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www.thevistaonline.com The Student Voice of the Universit of Central Oklahoma Since 1903

Reyes becomes ninth Miss Hispanic UCO by Jana Davis Staff Writer

"I was overwhelmed with joy. We've all worked so hard," Erika Carmen Reyes said after winning the 9th annual Miss Hispanic UCO Scholarship Pageant last Saturday at 7 p.m. in Constitution Hall. "We all equally deserve to be queen," Reyes said. The three contestants of this year's competition participated in traditional wear of their country, swimsuit, talent and eveningwear. The swimsuit competition was added to this year's program to better prepare them for Miss Oklahoma Latina, the next round in competition, Tiffany Brown, coordina-

for of Multicultural Student Services said. She said the contestants had been practicing for Saturday since mid-February. "I think she's going to be a great representation of UCO," said MeShawn Conley, director of Multicultural Student Services. "I think the pageant was overall a success. Everything flowed smoothly," Brown said. Reyes is a freshman dance major and her platform is childhood obesity through movement. "I plan to create dance classes for young children. They can not only work on exercise, but also have fun," Reyes said after the pageant on Saturday.

For the talent portion of the evening, Reyes performed flamenco, a Spanish dance with strong rhythms. Miss Hispanic UCO 2007,Cecilia Contreras, returned to crown the winner, perform her last year's talent and give the on-stage projection questions. All contestants had to answer an on-stage question concerning their platform. For Reyes, the question was asked about her opinion on how the public should be made more aware of childhood obesity. "In my opinion, we should all be educated on nutrition, especially in the home," by Vista photographer Chris Albers Reyes said. First runner-up was Yenifer Erika Carmen Reyes crouches while being crowned Andrea Orioli, a junior dance Miss Hispanic UCO 2008-2009 by the outgoing Cecila major, and the second run- Contreras.

ner-up was Ana Stephania Tehrani, a freshman biomedical engineering major. Tehrani won a $400 tuition waiver and an official plaque. Orioli won a $1,000 tuition waiver and a plaque. Reyes won a $1,600 tuition waiver, official crown, sash and plaque. Reyes also won the Future Business Woman award, which consists of a $100 scholarship and plaque, and the Best Talent award. Tehrani received Miss Photogenic. In regards to the low participation in the pageant this year, Brown said she believes people weren't participating because students didn't think they would have time. "It's a great opportunity to build friendships," she said.

Bobb-Semple, others officially sworn in to lead UCOSA by Nelson Solomon Staff Writer

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

New UCOSA president John Bobb-Semple prepares before the April 21 UCOSA Inaugural Banquet.

The four individuals charged with leading UCOSA in 2008-09 were inducted at the annual UCO Student Association Inaugural Banquet yesterday, the last UCOSA gathering of the year. Dylan Burgey of the House Judiciary Committee swore in the new President, Vice President, Speaker of the House and President Pro Tempore of the Senate. Dr. Kathryn Gage received a roar of applause for her active support of student government. Gage said that in her 10 years as Vice President of Student Affairs, UCOSA has become "more sophisticated and involved." Jason Hines, 2007-08 Student Body President, said he was "changed by his four years of experience in UCOSA." "I want to challenge everyone with the fact that `UCOSA has a voice, — he said. He said that "UCOSA is [going] in the right direction"

and feels that the newly elected leaders will continue that trend. "This year, we have really stepped to the plate, having the largest delegation at the Oklahoma Student Government Association and other events," he said. He referenced a remark from Regent Stuart Price of the Oklahoma Regents for Higher Education, who mentioned at the Regents' Hearing to Hines that UCO is "on fire this year." He introduced the Student Body President to follow in his footsteps, John BobbSemple. Bobb-Semple gave high praise to the work of Hines this past year, and said that Hines "set the bar very high for me." He said he hopes to surpass his predecessor's accomplishments at UCO, "because if we didn't, we wouldn't be growing as we should be and staying in the same place." He told the body to "be prepared to work, and to be prepared to grow."

see UCOSA, page 5

Campus to hold Relay for Life fundraising to kick off Friday Earth Day Fair by Jordan Richison Staff Writer

by Laura Hoffert Staff Writer

Since 1970, Earth Day has been celebrated worldwide and UCO is continuing this , tradition by hosting the "Earth Day Fair" from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 23. "In 1986 the biology club started selling plants and t-shirts for Earth Day, it wasn't until 1991 that it became the offi-

cial event we see today," said UCO Earth Day Committee Chairman Dr. David Bass. The event will be held at Broncho Lake and free hot dogs, chips and drinks will be given out at 11:30 a.m. There will be snack stands, as well, with profits going to various environmental causes. Being the longest-running Earth Day

see EARTH, page 5

see RELAY, page 3

"Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts."

Mon. through Thurs. at 5 p.m.

UCO students will do their part in the fight against cancer at UCO's first ever Relay For Life event this Friday from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. at Plunkett Park. • Relay For Life is a nationwide event, sponsored by the American Cancer Society to help raise money and awareness for cancer research. It is also designed to honor those who have fallen to cancer and commend those who have survived it. Relay chair Beth Marcotte said the event is going to be very laid back. She said there would be several activities

and entertainment including a Mr. Relay contest, along with free food from local restaurants like Alvarado's and Jamba Juice. There will also be a survivor ceremony honoring those who have overcome cancer and a Luminaria ceremony that will honor both cancer survivors and the memory of those who have succumb the disease. The theme for the event is "Cast Out Cancer." Marcotte said each participant would by Vista photographer Brenda O'Brian dress up as characters from different movies or TV Tiffany Palmer, biology sophomore, puts up posters shows. as part of her duties as Publicity Chair for Relay for Some teams have already

NEWSCENTRAL

-Rachel Carson

Life on Thursday, April 10 in the cafe at Chambers Library.

Catch up on your Greek myths in "Metamorphoses"


OPINION

April 22, 2008

Technical difficulties See you next time! Solutions will be available in Thursday's issue

Cartoon by Jared Aylor

CAMPUS QUOTES:

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Compiled and photographed by Chris Albers

"If you were James Bond, what would your first mission be?" "Infiltrate the Bush Administration and uncover their evil plots."

In Response to the 4-17 'What's the Point?' What's the point? The point is that Agent Horn's scenario is fundamentally flawed in two ways. Students with concealed carry permits want the ability to defend themselves on campus just like they do off campus. Agent Horn's scenarios assume that responding police officers will run into permit holders who will draw their weapons or have their weapons drawn. That's not the point. If police officers are already present and capturing or killing a shooter, why would I, as a permit holder, need to get involved? My permit, and my pistol, are for the many, many times where police officers are not present. I'm sitting on a college campus right now and there isn't a police officer to be seen. We fully support enhancing police departments' ability to

respond to mass shootings-- but the point is that police departments respond to mass shootings after they've happened. They don't stop them in progress. Most of the victims at Virginia Tech died after the police already arrived. It only took four minutes for police to respond to the NIU shooting. But by then, it was already over. All Students for Concealed Carry on Campus and its supporters want is the ability to defend ourselves when it's needed, not five minutes after the shooting is over.

Samuel Keane-Rudolph

In response to the 4-17 staff editorial, "The Pope's Here...So What?"

Robert Gambill Criminal Justice - Graduate Student

"Tie up Rep. Sally Kern and ship her off to Kuwait."

Billy Noble Music Theatre - Senior

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"Kidnap Tyra Banks and take over her empire."

Ethan Contreas Music Theatre - Freshman

"Travel around and eat foreign foods."

It seems to me that you are no better than the media which is, according to you, "turning the Pope's visit into a freak show." Why are we "treating him as a celebrity"? Because he is a celebrity. The Pope is infinitely more well-known and influential throughout the world than Elvis, whom you so intelligently compared him to. If you really believe this comparison is legitimate, then you must also believe that people gathering in St. Peter's square to hear Mass every day is equivalent to a mosh pit. Of course the Pope's visit to the United States is newsworthy, because it is the first time that this pope has done so and it is important to the approximately one-fourth of the population that is Catholic, not to mention all of the other people around the world who closely followed his visit. Furthermore, it is not the pope's job to address the Iraq war (even though I highly doubt that the reason he did not is because he "has been watching too much presidential campaign coverage"). When the pope visits a country, his direct intention is to address the Catholic Church in that country and discuss its strengths and weaknesses and come up with solutions to fix said weaknesses. While it certainly would have been permissable for the pope to talk about the Iraq war, it was not his responsibility and for you to criticize him for it shows a great lack of knowledge and understanding on your part.

Holly Pritchard

That simple statement offended not only the Catholics on campus, but also those of other faiths. It saddens me that as a journalist the author of this article had to be so negative to get his point across (Perhaps the author is anti-Catholic?). To the millions of Catholics around the world, he is the leader of their chosen faith. For someone as important as the Pope is to Catholics, it is a big deal. I don't believe I have heard of any criticism of the Rev. Billy Graham when he visited the White House, or counseled or ministered to our Presidents over the many years of his ministry. The Catholic Church is not perfect, but then any institution created by man is not perfect. The author seemed to utter distain about the Pontiff in his "glass can," but what about our President? He travels in a bullet probf limousine, and we don't get to see his face! Tight security and metal detectors are common when the President or any foreign head of state visits an area as unsecure as a baseball stadium. The author also seems to take issue with the Pope coming as a friend. I guess he doesn't really know his history. The Pontiff is no longer a political leader. He has not been one for over a hundred years. That does not mean he does not have opinions and he will undoubtedly share them with our President. Benedict XVI comes to the United States not to change world politics, but to do his job: minister to his flock, the Roman Catholics of the United States. Yes, he is a world leader—to the millions of Roman Catholics around the world. Debbie Brazil, Junior Histoty Major Debbie Brazil

Katheryn Johnson Music Education - Sophomore

"Kidnap every member of the Liverpool ftltbol team, so they will lose their next match."

Tayo Awodumila Accounting - Sophomore

"Undercover humanitarian work in Africa."

THE VISTA Comm. Building, Rm. 107 100 N. University Dr. • Edmond, OK 73034-5209 405-974-5548 • editorial@thevistaonline.com EDITORIAL

PHOTOGRAPHY

Andrew Knittle, Editor in Chief No Lupov, Managing Editor

Chris Albers, Photo Editor Brenda O'Brian

N EWS

ADVERTISING

Justin Langston, Senior Staff Writer Nelson Solomon, Staff Writer Jana Davis, Staff Writer Abha Eli Phoboo, Staff Writer Jordan Richison, Staff Writer Carrie Cronk, Staff Writer Megan Lee, Staff Writer Laura Hoffert, Staff Writer Josh Flowers, Staff Writer

Keith Mooney, Ad Director Garrett Johnson

CARTOONIST Jared Aylor

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Tresa Berlemann

SPORTS Jeff Massie

ADVISER Julie Clanton

Joshua Burgin Senior - OCU

DESIGN Steven Reckinger

The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semiweekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and on Thursdays only during summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034. Telephone: (405) 974-5549. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO.

LETTERS

The Vista encourages letters

to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 107. Letters can be e-mailed to editorial@ thevistaonline.com .


April 22, 2008

'Metamorphoses' to premiere April 24 by Josh Flowers Ste Writer The ancient tales of Greek mythology will come alive at Mitchell Hall Theater April 24 through April 27 as the UCO Department of Theatre, Dance and Media Arts presents Mary Zimmerman's Tony Award-winning play "Metamorphoses." Based on Ovid's seminal anthology of classical stories, the play features a combination of music, theatre and dance that has thrilled audiences around the country since its first run on Broadway in 2002. The play borrows 10 of the Roman author's most memorable myths and fuses them together with modem elements of humor and thought to create a unique storytelling experience. Contemporary audiences will instantly recognize many of the legendary tales presented within the production, such as King Midas and the golden touch, but they will also be treated to such lesserknown myths like the story of Erysichthon and his insatiable hunger. However, audience members do not need a Ph.D. in classical literature in order to enjoy the play. "'Metamorphoses' is a very exciting show in so many ways. Visually, it's absolutely beautiful. Everything from the lighting, to the use of silhouettes, to the virtual thunderstorm," said Daisy Bristow, theatre professor and show director. "We have 10 incredible actors who each morph into different gods and goddesses throughout the story. What's amazing is that the audience will be right there on the stage rather than in

the main floor seats so they will really get to experience the show from an interesting perspective." The audience will be seated around a large pool of water, which was actually built into the middle of the stage, and will act as a conduit for the performers to change from character to character. According to technical director Chris Domanski, staging a play based around

"Visually, it's absolutely beautl. Everything from the lighting, to the use of silhouettes, to the virtual thunderstorm." Daisy Bristow

water has presented the production team with a number of difficulties. "There are so many elements involved. The actors are in a foot of water that has to be filtered and heated. In addition, we've crafted a 12-foot tall chandelier that rains," said Domanski. Throughout the show, musicians will wander among the audience and perform on a variety of flutes and drums, adding to the classical framework of the production. "It will be a very interactive experience," Domanski said. Tickets to the play are $12 for adults, $8 for senior citizens, $7 for non-UCO students and children and $4 for UCO students and faculty members. Performances begin at 7:30 p.m., April 2426 and at 2 p.m., April 27 at

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Faculty member Luke Hadsall cleans a pool of water that will be used for the theatre production "Metamorphosis."

the Mitchell Hall Theater. Since seating for the show is limited, reservations are strongly recommended. Seating also comes on a firstcome-first-serve basis so audience members are advised to arrive early„ The play does contain brief scenes of nudity,

LIVING OFF CAMPUS

so the performance is recommended for mature audiences only. For more information and reservations, call the Mitchell Hall Box Office at (405) 9743375. The Box Office is open weekdays from 10 a.m. till 5 p.m.

RELAY from page 1 decided on what TV show or movie they are going to represent. Members of Alpha Gamma Delta decided on characters from "That 70's Show." Members of Sigma Kappa are taking a unique approach to the theme as their team will divide in half and dress as characters from the popular MTV reality show "The Gauntlet: Rookies vs. Veterans." Each team was encouraged to raise at least $1000. So team members have been doing a wide variety of things to raise money. The different fundraising tactics include sending out Relay fundraising e-mails to friends and family and going around different business collecting checks and cash donations. Marcotte said one team set up an Arbonne open house to raise money for their team and half of the profits that they raised went to Relay. According to the Relay For Life Web site, freshman Mollie Hemric and sophomore Diana Holman have raised the most money among students. Hemric has raised $675 and Holman has raised $375. Hemric hopes the fundraising will educate people and give them a chance for early cancer detection that will help save their lives. "I know some people may not see it as a big deal but with cancer becoming more frequent, I believe every penny counts. I know that this will never bring the people I love back, but it could ease pain of other families, who I hope never have to experience the kind of pain of losing someone they love," she said. Unlike most Relay For Life events which are planned a year ahead of time, this Relay was put together in February.

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So with limited time, the committee has been going above and beyond, doing whatever it takes trying to promote the event on campus. Relay publicity chair Tiffany Palmer said she has put posters up in the different buildings around campus to help promote event. She said they have also been making announcements at a variety of organizations and at the UCOSA meetings on Mondays. Palmer said she has a lot of family and friends that are both cancer survivors and victims and she is happy to do her part in the fight against cancer. "It has been an honor to help out with this event and raise money to fight a horrible disease," Palmer said. Marcotte said everyone is encouraged to come. She said luminaries would be on sale for $10, so people can buy one and honor a friend or love one who had cancer. She added that donations would also be accepted throughout the night. "If you are not a participant or part of a team, just coming to the event is a great way to give back and get involved," Marcotte said. Palmer said she is looking forward to the event because it will allow her a chance to spend time with her teammates while supporting a great cause. She added that she is looking forward to the luminaria ceremony and getting to see all the luminaries lit up around Plunkett Park. "I am looking forward to seeing all of the different luminaries, I know it is going to be very inspirational." Palmer said. For more information about Relay For Life, visit relayforlife.org or contact Beth Marcotte at bmarcotte@ ucok.edu. To make a donation, visit the official UCO event Web site at events.cancer. org/rflucentralokok.

LIVING ON CAMPUS

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CLASSIFIEDS

April 22, 2008

FUN SUMMER JOB!

Deadlines/Pricing DEADLINES: All classifieds

MUST be submitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. Prices: Classified ads cost $6/day for the first 20 words and $.10/word thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call 974-5549 or 974-5918 for info.

NOW HIRING PT/FT RECEPTIONIST

Must have people skills, positive attitude, basic computer skills and be proficient in handling phone calls and scheduling. Call 923-0074 or apply in person at 2000 W. Danforth, Ste. 124. (brow Studio.

Looking for a part-time ffice assistant (mornings/afternoons.) Must have experience in Microsoft Office, able to multitask, and typing skills are required. Experience in transcription a plus. Please contact Heather or Kayla @ 341-3085.

ENJOY THE FRESH AIR

Work outside on tree and berry farm. Flexible hrs. Great for students. Call (405) 340-5488 for interview.

BUSY EDMOND DOGGY DAYCARE

NEED P/T JOB?

Looking for part-time employees. Fax resume to 341-3037.

St. Elizabeth's afterschool program is looking for someone that loves children that could help with our program. Hourly pay commensurate with experience. Hours are 3-6PM, 5 days a week for summer & fall. Also, subs are needed for this time period. If interested call the CDC office at 340-1789.

PT SUMMERTIME CHILDCARE NEEDED

For 2 boys, age 4 & 6. Flexible schedule. 3 days per week. Must be dependable and honest, with good driving record. Located east of Portland Ave. Call Amy 406-9985.

ST. ELIZABETH'S CDC

Is looking for a FIT teacher with early childhood degree or working on their degree. We also need subsitute teachers that can help 3-4 or 5 days a week. Hours are anytime between 6AM-7PM. If interested please call CDC office at 340-1789.

Looking for...

SCHOLARSHIP?

TEMPORARY WAREHOUSE HELP NEEDED FOR SUMMER

FLEXIBLE HOURS? WEEKLY PAY? $8/HOUR?

Must be able to lift 40Ibs. Hours are 8AM to 4:30PM M-F with some overtime and Saturdays. Pay starts at $8.50 hourly. Please apply at Thompson School Book, 39 NE 24th St., OKC. Ask for Ronnie.

...then look no further!

VISION QUEST IS NOW HIRING!

EDMOND FAMILY

CUSTOMER SERVICE HELP

P/T CASHIER/ STOCKWORKER NEEDED

RECEPTIONIST NEEDED

EDMOND PSYCHOLOGICAL OFFICE

Heavy lifting required. Must be 21. Apply in person: Edmond Wine Shop, 1520 S. Boulevard.

LAWNCARE MAINTENANCE HELP WANTED

For financial services co. PIT position in Edmond. Call Alex, 990-0488, for more info.

CITY OF EDMOND

Summer positions @ Pelican Bay Aquatic Center: Asst. Pool Manager, Cashier & Cafe Managers, Cafe Staff/Cashiers, Lifeguard Staff, Water Safety Instructors, Golf Course, Arcadia Lake, Parks & Recreation jobs also open. Job Info line 359-4648. www.edmondok.com . Apply at 100 E. First, Room 106

Flexible hours. $8.50 per hour. Apply at Pinnacle Fitness, 2137 NW 138th St. 748-4544.

Full and part-time positions. Starting pay: $8/hr. 359-3747.

Employment

FLYER DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED

Seeking summer nanny in North Edmond for 3 boys, Mon - Fri. 7:45am til 5pm. Call for interview. 412-3144.

Seeks year-round in-home sitter for 2 and 4-year-old. Monday through Friday, 2-6PM. Our home is less that a 1/2 mile from UCO. References required. Position starts May 12, 2008. Please call 405-401-2943 and leave a message.

ZEN ASIAN DINING

Now hiring servers & hostesses. Flexible hours. Call Leslie, 627-8795.

CHILDCARE HELP NEEDED

Family looking for mature, responsible student to care for elementary age boys. Must be dependable, honest, with good driving record. Call Jill (405) 359-8353.

LOOKING FOR A NEW & FUN WORK ENVIRONMENT?

Now hiring for all shifts. Hyatt Place. Send resumes to Kenneth.James@ hyattselect.

corn RIVER OAKS GOLF CLUB

Looking for a friendly, energetic person to fill weekday shifts or Saturday & Sunday shifts at the bar & grill. $8-10 per hr. Will train. Located 10 min. from UCO. Call Chris 771-5800 for appt.

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For Sale

Conveniently located on the UCO campus, offers English as a second language classes for international students/individuals. NOW FEATURING a specially designed program with: Strong emphasis in listening & speaking, Highly interactive classes, Comprehensive TOEFL program. Enjoy small classes and the campus facilities. Contact us at (405) 341-2125 or www.thelanguagecompany.com

DO YOU WANT MORE FOR YOUR CHILD THAN DAYCARE WHILE YOU ARE WORKING OR ATTENDING SCHOOL?

Churchill Pre-School Academy's curriculum prepares your child for school. Estabished in 1986. Enrolling now for summer and fall. No enrollment fees. Located at 724 W. 15th St. Open 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m., all year. Please call 341-4314

3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH MOBILE HOME

Already set up in park, 1 mile west of campus. $6,000. Contact: 878-0104 or 659-9225.

SHOGUN'S STEAK HOUSE

Hiring for wait staff, bussers, dish washers, host, bartender. Apply in person at Northpark Mall (NW 122nd & N. May) after 5:30pm. 749-0120.

PART-TIME POOL MANAGERS & LIFEGUARDS

THE ATHLETE'S FOOT TECHNICAL SHOE STORE

in North OKC is accepting applications for employment. 12-15 hrs. per week. Flexible hours & Saturdays. No retail experience needed. Call 848-3232.

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COLLEGE DISCOUNTS AVAIL.

Spacious 1 & 2 bed units priced from $450.00-600.00. Limited availability. Call today to reserve your new home. (405) 341-8911.

UNDERCOVER SHOPPERS

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DILLON PARK APTS

Now pre-leasing for Summer & Fall. Free cable T.V., phone & high-speed internet. Call 285-5900

Earn up to $150 per day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail establishments. Experience not required. Call 800-722-4791.

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EDMOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTE

Must have experience with cattle, horses and yard care. Located 7 miles west of Edmond on Edmond Rd. (2nd/178th). Need a person for all year round. Call 341-8392 and leave name and number.

Is looking for students to fill part time positions. Several 9am 1pm and 1:30 pm - 5:30pm shifts are available for Mon-Fri. We pay $10 per hour for energetic phone work educating senior citizens on healthcare issues. No experience is needed we will train. Business is located at 1417 NW 150th St. in Edmond. Call 879-1888 to set up an interview. Ask for Hannah McMahan.

TEACHER

apply online: www.vqrn.net or call (405) 749-0332 today!

1 BDRM HOUSE FOR RENT

FURNISHED APT. W/UTILITIES PROVIDED FOR PERSON TO DO FARM/RANCH CHORES

SENIOR SERVICES OF OKLAHOMA

SERVER POSITION

Needed immediately for Edmond Daycare. FT/PT. Experience preferred, competitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262

Services

No pets, no w/d hookups. Campus close, water paid, available June 1st. $375 securing deposit. 408-8765.

M-F 4:45AM - 9AM. Occasional weekend shift. Apply in person. Edmond YMCA.

Positions for Summer '08. Good Pay. For info and to apply go online to www.nwpoolmanagement.com

Available @ Pearl's Lakeside. Apply within. 748-6113.

Rentals/Housing

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Previous Solutions:

Technical difficulties See you next time!

www.thevistaonline.com

1. Political Action Committee: abbr. 4. Word to end a prayer 8. Supernatural force 9. Impersonated a sheep 11. Port city in S. Korea 12. Crime involving fire 13. Can't move 15. Italian city 16. S. China seaport 17. Scores off of the serve 19. Peer 20. mode, with ice cream 21. American Institute of Technology: abbr. 24. Leaf or strip from a leaf of the talipot palm used in India for writing paper 25. Absorption unit 27. Extinct flightless bird of New Zealand 29. Have already done 30. A citizen of Oman 31. Upper body appendage 32. " no evil, hear no evil..." 33. Italian princes 34. Cheat (slang)

35. Unites States of America: abbr. 37. Request 38. Departs 39. "Every Has Its Thorn" 41. Clearances 43. Expressed pleasure 46. Sausages 49. Improve by changing, as in a law 50. Whittles; peels 51. Not urban 52. Portuguese nurses 53. Pink, like cheeks 54. Sprinted

DOWN 1. Leisurely stroll 2. Type tenus of the Anatidae 3. Walking stick 4. Lower in esteem; humiliate 5. Tomei, actress 6. Simplicity 7. Type of lights seen in Las Vegas 8. Harelike rodent of the pampas of Argentina 10. Genetic component 11. Medieval spiked club 13. Street processions with floats and candy

14. Solution used to clean contact lenses 16. Environment; surroundings 18. Type genus of the Canidae 19. Where peas live 20. With 'taken," means dumbfounded or startled 22. Insects in their adult stages 23. Opposition party to the Whigs 25. Colas 26. Makes one laugh; entertains 28. Current units 36. Stadiums 38. Type genus of the Gliridae 40. Strangely 41. wrap, clear packaging film 42. Research labs 43. Swiss river 44. An Asian river between China and Russia 45. In stories, for example, one who saves the day 47. S. American armadillo with three bands of bony plates 48. Mammal genus

Services for Birth Mothers: • • • •

You choose the family for your baby Free housing, medical & legal fees Continued contact with family available Confidential counseling Please call or visit the welisite: (405) 216-5240 or toll-free (866) 397-7202 www.christian-acloption.org

erViceg Chrig Ian Okt,t.. "An adoption agency and maternity home"


April 22, 2008

5

raq veterans speak at UCO by Justin Langston Senior Staff Writer

lence during the past year, as well as the reduced number of American casualties. Russell also defended the original claims for the U.S. led invasion, including his belief that Iraq was harboring of weapons of mass destruction. He reminded the audience that American soldiers had found equipment for making weapons-grade uranium and that many of Hussein's former military leaders had claimed that Iraq's weapons caches were moved to Syria just prior to the invasion. After Russell spoke, he introduced Pulido who spoke about the injury that led to the amputation of his left leg from the knee down. Pulido, who had gone over to Iraq to train the Iraqi Army, was on a convoy mission when an improvised explosive device struck his vehicle. A combat medic from Nebraska saved Pulido and he was sent out of the country to have work done on his knee. When nothing could be done to save it, his leg was

amputated. While recovering, General David Petraeus personally gave him his Purple Hear and later, called Pulido's family to them that he was going to be fine. Pulido said he did not regret the service that resulted in his lost leg, and was quite proud of the work he was able to accomplish while serving in the war. He said that he didn't tell people his story so they would feel sorry for him, but instead so they can know the stories of those who overcome and recover from injuries such as his. After both men spoke, they fielded questions from the audience. Most of the questions from the audience were directed at the men's experiences in Iraq, particularly what they had seen and what they had personally accomplished. It should be noted that very few questions were directed at the political stance the men took concerning their support for the war.

This past Thursday, veterans of the Iraq war, retired Lieutenant Colonel Steve Russell and retired Major Ed Pulido spoke about the Iraq war, their positions on it and their views on how the war has been perceived by the media. Both men offered a defense of the war, and the pair spoke for about an hour and a half. "I will tell you, war is difficult business," Pulido said as he began his story about how he lost is leg while serving in Iraq. "It's stressful to be in a combat situation every day, by Vista photographer Chris Albers but our soldiers survive," he added. UCOSA 2007.2008 vice president Cyndi Munson poses for a photo with Shelby Russell, who commanded Brown after presenting her with The Student Body Vice President's Award Monday the 1st battalion of the 22nd Infantry and was one of the at the Nigh University Center. central players in the capture of Saddam Hussein during the Iraq war, spoke first, the Regents' hearing. 08 President Pro Tempore of delivering a speech defending "UCO is making its way in the Senate, said he was glad the war in Iraq. He noted the the state," she said. that he accomplished his goal reduction in secretarian vioShe challenged the mem- of "making Senate a more from page 1 bers to continue to make an reputable organization while impact within the university making it more enjoyable and His goals for the year and the state. fun" before announcing his include civic engagement, "I hope you will continue successor, Daniel Stockton. traffic safety, and reaching to fight for UCO in the time "You [Senate members] out to every single student on you have left here," she said. are a part of the story for 23 campus. Newly instated Vice new organizations on camHe said he wants to "cul- President Davis said she has pus," Reynolds said. tivate relations with the state an "earnest desire to see the Stockton, the deputy for government, even potentially momentum built up from this this year, said that "quality the national government." year to continue and to help growth has been the goal of Vice President Cyndi UCO reach bigger and newer UCOSA recently, and it is Munson said "it's hard to heights." also my goal for my term." believe I'll be doing someKaela Davis, 2007-08 He said he is prepared to thing different every Monday Speaker of the House, first "settle down and get a lot of at 1 from now on" before inducted her successor, stuff done." announcing her successor, Malory Craft, into office. Bobb-Semple said he Kaela Davis. Craft emphasized her needs the support of all stuShe highlighted the fact desire to "serve our school, dents on campus. that there were 28 committed make our school better, and "I want to be ambitious students who attended Higher increase communication with and aggressive, but I can't do Education Day at the state the colleges." it alone. I need your help," An Iraqi woman walks past the rubble of her damaged house in the Shiite enclave capital and nine students atLogan ReynOlds, 2007- he said. of Sadr city in Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, April 21, 2008.

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EARTH from page 1 celebration on any campus in Oklahoma, outside vendors have gained interest in the event. Local businesses and UCO organizations will have booths set up to inform those who stop by about how their organization is, or is becoming, eco-friendly. . One of the fair's main attractions will be the UCO Physical Plant's booth. Representatives will be on hand to explain the different developments that have made the university one of the top 10 green campuses in the nation and how they plan to stay in that ranking. Explanations will include how UCO's used cooking oil is turned into an eco-friendly fuel for campus vehicles, and other ways UCO is planning to continue being green.

"Students should come to learn about the environment and the things they can do to help," Bass said. The Physical Plant will also accept numerous recyclable items on-site, such as printer cartridges, cell phones, and cell phone pieces, scrap metal, batteries, florescent lights, cardboard, paper, plastic and aluminum to be properly recycled. The Oklahoma Department of Environment Quality, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, Martin Nature Park, the Oklahoma State Parks, the Edmond Drainage Utility and many other businesses will also have booths set up at the event. Free redbud saplings will be given away while they last, and t-shirts will be on sale starting at 9 a.m. for $5. There will be a showing of "Living Planet: Our Future" at 7:30 p.m. in Pegasus Theater.

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SPORTS

April 22, 2008

Olympics protests go on and on..... by AP Writer JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) _ Indonesia will stage a shortened, invitation-only Olympic torch relay under heavy security Tuesday to thwart any anti-China protests, organizers said. • The steps were taken after pressure from the Chinese Embassy, organizing committee head Sumohadi Marsis told a media conference Monday. The event was originally scheduled to follow a route through the center of the capital, Jakarta, but will now take place on streets outside a sports stadium, he said. Marsis said around 5,000 guests would watch the 4mile relay, but that members of the public would be barred. "We have to make it limited," he said. The relay will not be televised live, apparently because no station was prepared to pay

for the rights, Marsis said. Criticism ofChina's human rights record has turned the Olympics into one of the most contentious in recent history. Protests have dogged the torch relay during its stops in Paris, London and San Francisco, with demonstrations over China's crackdown in Tibet where it forcefully put down anti-government riots. On Monday, police arrested three members of a Japanese family during the relay in Malaysia after they waved a Tibetan flag, police and witnesses said. The only other country to make the event invite-only so far was Pakistan, which cited security fears. Police in Indonesia had warned of possible protests by pro-Tibet activists, Falun Gong spiritual movement practitioners and others, Marsis said 2,500 police officers will be on duty.

AP Photo

Demonstrators holds flags as security line the route of the Olympic Torch in Paris, Monday April 7, 2008.

UCO Baseball wins 3 out of 4 by Jeff Massie Sports Writer The Bronchos performed magically in the land of enchantment last weekend, ' winning three of four against Eastern New Mexico University. UCO took the first game 10-7, thanks to a strong third inning in which the team put up six. Clint Straka dominated on the mound for the first game of the series. He has led the league in ERA for the bulk of the season, but had his worst performance of the season this game in which he gave up seven earned runs, but he still extended his record to 9-0. His ERA is now 2.58, which is good enough for second, one-hundredth behind the leader. Despite the Greyhound bats, the Bronchos were able to outrace them. Trailing 4-1 after two innings, UCO responded with a six-run third inning. The Bronchos held the lead for the rest of the contest. Always potent Tyler Carroll and Breck Draper pounded a couple of long balls, their 14th and 17th. Draper has the second most homers in the Lone Star Conference and Carroll is tied for fourth. Carroll also has the LSC's fourth best batting average with a .435 mark. Fellow Broncho Miguel Moctezuma is leading all hitters with a .465 average. UCO continued to muzzle the Greyhounds in the second game, wining 9-7. The Bronchos put up a dozen hits, one less than they did in game one.

AP Photo

UCO Baseball team wins three out of four games last weekend against Eastern New Mexico University. Moctezuma's three RBIs lead the team, and he went 2 for 5. Dean McIntyre and Dustin Dailey also registered multiple hits. The game was tied 6-6 in the fourth and added three more to the mark in the sixth. The boys in blue had their most dominating performance in the third game of the series, which they won 13-4. Michael Pollock had a huge game and batted six while going 2 for 4 at the plate. Draper continued his reliability with three RBIs and Andrew Foshee also scored two. The final game was a high

scoring affair, but UCO ended up on the short end, losing 17-12. Eastern New Mexico started out hot and continued it throughout. They put up two quick in the first inning and added to that with four more in the second, but they weren't done then. The Greyhounds scored in every inning except the eighth. UCO tried to rally in the middle innings, scoring three in both the third and fourth innings. They then went on to score one in the top of the fifth, two more in the sixth and three more in the ninth. It wasn't enough

though. Carroll was a monster during the game, he registered an astonishing eight RBIs and a pair of homeruns while going 4 for 6. Blake Mitchell batted in two more, and Brent Hodge and Moctezuma each added an RBI. As of. April 20, UCO is fourth in the conference standings. This weekend's four-game series against Northeastern State is the only thing remaining on the schedule before the Lone Star Conference Tournament May 3-6.

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The Vista April 22, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista April 22, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.