics. Maya Enista, the 24-year-old CEO of Mobilize.org whose visit was sponsored by UCOSA and the American Democracy Project, spoke on campus as part of Constitution Week in President Webb's "Lessons in Leadership" class. Enista's goal: To encourage our nation's youth to take interest in the future of our country and to make it eagier for them to get involved politically. ;i( "Young people are revolutionizing," she said to students in Constitution Hall, stressing the importance of youth involvement in politics and civic engagement. "You should really be excited about the work you're doing." Mobilize.org, an all-partisan organization based out of Washington, D.C. and Berkeley, Calif., gears their efforts toward the "millennial generation", people from ages 16 to 30. It was founded in 2002 by students at the University of California, Berkeley, in response to a sharp rise in tuition. Led by David Smith, the founder and executive director of the organization, students went to Sacramento to discuss their plans and suggestions with state legislators. Even though they focus their efforts toward young voters, Enista said there are challenges with maintaining voter retention. news stories on Nov. 3, 2004 [were] "The] that young voters did not turn out," she said. "It was like Black Friday for us." She said, registered voters need to be spoken to on an average of three to five times for them to turn out at the polls. Facebook was mentioned in her speech as a good way of getting people involved with campaigning and voter information. Members can also be a "fan" of presidential candidates and receive campaign e-mails. "It's like a lawn sign," Enista said. "It has peer pressure; it's in your face on the front page [of the website]." She said that Facebook has seen a large

"Lakeview Terrace," Sony Screen Gems. "Burn After Reading," Focus. 2. "My Best Friend's Girl," Lionsgate. 3. "Igor," MGM. 4. "Righteous Kill," Overture Films. 5. (From Media By Numbers LLC)

number in "small dollar donations didate's campaigns. Patti Loughlin, the faculty coordinat the American Democracy Project at U heard Enista give the keynote address their national meeting in Utah last summer. "We thought that [she] would get the stu dents excited and involved," she said, noting that there was a positive student reaction to her speech. "She was approachable, refreshing and real." The American Democracy Project, a national initiative focusing on higher education in democracy, was established in 2003. Meredith Scott, the student coordinator for the American Democracy Project at UCO, called Enista an "amazing role model for our youth." Scott, a senior majoring in community health, has been with the project since she was a freshman. "You can do whatever you put your mind to," she said, "there [are] no limits to your age." Scott had the idea to place large signs that said "Vote" outside Constitution Hall that people could sign before the speech. They will be brought back out in early November to remind students to vote. Enista also addressed other concerns that affect college students, including rising tuition and personal debt. "It's becoming impossible to get an education," she said. She also referred to lending practices on college campuses that leave the average student with $19,000 in debt after they graduate. "They don't tell you about [credit card] fees," she said, noting that companies will hand out t-shirts to entice students into signing up for a credit card. "There needs to be fiscal literacy for our generation." After the positive reaction to Enista and Mobilize.org, Loughlin expressed confidence about UCO students who want to get involved with local politics and civic engagement. "We can see internship opportunities in [Washington], D.C. coming out of this," she said.

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Point/Counterpoint

• •

Is oversight necessary for the proposed bailout? Paulson should have total control Oversight is imperative By Andrew Knittle', Senior Reporter ,\*

As lawmakers continue to debate the particulars of the federal government's unprecedented $700 billion bailout plan for Wall Street, many aspects of the deal have yet to be agreed upon. Some things seem obvious. The CEOs of these irresponsible mega firms should have their pay capped. They shouldn't be allowed to walk away with huge bonuses or rewarded with any kind of financial reward whatsoever, at least not until the heaps of cash they "borrowed" have been paid back with interest. And that interest should be high. These companies deserve a little bit of their own medicine at this point. And the taxpayers should be treated like stakeholders. It's their $700 billion, so they should get a cut. These companies, who preyed on shortsighted Americans with limited financial means, need to be treated in the same way. It was their lending practices that led to this mess in the first place. The list goes on. But one aspect of the plan put forth by Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, among others, shouldn't be changed. Paulson, who will no doubt have to make some concessions to mollify Senate and House members who've already balked at the rescue plan, should be the one and only person in command of the record $700 billion government offering. And while it might seem absolutely insane to give a single man control of nearly a trillion dollars in taxpayer money, you need to bear in mind that we're dealing with the federal government here. The rima reason it would be wise to '-- I is,that, ttrrie111111. 1101016tfy. is aff-4*in a re-aes ten. And if the powers that be aren't careful the current economic problems will pull the nation further into one. With that said, it seems only prudent to give Paulson the final say on how the money

By Chris Albers Photo Editor

is doled m. If the government forms a panel or a co ittee or some of other group of deciders, the ds will be tied up far longer than they wo if one man was left to make the final decisi S. If the government is good at anythingit' Orking in an inefficient manner. Another reason to prevent the $700 billion from being controlled by a group of people rather than by Paulson alone is the waste factor. Every year the government wastes untold amounts of your money. The figure is so high they don't even really know what it is. In fact, government agencies are actually allowed to waste your money, so long as it's less than $10 million or so at a time. Anything higher and an investigation is launched, but who are they kidding? So, how much of that $700 billion would get wasted if you let a bunch of alpha dogs fight over it? We'd never know. But wasting any of it, especially as the average American is having problems paying the bills and keeping up with ever-rising cost of gas and food, is not an option. It's just morally wrong at this juncture. The last thing we need is the feds "misplacing" any of this money. The stuff is hard to come by these days. Top experts available to him will advise Paulson, which is kind of scary, but he'll be advised nonetheless. It's not as though he's just going to come up with the strategy all on his own and cross his fingers. Congress will have to approve the plan. The checks and balances are in place. So, why should more than one person be in charged of the $700 billion — or whatever the final dollar ends up being — , QnMItre,Plan into action?..`.4. cut out gorOment waste and inefficiency right now more than ever. Allowing Paulson to take absolute control will be the first step in changing our economic forecast. Doing things the old way will ensure bad weather for years to come.

In the original three-page bailout proposal, submitted to Congress by the Treasury department, the second line, right under the header titled Section 1, reads;' "This Act may be cited as", followed by a long blank. They didn't give it a name, but I have a good name for the proposed bill, how about Don't Ask Don't Tell Executive Bailout 2008 subtitled with a "your mama" joke. The $700 billion bailout proposal currently being considered by Congress offers little specifics about where the money will go, how the market will recover and what stake taxpayers will have in the bailout, given that it is our money to used. The only things the proposed bill seems clear on is that one man, Treasurer Paulson, will have complete authority of the funds and that oversight of how the funds are used will not be necessary. In fact, it proposes to make any oversight or regulation of the plan's execution impossible. Section 8 of the bill reads, "Decisions by the Secretary [Paulson] pursuant to the authority of this Act are non-reviewable and committed to agency discretion, and may not be reviewed by any court of law or any administrative agency." It's time to get nervous. Paulson is asking for more power than any treasurer in the history of our country, and he doesn't think we should question what he does with it. Let's get real, how does the same administration that brought us such abuses of power as the Patriot Act and Operation Iraqi freedom expect us to accept yet another blatant slap in the face just as they're on their way out. Don't get me wrong. Paulson, former chief executive of the investment banking giant Goldman Sacs, is extremely qualified to do the job, but his former position makes him a Wall Street insider; that's a conflict

"Paulson is asking for more power than any treasurer in the history of our country, and he doesn't think we should question what he does with it." of interest. As a former financial fat-cat he can easily sympathize with the other CEO's concerns that they may have to sell their six-bedroom Manhattan apartments and relocate to their summer and lake houses. $700 billion will surely be enough to alleviate those concerns. Members of Congress call it a "Golden parachute" when CEO's get severance packages exceedingly beyond what they deserve for failing at their job. And the American people are being asked for the gold plating. The worst part of the bill is the oversight issue. This government was strongly founded on the idea of checks and balances. Safeguards help keep corruption at bay and this bill leaves plenty of opportunities for corrupt practices. Also, the proposed absence of oversight in the bill runs parallel with one of the main reasons the problem exists in the first place: not enough regulation, not enough oversight and no checks and balances on Wall Street. I guess Paulson just feels more comfortable working with unfettered authority over our money and without accountability, that insider Wall Street fat-cat.

The Vista Comm. Building, Rm. 107 100 N. University Dr. • Edmond, OK 73034-5209 405-974-5549 • editorial@thevistaonline.com The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and only on Thursdays during the summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

MANAGEMENT Jana Davis, Co-Editor Nelson Solomon, Co-Editor Carrie Cronk, Managing Editor Chris Albers, Photo Editor

EDITORIAL Chase Dearinger, Copy Editor Kaylea Brooks, Sports Editor Andrew Knittle, Senior Reporter Abha Phoboo, Senior Reporter Laura Hoffert, Sailor Reporter Greg Newby, StailVtiter Ryan Croft, StalWrikaLauren Lubbers, StopVritaAlex Gerszewslci, St4WriteStephani Tobin, StaffWriter Rebecca Shampay, Correspondent Melissa Dixon, Conespondent

EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of. Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents PHOTOGRAPHY or UCO. Chanel Henry, Photographer LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the DESIGN Josh Davis editor. Letters should address issues Kayleigh Adamek and ideas, not personalities. Letters Andrew Knittle must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must CARTOONIST include the author's printed name, Jared Aylor title, major, classification and phone AD SALES number. Letters are subject to editStacy McIntire ing for libel, clarity and space, or to Tim Cronk eliminate statements of questionable CIRCULATION taste. The Vista reserves the right not Chris Albers to publish submitted letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications

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SAVE ME FROM HER, DEMOCRATIC PARTY! Cartoon by Jared Aylor

Free Tai Chi Workshop Today As the Passport UCO/Healthy Campus Initiative presentation series continues, martial artist David Vidato will offer a free Tai Chi workshop 3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. today in the Wellness Center's group fitness room. Wear comfortable clothes and sturdy shoes, and prepare to get up and move.

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Tresa Berlemann

ADVISER Kelly S. Wray

CAMPUS QUOTES: "If you could ask the UCO campus any question for 'Campus Quotes,' what would it be?" Compiled and photographed by Chanel Henry "How can UCO make you feel more connected on campus?"

"Are you saved?"

"Why don't people come to UCO football games?"

"Why is everyone worried about the parking situation on campus?"

Kandyce Rogers

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The Vista P.tae 5_

Best Bite in Town? Maybe By Daviyion Johnson and Ryan Kolb

Restaurant Reviewers

Hobby's Hoagies, located near the corner f. Edmond Road (2nd street for you nondmond folks) and Santa Fe in the Oakbrook hopping Center near Homeland was this eek's crème de la crème and a fine choice t that. With lots of restaurants located in omplexes, it's easy to think of them as a ole-in-the-wall or questionable but if our review of Hobby's Hoagies is not enough to change your mind about that myth we don't know what will. First, we want to say we aren't big fans of restaurants that serve their food a la carte (I mean seriously, we're in college). The very idea of paying for just a sandwich without some tasty chips or greasy fries just sounds like a nightmare, doesn't it? Fortunately, at Hobby's you get what you pay for. Their Hoagies, Sandwiches, and Subs range from $4.19 for a 7 inch veggie to $7.99 for a 12 inch Hobby's Steak Supreme, which is basically a Philly Cheese Steak on steroids. The other items they served will be discussed a bit later. Now granted these prices don't include a side or drink, but you can purchase those for a reasonable price at .99 cents for a bag of chips, $1.50 for a medium drink, or both for $2.29, which isn't too shabby. They also mentioned something about a UCO student discount. Now that we got all the boring numbers out the way, we're sure you want to know what we digested for dinner. Daviyion had the foot-long classic Philly Cheese Steak with all the fixins', which made it massive but in a good way. The Philly steak was delicious through every warm and toasty bite and was quite filling, so not having any chips wasn't a big deal. Ryan had 12 inches of * homemade meatball sub goodness, which came with everything you need on a sandwich ... cheese (Provolone and Parmesan to be exact). Although at first he didn't think it would fill him up, by the last bite he was as stuffed as a teddy bear, you know the gigantic ones you win for your girlfriend at the fair, stuffed. The meatballs were huge and gushing out of their doughy confines and were drapecljn a blanket of marinara sauce. So, aside from the obviously satisfying meals we had, this place just doesn't know

11111111111111

movie is worth seeing

HOBBY'S HOAGIES AU%

Photo provided By Greg Newby

Staff Writer by Vista photographer Chanel Henry

When you think of comedy, Will Ferrell, Ben Stiller or any one of the other actors in the too-many-to-list college/ drinking/ Hobby's Hoagies is on the corner of Edmond road-trip movies that have defined Road (2nd Street) and Santa Fe in the Oakbrook American cinema as of late, come to mind. Shopping Center. But, put a witty script in the capable hands of one of "The Office" originals and you get an entirely different view of the world of comedy. "The Philly steak was In a welcome departure from the delicious through every obscene, David Koepp's "Ghost Town" warm and toasty bite and also manages to breathe some life into the Hollywood doldrums that are the weeks was quite filling..." between summer and the holidays. Bertram Pincus (Ricky Gervais) is a Daviyion Johnson and Ryan Kolb New York City dentist who has a people problem. The problem is that he cannot when to stop with all the great options. stand people. Living in one of the most They also make Homemade New York densely populated areas in the world; one style pizza, soups and salads, and even a would think he'd rather be somewhere Bucket of Spaghetti that feeds four. These else. menu items range from $4.50 for Stromboli Then, he suddenly dies during a fairly to $17.99 for the 18" New Yorker Supreme common procedure and is brought back to life again, seven minutes later. Having Pizza (that's an extra large pizza). Ryan gives Hobby's a fresh 4.2 out of 5 been heavily sedated, Pincus leav6s the stars for the great food but wonders if he hospital after the procedure with no could get something just as filling from inkling or suspicion of the events that Subway for $2 less. , Daviyion says with their fair prices and excellent food cruality you should put Hobby's Hoagies on this weekend's to do list right after laundry, but before homework.

transpired on the operating ro until he sees the ghosts. On the way home, he meets (Greg Kinnear), whose death we see at beginning of the movie. Of course, sin Pincus is the only living person that c see the non-living, they are quickly drawn to him. His social deficiencies make him a perfect reluctant hero. They all need help from him because they cannot pass on to the next life until they take care of their "unfinished business" from this life. Frank seems to be the ringleader of these ghosts, and when you combine that with his persistence, Pincus 'decides to help him so he'll call the others off. Plus, Frank's story is interesting: His widow is about to marry another scumbag who won't pay attention to her and he needs to keep that from happening. It's pretty obvious that Pincus is going to fall in love with her during this intervention process, but the film does a good job of giving you doubts and making it not so obvious. After a rough opening gig at the Primetime Emmys, some might say that Gervis just isn't funny. I'd say, in regards to Sunday night, he wasn't, but don't let that chase you away from this movie. He was one of the original cast of "The Office" in England long before the American version was born. He has a good sense of humor and does a good job of selling his character. Pincus is a dislikeable guy in the film, but the audience still feels for him. The film gives us some good insight into his personal life that the people of the movie don't get to see. Despite his aloofness, the character actually does have a good sense of humor and is very smart. He's just one of those guys that won't let people get close and he has to spend the length of the movie figuring out how. Overall, "Ghost Town" is surprisingly refreshing. Death and ghosts are not normally something you'd associate with humor, and there are some very serious parts, but there really is something for everyone. Go see it in the theater, and take a date.

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Events and Releases 9/25 to 10/1 By Greg Newby

Staff Writer

Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, Zoo Amahitheatre, 9/26 Ben Kw el Icy Cody and the Bishops, South .Lawn at 11C0's Hamilton Field House, 9'27 - I0 min., free with UCO ID or football ticket stub, $10 at door.

The Mitch Bell Quartet, traditional & contempora6 , jazz, UCO Jazz Lab, 9/25 - 8 p.m., $7. Fred Eaglesmith, Blue Door, 9/25 - 8 p.m. Mother Truckers, Red Dirt Rangers & more; Rose Bowel, 9/ - S p.m. Neycl Dinova & Colour Revolt, The Marquee, 9/25 -- 8 p.m. 1WrestledABearOnce, King of Clubs, 9/26 - 6 p.m. Neko Case with Giant Sand, Diamond Ballroom, 9/26 - 7:30 p.m. Jazz Trombonist David Gibson, special show, UCO Jazz Lab, 9/26 - 7 $10. Joel Melton, Blue Door, 9/26 - 9 p.m. The Micheal Summers Band, jazz & variety, UCO Jazz Lab, 9/27 - 8 p.m., $ The Dirty Devil Race to Hell Tour, The Conservatory, 9/27 - 7:30 p.m. Metal Massacre, Rose Bowel, 9/27 - 8 p.m. Sara Hickman, Blue Door, 9/27 - 9 p.m. 23rd Street Jazz, MAC Amphitheater at Mitch Park, 9/28 - 6:30 p.m., free admission. Tess Remy-Schumacher & Friends, chamber music concert, UCO Jazz Lab, 9/29 - 7:30 p.111 August Bums, Red, Bricktown Live, 9/30 - 7 p.m, Suite Unraveling, UCO Jazz Lab, 9/30 - 8 p.m., $7. Rev. Peyton. Blue Door, 9/30 - 8 p.m. Sunset Rubdown, °polls Production, 9/30 - 930 p.m. Testament, Diamond Ballroom, 10/1 - 6:30 p.m. Dance Club MaL,sacre, The Pinkeye, 10/1 - 6:30 p.m. Chris Tapper, Blue Door, 10/1 - 8 p.m.

"Doubt;" UCO Dept. of Theater, Dance and Media Arts; Pegasus Theater, UCO Liberal Arts Building; 9/25-9/27 & 10/3-10/4 - 7:30 p.m.; 9/28 & 10/5 - 2 p.ra., adults $14, seniors $10, UCO Students $4. "Born Yesterday," Oklahoma City Theatre Company, Civic Center, Oklahoma City, ongoing, ends 10/5.

by Vista photographer Chanel Henry

The Sleepless Continuum played at this years first Broncho Jam at the UCO Jazz Lab Wed. Sept. 23.

.0Hahoma Wildlife Expo, Lazy E Arena, Guthrie, 9/26. 8-Ball Pool Tournament, The Wolftrap, Thurs and Sat nights, ongoing.

arao Darirryllob's ideout, Tues• ay and The )\folftrap, 'Tuesday nights. Ceegee's, Thursday rights

By AP Writer

,

"Four Women Artists," Donna Nigh Gallery, 4 th floor Nigh University Center, UCO. ongoing, ends 1014, free admission. "Roman Art from The Louvre," Oklahoma City Museum of Art, ongoing., ends 10/12, $12 adults, $10 students and seniors. "Life on the Butterfly Farm.," Donna Nigh Gallery, 4 th floor Nigh University Center, UCO, 9118-10/30 "Savior or Spoiler: Teddy Roosevelt as a third-party candidate in 191 2,"

Local OKC musician entertains audiences By Rebecca Shampay

Staff Writer

With a raw, raspy voice and guitar in hand, Ali Harter can entertain a crowd wherever she goes. If the real skill lies in a musicians live performance, Harter is about as talented as they come. As a musician and songwriter residing in Oklahoma City, she captivates audiences locally as well as globally. Harter has played all over the United States and she has also played many gigs in Europe, including France and Belgium. "I play anywhere that takes me," Harter said. "Coffee shops, concert venues, bars, theatres, stadiums, outdoor amphitheaters ... if they want me, I'll play. I've played everywhere and Ill do it until the day I die." On stage her smile seems devious like she may be hiding something, but listening to her songs; she appears to give all the secrets of her life away. Her folksy style seems to lend itself well to her personality and stage presence. As she strums the guitar and sings on her latest album, Worry the Bone, her lyrics seem soft and sweet, unfolding the truths of life and the beauty of love-sick fools. Then she surprises you with songs like Poor Kate and Everyone Must Lose, where her blunt and somewhat unsympathetic words are easy to relate to, but cause you to sit there and self-reflect at the same time. Her unrefined lyrics resonate in your

McCartney in Bethlehem: I'm carrying peace message

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BETHLEHEM, West Bank 6. Always remember to introduce your, (AP) - Paul McCartney said Wednesday he's carrying significant other as your girlfriend or spouse. a message of peace for Israel and the Palestinians, 5. Stop to open the door for every female, not rejecting criticism of his the pretty ones. just planned concert in Tel Aviv. McCartney toured 4. A can of starch and an iron is your friend, the West Bank town of not your enemy. Bethlehem, visiting the Church of the Nativity, 3. STUDENT PICK: Elizabeth. Wilson, FRbuilt over the traditional ' Listen with interest; be able to interact act birthplace of Jesus. The 66-year-old former and hold a conversation. Beatle ducked into the fourth-century church 2. Make sure to keep at least one tailored through its low, narrow suit in your closet. Keep in mind possible job entrance, taking pictures interviews, AATedding and funerals; with a small camera. He lit two long, tapered white 1.1-lygene is the most important thing, no candles in different parts of the church, saying each time matter what your personal style. The simple basics are essential to life and that they were "for peace." After posing for pictures you can get very far just covering the basics. with fans outside the fortresslike church, McCartney was asked to respond to criticism from some Palestinians that EARC Thrift Store has I • his visit to Israel supports its occupation of the West Bank. He said his visit to make your Wednesday to the West Bank showed he was not playing favorites. "I'm here to highlight the situation and to say that what we need is peace in this region, a two-state solution," he said, referring to Israel and a Palestinian state. Vintage & Name-Brand Fashions "Igetcriticized everywhere for Her & Hint I go, but I don't listen to them," McCartney said. "I'm bringing a message of peace, and I think that's what the region needs." McCartney arrived Game Systemms, DVDs/CDs d Soft-ware TVs, Electronics •Appliances Tuesday night ahead of his concert Thursday in Tel Aviv's largest park. Be Sure to Visit Us for Four decades ago the Student Discounts Israeli government banned a planned concert by the & Half-Price Saturdays! THRIFT STORE Beatles, ruling that the rock 92 E. 15th St. & 100 E. 3rd St., Edmond group's performance could (405) 348-6502 corrupt the morals of Israel's youth. Open Mon. thru 7hun, 9-5 & Fri. - Sat., 9-7.

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head, reminding you of the good and bad we all deal with in relationships and life. Harter has performed for the past 12 years, in bands and as a solo artist. She has shared the stage with such artists as Meg and Dia, Magnolia Electric Co., Steel Train and Dierks Bentley. Some of her influences include Elliott Smith, Ben. Harper, Aretha Franklin, Foo Fighters, Joe Cocker and Ray Charles, according to her Web site. Voted Best Folk-Artist in 2007, Harter was the winner of an Oklahoma Gazette Woody Award. If you're looking for something to do this Thursday, Harter is giving a free concert at REDHouse local design firm. Tickets are available at www.theheliumproject.com

EARC


"A Thousand Years of Go od Prayers" And the good things we should know about it it explores human relationships against the background of a changing China and Senior Reporter its strained and suppressed history. China has been in the limelight for Li writes in minimalist prose and a while and the recent Olympics in wastes no time being artsy for art's Beijing brought it out of the shadows. sake. She tells the story like it is, like The UCO Passport to China program she sees it, using language that is gentle brought interest to UCO as well. and ironic. With all this attention, the interest in The title short story "A Thousand Chinese literature and Chinese authors Years of Good Prayers" is about Mr. writing in English has increased. Shi, who comes to visit his daughter in Among the new crop of authors is America. His daughter is portrayed as Yiyun Li, selected as Granta's Best distant and withdrawn until we see her Young American Novelist and recipient talk on the phone. of the Frank O'Connor International The dialogue that follows between Short Story Award, as well as a host of father and daughter reveals a phenomenon that many international other literary prizes. In an interview with the Guardian, Li authors today would relate to. "If you said, "I'm not going to satisfy people's grew up in a language that you never curiosity about exotic China. If I write used to express your feelings, it would a story, I write a story. I have to make be easier to take up another language sure it's a good story and that I don't and talk more in the new language. It take any shortcuts." makes you a new person." "A Thousand Years of Good Prayers" Li herself is more comfortable doesn't take shortcuts or give a expressing herself in English than in stereotypical image of China. Instead, Chinese and is hesitant about being By Abha Eli Phoboo

performing a Pulitzer Prize play, "Doubt"

translated into her mother tongue. The new found freedom she has found in English is evident in all of the short stories in the collection, where her clichés and idioms translate in an odd and insightful way. Another interesting story in the collection is "Immortality," which is about a boy with the face of a dictator. Li subtly narrates the story in the simplest style but the complications that make the plot are absurd and astounding. Her protagonists are usually dealing with alienation and the incapability to communicate clearly. Li understands the intricacies ofhuman relationships and circumstances. If you haven't read the book already, you should put it on your list. "The Thousand Years of Good Prayers" has also been made into a movie that won the Golden Shell Best Film Award in the San Sebastian Film Festival last year.

By Melissa Dixon Newspaper Participant

What a swing may bring Acacia and Alpha Xi Delta swung for 36 hours Wednesday, Sept. 24 for the Oklahoma Hemophilia Foundation on Broncho Lake.

A play of thrills, uncertainty and suspicion will take stage in Pegasus Theater. UCO's Theatre Department is performing the 2005 Pulitzer Price play, "Doubt" beginning this evening. "Doubt" is a Tony Award winner written by John Shanley. It is the first time to be performed in the state. "I thought it would be a good play and provide excellent opportunities and challenges for the actors," Dr. Donald Bristow said. Plays are usually performed in Mitchell Hall but due to renovations the play has been moved to Pegasus Theater which seats 200, smaller than Mitchell Hall. The play takes place in 1964 in a Bronx Catholic School, where Sister Aloysius, the school principal, played by Kelsey Patterson, accuses a young priest, Father Flynn, played by Robert Wright, of sexually abusing a male student, Donald Mueller. Aloysius has no evidence or witness to her accusations against the priest but she is convinced Flynn did abuse the student. Ms. Mullins, played by Terjuna Powers, and Sister James, performed by Stefanie Colle, add their input and opinions to the situation. During the play the Father and Sister lead the audience through thrills and plant uncertainty into their minds. The play is written so that it leave the audience with no last words and still in mystery of the truth. "It's a little mystery," Dr. Bristow said. Shanley took a year to write the play and began writing it as the U.S. was invading Iraq. He takes us back to the 60's but still wants to address issues that can be found in current headlines. Performances are September 25- 27, October 3-4 at 7:30 pm and September 28 and October 5 at 2 pm. Dr. Bristow advises one wishing to see the play to purchase tickets early. Tickets are $14 for adults, $10 for senior citizens and faculty and students are $4.

by Vista photographer Chanel Henry

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Continued from page 1 Overocker said the majority of the wetness found and replaced was purely aesthetical and was not a health risk to students. One of the problem areas LeClair showed The Vista was the basement, specifically the area in which students wash and dry their clothes. "We did not go down into the basement," Overocker said. "We have drawn air quality samples from that area in the past ... the concern would be anything that might come up into the lobby." He said the main reason samples were not taken from the basement is LeClair did not initially voice concern about it. Both Overocker and LeClair said they will continue to work together to ensure that the housing department efficiently addresses students' questions and complaints about Murdaugh Hall. "[LeClair] is going to give me a list of those concerns so ... we can follow up on them," Overocker said. "We ... are trying to make sure he knows we are here to help him."

Congress Continued from page 1 At the same time, Democrats were asking the Bush administration to dramatically cut the size of the rescue and then come back to Congress later if they need more. Under that plan, which was still emerging, Congress would approve a fraction of what Bush is asking for — perhaps $150 billion or $200 billion — to allow the government to begin rescuing tottering financial companies. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has privately suggested the idea to Paulson, according to officials who spoke on condition of anonymity because the negotiations are private. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., pressed Paulson on the idea Tuesday and was told it would be a "grave mistake." The heart of the unprecedented plan, dramatically unveiled less than a week ago, involves the government buying up sour assets of tottering financial firms to keep them from going under and to stave off a potentially severe recession and the accompanying lost jobs and further home foreclosures. Away from Washington, debate over the bailout became embroiled in presidential politics as Republican presidential nominee John McCain said he was returning to the capital and was asking Democratic rival Barad( Obama to agree to delay their first debate, scheduled for Friday, to deal with the meltdown. Obama said the debate should go ahead. McCain said the Bush administration's plan seemed headed for defeat and a bipartisan solution was urgently needed. "I do not believe that the plan on the table will pass as it currently stands, and we are running out of time," he said. Obama said the two campaigns' staffs were working on a statement the candidates might make, spelling out major points they believe the rescue legislation must include.

Depression

Continue from page 1

has proposed, but that it should be some form of bipartisan action to reform Wall Street. Laura Bush told CNN that she thought Palin had "a lot of really good common sense" and commended her executive experience. Asked if she thought Palin had sufficient foreign policy experience, the first lady said: "Of course she doesn't have that. You know, that's not been her role, but I think she is a very quick study, and fortunately John McCain does have that sort of experience." Palin got a glimpse of ground zero for the Sept. 11 terror attacks in New York as her motorcade made its way downtown to a private meeting with. Iraqi President Jalal Talabani. She did not respond to a reporter's question about what she thought when she passed by the 16-acre site. Her motorcade was stuck in traffic for a few minutes along its western border, where passers-by can see cranes jutting into the sky from the base of the deep pit that once was the World Trade Center basement. Crews are building a memorial to the attacks and a 1,776-foot-tall building to replace the destroyed twin towers. Palin met with Talabani and then with Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari before preparing to join McCain for an evening session with Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh. Earlier Wednesday, Palin and McCain met jointly with Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili and Ukrainian President Viktor Yuschenko. The McCain campaign set up the sessions with the leaders, who were among those in town for the United Nations General Assembly.

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Crossword Puzzle Across 1. Keg stopper 5. Benefit 9. Craze 14. Biology lab supply 15. Lying, maybe 16. Boot 17. Aquatic plant 18. Sort 19. Automaton 20. Spouse's sisters , data, briefly 23. Flid,,,Yht 24. ReIexive of "it" 28. Strengthen 31. BBs, e.g. 33. Amigo 34. Something acquired 36. Morgue, for one 37. Yiddish for synagogue 38. Elmer, to Bugs 39. Curse 40. Colorful ornamental carp 41. Teen years 45. Dusk, to Donne 46. Poker action 47. Values 48. Channel 50. Drop 51. Inhumane treatment 57. Breathing problem 60. Whip mark 61. Western blue flag, e.g. 62. Native plant of the Mediterranean region

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imeout: Does mentality affect the game? Yes, indeed it does. By Kaylea Brooks

Sports Editor

Our football team started out the year with a dose game against Pittsburgh State, a team known for its amazing program. But since powerhouse West Texas A&M thrashed the Bronchos, the Bronchos seem to be having a hard time pulling out of the losing rut. In their defense, it takes time to build a team, from a couple of games to several years. Coach Holland's new plans for offense

will definitely take some getting used to. The spread offense wasn't what most of these players were recruited for, but considering, last Saturdays game showed that the offense can put up a fight. It was only in the first half, but the Bronchos held their own with an undefeated team 17-21. Also, UCO's location is another major factor. It seems there is a lack of spirit, and with two Big 12 teams within an hour of Edmond, many students skip out on the UCO game to see the OU and OSU games. OU can be pretty

hard to compete with when they are having home games on the same night as UCO and it is likely that the lack of a crowd in the stadium affects the mentality of the players. Shoot, I know that it would for me. Nonetheless, The Vista was criticized for content in recent issues, such as running the starting time for the opening OU game and for using overly harsh language when describing UCO football games. I'm going to be honest that it is hard to put a loss nicely, and if we are serious with

ourselves, a loss of 30 plus points is pretty bad. So, in my defense of the paper and journalism, please remember that we are news writers. Our job is to tell the truth, however harsh it may be. We're not going to fluff up a story to make you feel better. Trust me, I want our team to win just as much as the next student, but The Vista is not a booster club. In fact, you may be surprised to know that we are not paid by UCO. Our salaries are funded by Vista ad sales. Hence, we write to report news,

which does not necessarily need to be slanted in a certain way to make the school or football team look good. We won't bash them, but we aren't going to sugarcoat things, either. Concerning football, Coach Holland is a good coach that inspires the team. If anyone can lift his or her spirits, he would be the one to do it. I believe he can change the direction of the football program. It will be a long and hard road for the Bronchos, but as Holland has said himself, hard is the road to victory.

UCO opens north play It's the start of a new season for Central Oklahoma this week as the Bronchos host Texas A&M-Commerce Saturday night in the Lone Star Conference North Division opener for both teams. Kickoff is at 6 p.m. in 10,000seat Wantland Stadium. The Bronchos are 0-4 on the year and 0-3 in the overall league standings, while the Lions are 2-2 and 2-1. UCO and A&M-C shared the LSC North title with three other teams last year. The Lions were picked first and the Bronchos fourth in this year's preseason LSC North poll. The Bronchos have played what is undoubtedly the toughest schedule in NCAA Division II so far this season. UCO's first four opponents are a combined 15-1 and three are ranked in the top 15 — No. 6 West Texas A&M (4-0), No. 7 Pittsburg State (4-0), No. 16 Tarleton State (4-0) — with Texas A&M-Kingsville (3-1) a long-time powerhouse that owns 26 LSC championships. The 13-team Lone Star Conference is divided into two divisions, with UCO and A&M-C both in the six-team North Division. Divisional champions are decided by results of division games only, while the overall league champion is decided by counting division games plus crossover games. UCO has a 145-72-5 record in its forty-fourth year at Wantland Stadium, which has undergone a dramatic face-lift the past few years and now rates as one of the finest stadiums in Division II. The Bronchos have lost four straight home games. UCO battled Tarleton State on even terms for the first two quarters, but the Texans seized the momentum and a 28-17 lead with a 93-yard kickoff return on the final play of the half en route to a 42-17 win over the Bronchos. A&M-C racked up 545 yards total offense as Terry Mayo passed for 360 yards and five touchdowns — four to Willie Thornton — in a 38-14 rout of Eastern New Mexico. The Bronchos go to Bolivar, Mo. for their final non-conference game against Southwest Baptist. Scott Conley is 21-24 in his fifth year with the Lions. He was an assistant coach at seven different Division I schools and was also head coach at Trinity Valley Community College before taking over at the A&M-C helm. The Lions have a 14-10 lead in a series that started in 1972 with a 54-0 A&M-C rout in the first round of the NAIA playoffs. UCO has won four of the last five meetings, including the last two. The Bronchos own a 6-4 series lead at home, having won the last five games in Wantland Stadium. UCO survived a 21-20 overtime thriller in Commerce, Texas when. Alex Weaver made a tie-breaking extra point. A&M-C scored first in the extra session and missed the PAT, with a 13-yard touchdown run by Ben Birmingham and Weaver's kick giving the Bronchos the win.

LET THEM F that TIME

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The Vista Sept. 25, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Sept. 25, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.