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www.thevistaonline.corn

T Sept. 16, 2008 The Student Voice

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the [Ink crsit\ or Central Oklahoma Since 1903

History professor discusses rising influence of China The Passport UCO program and Friends of the Library continued its lecture series Sept. 10 with a speech titled: China Rising: Friend or Foe, presented by Xiao-Bing Li, professor in the Department of History and Geography and Neo D. Zhang. Li discussed the current problems with the United States' trade deficit, what people in the U.S. can expect to see from China in the near future and also China's defense budget. -Full story page 5

Campus honors 9-11 victims with flags Ancient Chinese secret revealed

Lyndsay Holder, coordinator for UCO's Service Learning Center, helped place in the ground 4,000 flags near Broncho lake Thursday for the 7th anniversary of the September 11 attacks in 2001.

Last Thursday, Dr. Larry Altshuler, from the Balanced Healing Medical Center spoke about the advantages of traditional Chinese medicine such as acupuncture, herbs that are used to treat different symptoms and even gave students something to practice if they get bored in class. Page 3

akistani students ary of U.S. raids The global media is not quite ure how to label the recent U.S. it strikes and ground raids in akistan. Last week, five civilians and even militants were reportedly 'lied in northwest Pakistan by .S. missiles. Page 3

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

E. coli breakout sickens 116 people By Laura Hoffert Staff Writer

Features Who ddy Broncho? UCO's very own mascot, Buddy Broncho has brought much spirit and fun to sporting events such as football and basketball here on campus. He also makes appearances around campus for events such as homecoming and will even attend nationals with the cheerleading squad this year. Page 5

On Aug. 29 Oklahoma health officials announced a rare form of E. coli had sickened 116 people and killed one other in the Northeastern region of the state. Chad Ingle, 26, died on Aug. 24 after eating at the Country Cottage restaurant in Locust Grove. The newlywed was from Pryor, Oklahoma and his death has been linked to the restaurant, which is currently closed and under investigation for the outbreak. Of the people who ate at the Country Cottage between Aug. 15 and Aug. 23, 291 have become ill. The restaurant, located 50 miles east of

Tulsa, was reviewed online and received high marks for its buffet and atmosphere, one woman wrote, "It is a 1.5 hour drive for us to get to the restaurant, but we enjoy the atmosphere and food so much that we are willing to plan our day around a visit to Country Cottage." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Ga. helped Oklahoma officials verify the bacteria subtype strain, however the source of the outbreak is still unidentified. The official name for the specific bacteria is Escherichia coli 0111:H8, however the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) calls it E. coli 0111. Symptoms include bloody diarrhea, vomiting and

abdominal cramping, but fevers are not typically present. Most symptoms begin three to four days after ingesting the bacteria and can last up to 10 days with medical treatment. Without treatment, prolonged sickness can lead to kidney failure, which is potentially fatal. The best way to prevent an infection of enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) strains of E. coli is to follow four steps laid out by the OSDH. First, always thoroughly wash your hands before preparing or eating food, after changing diapers and after using the bathroom. Secondly, do not prepare food for other people if you are ill or have diarrhea. see E. coli, page 5

Traffic lights adding to the stress of students By Stephani Tobin Staff Writer

Sitting volleyball team wins silver The U.S. Women's Sitting Volleyball team faced China after upsetting the Netherlands in five close, hard fought sets, but gave up the gold on Saturday evening. -PAGE 8

With all the stresses heaped upon UCO students, the City of Edmond adds another: long traffic lights. Several students across campus have recently shown their dislike for Edmond traffic lights, and many agree that the lights down Broadway as well as the light at 2nd Street and Garland Godfrey are some of the longest. "I have to leave work earlier to get to class," said Stephen Roberts, senior public relations major. "I don't get as much time to work after class because it takes so long to get back [to work]." Roberts said that he goes through neighborhoods to avoid the long wait at lights, and that Boulevard and 2nd Street is one of the worst. According to an article published in The Oklahoman on Aug. 28, more than 75,000 cars travel through the intersection of 33rd Street and Broadway. Eastbound traffic through this intersection has a 25-second green light during morning rush hour,

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Edmond autos stop for a red light Sept. 2 at Broadway and Second street.

Watch it! "In order to change the world, you have to pet your head together firsf."

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Page 2

FEATURE Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008

N les Want to contribute .16:The Vista? Did you know The Vista was originally a literary journal devoted to showcasing UCO's creative minds? We've decided we'd like to get back to that. We're looking for poems and short stories from UCO students to publish in upcoming issues of The Vista Weekend. Due to space limitations, we can only print one per issue, and submissions must be shorter than 500 words in length. Send them by e-mail to vistastudentfiction@ yahoo.com and look for your work in the next issue!

Today's Scheduled Constitution Week events 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.: Maya Enista at Lessons in Leadership, Constitution Hall

The Vista

Schedule of Events

Odds & Ends/

UCO Jazz Lab & more Guitarist Edgar Cruz: Variety, 8 p.m. to 10:30

A.J. & Why Not: Blues & Soul, 8 p.m. to 10:30

p.m., UCO Jazz Lab, $7 adults, $5 children 12 and younger. Wednesday, September 17

p.m., UCO Jazz Lab, $7 adults, $5 children 12 and younger. Saturday, September 20

The Silent Epidemic: STIs/STDs: 9:00 p.m. to

The Mitch Bell Ensemble:

10:00 p.m., Central Plaza Wednesday, September 17 Volleyball: Volleyball vs. Midwestern State

University. Wichita Falls, Texas. 7 p.m., Thursday, September 18

Traditional & Contemporary Jazz, 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., UCO Jazz Lab$7 adults, $5 children 12 and younger. Thursday, September 25 David Gibson, Jazz Trombonist: In Concert with the Jazz Company: Traditional &

Weight Watchers at Work: 12:30 p.m. to 1:30

p.m., Wellness Center, Room 104 Thursday, September 18

Contemporary Jazz, UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Friday, September 26

Miss Brown To You: Traditional Jazz, 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., UCO Jazz Lab, $7 adults, $5 children 12 and younger. Friday, September 19

The Michael Summers Band: Jazz & Variety.

UCO Jazz Lab, 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Saturday, September 27

10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: ."Be Heard" Graffiti Wall, Broncho Lake

Language Society's Battle of Brains scheduled The UCO Language Society will host its second annual Battle of the Brains Oct. 25, on the UCO campus. For teams without previous academic meet experience, teams will battle to see who knows the most in a Jeopardy-style tournament. Question topics will include popular culture, sports, music, politics and literature. Check-in begins at 10:30 a.m. Oct. 25 in the Liberal Arts lobby. Initial rounds commence at 11 a.m. Prizes will be awarded to the top three teams, and the first place team will have its name engraved on a perpetual plaque that hangs in the English Department. Registration deadline is Oct. 15, with a limit of 16 teams. Registration forms are available in the English Department, Room 101A, Liberal Arts. A $20 non-refundable, cash-only fee is required at the time of registration. For more information, contact Language Society president Kodi Weatherholtz at kweatherholtz@ucok.edu or Language Society adviser Amy Carrell, Ph.D., at acarrellPucok.edu .

Modern Languages show applica0ons due Oct. 22 Participant applications for UCO's annual Modern Languages Talent Show are due Oct. 22. The show will be from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Oct. 29 at the UCO Jazz Lab. Admission is free, and Hideaway pizza and drinks will be available for purchase. For more information, call the Modern Languages Office at 974-5647.

Book fair lasts through Friday The Association of Childhood Education International (ACEI) is sponsoring a book fair through Friday on the first floor of the Education building. ACEI will offer prizes during the fair, and proceeds will benefit inner-city schools.

Career fair on tap Sept. 24 The 2008 Fall Career and Internship Fair will be from noon to 4 p.m. Sept. 24, in the Nigh University Center Ballrooms. Many local and national organizations will be at the event to discuss full-time employment, internship and graduate school opportunities. Professional attire is required for entry. The event is free and open to the public. Career Services is seeking volunteers for the event. Any student, class, organization, faculty or staff member who is interested in volunteering an hour of their time Sept. 23 or Sept. 24 is encouraged to contact Career Services at 974-3346 or complete a copy of the volunteer form found at http:/ / www.careers.ucok.edu . Return the form to Career Services (Box 126) or e-mail it to careers@ucok.edu . For more information about the 2008 Fall Career and Internship Fair or UCO Career Services, visit http: / / www. careers.ucok.edu or call 974-3346.

From the Associated Press

Pilfered primate freed EAST MACHIAS, Maine — An 8-foot-tall mechanical gorilla is back home at an eastern Maine flea marketstyle store two weeks after it was stolen and later dumped in a cornfield in Vermont. A pickup truck carrying the somewhat battered and torn gorilla arrived Saturday afternoon at Sandy's Sales a day after being picked up at a Vermont police barracks. Owners Sandy and Lowell Miller were delighted to see the gorilla dubbed "Seemore," which was stolen from outside their store over Labor Day weekend. But they agreed the gorilla needs some tender loving care for its injuries: a head severed from its body, holes and rips in its face, and a broken arm. "After people see her battle wounds, we are going to have her have a face lift," Sandy Miller said. "A new rubber face." After the gorilla was stolen from its longtime location outside the store, the owner of the factory where the gorilla was created produced a YouTube video offering a $500 reward for its return.

Umbrella case ruled frivolity in court

Passport UCO examines China's one-child policy The Passport UCO/Healthy Campus Initiative series continues at 3:30 p.m. Thursday in the Wellness Center room 127. This_ week features a panel of parents who have adopted children from China; in one case, a baby girl six years ago and a special, needs boy two years ago. They , will discuss China's one-child policy and the history of the China adoption program and how they are raising Their children here in the U.S. while maintaining a cultural connection with the, children's birth country.

News of the strange

Election Dates to Know from the Oklahoma State Election Board

Election Day: Tues, Nov. 4 Voter Registration To submit Voter Registration (Must go to County Election Board) Deadline: 5 p.m., Fri., Oct. 10

Absentee Voting Deadline to submit Application for Absentee Ballot: 5 p.m., Wed., Oct. 29 Deadline to submit Absentee Ballot: 7 p.m., Tues., Nov. 4 To vote in person early (Must Be at County Election Board Office) -Fri., Oct. 31, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. -Sat., Nov. 1, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. -Mon., Nov. 3, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

TODAY AT THE OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR -Two Dollar Tuesday: $2 gate admission for everyone! -Armed Forces' Day: Military Personnel & Spouses (with valid ID) to get in FREE! -Disney's "High School Musical: The Ice Tour" - 7:30 p.m. (Arena) -The Elvis Extravaganza - 7:30 p.m. (Toyota Stage)

NEW YORK -- It's a rainy day for the Manhattan restaurateur who sued a supermodel claiming she intentionally damaged his designer umbrella, said to be worth $5,000. State Supreme Court Justice Joan A. Madden threw out Nello Balan's lawsuit Friday. She also fined Balan's attorney $500 for filing a frivolous claim and said motions the attorney filed were a "waste of judicial resources." Balan claimed he lent supermodel Le Call his limited-edition leather umbrella designed by Jean-Paul (ZHON'-Pawl) Gaultier (GOL'-tee-yay) and she belatedly returned it to him in two pieces. Balan, owner of the celeb magnet Nello's, sought $1 million in the lawsuit and claimed emotional distress over the damaged umbrella. Attorneys for both sides have declined to comment.

Mom steals daughter's identity GREEN BAY, Wis. -- A 33-year-old woman stole her daughter's identity to attend high school and join the cheerleading squad, according to a criminal complaint filed against the woman. Wendy Brown, of Green Bay, faces a felony identity theft charge after enrolling in Ashwaubenon High School as her 15-year-old daughter, who lives in Nevada with Brown's mother. According to the complaint, Brown wanted to get her high school degree and become a cheerleader because she didn't have a childhood and wanted to regain a part of her life that she'd missed. Brown allegedly attended cheerleading practices before school started, received a cheerleader's locker and went to a pool party at the cheerleading coach's house. The $134.50 check Brown gave to the cheerleading coach for her uniform bounced, the complaint said. Demeny said she told her she was not good at math and even cried when she talked about moving from Pahrump Valley High School in Nevada. Demeny said she looked older than a student but had the demeanor of a high school girl.


Page 3 Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008

NEWS

The Vista

Ancient Chinese secret exposed By Alex Gerszewski and Melissa Dixon

Staff Writers

Last T ursday, Dr. Larry Altshuler, from the Balanced Healing I‘ edical Center spoke about the a vantages of traditional Chinese medicine such as acupuncttlre, herbs that are used to treat afferent symptoms and even gav4 students something to practice q they get bored in class. Altshuler has been practicing traditional Chinese medicine for the last 1 years and said some of ces are over 10,000 years the pract old and an cure some things that conventi nal medicine can not. Altshuler said traditional Chinesemedicine is very different from ccnventional medicine. He said in the Chinese culture, it is all about harmony and balance, and when someone has internal disharthonies, they get sick. "You can usually tell what's wrong with someone by looking at their tongue," Altshuler said. "The more cracks someone has, the niore deficiencies their body contains." Althuler said he has treated and cured a number of people with different ailments such as fibrorriyalgia, chronic back pain that conventional medicine and surgeries could not help and stroke patients who have lost their ability to communicate. "I once treated a 46-year-old who had a stroke and who couldn't speak," Altshuler said. "After just three acupuncture treatments, she was speaking again." Skeptical coming in, David Hull, broadcasting senior said he was left Open by Altshuler's presenta tion, "Some of fie things he said make it hard to beieve," Hull said. "It's one of thos things I would have to see to b lieve. In parts of his presentatio it sounds almost like he wants to et rid of conventional medicine." Altshule said at his clinic they have a skccess rate of 90-5-5, which mans 90 percent of the time patierits are healed, 5 percent of patients are partially healed and the cjher 5 percent do not get healed. "Usua y the patients who don't get bett are the ones near the end an they can't be helped," Altshule said. Howe er, Alshuler said someti es it is a delayed effect. He sai some patients who were not he ed during treatment have called im six to eight months after treatment sessions ended and told him their pain was gone. "So e of it's really hard to believ " said Bailey Holden, nutriti n sophomore. "I don't know ow it [acupuncture] could heal omething as serious as fibro yalgia or bone spurs, but I think ome of the herbs could be help ful I Faculty and students that stayed after the lecture were able to /I

"In acupuncture, the earlobes are like little brains. By rubbing both earlobes for two minutes, you will feel revitalized and be able to remember things you studied the night before." --Dr. Larry Altshuler

experience and feel first hand how acupuncture works. Altshuler poked participants in their hand with the hair like needles, demonstrating how it feels. The Balanced Healing Medical Center has been opened since 1996 and was the first clinic of its kind in Oklahoma. The center offers 15 different styles of acupuncture ranging from $65-$85. Most patients can be treated in eight to 12 treatments. The clinic also sells herbs ranging from $10-$30. There are currently over 20,000 clinics across the United States, but few offer different styles of acupuncture. Altshuler also gave students some advice after a night of studying and had trouble remembering problems on a test. "In acupuncture, the earlobes are like little brains," Altshuler said. "By rubbing both earlobes for two minutes, you will feel revitalized and be able to remember things you studied the night before." Altshuler also gave students advice on how to heal minor injuries through the power of energy. He said for students to put their hands, roughly an inch apart, in front of themselves and slowly move them back-and-forth about a foot apart for five minutes. Then place their hands an inch above the afflicted area for a couple of minutes. "I have proof this method actually works," Altshuler said. "My wife fell off a ski lift once and sprained her knee. That night I performed the method and the next day she was 100 percent better." Altshuler said the more someone practices this method, the more energy will build-up and the better the results will get. Altshuler's lecture embraces what Healthy Campus UCO is promoting. It embraces the concept that wellness is an expanded idea of health and to promote a campus environment supportive of development and maintenance of a healthy body, mind and spirit. The next event for UCO Passport will be held this afternoon between 2 and 3:15 in the Pegasus Theater. Guest Brian Hearn from the Oklahoma City Museum of Art will screen and discuss "The Blood of Yingzhou District." .

Pakistani students wary of U.S. raids President of the International Student Association, who is'frOm Senior Reporter Pakistan, "It is not a very smart move on America's part because it could cause a lot of problems in The global media is not quite the Indian subcontinent. Striking sure how to label the recent U.S. any country's soil withotit notice air strikes and ground raids in for whatever reason is calling Pakistan. them to war." Last week, five civilians When asked and seven about • the militants were terrorists in reportedly killed Pakistan and in northwest how the country Pakistan by U.S. could handle missiles. it, Iqbal said, The attacks "I am against were carried out in terrorism. North Waziristan Pakistan region, which is is against near the Afghan terrorism, it border, without has enough prior approval problems. from the Pakistani America can government. fight the Taliban President Bush better with is said have Pakistan as an AP Photo authorized the ally. It needs to raids to kill the be taken care of Taliban. However, Supporters of a Pakistani opposition party Pakistan Tahrik-e-lnsaf chant but through the women and slogans in front banners reading 'we condemn the killing of innocents right channels children were also people in U.S. strikes in Pakistani tribal areas' during a rally in Karachi, and the right Pakistan on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2008. Pakistan is backing off sug- steps." reported dead. gestions it might confront U.S. troops making raids into its territory in The United "Itwasshocking to hear about the search of Islamic militants, saying Saturday it will deal diplomatically with States risks alienating attacks," said Ali Washington over the stepped-up tactics. Pakistan in its Tasawar, general fight against secretary of UCO terror with Pakistan Student Association. "There's a lot of Ramadan when Pakistanis, the raids on Pakistani soil. confusion about what's really mostly Muslims, are advised If continued, it could lead going on. North Waziristan is to practice peacefulness and to dire consequences. As the in the borders of Pakistan and tranquility. For many Pakistani media questions whether to Afghanistan, and is a tribal students at UCO, the move made call the action "invasion," region where [the] illiteracy by the U.S. government close to "intervention," or simply "war," rate is high, fostering terrorists. the end of President Bush's term the Pakistani students at UCO say they are tired of power The U.S. must have attacked is bewildering. "The United States Army politics that has been playing because they couldn't wait for the Pakistani government to and intelligence should have out over the last few months and collaborated with the Pakistani wish that things could better. give permission." Tasawar refers to the recent forces," said Khusro Iqbal, By Abha Eli Phoboo

political instability that has plagued Pakistan resulting in the resignation of Former President Pervez Musharraf and the elected victory of Ali Zardari, Benazir Bhutto's husband, following Bhutto's assassination in December last year. This is the month of

History professor discusses rising influence of China f

Li said China has its own problems with labor relations, environment and currency exchange, which increases the cost of production., 'He -said when China's price goes ,up, the deficit will stop. "We need to work with the Chinese government on their human rights issues, pollution and labor abuse," Li said. "However, it takes Li said the U.S. government, as well as the rilectiti dre concerned about the doubledigit annual increase of China's defense budget. "The Chinese Army has been modernized and armed with nuclear and strategic weapons," Li said. "They have over 450 nukes." Li said tensions in the Taiwan Strait could bring the U.S. into the civil war between China and Taiwan. "U.S. officials have urged China to slow down their military buildup and not use force against Taiwan," Li said. Zhang said it is something for whoever gets into office next to consider. "Hearing it from someone like him [Li] makes it more real," said Stefano Tarantini, biology sophomore. "I wouldn't usually think about it unless it was on T.V. or in a book, but this makes me think about it a little more."

By Alex Gerszewski

Staff Writer

The Passport UCO program and Friends of the Library continued its lecture series Sept. 10 with a speech titled: China Rising: Friend or Foe, presented by Xiao-Bing Li, professor in the Department of History and Geography and Neo D. Zhang. Li discussed the current problems with the United States' trade deficit, what people in the U.S. can expect to see from China, said Zhang, who helped China in the near future and also Li with his presentation. China's defense budget. "Without the trade, The current trade deficit there wouldn't be as much between America and China is employment in either country," $256 billion, Li said. Zhang said. "It's important to know about Li said the situation could be the trade deficit good or bad, depending on how with China someone looks at it. because it is part "It's bad for U.S. workers of our economy who lose their jobs to China, at home," Li but it's a plus for American said. "Problems consumers who benefit from such as the lower prices," Li said. "U.S. unemployment corporations have made a lot of and gas prices money from the trade." are inevitably Li predicts the current trade linked to our deficit will continue as long which has the scales of justice directly on international as it benefits interests of U.S. the glass in a beautiful rounded shape. Miller, another acrylic painter in the trade." corporations and consumers are It is a major happy. However, China highly show, says she has been doing the art for over 10 years. The variety of people and problem because depends on the U.S. market emotion in her portraits seem as though some people because in 2002, roughly 50 there is more meaning to them than meets do not want percent of all China's exports any products came to the U.S. the eye. Black Walnut, Mahogany and Bubinga that come from wood are smooth fluid shapes sitting on the tables within the gallery. Curry is the wood sculptor of the group. Her work seems universal in the sense that it could belong anywhere in any building and light up a room. "My intent is to translate my personal interpretations into a body of work by balancing the manipulation of form and expression with the organic nature of wood," Curry said in her artist's statement. 301 S. Boulevard Suite 117 It's hard to imagine that she carved these feminine shapes using carving knives, 405-715-2233 chain saws and machine tools. We can insure: "I enjoy putting together a exhibit with Easy Payment Options: - Permits such diversity and style in presentation," Credit Card Payments Accepted - Foreign Licenses said Zina Gelona, director of Galleries and Discounts for Full Payments - Minimum Auto Coverage Collections.

Exhibit displays 3 UCO graduates' art By Rebecca Shampay

Staff Writer

Diversity is the theme at the Donna Nigh Gallery. "4 Women Artists" is the show and it holds the works of artists Cynthia Curry, Susan Hanna, Sheila Miller, and Amy Zimmerman, three of whom graduated from UCO. The different styles of these ladies means you're sure to get a wellrounded experience. Artistic works in media of glass, wood, acrylic and pencil are scattered throughout the gallery. The bright colors and lively shapes of Zimmerman's acrylic paintings are sure to catch your eye right away. The bold colors seem to be an integral part of her pieces. "I consider color to be the most [impacting], subjective element to my artwork," Zimmerman said in her artist statement. Glass seems to reflect every color in the room. In the middle of the gallery there is a large clear case that holds the glasswork of Hanna. On the bottom shelf is a rather remarkable Five called "The Scales"

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Page 4 Tuesday, September 16, 2008

OPINION

The Vista

The Vista Comm. Building, Rm. 107 100-11.' University Dr. • Edmond, OK 73034-5209 405-974-5549 • editorial@thevistaonline.com The Vista is published as a newspaper and' publisc forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and only on Thursdays during the summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma. The, issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

MANAGEMENT Jana Davis, Co-Editor Nelson Solomon, Co-Editor Carrie Cronk, Managing Editor

Chris Albers, Photo Editor

EDITORIAL

Chase Dearinger, Copy Editor Kaylea Brooks, Sports Editor EDITORIALS Andrew Knittle Senior Reporter Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, Abha Phoboo, Senior Reporter reviews and commentaries represent Laura Hoffert, Senior Reporter Greg Newby, Reporter the views of the writer or artist and Ryan Croft Reporter not necessarily the views of The Lau= Lubbers, Reporter Vista Editorial Board, the Department Alex Gerszewslci, Reporter of Mass Communication, UCO or Stephani Tobin, Reporter the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Rebecca Shampay, Conespondent Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents Melissa Dixon, Conevondent

PHOTOGRAPHY

or UCO.

LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications

Chanel Henry, Photographer Ashley Smith, Photographer

MCCAIN IS UP IN THE POLES- 'THANKS PALING

DESIGN Josh Davis Kayleigh Adarnek Andrew Knittle

Cartoon by Jared Aylor

What's the point?

CARTOONIST Jared Aylor

AD SALES Stacy McIntire Tim Cronk

CIRCULATION Chris Albers

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Tresa Berlemann

ADVISER Kelly S. Wray

Red elephants, Blue donkeys: It's a jungle this election season BY. CARRIE CRONK Nothing defines divisiveness better than an election year, especially this one. Between the Democratic and Republican National Conventions, red elephants and blue donkeys, and change versus experience our political parties system insists on reminding us just how divisive our current government is. This divisiveness is expected between candidates of competing parties running for the same office, however, once our government officials are elected they need to set aside party politiCA and begin representing the American people as a single unit. This same dynamic of divisiveness can be found on college campuses around the country. On many campuses one of either the College Republicans or Young Democrats can be counted on to not sound their voices and refuse to be active. The other organization generally pounds their chest and spews messages full of inaccuracies (if not out right blatant lies) and airs of piety in the hope they can lure uneducated voters to their views. Students on campus don't necessarily want to be preached to about what they should believe or what morals another group says are the only right morals. In addition, people typically become tired of hearing negative news about the soap operas of the candidates' pasts and their families, as well as ads attacking their experience and plans to address the issues. While students may be tired of the attack ads, they still want to hear something about their political party and candidates. Remaining silent isn't going to help the organization, party or the students. Students want to know they're political interests are considered to be important as well. Both of these organizations and their members should be educating themselves and working to educate their campuses' student bodies by providing information about their party, its platform and its candidates. The ethical approach would be to provide the abovementioned information. I'm sure local party headquarters and campaign offices would be more than willing to provide these organizations with the materials and information needed to help educate students.

As Eye See It

CAMPUS QUOTES

Can you imagine being tracked, monitored and scanned for the rest of your life? Can you imagine if the government could at any moment access your bank account information, locate where you were and randomly search you to see if you were a terrorist? Jeremy Meadows stepped before the Transportation Committee of the Mississippi House of Representatives on Aug. 19, 2008. His topic? The REAL ID. Most students, when I asked them, had no idea what the REAL ID was. Why? Meadows is the senior policy director of the National Conference of State Legislatures Trade and Transportation StateFederal Relations Division. This organization "provides research, technical assistance and opportunities for policymakers to exchange ideas on pressing issues, such as the REAL ID," he said in his testimony before the Mississippi House Transportation Committee. So he began with the history of the REAL ID. The 9 /11 Commission "suggested" that: "Secure identification should begin in the United States. The fed-

is a real bad idea

UR ID

eral government should set standards for the issuance of birth certificates and sources of identification, such as driver's licenses. Fraud in identification documents is no longer just a problem of theft... sources of identification are the last opportunity to ensure that people are who they say they are and to check whether they are terrorists" (73 FR 5273). What? They want to have access to my ID so they can check if I am a terrorist at any point? What else are they going to be checking? You can't convince me that the only thing they are going to be looking at is my validity as a U.S. citizen. Meadows further explained what 9-11 Commission restrictions would be applied to states who do not comply. "...The federal government will not accept their IDs for 'official purposes." So, the government is basically saying the states have to comply, or their IDs will not be accepted. Don't we live in a democracy? According to the NCSL, and Meadows testimony, a few of the final regulations for the REAL ID allow "for an age-based progressive

re-enrollment process (a state-issued driver's license or identification card must meet the requirements of the REAL ID by December 1, 2014...)" Also, the DHS has re-estimated the 10-year costs to states "as just under $4 billion, down $10 billion from the original $14 billion estimate." Just wa der $4 billion? That was nice of them. Never mind all of the unresolved money issues. For example, the government didn't take into consideration the new scanning barcode system, the databases that will hold everyone's information, or the user fees the states will have to pay, etc. So really, the true estimated cost of the REAL ID will be more than $4 billion dollars and will most likely be compensated for by us, the taxpayers. Twenty four states have passed anti-REAL ID measures, including Oklahoma. Oklahoma is only one of 10 states that passed a bill forbidding the state agencies from complying with REAL ID. But the 9 / 11 Commission has somehow made it a requirement. How? Isn't it weird that we haven't heard about any of this and we've had no say

in it? Why hasn't the media covered it? It makes you wonder if the media's lapdog-style attitude toward government also includes an envelope with a wad of money and a dog treat tied around it. "Good boy, media," the government would say. "Keep up the good work. Keep them distracted with what Obama is saying about Sarah Palin w'aile we pass this bill under their noses." You don't want to live in a country whe7e they can barcode you lice you are imprisoned to America. We are not slaves ofthe government. Our demDcracy was intended for us, the people of the United Staes, to govern ourselves. Hcw can the 9-11 Commissions get away with telling the states what to do? They are scaring us into conformity. 'They are herding us like cattle. I encourage out readers to dive deep into his concept of the REAL D. Fight for your right to privacy. Terrorists will attacl, whether we have a barcode on our driver's license or not. As Ben Franklin said, "Those who would sacrifice liberty for security ceserve neither."

McCain family legacy touching, writer says It was my privilege to be a delegate aid at the Republican National Convention in St. Paul, Minnesota, last week - and what an experience! It was one of the most significant and moving experiences of my life, not just because of the fun I had or all the people I was able to meet, such as John McCain's 96-year-old mother, Roberta. The most moving moment wasn't when the balloons fell, or even when the crowds cheered and celebrated like nothing I have seen. While all these contributed to this wonderful experience, they weren't the greatest or most important for me. You see, I was touched deeply by the patriotism, integrity, and deep love of country I saw in so many

faces — a deeply moving love of country that was far more important than any individual issues. This deep love of country was portrayed best by the McCain family legacy of service to our country and a strong woman, Roberta McCain, who stood beside her husband, son and now grandson as they courageously, went into harm's way to protect those who remained back at home. It was demonstration by action that this, the greatest country on earth, is overflowing with tremendous opportunity, that a soccer mom from the one of its most remote areas can rise to be a strong contender for Vice President of the United States, or that a 19-year-old from Muskogee, John Tyler Hammons, can have a vision for a better community and

go on to become the nation's youngest mayor. I was later amazed by the backlash of leftist liberals, amazed that there are those who scream for equality, but only when it is void of any faith in a divine creator or value of life, or when it isn't exactly in-line with what they feel is perfect, such as her precious baby. I also was moved all over again in something that has amazed me many times, yet so easy to take for granted, that American men and women put their lives on the line daily for the freedom of anyone to speak out against anyone else's politics or beliefs — and that this is one significant thing that makes our country so strong. These men and women fight for others' rights to speak out. You see, Sarah

Palin may disagree with what her opponents spy, yet she will defend their right to say it — by ensuring our country is safe from hose who would take away this freedom of speech we sold dear, even to bid her own son farewell to fight for our well being and preserve our precious way of life. Here in America we are truly blessed with so many things. Let us hope and pray we never lose sight of the value of the freedoms we enjoy, and may the U.S. A. always be that city on a hill illuminated by a light of hope for the rest of the world to see, and be a demonstration of the deepest devotion of patriotism and the purest freedom.

-Bonnie Brown Economics major

"What do you like and dislike about UCO?"

Photographed and compiled by Chris Albers Like: " I like how involved the teachers are with the students." Dislike: "I wish the students were more friendy."

Like: "I like the campus, it's real close togethet" Dislike: "The parking situation."

Like: "People are really friendly." Dislike: "I really haven't found a dislike, well, oh yeah; the parking."

Dislike: "Parking accessibility" Like: "Everything else is pretty good."

Marchella Dennis

Connor Clouser

Kristina Canning

Daniella Speegle

Broadcast - Junior

Biology - Sophomore

Accounting - Freshman

English - Freshman


Page 5 Tuesday Sept. 16, 2008

NEWS

The Vista

Who is Buddy Broncho? President defines role of Supreme Court for new year

UCO's mascot unveiled at last By Lauren Lubbers Staff Writer

High School in 2007. " The best part about being Buddy Broncho is actually being Buddy Broncho. Wherever Buddy is at is UCO's very own mascot, where the fun is at. He Buddy Broncho has is the man!" laughed brought much spirit Everett. "I love being and fun to sporting able to represent the events such as football university." and basketball here on Junior Ian Watkins, campus. He also makes said "It is a real appearances around honor to be Buddy campus for events such Broncho." as homecoming and will According to the even attend nationals Student Life Office, with the cheerleading Buddy Broncho has squad this year. been been UCO's Buddy Broncho has mascot since October been around for over 3, 1923, where he made eighty years and his his first appearance presence is much desired in the Vista wearing and appreciated. One his Broncho football might ask themselves jersey . The first live at a home football game mascot, however, did while watching Buddy not show his face cheer on the crowd and until Homecoming giving high fives , "Who in 1979. Since then is the man under the Buddy has been the by Vista photographer Chanel Henry suit?" heart of UCO events Well so who is Buddy while working with Broncho anyway? The man Buddy Broncho other spirit groups to under the suit is actually the show support to the men under the suit. Two students were school. selected to be UCO'S mascot. Ian Watkins Interested in becoming the next Buddy and Caleb Everett work with each other to Broncho? Visit the UCO Student Life make the appearances of Buddy Broncho Office to pick up an application. For any consistant and exciting. questions, call The Student Life Office at Sophmore and Advertising major Caleb (405) 974-2363. Everett who graduated from Carl Albert

Alpha Gam receives award By Lauren Lubbers Staff Writer

UCO's Greek system has received several awards for the individual chapter here on campus. Amongst these chapters is the Alpha Gamma Delta sorority whom which received an honorary award called the Annulet which was given to them at the biannual 2008 International Convention, held in San Antonio, Texas. There are currently 182 chapters of Alpha Gamma , Delia. The Annulet is the highest international award given to the chapter recognized for their scholarship, campus leadership and involvement, philanthropy, recruitment, and member development.

There are three divisions of Alpha Gamma Delta which are based on current membership size. There is one chapter from each division that is selected for the Annulet award at the 'international convention. "Our chapter is very excited to have the annulet award because it signifies what every Alpha Gam strives to achieve", said Kaela Davis, President of Alpha Gamma Delta here at UCO. The UCO chapter sent tworepresentatives to the convention. Seniors Kaela Davis and Molly' Dougherty were the two members present to receive the award.

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UCO students should have a betterorganized student-government body. That, said Student Body President John Bobb-Semple, was the idea behind a recent proposal he made to the TJCOSA Supreme Court. The proposal consisted of three basic points - the Supreme Court's authority, its role within UCOSA and whether or not the court can express an opinion about changing the UCOSA constitution, according to a report from Supreme Court Chief Justice David Harrison. "Right now [Bobb-Semple] is doing some exciting things in the legislative and executive branch. He's really working to modify student government to where it becomes more functional and effective for the students," Harrison said. Harrison said Bobb-Semple met with him to discuss how the Supreme Court has operated in previous years and to begin finding a way to help the leaders in UCOSA better coordinate with each other. "When we looked through the constitution ... we noticed we did not know much about the judicial branch," Bobb-Semple said. He went on to say the university has policies that actually differ from what is originally in the constitution ft,c1 those differing policies cause mikommunication problems. The UCOSA president cited a lack of knowledge about procedures on student conduct issues, students not knowing where and how to file traffic appeals and administrators unawareness of a UCOSA judicial branch as examples. "I ... met with every single top administrator ... most of them didn't even know we had [a judicial branch]," President Bobb-Semple said. "If we're going to have a constitution ... we all need to know it...what it says, the things that are important in it ... and we need to be doing everything we can to be abiding by our constitution," Bobb-Semple

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said. , Bobb-Semple and Harrison both cited changes in administration as 'a ''major reason why many officers and current administrators are unaware "bf policy changes and their relation to UCOSA's constitution. "One administrator had [a- certain] appeals process and the next administrator didn't and they reorganized the court or the appeals process...to where • it doesn't include the end purpose of the constitution...and the next person comes in and doesn't even realize the laSt person's changes," Harrison said. Both men said Bobb-Semple asked the court's opinion on changing the constitution and what role it could have in that change. Harrison said he met with Chief Justice Da'Mon Smith to discuss the questions posed by Bobb-Semple. "Our ... analysis was that because we are the final interpreters of the constitution, it would be improper for us to [give] an opinion about modifying the constitution," Harrison said. Despite the court's official decision about Bobb-Semple's request, Harrison said he personally believes the president has positive progress in mind and will continue to pursue making changes to help UCOSA. Bobb-Semple said he plans to form a joint committee between UCOSA's House of Representatives and Senate to view the constitution in light of the president's revision suggestions, and decide what should be changed. The president said he has two other key plans in mind for the coming year — nominating his three supreme court justices and proposing a package of constitutional amendments in the spring semester. "[The amendments] will go to a vote before the entire student body, then it goes to the desk of [UCO President Roger Webb] ... if he ratifies it ... our constitution will be officially amended," Bobb-Semple said. '

1

New TEACH Grant aid students becoming teachers By Stephani Tobin Staff Writer

ELI

By Ryan Croft! Staff Writer

Future teachers and education students at UCO can now take advantage of the Federal TEACH Grant, which is now available to students who want to be teachers. The grant is focused on students who plan to teach at schools that serve lowincome students, according to federal guidelines. Part of the agreement in the grant requires that graduates teach for four years in a "high-need field" at a Title 9 school. "We're excited about it," said Sheila McGill, director of Student Financial Services. "[The grant] is open to anyone who meets the criteria and is willing to meet the agreement." In order to be eligible for the grant, applicants must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen, and an undergraduate or graduate student enrolled in coursework necessary to begin a teaching career. They must meet academic achievement requirements on college admissions tests, maintain a G.P.A. of 3.25 and sign the TEACH Grant Agreement. Students are also required to teach full-time for at least four academic years within an eight-year period. If the requirements in the agreement are not

met, the grant will be converted into a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan with retroactive interest. "This is a huge source of financial assistance to students who have an interest in teaching, and who love kids," said Dr. Bill Pink, the associate dean of the College of Education. "We are in desperate need of more educators." Pink said that in today's society with rising education costs, it's good t:o _see federal efforts helping students:, He added that UCO is one of the top teaching schools in the region, and that -students will receive "high-quality preparation:', High-need subject area fields include bilingual education, foreign lang4ges, mathematics, science, special -eatica6on and reading specialists. Other identified teacher shortage areas may be included, at the time graduates begin teaching in' the field. Students applying for the TEACH Grant must go through counseling sessions to help them better understand the stipulations of the agreement. The application period opened on Sept. 5, and as of Sept. 11 there were 40 applicants. According to McGill, the grant has unlimited openings, and those who have applied have not yet been screened. "The dollars [for the grant] are not limited," she said. "They want to recruit."

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Page 6 Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008

CLASSIFIEDS E. coli Deadlines/Pricing

The Vista EDUCATION MAJORS Interviewing for in-home childcare, excellent pay, light travel, auto provided. One-two days a week. Email resume and references to lakerats@cox.net

Continued from page 1

Thirdly,: always wash hands carefully befOreanotafter preparing any raw meat to prevent cross-contamination. Also people should wash produce before preparing. Finally, make sure that children wash their hands carefully, especially after using the bathroom or petting livestock. The OSDH released 15 situation updates arrd'in its'final release announced, "at least 67 persons have been hospitalized including 16%01o110e received dialysis treatment. Of that number, nine were children and seven were adults." The 'up-- date also stated that more than 1,700 people had been interviewed that had eaten at the Country Cottage restaurant and both the OSDH, Tulsa Health Department and a team from the federal CDC would investigate an event the Country Cottage catered for the Bethany Free Will Baptist Church which was held on Aug. 16. "About 250 persons attended the event and health investigators have interviewed about 160 thus far to see if they became ill after eating at the event and if so, what their symptoms were. At least 30 of those attending have indicated they became ill with diarrhea or other milder symptoms," the updated stated. If a person believes they have E. coli or their child has come in contact with the infection immediate medical treatment is necessary. For more information on the infection the public is urged to call 2-1-1.

DEADLINES: All classifieds MOST be submitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. PRICES: Classified ads cost $7/day for the first 20 words and $.10/ word thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call 974-5549 or 974-5918 for info

The University of Central Oklahoma will host the Edmond College Night, 6 to 8 p.m., Monday, Sept. 22 in the Nigh University Center, offering high school students from all over the state an opportunity to meet with representatives from various colleges and universities for free. Representatives from more than 100 colleges and universities from throughout Oklahoma and the United. States will attend the event to visit with students and parents about admissions, scholarships and more. Each institution will have a booth set up to provide participants with brochures, pamphlets and additional information to help students prepare for the important decisions they will make when selecting a college. The event is presented by the Oklahoma CollegeDay/ NightCoordina don Committee, a consortium of Oklahoma colleges and universities. UCO also hosted last year's Edmond College Night, with more than 2,000 students attending. Organizers expect numbers to increase this year. For more information, call UCO's Office of Undergraduate Admissions at (405) 9742338.

EARN EXTRA MONEY! Students needed ASAP. Earn up to $150 a day being a mystery shopper. No experience required. Call 1-800-722-4791. JJ KELLY BRIDAL Part-time. Sat. 10-15 hrs. per week. Appt. only: 752-0029. BOULEVARD STEAKHOUSE Now hiring line cooks, pantry, dishwashers. Please call 715-2333 or apply within:

PT IN-HOME BABYSITTER Kids are 3 & 5. Must live locally and be available on weekends and holiday breaks. Mostly afternoon work and some weekends. Serious applicants only. Call Paula at 323-8383.

Continued from page 1

UCO to host "College Night' for high school

BABYSITTER NEEDED For6yearold boy. Saturdays only, 8am - 5pm. Very close to campus. Call 315-1568.

DAYS INN NORTH SUITES Near Frontier City. Hiring FT night desk clerk (11 pm - 7am shift) & PT desk clerk (3pm - 11 pm shift) Call 478-2554.

Lights and a 30-second light in the afternoon. These times were approximated by Edmond ( Traffic Planner Tom Minnick, who said that the times could be different according to the / number of cars in what is considered to be Edmond's busiest intersection. However, city planners in Edmond will be making changes to accommodate drivers. According to the city of Edmond Department of Engineering, in 2011, a traffic project will pv evalua tetheexistinglane capacity to determine where additional lanes are needed. This project will be part of the 2000 Sales Tax Improvements, and the funding will be split nearly halfway with federal and city funds. Lauren Hill, junior forensic science major, 0, said she parks in the student lot near Howell 0:k Hall, where her classes are held. "It takes forever," she said, referring to the number of left-hand turns she has to make to get onto 2nd Street as well as the light at Garland Godfrey. "There's more traffic at 5 p.m., when people get off of work," said Alexis Gomez, freshman criminal justice major. She said she lives near 2nd Street; an area where many students have expressed, frustration at long lights, and also ,g6e- 7f,K thinks fhat the light at 33rd and Broadway is M./ Freshman Jesse Gatwood agreed that the light at 2nd Street and Garland Godfrey is te difficult. The light is so long that after it turns green, .still turn red on you he said "It's bad all around."

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OPTOMETRIST OFFICE Seeking 2 part-time assistants. Must be able to work some evenings & weekends. Flexible hours. 749-0220.

KIDZSTREET HOURLY PLAYCARE e Nbw hiring teachers for our EdmOnd =and Moore location. Visit either location to apply: 610 S. Kelly in Edmond or 2735 S. 135 Service Rd. in Moore or call Lisa at 413-1911. Learn more about us at www. kidzstreet.biz BLOGGERS & PODCASTERS NEEDED Real job. Real people. Real oppty. w/Edmond office. Flex hours around class schedule for Social Media Mavens. Starting at $8/hr. Email resume to careers@APMEX.com for interview. NOW HIRING BLOGGERS & PODCASTERS Immediate openings for FT/ PT Blog, Forum an Social Media writers to work for Edmond office. Flex hours at home and office. Excellent oppty for students or working moms. Starting at $8+ per hour. Email resume to careers@APMEX.com for interview. DAY JOB Arcadian Inn Bed & Breakfast east from Coyner Health Science Bldg. looking for dependable individuals with eye for details in housekeeping from 12pm - 4pm. Weekends/Holidays required. Pay starts at $7.50. Contact Mark at the Inn or 405-313-5439. PT CASHIER / STOCKER needed . Heavy lifting required. Must be 21. Please apply in person @ Edmond Wine Shop. 1520 S. Blvd.

NEED AFTERSCHOOL CHILDCARE Two kids, 10 & 13, must have good driving record, reliable transportation. 405-650-5779. EDMOND RANCH Needs PT Landscaping help. 8-12 hrs. per wk. Flexible schedule. Call Mike, 850-7610. NEED PT JOB? St. Elizabeth Ann Seton afterschool program is looking for someone to work 3pm 6pm five days a week. The position pays $6.55 an hour. Starting date would be in September. If interested call the CDC office at 340-1789. Also needing subs between 7am and 6pm on PT basis. MARKETING OR MANAGEMENT STUDENTS 10 to 20 hrs. wk. Flexible schedule, must have own transportation. Hourly pay plus commission. Earning potential excellent. 348-4697 SERVERS & LINE COOKS NEEDED Apply in person between 2-4 pm, Mon - Fri. Cascata Restaurant, SE Corner of 15th & Kelly.

Customer Service, Car Wash a Oil Change Attendants - Openings available at 2 Locations:

2220 S. Broadway, Edmond 844-8034 Quail Springs/N. Penn, OKC 608-0570 Great Advancement Management Opportunities Available!

CUSTOMER SERVICE HELP M-F 4:45AM - 9AM. Occasional weekend shift. Apply in person. Edmond YMCA. SHOGUN'S STEAKHOUSE Hiring for wait staff, bussers, dish washers, host, bartender. Apply in person at Northpark Mall (NW 122nd & N. May) after 5:30pm. 749-0120 SENIOR SERVICES OF OKLAHOMA Is looking for students to fill part time positions. Several 9am - 1 pm and 1:30 pm 5:30pm shifts are available for Mon-Fri. We pay $10 per hour for energetic phone work educating senior citizens on healthcare issues. No experience is needed we will train. Business is located at 1417 NW 150th St. in Edmond. Call 879-1888to setupan interview. Ask for Hannah McMahan TEACHER NEEDED IMMEDIATELY for Edmond Daycare. FT/ PT. Experience preferred, competitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262

HANDY STUDENT WANTED Carpentry, painting, lawn maintenance. Must be self-motivated, trustworthy. 641-0712. PT RETAIL SALES National menswear retailer needs PT Associates for Edmond location. Flexible days & hours. Call 844-6530. NOW HIRING SERVERS & HOSTESSES Fuji Japanese Restaurant. 2805 S Broadway, Edmond. Apply in person. WORK ON CHRISTMAS TREE FARM! Flexible hours, great for students! Call 405-340-5488 for interview. VILLAGE TOURS Seeking a part-time bus washer. Flexible hours. Good starting pay. Apply in person, 3021 NE 50th, OKC. LIQUOR STORE Needs part-time help. Must be 21. Close to campus. Call 348-2101 LUNCH & AFTERNOON WAITSTAFF NEEDED Tips avg $16-20/hr. Flexible hours. Close to UCO! Apply in person. 216 S. Santa Fe. Ron's Hamburgers. PRIVATE GOLF CLUB Looking for friendly, energetic staff to join our team. Bagroom, golfers grill, beverage cart, event staff. Located just a few minutes from UCO. 771-5800, or stop by 10909 Clubhouse Rd., Edmond. SERVER POSITION Available @ Pearl's Lakeside. Apply within. 748-6113

$8.00/hr NOW HIRING:

ATM!!! ELEMENTARY ED. & EARLY CHILDHOOD MAJORS & DEGREED TEACHERS!!! Edmond pre-school hiring. Flex hrs. Call 205-4299. Also need lunchroom monitor and recess monitor, 10:45am1:15pm, Mon - Fri. ($8/hr) Also need aftercare teacher aides, 3pm-6pm, ($8/hr.)

NOW HIRING Delivery Drivers & Prep/Cooks Needed Apply in Person 1022 N. Santa Fe 341-6012

Rentals/Housing REMODELED NEWLY 2bd/1 ba with laundry. Furor unfurnished. nished 1021 E Edwards. 591-7719.

Roommates ROOMMATE NEEDED Spacious room close to campus available now! $330 per month plus utilities. Private bathroom. Call Ben at 615-8913.

Services EDMOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTE Conveniently located on the UCO campus, offers English as a second language classes for international students/individuals. NOW FEATURING a specially designed program with: Strong emphasis in listening & speaking, Highly interactive classes, Comprehensive TOEFL program. Enjoy small classes and the campus facilities. Contact us at (405) 341-2125 or www.thelanguagecompany. corn INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS! Need to pass the TOEFL, an 1-20 for a friend or a 12-week certificate? English Language Center can help you! Call us at (405) 348-7602, visit our website www.elcok. corn or come meet us in person at 1015-C Waterwood Pkwy, next to the UCO University Plaza on 2nd Street. DO YOU WANT MORE FOR YOUR CHILD THAN DAYCARE WHILE YOU ARE WORKING OR ATTENDING SCHOOL? Churchill Pre-School Academy's curriculum prepares your child for school. Established in 1986. Enrolling now for summer and fall. No enrollment fees! Located at 724 W. 15th St. Open 7:30a.m. - 6p.m., all year. Please call 341-4314


Page 7 Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008

GAMES

The Vista

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Page 8 Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008

SPORTS

The Vista

At Right: Senior Micah Howeth takes down an opponent in the first quarter of Saturday's game at Wantland Stadium. The Bronchos Iosst the Lone Star Conference crossover game to Texas A&M Kingsville. Below: Porn squad members huddle in the rain during Saturday's game.

Photo by Chris Albers

Photo by Chris Albers

UCO football loses to Texas A&M-Kingsville, falls to 0-3 By Kaylea Brooks

Sports Editor

Texas A&M-Kingsville proved to be a more difficult opponent than anticipated, as the Bronchos handed it the Sept. 13 game, 41-6. The game was held at Wantland Stadium, though it was originally scheduled for Javelina turf. But with Hurricane Ike scheduled to make landfall early in the weekend, Kingsville opted to make the trip to Edmond for the game. Kingsville is near the Gulf Coast, which Ike was targeting last weekend. The Javelinas, a type of wild hog, spent most of the game pushing the ball, while UCO only raked in 243 yards, not even half

of Kingsville's 564 offensive yards. The Javelinas led from the beginning of the first quarter, except for a tie in field goals in the first 10 minutes of the game, 3-3. By the end of the first quarter, Kingsville kicked yet another field by Christian Brom, putting the Javelinas three ahead. Second quarter saw the first touchdown when Kingsville's Jabir Perkins recovered a UCO fumble in the end zone. The Javelinas scored another touchdown by Myron Brew with an extra point by Brom, but the Bronchos failed to score in the second quarter. In the third quarter, Kingsville's quarterback, Bill Garza, threw two passes for a touchdown, one being to Damien Couthren and the other to Jareko Taylor.

Brom contributed with extra points on each of the touchdowns. UCO scored another three points through Chad Susman with a 40-yard field goal, but those would be the last points scored for UCO in the game. The Javelina's scored one last touchdown in the fourth quarter with 7:57 left. The Broncho's offense spent the majority of the game on the sidelines, while its defense played into exhaustion. Kingsville had 198 net yards rushing, nearly 10 times the Broncho's 20. Jason Palmer rushed 30 net yards, and quarterback Brandon Noohi had -18 net yards. Daniel Morrell received passes for 97 yards, the longest being 26 yards. Kendall Hendricks trailed behind him with 56

yards, and 39 being his longest. UCO's defensive players Terrence Hill and T.J. Shaw topped in tackles, with 11 and 10 each, respectively. Jermelle Cudjo was third with eight tackles, and Freddie Harris had a sack. The loss to the Javelinas makes. UCO 0-3. Head coach Tracy Holland said the Bronchos were unprepared in the matchup against Kingsville. "There is no reason for a loss like that," he said. "I accept responsibility for it. It's my job to prepare them, and obviously they weren't prepared." The Bronchos will head to Tarleton State University in Stephenville, Texas, for their next contest this Saturday.

Bronchos Split STEPHENVILLE, Texas -- Kristen Wilson continued her dominating ways to lead Central Oklahoma to an easy three-set romp over Oklahoma Panhandle State Saturday on the second day of the TexAnn Classic before the Bronchos finished the two-day event with a loss to Texas-Permian Basin. Wilson, who had 47 kills in two five-set losses Friday, hit a blistering .462 with 21 kills and just three errors in 39 attacks as the Bronchos rolled to a 25-14, 25-16, 25-13 victory over OPSU. UCO dropped a 25-21, 13-25, 15-15, 25-15 decision to UT-Permian Basin in its final match. "We came back after two tough losses Friday to get a win we badly needed against Panhandle and then we just couldn't seem to

get going in the last match," UCO coach Jeff Boyland said. "It was a tough weekend for us, but our young players are continuing to learn and we've got to keep moving forward." The Bronchos hit a season-high .374 with 45 total kills and only 11 errors in 91 attacks against OPSU. Jessica Legako hit .545 with six kills and no errors in 11 attacks, while Sarah Niles and Ginger Gowen had 13 digs apiece. Wilson paced UCO in the loss to UT-Permian Basin with 16 kills and 12 digs, but the Bronchos hit just .151 in that contest. Legako had six kills and four blocks and Niles had 19 digs. UCO, now 4-9 on the season, goes to Midwestern State Thursday to open Lone Star Conference play.

Photo provided Ginger Gowen bumps the ball in Saturday's match against Oklahoma Panhandle in the TexAnn Tournament.

U.S. women's sitting volleyball team earns silver medal By Kaylea Brooks

Sports Editor

AP Photo U.S. team player Sugui Kriss, second left, cheers along with her team mates, Hope Lewellen, first left, Kari Miller, center, Brenda Maymon, second right and Alexandra Gouldie, first right, as her American team scores against China during a sifting volleyball match at the Paralympic games in Beijing , China, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2008.

The U.S. Women's Sitting Volleyball team faced China after upsetting the Netherlands in five close, hard fought sets, but gave up the gold on Saturday evening. The team lost three straight sets to the formidable opponent, whose star, Sheng Yuhong, scored a whopping 28 points. Even so, the U.S. put up a fight and scored the first point by team captain Brenda Maymon of Sellersberg, Ind. . Edmond's own Katie Holloway led the team in points scored with eight points: five kills, one block and an ace. Lora Webster, also of Edmond, came in second with six points and Maymon had five. The loss was a result of many hitting errors, 13 of which happened in the first set alone. The U.S. lost to China earlier in the match-ups as well. Assistant Coach Denise Van deWall said, "We have improved a lot and we've come so far, but we were simply outplayed. It was just not our day" Despite the loss, the girls said that they

were glad to have had the opportunity to play "I am awestruck at the caliber of the individuals that we're competing again," Kari Miller of Edmond said. "It was the perfect experience, just indescrib able." Nichole Millage, of Edmond, commented that Beijing's hospitality was outstanding. "I thought that when we got there, it would just be leftovers of the Olympics. But no, everything was about us," she said. They expressed that they were grateful for the support from fellow students and faculty at UCO. "Thank everybody for their support," Miller said. "UCO has been a huge help,". The U.S. team accepted the silver medal, already thinking of training for the World Disabled Volleyball Championships, which will be held in 2010 in Oklahoma City.

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The Vista Sept. 16, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Sept. 16, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.