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www.thevistaonline.com

July

2008 3,\ The Student Voice or the tIni\ ersitN, of Central Oklahoma In the spring of 1943, Quimby Enterline ran machinery parttime on a farm. And every day he wondered when he would go to fight in the largest war the world had ever seen. Twice he had received letters calling him into action and twice these letters had been recalled. He wasn't old enough, they told him, though he questioned why they would ask him if they knew his age to begin with. See page 3

Feed your brain

Vista Video Voice Most people never know how much work it requires to be a TV anchor/reporter. After all, it looks pretty simple when you're watching it from your couch. Just appear in front of the camera and start reading — that's what anchors and reporters do, right? PAGE 2

New Liberal Arts major offered Starting this fall semester, UCO students will have another option available to declare as a major. The College of Liberal Arts will add a major in humanities to its list of degree programs. Dr. Pamela Washington, College of Liberal Arts dean, said the new major is the first Bachelor of Arts degree in humanities to be offered in the state of Oklahoma. PAGE 3

Delta Zeta moves to a new home "Home is where the heart is" maybe a cliché phrase people say, but for the women of Delta Zeta, the phrase could literally be taken to heart. The DZ house, which is located on the corner of Jackson and Chowning, was built last year and features 10 bedrooms, housing 20 girls.

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Regents give nod for UCO tuition hike

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By Carrie Cronk and Jordan Richison

During the June 26 Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education meeting, tuition and fee increases were approved for 25 colleges and universities across Oklahoma. Ben Hardcastle, OSRHE director of communications, said UCO administrators requested the state regents approve a tuition and fee increase of 9.5 percent. Hardcastle said the presidents of universities and colleges across the state met with the state board of regents on June 25 to discuss why the institutions required tuition and fees to be increased. According to www.okhighered.org, UCO resident undergraduate student tuition will increase from $128.55 in the 2007 — 2008 academic year to $140.75 this year, while non-resident undergraduate students' tuition rates will increase from $324.30 last academic year to $355.05 this year. UCO resident graduate student tuition rates will increase from $164.55 for the 2007 — 2008 academic year to $180.20 for 2008- 2009 and non-resident tuition rates will increase from $395.30 last year to $426.90 for this academic year. UCO's proposed tuition and fee increase would cover mandatory costs the university incurs each year, Hardcastle said. "Even with the increases in tuition and fees, Oklahomans will still be paying less for a college education than their peers in other states," OSRHE Chancellor Glen Johnson said in a June 26 press release. "This increase will allow our institutions see TUITION, page 3

* iboeilogosi

1928 Chegrioiet National AR Roadster

111,C,400,f,

-•

by Vista photographer Eric Rothwell

At the classic car show, a 1928 Chevrolet sits in the UCO parking lot on June 28. The classic car show is part of Liberty Fest.

OSU bans smoke; is Central next? By Nelson Solomon and Jordan Richison

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Kicker makes all-pro football Former Central Oklahoma place-kicker A.J. Haglund has been named a first-team selection on the All-Arena Football League Team after a record-setting regular season with the defending ArenaBowl champion San Jose SaberCats. PAGE 8

Former UCOSA president Jason Hines and UCO student Matt Blubaugh proposed a resolution, that passed, to twko all institutions tor hi ;-he in Oklahoma bocomc, tobacto.irtv at the dq 27tn Spring Congress of the Oklahoma Student Government Association, held this past March at the Nigh University center. And at their June 26 meeting, the Board of Regents for the Oklahoma Agricultural & Mechanical Colleges passed a measure that bans all tobacco use on any OSU-related campus. The rule says that no student is allowed to use cigarettes, cigars, dip or any other tobacco-related product on any campus grounds. Some students want UCO to implement the same policy. "I don't smoke, so that would be good," senior marketing major Saurabh Sharma said. OSU-Stillwater is the second higher education facility in Oklahoma to enforce such a policy. On Jan. 1 a rule went into effect that made Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City a tobacco-free by Vista photographer Chanel Henry campus. The tobacco-free policy includes buildings, More Oklahoma colleges are becoming tobacco-free. Oklahoma State University is lead- grounds and parking lots leased, owned or

ing the way after their board of regents approved a ban on tobacco use on all of their campuses last week.

"9-jhe price o freedom of religion, or of syeec , or of the press, is that we must put up with a good deal of rubbish." -Robert- Jackson

Watch it! Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5 p.m. on Cox channel 125

see OSU, page 3


Page 2 Thursday, July 3, 2008

FEATURE

The Vista

Campus Notes

Web Watch/, What You're Reading On-Line

Odds & Ends/

Center demonstrates software

'Reality 11/' takes work

From the Associated Press

The UCO Student Counseling Center is demonstrating its stress reduction software to departments and classes this summer. The clinic, located in Room 419, Nigh University Center, is free and is available to the entire UCO community. Contact Jan Chapel at jchapel@ucok. edu or 974-2215 for more information.

UCO preps for wage change The federal minimum wage will increase from $5.85 per hour to $6.55 per hour effective with UCO's pay period beginning July 20, 2008. This change will impact those students currently making less than $6.55 this summer, but no additional paperwork will be needed from their departments. Payroll staff will enter the new hourly rate for each individual, and student salary budgets will be funded to accommodate the increase.

Leaders picked for Academy The Educator's Leadership Academy (ELA), based at the University of Central Oklahoma, selected 31 K-12, CareerTech and higher education administrators from throughout the state to participate in their 2008-09 Combo Academy. ELA offers leadership development comparable to that offered to many upper level executives in successful organizations for education professionals throughout Oklahoma. The Combo Academy brings together administrators from K12, CareerTech and higher education institutions. Other ELA academies serve teachers, professors, principals and other specific administrators.

Most people never know how much vvtfrk it requires to be a TV anchor/reporter. After all, it looks pretty simple when you're watching it from your couch. Just appear in front of the camera and start reading — that's what anchors and reporters do, right? Not exactly. The industry is so consuming that you must have a passion for it or you'll never survive the long hours and stress. Working in news is more than a career choice. It's a lifestyle. While you're reporting one story, you're thinking about the next. And when you wake up in the morning, you turn on your TV or radio, making sure not to miss out on anything that might be happening in the world. It is definitely something that's on your mind at all times. I even find myself listening to friends' conversations or walking through the grocery store — and story ideas start flying into my mind from nowhere. It can be high stress at times but is highly fulfilling in the end. One thing people don't know about TV news is how

Vista ideo Voice many people it takes to make a newscast happen. What most people see are the anchors or reporters on camera, but what they don't see are all the people behind the scenes that work just as hard, if not harder, to make that final product possible. There are so many people off camera who never get the credit they deserve. And so much of what all of us do happens at the same time. You have reporters setting up interviews and putting together story packages ... videographers trying to capture the story with the lens ... editors putting it all together so that it flows smoothly and includes all the major details ... graphic production putting it all on the air ... someone moving the prompter ... cameramen getting the perfect shot and making the anchors look like a million bucks ...

Wheh! There's so much going on all at once. Then you have producers filling in gaps and making sure the newscast is written in from start to finish ... audio technicians keeping the mic levels balanced ... and a director on top of things from start to finish, telling everyone when to move and when to breathe. It's a scrutinized industry, one in which everyone has something to say about what could "make it better." But I tend to find myself being my own biggest critic. For me, the most challenging part of newscast comes in preparing so hard to go live and then having only one chance to get it right. Anytime you have a slip up you have to just shake it off and continue. You have to be confident and comfortable and wear really thick skin. Lauren Seabrook, a junior majoring in broadcast joumalism, provides video updates each Tuesday and Thursday afternoon at the

Annual Summer Tea to be held UCO's annual Summer Tea panhellenic event will be Sunday, July 13 at 3 p.m. in the Nigh University Center ballrooms. Registration is free and parents are invited. The Summer Tea will allow attendants to visit with four sororitys including: Alpha Gamma Delta, Alpha Xi Delta, Delta Zeta and Sigma. Kappa. Attire is casual. To register, go to http: / /www.ucok.edu/ student ,lAtefgreek/sx.immer tea.htm or call the Greek Life office at 974-2511.

Lots No. 4 & 5 closed Parking lots No. 4, north of Liberal Arts, and No. 5, east of Business, will be closed the remainder of the week in preparation for LibertyFest on July 4. The early closure of these lots is necessary for fireworks contractors to set up equipment in accordance with fire safety procedures. All cars must be removed from these lots as soon as possible. During this time, the north doors of Liberal Arts and the east doors of Business will be closed except for fire emergency exits. All parking lots around Liberal Arts including the small parking lot north and east of Thatcher Hall will be closed to the UCO community except UCO LibertyFest participants, effective sunset Thursday, July 3. On Friday, July 4, the Business and Liberal Arts buildings will be closed to all occupants all day. Contact the Department of Public Safety at 974-2345.

by Vista photographer Chanel Henry

Crystal Price (left), Brandon Richard, Alicia Raymond and Logan Reynolds, are the anchors for the UCentral broadcast at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays on COX channel 125.

Top Ord-line stories The top foiir most-viewed articles on thevistaonline.com for the week of June 26- Julyl:

1. Director sues

3. Alpha Gamma Delta

Dr. Sandra J. Mayfield, the director of UCO's Whether they're serving spaghetti to women's studies minor, has filed a lawsuit against hungry college students to help raise money the Regional University System of Oklahoma, for charity or volunteering their time to help out the body that governs the university, over pay in the community, the women of Alpha Gamma unfairness, according to court records. Delta are doing their part to help not only UCO --Nelson Solomon community, but also the Edmond community. --Jordan Richison

2. Regents approve tuition hike

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - The Oklahoma State Regent' for Higher Education on Thursday approved tuition and mandatory fee increases for universities and colleges across the state. --Associated Press

4. Ethanol-solution we need?

Work of citizen and traditional journalists often collides on the Information Superhighway. And the debris from the wreckage can halt our understanding of important but complex issues. --Nelson Solomon

Insurance for dependents Effective July 1, House Bill 3112 now allows a dependent child under the age of 25 to stay on their parent's health insurance. Forms are available in the Employment Services Office and must be completed by July 31. Visit http:/ / administration.ucok.edu / documents/ job_specialEnrollmentForDependents. doc. For further information or call 9742575 or 974-2656.

Poll Results What do you plan to do on Independence Day?

Orientation to be held Aug. 16 The Office of Commuter Student Services and the Office of Transfer and Nontraditional Student Services will hold the inaugural Nontraditional and Transfer Student Orientation Saturday, Aug. 16. Commuter Student Services needs eight student volunteers. Please stop by the Office of Commuter Student Services and pick up a volunteer form. Contact Nathan Box at nbox@ucok.edu or 974-3655.

Visit: thevistaonline.com

News of the strange

Saddling up to work ARLINGTON, Wash. - When gas prices hit $4 a gallon, the staff at Dr. Keith Leonard's dental office figured it was time to pony up. Since more than half of the dental assistants and office staff own horses, last Wednesday the crew saddled up and rode in to work. "We decided that when gas got to $4 a gallon, we would all ride in," Leonard said. Ten riders and two bicyclists met up at Leonard's home about four miles north of his office for the commute. City officials in Arlington, located about 50 miles north of Seattle, granted them a special-permit to ride as a group. "We can't dictate how much oil companies charge, but today we're not buying," Leonard said. "We're using one-horse power." Leonard said the ride was a way to encourage his patients to use alternative forms of transportation.

Boy tackled by Mayor GREELEY, Colo. -- The mayor of this northern Colorado city has a temporary restraining order against him after he was accused of throwing a 15-year-old boy to the ground when the teen refused to stop riding a motorbike. Mayor Ed Clark, who must stay at least 100 yards away from the boy, told the Greeley Tribune he stopped the boy for his own safety and did not hurt him. He said he will fight the restraining order during a July 7 hearing. The boy's father, Tim Stitt, plans to ask the judge to make the restraining order permanent. Stitt said Clark forced the boy to the ground on Monday and then held him there until police arrived. Police ticketed the boy for driving without a license. The father said Clark should be charged with assault. Greeley police spokeswoman Joe Tyrnkowych said Wednesday an investigation was ongoing. Stitt said his son and Clark have been at odds for weeks after his son had a dispute with the mayor's wife. Stitt said Clark confronted his son at a basketball court and told him "bad things are going to happen" if he didn't stop showing disrespect to his

Inmate leaves behind rose cut toilet paper VAN BUREN, Ark. -Crawford County authorities say an inmate escaped the county jail and left behind a rose fashioned out of toilet paper because he felt sorry for breaking out. Luis Camacho-Mendoza was recaptured a day later last Wednesday in a Van Buren home after police received a tip. Investigator Ken Howard said Camacho-Mendoza was found hiding in a closet in a pile of clothes with a pillowcase over his head. "But he wasn't hiding too good because you could see the outline of his head in the pillow case," Howard said. "We all grabbed him pretty quick and he didn't seem to be resisting." Authorities said CamachoMendoza was in jail on drug charges and was expected to be deported to Mexico by immigration officials. In his escape, CamachoMendoza broke open a lock on a kitchen door using a tool made from two screwdrivers, authorities said. CamachoMendoza worked in the kitchen. When the inmate was discovered missing, authorities also found the flower, Howard said.


Page 3 Thursday July 3, 2008

N EWS

The Vista

"Free

• • ••

By Chase Dearinger

Staff Writer

BEN ROBINSON: WATCHING THE WALL COME DOWN Ben Robinson left for Vietnam at age 21. It was 1969 and the whole college experience hadn't gone as planned. He flunked. And then he went to war. But it wasn't until 19 years later that Robinson truly understood the impact of freedom. "In 1988, I was in East Berlin, behind the wall," says Robinson, now a site director for Boeing in Oklahoma City. "My wife was with me, and we met an older gentleman, maybe 80 years old.

I

n the spring of 1943, Quimby Enterline ran machinery part-time on a farm. And every day he wondered when he would go to fight in the largest war the world had ever seen. Twice he had received letters calling him into action and twice these letters had been recalled. He wasn't old enough, they told him, though he questioned why they would ask him if they knew his age to begin with. Yet, finally, on April 23, the 18-year-old was sworn into the U.S. Army at the Masonic Lodge on Fourth Street in Oklahoma City. And that's when his war began. Meanwhile, Leonard George's war had already begun. He joined the U.S. Navy on March 1, 1942 at age 25 because he believed the only thing more important than family was country. Despite the diverse backgrounds of those men and the unique paths they ultimately choose — Enterline now volunteers at the Edmond Historical Society; George is a retired pharmacist — they share one thing: They all took an oath to defend with their lives the United States Constitution and the freedoms that come with it. So, as the Fourth of July approaches, many Americans are preparing for yet another mundane holiday. There will be parades that many won't attend and fireworks that many won't see. But most Americans haven't trudged the path taken by veterans of foreign wars. Theirs has been a path that often led through hell but ended with independence. They are men like Enterline and George — and Denny Krause, a marine who left for Vietnam in 1964 because he believed he owed his country something; wasting away his parents' money, not to mention his own, while he majored in "party" just wasn't enough. The experiences of veterans give other Americans a unique perspective on the American holiday that celebrates independence and freedom. The Fourth of July "makes your heart beat a little harder," Krause says. "It makes you think. The Fourth of July means something to me. Can I explain it? No. It comes from the heart." "Those who have been in the military are more aware of what you're giving up. Veterans have a better idea of what freedom costs, because we've seen what happens to countries where freedom is taken away." These, then, are the soldiers' stories, told as only those who understand freedom at its core could tell them. • •

He wanted to know if I was an American. And I said yes. He asked if he could sit down and have a cup of coffee." Before the man left, he shook Robinson's hand and with tearfilled eyes said: "The Americans must never forget about the East Germans because only Americans know about freedom and only Americans can bring down the wall." Says Robinson: "This man had been separated from his family for 20 years. Within a couple of years, the wall came down."

"Those who have been in the military are more aware of what you're giving up... because we've seen what happens to countries where freedom is taken away." -Denny Krause

LEONARD GEORGE FAMILY & FREEDOM "Freedom? What's better [than that]?" George asks. It's a rhetorical question. He knows the answer: Nothing is better than freedom, particularly when you can spend it with family. George gave morphine shots to injured soldiers and looked a Japanese pilot in the white of his eyes as he was nearly killed. He knows how precious life and freedom are. "In those days, the most important thing we had was family," he says. "The next most important thing was our country, our freedom, which I think a lot of people today don't even think about." Freedom touches all aspects of life, George says. "It's a place where I wasn't being told what I had to do or report to someone everyday or where I could own my own property and I could do whatever I wanted to do whenever I wanted to do it and wherever I wanted to do it," he says. "Hold down any kind of job I wanted;-Chet-I was qualified for." George's Independence Day _plans don't include a fireworks show. He'll stay close to home, he says. "I have no desire to go out and see the firecrackers blowing off," he says, "I've seen that in actual shells."

1 •

Photo illustration by Eric Rothwell

...What's better than that? -Leonard Georg O SU

Continued from page 1 operated by OSU-OKC, according to their Web site. Tobacco use will also be prohibited in any vehicle leased or owned by the school. 2008-2009 UCOSA President John Bobb-Semple addressed the question of the UCO campus following in the path of the OSU Board of Regents. "UCO going tobaccofree is part of an effort to make our campus healthier. Our university does what it desires. But the goal is to ensure that we bring everybody on the UCO community along," he said. "Our student body, staff,

to continue providing a top quality education and outstanding service to our students." Approval by the state regents was the final action required before 25 colleges and universities could implement the increase in tuition and fees. Amanda Paliotta, OSRHE vice chancellor for budget and finance, said instate resident

Enterline saved lives as he fought his way from Africa across Europe. It is the price he — and many others — paid foc the ultimate commodity: freedom. And 65 years after Enterline waited in the farm fields for , .word of his role in the war, he'll be organizing Boy Scouts for the LibertyFest in downtown Edmond this Fourth. He's been helping with the Fourth of July parade since 1972. "I hope to see you out there," he says. "I'll be sitting by the library." And no doubt, enjoying his freedom.

Liberal Arts offers new major and faculty should work together to find a solution that works for our university. We can't be hasty, and let's take into consideration all parties involved." A look at the policies of various institutions throughout the state revealed different policies at each school. Southeastern Oklahoma State University in Durant, Okla. complies with the state's Smoking in Public Place Act, passed in 1987, that prohibits tobacco use in all campus buildings, except in designated smoking areas, according to their Web site. Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford, Okla. prohibits the use of tobacco "except

TUITION

Continued from page 1

II

QUIMBY ENTERLINE: SAVING LIVES & SCOUTS

students will experience an average increase of 9.1 percent, which translates to approximately $10.07 per credit hour. Tuition and fees increased by 9.9 percent at Oklahoma State University and the University of Oklahoma. The highest increase in tuition and fees in the state was for Oklahoma Panhandle State University in Goodwell with an increase of 11.3 percent, while the lowest increase was

in those locations that have been specifically designated for such use." SWOSU's policy states that "there shall be no use of tobacco in any of the classrooms, libraries, officers, restrooms, hallways and entries, gymnasiums, etc." The policy applies to all employees, students, vendors and visitors. East Central University in Ada, Okla. also complies with the state's Smoking in Public Places Act, according to their Web site. Northwestern Oklahoma State University in Alva, Okla. prohibits tobacco usage "in all buildings on the campuses," according to their Web site.

at Carl Albert State College in Poteau, with an increase of 4.9 percent. Incoming in-state freshman enrolling at a four-year university will be eligible for the guaranteed tuition rate program. Students enrolled in the program will be able to lock their tuition rate at an amount not to exceed 115 percent of the institution's nonguaranteed instate resident tuition rate for four years.

By Carrie Cronk Staff Writer

Starting this fall semester UCO students will have another option available to declare as a major. The College of Liberal Arts will add a major in humanities to their list of degree programs. Dr. Pamela Washington, College of Liberal Arts dean, said the new major is the first Bachelor of Arts degree in humanities to be offered in the state of Oklahoma. She • said UCO has worked for approximately 20 years to be able to offer the major in humanities, submitting proposals to the regents over that course of time. Dr. Theresa Vaughan, chairperson for the Department of Humanities and Philosophy, said, "Although the Humanities major is new to us, it actually represents a very tried and true method of education that goes all the way back to ancient Greece." "A humanities major will offer [students] an opportunity for excellent cultural and global competency, the ability to analyze disparate types of information into a coherent whole and excellent practice in critical thinking through writing," she said. "The Humanities major is designed to give a student intensive preparation in analytical and critical thinking using an interdisciplinary orientation." Washington said employers are currently seeking college graduates with humanities and liberal arts degrees because they are more skilled in critical thinking and writing. "The Humanities major will offer

excellent general preparation for a number of fields, as students will learn to analyze so many different kinds of information — it makes for very agile thinkers and workers," Vaughan said. "Some studies have shown that people with humanities degrees who go into business or other areas of employment not directly related to the humanities actually perform better, and rise more quickly in their chosen fields because of their ability to take in new information, understand cultural contexts and analyze diverse situations." Vaughan said careers in humanities specific areas include arts and educational programs, state humanities councils and other agencies that work to preserve and increase awareness of the humanities. In addition to employment opportunities, students seeking graduate level degrees can benefit from a degree in humanities as well. Vaughan said the humanities major would increase the student's understanding of numerous intellectual disciplines such as art, history, philosophy, literature, architecture, music and religious studies. "This breadth of preparation, and the correspondent emphasis on writing, reading and cultural analysis will provide high-quality intellectual training ... (and will) also give students flexibility in terms of which programs they might consider for graduate study," she said. For more information, contact the College of Liberal Arts department at 974-5844.


Page 4 Thursday, July 3, 2008

NEWS

The Vista

Delta Zeta members move home By Jordan Richison

Staff Writer

"Home is where the heart is" maybe a cliched phrase, but for the women of Delta Zeta, the phrase could literally be taken to heart. The DZ house, which is located on the corner of Jackson and Chowning, was built last year and features 10 bedrooms, housing 20 girls. The house also features a study room, living room, a patio, and a chapter room / dining room, where their meetings are held. "Having a brand new house on campus is such a blessing. There have been many members for many years that have worked very hard to get it and we are extremely proud of it," said DZ member Kori Samples. Samples said she loves living in house because "it is such a great experience." She said it's like a ongoing slumber party because they always have people at the house and there is always a shoulder to cry on. "It's such a joy to get to live with 19 of my best friends," Samples said. Samples said being a woman of Delta Zeta is extraordinary. She said Delta Zeta has instilled qualities in her "of a strong-willed, yet kind and compassionate woman." According to UCO professor Dr. Patti Loughlin's book, "Building Generations, Educating Generations," which details UCO's history, the Epsilon Upsilon chapter of Delta Zeta is the oldest Greek organization at UCO. The sorority was founded at Central State College on September 11, 1956. The sorority is one of 165 Delta Zeta chapters in the United States. Delta Zeta, which currently has 48 active members, has been one of the most successful Greek chapters on campus. In the past three years, DZ members Jill Sallee and Ashley "Eddie" Edwards have won the title of Miss UCO in 2006 and 2008 respectively. They have also had the past two freshman queen winners in Amanda Ardese in 2007 and Elizabeth Le in 2008. Edwards, public relations junior, was also a member of the Hornets Dance Squad during the Hornets two-year stay here. She said being in DZ is like having another family who you can come to anytime and they will be there supporting you in all you do. "It's great feeling knowing that when I do anything, I will always have the support of my sisters. They would do anything for me and I would do anything for them," Edwards said. Salee, who graduated this past spring with a B.A. in

Geography, said she enjoyed being in Delta Zeta because she knew she could always be herself. She said the chapter has always prided itself on being a very diverse group of women and while she was there she said she learned valuable lessons on working with many different kinds of personalities which in time helped to enhance her skills as a leader. "Most of my fond memories from college involve the friends that I made in Delta Zeta," Salee said. Delta Zeta is actively involved on campus as they participate in various events on campus like Homecoming, Greek Week and The Big Event. Samples, who was nominated as one of the four Greek Week goddesses, said her favorite event DZ participates in is Homecoming because of all the many by Vista photographer Chanel Henry activities all week long where they get to spend so much time together while Delta Zeta, located at Jackson and Chowning, was built last year. This house feacompeting. ture 10 bedrooms and can house 20 girls. "I really like it because it is not only about Greek life, it embraces the whole university. Every student and every given me a drive to do more than the average college parent or just anyone interested can enjoy Homecoming student and being in Delta Zeta has given me the sense of week, unlike Greek Week," Samples said. belonging somewhere away from the comforts of home," Delta Zeta also does a lot of work that helps out the Samples said. community. Their main Samples said by the philanthropy project is time she graduates from "Hearts for Hearing Week," "It's a great feeling UCO, she hopes to have which is held every spring experienced many more semester at UCO. knowing that when I do irreplaceable memories According to Samples, this her sisters because she anything, I will always with week holds many activities knows these experiences that vary year to year. All help shape her into the have the support of will the proceeds go to their women she has become. national philanthropy "Sound "I hope to look back my sisters." Beginnings Program," a over my collegiate years program that benefits people and know that I made the -Ashley Edwards best of them by joining an who are speech and hearing impaired. organization that is lifeSamples said being a altering and charactermember of Delta Zeta has building. Delta Zeta helped her become "a more open person and to interact Sorority transforms a girl into a woman and prepares her well with others, whether it be at DZ events or in the for what awaits after her collegiate life," Samples said. classroom or in the workplace." "Being a member of something bigger than me has

Mugabe wins tainted runoff election after opponent quits, citing violence By Abha Eli Phoboo

Staff Writer

Robert Mugabe of the ZA'NU-PF party won a single candidate runoff election June 27 for the presidency of Zimbabwe. His victory did not warm the heart of UCO student Samantha Chirebva. Chirebva is from Harare, Zimbabwe, and still has family there. "I don't think we've had a president in a long time," Chirebvu said. "What we've had is just a dictator. She and her Zimbabwean countrymen hoped for a different __outcome after opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai won the March ' 29 election. But the leader of the iMovement for Democratic Change pulled out of the elections, citing violence, and sought refuge in the Dutch embassy in Harare. There have been many incidents of violence in Zimbabwe, most of them Photo Provided by the ruling party supporters who have been accused of raping young Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe leaves after attending girls and beating up families opposed the eleventh ordinary session of the assembly of the African to Mugabe's rule. The supporters Union heads of State and government in Sharm el-Sheikh, also perpetrated violence against Egypt, Monday, June 30, 2008. citizens who voted for the opposition

in previous elections, reports claim. The political upheavals in Zimbabwe have been getting a lot of attention -xfs the African Summit ended Tuesday. gEVerything that has been going on, the violence, just shows how ruthless Mugabe is," said Chirebvu, who is one of two Zimbabwean students at UCO. "The people want things to change. They need to be able to speak." Mugabe has headed the Zimbabwe government since 1980, first as prime minister and then as president since 1987. At the African Union Summit held in Egypt's Sharm el-Sheikh, Mugabe attended as the president of Zimbabwe and was received as such. However, toward the end of the summit on Tuesday, Mugabe stormed out, according to Independent Online (iol.co.za). "Mugabe appeared less satisfied with the outcome and closing session during which he came in for heavy criticism," the iol site reported. "He and his entourage of bodyguards stormed out of the Sharm el-Sheikh summit centre some 30 minutes before the two-day meeting came to a close, missing the traditional group photo."

The African Union suggested that the two leaders compromise and form a unity government after Kenya's example. This suggestion has been dismissed by both Mugabe, and Tsvangirai. Chirebvu said her family in Harare is okay. They are staying safe by doing the basics, she said. "Watch where you're going, who you talk to, food shortage," she said. "Every time I look at the situation, I think of 'Animal Farm.' " At the summit, most of the African countries recognized 84-year-old Mugabe as the president at the African summit, but Botswana broke rank and refused to comply. Botswana's vice president Mompati Merafhe said the "elections do not confer legitimacy on the government of President Mugabe." Nigeria, Sierra Leone and Senegal followed Botswana's lead. The situation remains unresolved and as the country struggles to deal with its problems, the number of casualties grows. "I want to go back when I graduate," said Chirebvu, who should complete her studies in spring 2009. "All the hospitals are looking for nurses. There's plenty to do there."

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Page 5 Thursday, July 3,2008

OPINION

The Vista

The Vista Comm. Building, Rm. 107 100 N. University Dr. • Edmond, OK 73034-5209 405-974-5549 • editorial@thevistaonline.com The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and on Thursdays only during summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO. LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters,

EDITORIAL Jana Davis, Editor in Chief Nelson Solomon, Managing Editor

NEWS Jordan Richison, Staff-Writer Carrie Chalk, Skil-Writer Laura Hoffert, StaffWriter Lauren Lubbets, StoffWriter Abha Phoboo,StaffWriter

Lauren Seabrook,Staff writer

DESIGN Jana Davis

PHOTOGRAPHY Chanel Henry Eric Rothwell

ADVERTISING Keith Mooney, Ad Director Kellen Hodgeson

CARTOONIST Jared Aylor

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Mesa Berlemann

Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, ADVISER Kelly Wray 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 107. Letters can be e-mailed to editorial@thevistaonline.com .

EDITORIAL

Problems show in age gap By Corey Martin/Daily Mississippian

The gap between some things is amazing. Gas prices three years ago. Gas prices now. The credibility of a babysitter on "Jon & Kate Plus 8." The credibility of Michael Jackson as your neighborhood nanny. You get the point. By the time you cast youP vote in the November election, both presidential candidates will have celebrated their August birthdays. Sen. Barack Obama (Aug. 4) will turn 47, and Sen. John McCain (Aug. 29) will turn 72. Now that's a gap. You don't hear much about the candidates' ages, but it's very easy to see why both candidates want to be president. McCain and his college roommate, Benjamin Franklin, reportedly spent many nights developing ground breaking governmental frameworks. As one of the original signers of the Constitution, he wants the country to head in the direction envisioned by him and the rest of America's forefathers. Obama, for whom McCain was a regular babysitter, has wanted to be in the Oval Office since he was a young boy. He even spoke about it last week at his high school's Future Leaders of America meeting. In all seriousness, age can add to or subtract from the candidates' popularity. A USA Today/Gallup Poll reveals that Obama is a 2-to-1 favorite in the 18-to-29 demographic. McCain leads Obama 49 percent to 40 percent with seniors 65 and older. CNN and several other news outlets report Obama brushed over the subject at a Jacksonville fundraiser. "They're going to try to make you afraid of me," Obama said. "He's young and inexperienced and he's got a funny name." In terms of absolute experience, there is nothing that can prepare a person for becoming the United States president. Becoming president is probably like driving a Chevy Aveo for a few years and then being expected to hop in Jimmie Johnson's car and win a NASCAR race. Obama went on to say, "And did I mention he's black?" Obama is being portrayed as an agent of change, because that's what young people are all about. How many 70-yearolds can you see saying, "Let's shake things up?" Obama's flashy speeches, charisma and energy are at least partly attributed to his age. To keep up with Obama, McCain would have to drink a few Red Bulls, the result of which would be his staff spending the next few hours worrying about his heart. In January, The Boston Globe reported McCain cited his age as a primary reason he might not run for a second term. "If I said I was running for eight years, I'm not sure that would be a vote-getter," McCain said. He's right. If the future president gives us a great four years, wouldn't we want him to come back? Wouldn't we want him to have the mental and physical wherewithal to do so? I'm not saying age will be this election's determining factor, but it's obvious the country needs change. It might just trickle down to one question: Do you want Matlock to be the next attorney general?

Cartoon by Jared Aylor

Tuition increases inhibit college students Tuition hikes. What a way to keep our society educated. I am not sure that anything could infuriate me quicker than a group of older adults sitting around making decisions for us younger adults. They don't have to pay for school anymore, so why not make it more expensive for everyone? Tuition and mandatory fee hikes have been increased by the Oklahoma State Regents far Higher Education by an outrageous 9.9 percent at OU and OSU and 9:5"percent at UCO. Twenty five schools just in Oklahoma alone have been affected by this increase. And it isn't just in Oklahoma, it is all over the nation. Auburn University approved a 12 percent tuition increase. The Western Kentucky University Board of Regents passed an 8 percent tuition increase. I can imagine the conversation being held in the board of regents meetings. "Good afternoon ladies and

What's the point? gentlemen, we are here to discuss tuition increases." Someone in the back raises their hand and asks, "Why?" "You don't know? The gas prices." Everyone "Oh's" together and nods their heads in agreement that tuition should, indeed, be increased. It's like the famous "world peace" answer that pageant women use to answer their stage questions. Or the "we are protecting you from another 9/11 terrorist attack" statement that the government gave us and the statement that so many hopeful Americans held on to. We lost a lot of our freedom over that one, didn't we? All for the sake of

a little more protection. I feel like we are living in a "Big Brother" society. Maybe George Orwell was on to something in his book, "1984." If the big boys and girls say that tuition should be increased, then it should. End of story. But that shouldn't be the end of the story. Not one article, at least that I read, explained the reasoning behind tuition hikes. Don't we deserve at least an explanation? I could perhaps rest a little easier knowing that my extra money was spent for a reason. I have too many friends that, when they graduated from high school, had no way of supporting themselves and paying for college. Not everyone is blessed to receive financial aid, scholarships, or mom and dad. What are we saying to our future grad students when we make it impossible to afford? I guess we are kicking them out the door and saying, "good luck."

Looking on the bright side of life I was recently able to get involved with a Habitat for Humanity project, and I found the experience rewarding. But I was struck with awe at a random comment I heard in the morning before leaving for the construction site. The forecast called for showers throughout the day and that would likely hamper our efforts at Habitat that day. But our coordinator had confirmed that plans were still in motion for the day's events to proceed. But one person said that because it's raining, our chances of doing real work were slim and us going was pointless. I was not deterred by this for a single moment, but it struck me at how pessimistic our world is today. Not that there isn't a reason to be pessimistic. Gas prices are rising, food prices are rising and tuition rates are increasing on a yearly basis. There isn't much to be positive about nowadays, especially when we consider the student loans that will catch up to us when we graduate.

The Bottom Line BY NELSON SOLOMON Our daily activities are being impacted by all of these rising prices, and things seem to be only going downhill from here, with negative forecasts predicted in most sectors of the news. But on this day of volunteering, we were able to paint the inside of a house, clean the inside of another one and help move two-by-four wood pieces from one site to a home construction site to assist another group. I was disappointed that we did not get to frame part of a house, but despite that, I feel that we were able to do some good by working to help construct a home for a family that is in need of decent shelter. But hearing that negative remark early in the day made me sad to think

that people can be so pessimistic about life and the possibility of doing a good thing. I know there isn't much good news out there today, but I urge you to try and find some source of hope or joy. And above all else, enjoy your life while being a responsible person. Appreciate the people you have around you that help color your life, live fully every single day, and you will not regret it. A few words of wisdom: "Perhaps our eyes need to be washed by our tears once in a while, so that we can see Life with a clearer view again." - Alex Tan "If you will call your troubles experiences, and remember that every experience develops some latent force within you, you will grow vigorous and happy, however adverse your circumstances may seem to be." - John Heywood, English playwright and poet "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty." - Winston Churchill

CAMPUS QUOTES: Compiled and photographed by Eric Rothwell

"What would you think if UCO became a non-smoking campus?" "I don't smoke, so that would be good."

"I would love it.

Saurabh Sharma

Tricia McCoy

Senior, Marketing

Senior, Marketing

"Even though I don't smoke, it would be ridiculous because a lot of people smoke."

Matt Sharp Freshman accounting

"Fine with me, but it might make UCO smokers mad."

Brynn Mays Senior, General studies


Page 6 Thursday, July 3, 2008

CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINES: All classifieds MUST be submitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. Prices: Classified ads cost $7/day for the first 20 words and $.10/word thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call or 974-5549 974-5918 for info.

Employment PT NANNY needed for children ages 8 & 10 in NW Edmond. Hours are 3:40 PM - 6PM M-Th and occasional Fridays. Prefer student with experience references, good driving record, auto insurance, reliable transportation and a great attitude. Resp. for assisting with homework, driving to all afterschool activities and keeping kids happy. Must love dogs, playing video games and jumping on the trampoline. Great family offering great pay for the right person. Call 471-3142 or email barnes.4@cox.net RECEPTIONIST CASHIER Kennedy Tire & Auto. Study while you work! Great part-time college job. Call Brenda at 341-8767.

SHOGUN'S STEAK HOUSE Hiring for wait staff, bussers, dish washers, host, bartender. Apply in person at Northpark Mall (NW 122nd & N. May) after 5:30pm. 749-0120.

ST. ELIZABETH CHILD DEVELOPMENT CTR. has PT teacher position starting August 26. Need to love working with children. Hours are 9am-3pm four days a week. Salary based on experience. If interested call the CDC office at 340-1789.

SENIOR SERVICES OF OKLAHOMA Is looking NEED PT JOB? St. Eliza- for students to fill part time beth Ann Seton after school positions. Several 9am program is looking for some- 1pm and 1:30 pm - 5:30pm one to work 3pm to 6pm five shifts are available for Mondays a week. $6.50 an hour. Fri. We pay $10 per hour Fall position. If interested call for energetic phone work the CDC office at 340-1789. educating senior citizens on healthcare issues. No ATTN ELEMENTARY ED./ experience is needed we EARLY CHILDHOOD MA- will train. Business is loJORS AND/OR DEGREED cated at 1417 NW 150th Edmond St. in Edmond. Call 879TEACHERS: 1888 to set up an interview. Flex hiring. pre-school ible hours. Call 205-4299. Ask for Hannah McMahan. Needed imTEACHER mediately for Edmond Daycare. FT/PT. Experience preferred, competitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call SERVER POSITION Avail- Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262 able @ Pearl's Lakeside. Rentals/Housing Apply within. 748-6113. DILLON PARK HANDY STUDENT Car- APARTMENTS Now pentry, painting, lawn pre-leasing for Summer maintenance. Near UCO. & Fall. Free cable TV., Must be self-motivated, phone & high-speed intrustworthy. 641-0712. ternet. Call 285-5900

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Page 7 Thursday, July 3, 2008

The Vista

A look into the community LibertyFest How Edmond is celebrating the Fourth of July Photo by Eric Rothwell Layton Jant (above) walks with his plate at Taste of Edmond on June 29. Taste of Edmond is part of LibertyFest. Gordon Couch (left) tells his friend about 'the engine in the classic car at UCO campus on June 28. The Classic Car Show is one of several events that occurred during LibertyFest.

Photo by Eric Rothwell

Schedule of Events: BRICKTOWN:

Bricktown events will start at noon with an art exhibit along the canal, children's groups will sing and dance from 5-6 p.m. and a hot dog eating contest will follow immediately after.

LIBERTYFEST:

The LibertyFest Parade begins at 8:45 a.m. tomorrow and the fireworks show is scheduled to begin at 10 p.m. The best viewing for the fireworks is on the grounds of the UCO campus east of downtown on Edmond Road (2nd Street). There is no charge for viewing the huge, 100-entry LibertyFest Parade, concert or the fireworks display. The July 4th parade travels through downtown Edmond. A map of the route is available in Adobe PDF format through a link available at okc.about.com/od/ holidayevents/a/okcjuly4th_3.htm.

Two-year-old Rowan (below) drags his kite around Mitch Park Sunday, June 29 at Kite Fest in Edmond.


Page 8 Thursday, July 3, 2008

SPORTS

The Vista

Haglund named a first-team selection on All-Arena Football League Team

by Vista photographer Chanel Henry

Liberty Fest Rodeo was held Sunday June 9 at Edmond Rodeo Ground. The rodeo held events such as barrels, roping, team roping and bull riding.

SAN JOSE, Calif — Former Central Oklahoma place-kicker A.J. Haglund has been named a first-team selection on the All-Arena Football League Team after a record-setting regular season with the defending ArenaBowl champion San Jose SaberCats. An All-American in 2004 for the Bronchos, Haglund has connected of 21-of-25 field goals and 116-of-124 extra points in scoring a teamrecord 179 points — the second-most in league history. His 84.0-percent field goal accuracy is a league record and he also made a team-record 59 consecutive PATs during one stretch. Haglund, a second-team All-AFL pick last year as a rookie with the SaberCats, won league Kicker of the Month honors in March, April and May. A native of El Reno, Haglund was UCO's place-kicker for four straight years from 2001 to 2004 and was a two-time first-team All-Lone Star Conference pick. He set school records for field goals made in a game (five), season (15) and career (40) and PATs (139) in a career while finishing second in career points (259). San Jose (11-5) won its third straight Western Division crown to earn a first-round bye in the AFL playoffs.

A.J. Haglund

Photo Provided

Favre considers returning to football, ESPN reports

family is tugging on him (to play)." open arms." Mortensen also said his source told him the Packers A message left with the Packers was not immediately would be reluctant to open the door for Favre because returned. GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) _ Brett Favre is considering "Brett retired for the right reasons, even though I know his Favre has two years left on his contract at an average of about $12.5 million per season. The Packers placed him coming out of retirement, according to an ESPN report. on the reserve-retired list in the spring so his salary does ESPN's Chris Mortensen said Wednesday a Green Bay not now count toward the cap. Packers source told him the 38-year-old Favre told coach Favre's commitment to retirement has been questioned Mike McCarthy in the past two weeks that he has the itch since his announcement. That talk resumed in midtoplay. June when Favre withdrew from the American Century The Packers' former quarterback retired March 6 after Celebrity Golf Championship at Lake Tahoe, scheduled a 17-year career. for July 11-13. Cornerback Al Harris said on ESPN's NFL Live that Tournament spokesman Steve Griffith said then that Favre also made similar comments to him. Favre had to miss the event because of a scheduling y. "I know he has the itch to come back and play," Harris conflict. said. "If he will or not, I don't know." When he retired, a teary Favre said, "I've given The Packers had planned to use Aaron Rodgers as their everything I possibly could give to this organization, the quarterback for the upcoming season. game of football, and I don't think I've got anything left "Aaron is our quarterback," Harris said. "Brett's retired. to give And that's it. I know I can play. But I don't think But if he wanted to come back, there would be some guys AP Photo I want to." who wouldn't mind it. I would welcome him back with By AP Writer

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The Vista July 03, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista July 03, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.