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April 1, 2008 www. thevistaonline. corn The Student Voice of the University or Central Oklahoma Since 1903

NO APOLOGIES FROM KERN

Senate opposes gun bill

"If I knew someone had a tape recorder and was recording my comments, I would have still said what I said." -Sally Kern by Jordan Richison Staff Writer Controversial Oklahoma State Representative Sally Kern spoke Thursday at the monthly UCO College Republicans meeting in front of a packed house in Heritage Room, located in the Nigh University Center. Kern's comments earlier this month about how the "homosexual agenda" is destroying the nation has made her a national figure and a lightning rod for criticism across the nation. "It seems like lately my name has become a household name. This is something that I wasn't looking for, it's something that has come my way and you have to deal with it when that time comes," Kern said. For the majority of her presentation, Kern avoided talking about the controversy surrounding her comments about gays and instead talked about how the nation was founded on the basis of religious freedom.

by Justin Langston " Senior Staff Writer

The UCO Faculty Senate passed a resolution March 25 containing language that condemned Oklahoma House Bill 2513, which would allow certain Oklahoma residents with a concealed fire arm license to carry a concealed fire arm on college campuses in Oklahoma. The resolution passed by the UCO Faculty Senate, called "The Continued Prohibition of Guns on Campus," was crafted by six former Faculty Senate presidents to protest the passing of House Bill 2513, which has not passed the State Senate, and was submitted to the Faculty Senate March 24 by Faculty Senate President James Mock. "I'm not pushing for this personally," Mock said in a telephone interview. "I'm acting as a representative of this by Vista photographer Chris Albers body. I'm not taking a stand Rep. Sally Kern answers questions from the crowd at Thursday Night's College Republican meeting. Kern made on this personally. I'm just trying to be the best represenit clear that she would not apologize for her recent controversial statements about the "homosexual agenda". tative I can be." The resolution passed by Kern-quoted John Adams, means_ a Government based- --she spoke briefly about her was wrong, she wasrnplying the Faculty Senate expresses one of the nation's Founding on a higher authority than controversial remarks regard- that their agenda of wanting reservations concerning the Fathers, on Republic, and man, which the Founding ing gays and tried to clarify everyone to accept it as being passage of House Bill 2513 how it is based on power not Fathers say is the Bible," Kern what she meant by them. She all right was wrong. and the resolution takes the of this earth. said. Toward the said when she mentioned that "The word Republic end of Kern's presentation the homosexuality agenda see KERN, page 3 see GUN, page 3

Mr. and Ms. UCO International crowned The Joys ot $priDg by Jana Davis Staff Writer Zeb *Khan, sophomore from Pakistan and Upasana Pathak, freshman from India, won the 8th annual Mr. and

Miss • UCO International title last Friday evening in Constitution Hall. "I was not expecting my name to be called, but I was very confident," Pathak said after the competition. "I

Photo by Chanel Henry

Zeb Khan, sophomore from Pakistan, and Upasana Pathak, freshman from India, are crowned Mr. and Ms. UCO International 2008 Friday March 28th in Constitution Hall.

Mon. through Thurs. at 5 p.m. NEWSCENTRAL

believed in myself." "It's been a very long time since Pakistan has won this contest," Khan said. Each contestant participated in casual and evening wear, a talent competition and an onstage interview question and answer. Pathak, a business major, plans to use her title to promote UCO in her own country. She is involved on campus in Quit Smoking, HIV/Aids Awareness, Indian Association and the International Council. She said she had been preparing mentally for the contest since August 2007. Khan, a management information systems major, hopes to promote the name of UCO by making speeches and telling people about the campus. He is involved in International Student Council and Rugby. He said he had been preparing for the Mr. and Miss UCO International for the past two to three weeks, four to six hours every day. For the talent competition, Pathak performed a native dance from her country and Khan danced to "Greased Lightning." Freeman, the international student adviser, said all of the proceeds from the eve-

ning will go to the Ronald L. Paddock scholarship fund that is given to students based strictly on a financial need. Paddock, former international director, was the interviewer for the evening. During the onstage interview, Pathak answered a question over the former New York governor, Eliot Spitzer. Her question asked if a governor's private life was any of the public's business. She said, in her opinion, that any public official should be held to a higher standard. Khan gave an answer to the question of what impact he wanted to have on this world. "After I die, I want to be remembered as a person who loved peace," Khan said during his onstage interview. "I am very pleased with it [the competition]," Freerrian said. "Talent was superb and students worked really hard." The first runners-up were Sushil Prajapati, a graduate MBA from Nepal and Dilshodai Sharifzoda, freshman finance major from Tajikistan. "I think they did great," Sharifzoda said about the winners.

by Vista photographer Brenda O'Brian

Students wait out the severe thunderstorms that rolled through the Edmond area late Sunday night and into Monday morning in the basement of Chambers Library.

see CONTEST, page 7

"Fool me once, shame on you; Fool me twice, shame on me."

Dw il/ Sinzdi tli) 11

-Chinese Proverb

r 11711

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OPINION

April 1, 2008

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Cartoon by Jared Aylor

CAMPUS QUOTES:

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Compiled and photographed by Chris Albers

"What do you think about the gun law?"

In Response to the March 13 editorial on Sally Kern On the one hand, Rep. Kern does have the right to say whatever she wants. She was, afterall, elected by her district and I doubt very much that her stance on these issues just came to light recently to surprise many of her constituents. On the other hand, her views are those that are seeded from a much darker

"I don't think it's necessary. I wouldn't carry one."

place. The views that many already having replied to this article share with her. She, while thinking her actions intentionally good, actually does more harm and proliferates lies and bigotry. She and her ilk continue to use the Book to justify their views of gays while ignoring the rest of it that doesn't suit

Crystal Kuriyama Biology - Freshman

them. Although the Book does mention homosexuality, it is not referenced in the way that Rep. Kern and her followers deem it to be. Were anyone "indoctrinated" I think it's Rep. Kern in

"I would be kind of scared if people were allowed to [carry weapons]."

having been made to believe that the Bible condems one thing over another, when in fact, it doesn't. Consequently, Rep. Kern

a campus location of limited space to control access in a concerted effort to exclude specific members of the student body. As a student organization the group is required to make reasonable efforts to make their meetings readily accessible to the entire student body. In addition, campus facilities and funding are provided to all student organizations on the condition that those groups make their events available and accessible to the student body, not just their group members. The group's recent actions are a clear violation of both the guidelines and the spirit of how student organizations are suppose to conduct themselves on campus. I sincerely hope that UCOSA responds swiftly and severely to this constitutional violation perpetrated against the student body.

commits just an aggregious sin if she doesn't keep kosher (the Bible also states this fact), doesn't sacrifice an animal (the

David Harrison

smell pleases the lord), eats pork (cloven hoofed animals are unclean) or stones to death her unruly children (as the Bible Tiffiny Heatley Graphic Design - Junior

would have her do. Until Mrs. Kern can live her life according to the ENTIRE Bible, she shouldn't profess to ask other to live to any of it. For to do so would make her a Hypocrite and God

"I don't think its necessary, it's a potential risk."

shall surely punish those.

M. LaFleur

Jennie Washington Funeral Services - Senior

"Just because they have a license, that doesn't mean that they should be allowed to."

Stephen Marco Freshman - Graph ic Designer

"What's the world corning to? We don't want kids gang-banging around Broncho Lake."

Matthew Oakley Broadcast - Freshman

"It's a horrible, horrible idea. I think it's going to be like an old western shootout on campus."

The recent visit of Rep. Sally Kern's to UCO has once again underscored the need for major reform of how student organizations operate. The College Republicans had an obligation to provide an inclusive space for all students when they chose to invite a controversial speaker. Instead the group sought out

THE VISTA Comm. Building, Rm. 107 100 N. University Dr. • Edmond, OK 73034-5209 405-974-5548 • editorial@thevistaonline.com EDITORIAL

PHOTOGRAPHY

Andrew Knittle, Editor in Chief No Lupov, Managing Editor

Chris Albers, Photo Editor Brenda O'Brian

N EWS

ADVERTISING

Justin Langston, Senior Staff Writer Nelson Solomon, Stall- Writer Jam Davis, Staff Writer Abha Eli Phoboo, Staff Writer Jordan Richison, Staff Writer Carrie Cronk, Staff Writer Megan Lee, Staff Writer Laura Hoffert, Staff Writer Josh Flowers, Staff Writer

Keith Mooney, Ad Director Garrett Johnson

CARTOONIST Jared Aylor

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Tresa Berlemann

SPORTS Jeff Massie

ADVISER Julie Clanton

Brandon Ankney Graphic Design - Junior

DESIGN Steven Reckinger

For those of you who are too ignorant to read the teachings of the man you worship as the SON OF GOD, you will find that you are referring to the Old Testament. So,if you are Jewish this would be acceptable because this is your book of faith. However, JESUS CHRIST is found in the NEW TESTAMENT, where JESUS said "LET THOSE WHO ARE WITHOUT SIN CAST THE FIRST STONE" as well as "I AM THE WAY, THE TRUTH AND THE LIGHT" Sally Kern, you are NO JESUS. STOP using him to promote HATE and INTOLERANCE. W.W.J.D. Richard Hinkle

The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semiweekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and on Thursdays only during summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034. Telephone: (405) 974-5549. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained.

EDITORIALS Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO.

LETTERS The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, double-spaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 107. Letters can be e-mailed to editorial@ thevistaonline.com.


April lM 2008

GUN from page 1 stand that allowing certain people to carry concealed firearms on campus will not quell the increased violence at universities nationwide. The resolution goes on to urge state legislatures to follow the recommendations put forth by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Campus Life and Safety and Security Task Force, which were published in January. According to the resolution, the document previously cited does not advocate the use of firearms on campus would lead to higher security. The Faculty Senate had discussed this matter fully and polled its constituents, including both faculty and students, concerning House Bill 2513 before passing the resolution. According to the senate, the

resolution passed last week is not simply a reflection of the opinions of the faculty senators, but is designed to reflect the opinions of the university as a whole. In addition to the UCO Faculty Senate, The Oklahoma University Presidents and the OSU Student Governing Body also oppose House Bill 2513. House Bill 2513, which was passed by the Oklahoma State House of Representatives, would allow certain people to carry fire arms onto college campuses if they meet certain criteria. The current incarnation of the bill allows active duty military, National Guard and Reserve members, honorably discharged veterans and people with at least 72 hours of firearms training certified by the Council on Law Enforcement Education to carry firearms. Those who

plan to bring a firearm onto a college campus must provide written notice to the college or university president before bringing a weapon onto the campus. It should be noted that this is not the original language of bill, as the original version of the bill allowed anyone at least 21 years of age or older who possessed a concealed firearms license to carry weapons onto a college campus. The Oklahoma State Senate, as of press time, has not passed the bill.

Group awarded for research paper by Laura Hoffert Staff Writer

Becky Eaton, Joseph Lopez and Laine McNair won the Outstanding Undergraduate Research Paper Award at the Sooner Communication Conference on March 8. Entitled, "Revistas y Sexo: Portrayals of Men and Women in Popular Magazines in American andAsian Cultures" the group's project took eight weeks to complete. "The topic spawned off of an original idea of a research that we wanted to do but did not have enough information on. Dr. Roz Miller informed us about the conference and helped us along the way," Eaton said. = 'Tlie "d6iifeience is all event'' that brings students' from across the nation to discuss

developments and theory in the discipline of research. The theme is different every year so students can focus on specific aspects of communication. Submissions for the conference included research papers, position papers, case studies, and round table proposals. This year's theme was "A Focus on the Dynamic Landscape of Political Communication." The group had known each other through a course they took together and found a common interest in the media's portrayal of men and women in society. "They produced the strongest research paper in my Communication and Gender course. Fairly early , in the semester, they irididated an interest in submitting the paper to the Liberal Arts

Symposium," Miller said. "When I talked to them about submitting to conferences off-campus, they were excited about the possibilities. Additionally, I knew they were thinking about pursuing graduate school at some point in the future," Miller said The group, all of whom are organizational communication majors, received plaques for their achievement and said they are thankful for the friendships that were formed. "Working together in research and writing this paper was a great experience in itself. This paper has opened so many doors for us and we are very grateful that we all got the chance to work together on such a project," Easton said.

KERN from page 1

"The 'political agenda of homosexuals was wrong, not the individual," Kern said. She also talked about how it wasn't right the homosexual agenda was being pushed in schools. Kern noted that a person could find resources homosexuals have for teachers to educate children about the homosexual lifestyle online. Following her presentation, Kern opened the floor up for questions, which soon turned into a heated debate. Kern answered several questions from both sides of the spectrum. A majority of the questions Kern fielded had the lawmaker on the defensive, but she replied to every question thrown at her. One man in attendance stood up and talked about how her negative comments were uncalled for and derogatory towards the homosexual population. He then asked her to admit she was wrong and issue an apology for her comments, which was followed by loud applause. Kern stood her ground and quickly gave a response, saying she wouldn't apologize because she believes in what she said. Soon after this statement those in favor of Kerns gave a loud applause. Some people gasped and walked out of room right after this statement. Sara Barnett disagreed with Kern's stance of standing by what she said and not offering an apology. "I was disappointed, she could of offered some sort of apology for the statements that she made," Barnett said. Rainbow Sureslict was another person in attendance who disagreed with what

SIGMA TAU GAMMA

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

State Rep. Sally Kern tries to clarify her recent controversial statements about the homosexual agenda while at a College Republicans meeting Thursday at the Heritage Room in the Nigh University Center.

Kern had said. She said even though Kern's believes in what she said, that doesn't make it right. "There was no original thought hardly at all from her, she was quoting other people. Everything was taken from Scripture in the Bible," Sureslict said. "It might be what she thinks, but it is still ignorance to me," she said. Another question from the crowd came from a reporter from KFOR asking Kern to address the e-mailed press release that said she would talk about the "untruths" the media had spread about her.

FRATERNITY THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF UCO'S SIGMA TAU GAMMA CHAPTER WOULD LIKE TO PUBLICLY CONGRATULATE OUR UCO CHAPTER FOR THEIR HARD WORK AND COMMITMENT DURING THIS PAST YEAR. RECENTLY IN NEW ORLEANS, THE BETA ZETA CHAPTER RECEIVED BOTH NATIONAL AND REGIONAL RECOGNITION FOR CAMPUS LEADERSHIP, SCHOLASTIC ACHIEVEMENT, COMMUNITY SERVICE AND FOR BEING AN OVERALL TOP CHAPTER OF SIGMA TAU GAMMA FRATERNITY IN 2007. •

WITHOUT AMAZING MEN AT ALL LEVELS OF THE CHAPTER, SUCH ACHIEVEMENTS WOULD NOT BE POSSIBLE. WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING WHAT IS AHEAD FOR YOU IN 2008!

2007 NATIONAL AWARDS EDWARD H MCCUNE, DISTINGUSHED CHAPTER AWARD EMMITT ELLIS, CHAPTER SCHOLARSHIP AWARD W.T. HEMBREE, CHAPTER LEADERSHIP AWARD ROBERT N. JONES, CHARITABLE PROJECTS AWARD

2007 REGIONAL AWARDS EDWARD H MCCUNE, BEST IN REGION MAN MILE AWARD - SOUTHERN REGION 40w/imir*

2007 LOCAL AWARDS TOP GPA AMONG UCO FRATERNTIES (FALL & SPRING) FIRST PLACE HOMECOMING FLOAT (WI AGD AND IKE) GREEK WEEK CHAMPIONS (TEAM THREE) FIRST PLACE WINTERGLOW 1 ST PLACE INTRAMURAL INDOOR VOLLEYBALL

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Kern said she was unaware of this e-mail and didn't know this was something she was supposed to talk about. Kern also went on to dispel some rumors circulating in the media, including the gossip she has a gay son and that the comments were made in a closed meeting. In the end, Kern said she would have said the same thing regardless of her current situation. "If I knew someone had a tape recorder and was recording my comments, I would have still said what I said," Kerns said.

Tuesday, April 1 ,7-zftaz, Order of Omega Penny Wars 1 Wear Your Letters / Blood Drive I God and Goddess Voting 9:00 a.m..- 5:00 p.m. Murdaugh Hall Hypnotist—Dr. Don White 7:30 p.m. Constitution Hall

Wednesday, April 2 Order of Omega Penny Wars I Wear Your Letters 1 Blood Drive / God and Goddess Voting 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Murdaugh Hall Stepshow 7:30 p.m. / Constitution Hall .

Thursday, April 3 Canned Food Drive & Sculpture Competition 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. I NUC, 2nd Floor

Friday, April 4 Spring Sing 7:30 p.m. I Wantland Gym


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April 1, 2008

To Dan Smith, camera is just a tool Sexual assault still issue on campuses by Chanel Henry Contributing Writer

The soft glow of a computer lights up a dark, cluttered office and a gentle face filled with concentration edits photos. The large desk with photos scattered across it fills half of the organized, yet cluttered space in the Photographic Services Office in the Communications Building. Daniel Smith, the university photographer for 28 years, moves with confidence; camera in hand. He wanders around campus thinking of new, unique images waiting to be captured. "The camera is just a tool, it's what you do with it," Smith said. Smith starts his day around 9 a.m. and works until 6 p.m. This does not include the hours on nights and weekends Smith spends shooting sports AvssiolbA.111h. and other campus events. He wcw:eilAVIOIEN. has taken roughly 600,000 pictures in his career. If he is not taking pictures, he is a chained to his computer editing or working on his biggest 'verv--7\ commitment, Bronchosports. 1W, corn. Smith shoots mostly 4", /1111.4k, lor7 digital with his Nikon D2Xs, Photo by Chanel Henry but said he can't abandon film. Dan Smith has taken over 600,000 photographs during He always enjoyed photography, but really started his 28 years at UCO. taking it seriously in junior high school. At 17 years old he went to Holland for a year five years as the second per- five students working for him where he bought his first high _ son to receive a degree in at a time. The students assist quality camera. He worked for photojournalism at UCO. him and also do assignments a Dutch photographer named "UCO is the place to go on their own like pageants, Jules Swagemakers, learning for photography," Smith said. sports and campus events. a lot in Swagemakers' lab. Smith left the Edmond The pictures run in The When Smith moved from Sun after five years to be the Vista and campus publicaTulsa to attend UCO his university photographer. He tions or are sent to The Daily junior year he worked for taught as an adjunct photog- Oklahoman and other media the Edmond Sun, while also raphy teacher for one year outlets. Smith said the studoing a .practicum at .News while he got his masters. dents who work for him end Channel 4. He graduated after Currently he has one to up working in newspapers

‘,N

across the state. Smith met his wife, Vicki, at UCO. She graduated with a degree in ad sales and now works at News Channel 4. They have two grown daughters who both enjoy photography as a hobby, but not a career. In his spare time he likes to fish and target shoot, which he said is a common hobby among photographers. Smith also enjoys family time and is involved in Bible Study Fellowship, an international organization that meets at the Church of the Servant in Oklahoma City. One of his most memorable assignments was when he covered the post office murders that ran on the front page of the Dallas Morning News and the Oklahoma Bombing in the Alumni Magazine. One of Smith's greatest influences was the late Woody Gaddis, a retired photography teacher from UCO. Gaddis used to always tell his students, "It's a tough racket." Gaddis would tell his students this because photography is a tough field to be in. "Photography is a career for somebody who feels they have to be a photographer," Smith said. Smith's advice to aspiring news photographers are to try and get as many photos published as possible and try to intern with a good commercial photographer. He recommends taking business classes and never avoid the writing classes. He suggests having other people edit and critique as many photos as possible. Smith's strongest advice is to, "Shoot more, talk less."

by Josh Flowers Staff Writer Sexual assault on college campuses has been growing steadily over the past few years and it is showing no signs of slowing down. According to UCO campus statistics, nearly 21 percent of all college women have experienced dating violence or sexual abuse. Of that number, only 17 to 19 percent are reported. In response, UCO officials have teamed up with Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater and have created the Violence

Prater is very passionate about this issue and he will provide support, expertise and guidance about the program fitnctions." "Mr.

Kathryn Toahty

Prevention Project (VPP). The project is a campus-run program that provides confidential services to all UCO students, faculty members and Edmond community members who have been victims of any form of sexual abuse. The new program's main goal is to effectively minimize incidents of violent relational crimes such as sexual assault, intimate partner violence or abuse and stalking on campus. "We provide information to the victims on all the services that are available to them and assist them with making further decisions," said Kathryn

Toahty, VPP coordinator. "The staff will help the survivor with as much, or as little, as they determine possible." Toahty has organized a four points reference system, known as the Community Education Response Team (CERT), which will include Prater, members of the Edmond and UCO police depai tments, UCO staff members, as well as outside community partners. CERT will oversee and provide the UCO community with a survivor response system, educational and awareness programs and will help develop effective campus judicial policies related to relational crimes. According to Toahty, everyone involved in the project is very excited about making the new program a success, especially Prater. "Mr. Prater is very passionate about this issue and he will provide support, expertise and guidance about the program functions," Toahty said. The VPP is part of a flagship program funded by a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice, which will be shared with four other Oklahoma universities. The project is also available to advocate for survivors in the areas of medical assistance, legal assistance, counseling on and off campus, accommodating housing needs or relocation, as well as assistance with addressing academic issues in regards to schedule changes. For more information on the VVP, contact Toahty at (405) 974-2224. Her office hours are Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

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April 1, 2008

Quidditch becomes a reality for some colleges by AP Writer MIDDLEBURY, Vt. — The broomsticks they hold between their legs can't help them fly. The Snitch is not a winged golden ball but a young man who sprints across the field at lightning speed. And at times, the game looks like the mongrel offspring of rugby, dodge ball and soccer. But somehow it all works. The first intercollegiate Quidditch match was held here this month, and though this version of the game is earthbound, its taking off. Originally played by wizards darting about on broomsticks in the Harry Potter novels, the game is now taking root on college campuses. "We were all Harry Potter's age when the books started," says Sam Libby, 20, a Middlebury College junior geography major from Richmond, Vt. "And Quidditch is one of the most creative things that came out of the books. We were able to create that here, follow all the rules, except the ability to fly. It just caught on." Quidditch surfaced at Middlebury two falls ago when a handful of students gathered to play a rudimentary form of the game on Sunday afternoons, making up rules extrapolated from the books. By this month's Intercollegiate Quidditch World Cup Fall Festival, there were banners, team processions worthy of Olympic opening ceremonies, halftime entertainment and 12 sevenperson coed Middlebury teams vying for the chance to play the visiting team from Vassar College. There was even an element of surprise: Streakers with nothing but broomsticks scampered out of a dorm, around the field and back to the dorm, sending the crowd wild. Who could ask for anything more on a crisp autumn afternoon? And as the sun set and the temperature plummeted, Middlebury's Mollywobbles defeated Vassar for the championship. A bit of a rout, really. Vassar never scored. Alexander Benepe, 20, a junior art history major from New York City and The Commissioner of all things Quidditch at Middlebury, wasn't surprised by his college's victory. "We had far more experi-

ence and intensity. I think it definitely overwhelmed Vassar a bit, but I'm sure that this inspired them to come back next year with a vengeance," he explains with all the earnestness of sportscaster Bob Costas. Rainey Johnson, 20, a junior chemistry major from St. Louis, played the Snitch position, taking on the part of a winged ball. (A tennis ball stuffed in a sock and hanging from his shorts is what both teams are after.) He says the game is really three games in one: a goal-scoring game, a dodgeball game, "and then there's the tag game. I'm part of the tag game." "Amused" is the word he uses to describe people's reaction to the newest sport on campus. "I think a lot of people are afraid to come out because they might enjoy it," says the lean cross-country runner. "In the beginning, the seniors wanted to know what we were doing to Middlebury. But there's a good vibe now. We're the upperclassmen now, and the freshmen think it's cool." Even Middlebury administrators see the benefits. With some prospective students, Quidditch is a draw, says dean of admissions Robert Clagett, who gets positive reactions when he mentions the teams in information sessions on campus and on the road. He says interest seems to be growing. "This is the first year when I've seen such a strong response, and it must be because these 18-year-olds grew up with the whole Harry Potter saga." Benepe, dressed in a pinstriped suit, purple tie, glittering cape and black top hat, scurried here and there, directing the afternoon's games and festivities with his cane. He believes Quidditch's lure is even stronger than college officials think. "Some freshmen here say they chose Middlebury because it has Quidditch," Benepe boasts. "I think they made a judgment about a school that would have Quidditch is a good school." In addition to Middlebury and Vassar, Quidditch is played at Bucknell University, Tulane, Oberlin, Washington state's Whitman College and Vermont's Marlboro College, where the Golden Snitch is not a human but a toy helicopter. (It has to be caught

AP Photo

Magic moment: Ben Weir, left, scores for the Wild Fire Whiz Bangs as Prisoners of Azkaban's Christian Woodland, right, watches the hoop during the Middlebury Quidditch World Cup tournament. Earthbound versions of the high-flying game created by J.K. Rowling are being played at colleges. before it hits the ground.) Not that this is the first time Middlebury College has been on the cutting edge of collegiate games. Legend has it that the first Frisbee took to the air here. Five Middlebury alumni claim to have thrown a discarded Frisbie Pie tin in 1939. There's even a statue of a dog catching a Frisbee on campus. And now Quidditch. Parents who are paying $46,910 a year to send their children to Middlebury say it's worth the price. "Given some of the alternatives out there, this is a good way to relax," says Michael Free of suburban Philadelphia, who, with his wife, Sharon, came to the World Cup games to cheer on their son Christopher, a sophomore in conservation biology. Christopher, 19, was a co-captain of champion Mollywobbles, and his parents couldn't have been prouder. "There are a lot of worse things he could be doing," his dad says. Saxon Elliott of Northampton, Mass., mother of freshman Conrad Schott, 18, who headed up the Vassar Quidditch team, agrees. "I sent him off to Vassar, and never once did I realize he would ascend to such

greatness," she says with a laugh. She made the pink capes worn by the New York team. (All Quidditch teams wear capes.) Even some of the college staff is getting in on the action. Linda Schiffer, coordinator of Cook Commons, one of Middlebury's residential colleges, showed up at the World Cup game dressed all in black, complete with witch's hat. Introducing herself to the hundreds of fans at the opening ceremony, she received a rousing welcome. "I'm Professor Minerva McGonagall," she said with great conviction. "Professor of Transfiguration at Hogwarts!" Quidditch is even giving alumni a good feeling, not only about their college but the world. Ken Nourse (Class of '52) and his wife, Pat ('53), wandered onto campus to catch the festivities. "It's all so creative," says Pat Nourse. "How can you say today's kids don't have an imagination? They're so smart. I have more faith in the future now." So what kind of student is attracted to Quidditch? Xander Manshel, 20, a junior English major from Boxborough, Mass., organized the first games and

designed rules for Quidditch for Muggles, J.K. Rowling's word for non-wizarding folk. Manshel concedes that there was a "nerd stigma" attached to the game early on, citing a preponderance of science majors. "There was some skepticism in the beginning," says Manshel, one of the playby-play commentators and a member of an improv team on campus. "But once people saw it wasn't just a fantasy game and very athletic, it's caught on." Benepe says he has more than 300 students on his Quidditch e-mail list. "More than any other club on campus." There also is a Facebook group called The Intercollegiate Quidditch Association, which has more than 600 members (middlebury. facebook. com/ group. php?gid=2220478706). He says Quidditch will outlast even Harry Potter and "absolutely" envisions a collegiate Quidditch league in the future. Benepe hopes to have more colleges participating next year, planning an aggressive recruiting campaign in the spring. "My vision is to get a couple vanloads of Middlebury players, all of the necessary equipment and Snitch run-

ners, and travel to four to five colleges in the Northeast and get some games going," he says. Colgate, Williams and Amherst are on the list. "I think watching Quidditch in real life will really inspire a lot of people so that by next fall, we can have at least five experienced and game-ready colleges." Benepe believes "Quidditch is strong enough to last on its own. You just have to look and see how much fun people are having today." Schott says fellow Vassar students weren't quite, sure what was going, op when Quidditch first appeared on the Poughkeepsie campus. "A lot of people just stood at the sidelines and watched," he says. "I couldn't tell if they thought we were fools or if they wanted to join in." Vassar has 25 students on its team, so many they couldn't all make the road trip to Middlebury. As for Vassar's talent level, well ... Sybil Johnson, 17, a freshman from Sudbury, Mass., was asked about her team's chances. "Oh, we don't have a clue what we're doing!" Everyone agrees it's the spirit of the game that matters most.

2008-2009 Student RCSA Call

for Grant Proposals

✓ Would you like to be rewarded for your research, creative and scholarly activities? You could be awarded a 1/4 time Research Assistantship for one or two semesters and be paid five hours a week at $935 per hour! ✓ Would you like some help in paying your tuition? Yoga could lie eligible for a Tuition Waiver for one or two semesters!

✓ Would you like support for supplies and travel while engaged in research, creative and scholarly activities? )ou could receive $500 for travel expenses, supplies or materials among other things to support your project!

Application Deadline: 5:00 PM, Tuesday, April 15, 2008

ear IRO

University of Central Oklahoma

Please call or visit: Office of Research & Grants: 974-2526, ADM 216 http://www.ucok.edigurcs/URCAT/URCAT_Program.html


CLASSIFIEDS

April 1, 2008

Deadlines/Pricing

ROSE CREEK GOLF CLUB Seeking F&B servers, Tues. & Thurs. help needed. Other shifts available. Please call Holly, 330-8220.

DEADLINES: All classifieds MUST be submitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. Prices: Classified ads cost $6/day for the first 20 words and $.10/word thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call 974-5549 or 974-5918 for info.

BED & BREAKFAST HOUSEKEEPER WANTED Part-time, afternoons. Must work weekends. 328 E. 1st (across from UCO.) Arcadian Inn. 348-6347. HOUSECLEANING NEEDED Fridays preferred. Will drive if needed. $8.50/hr. 844-1216.

Employment

EDMOND PRESCHOOL Looking for full-time teacher & part-time teacher aide. Contact 205-4299.

TUXEDO JUNCTION PT Sales and other duties. 15+ hours per wk. Flexible hours, great for students. Salary plus incentives. Call Matt, 751-1745 for application.

PT TELLER POSITION: RCB BANK OF NICHOLS HILLS Opening at our Edmond branch located at 610 S. Kelly - 31-35 hours per wk. 12:00 noon to 6:15 p.m. - Monday through Friday and every other Saturday, 8-12:00 noon. Health/dental insurance, 401(k), vacation, sick leave benefits. Min. 1 yr. previous teller/and or cash handling exper. required - good math and communication skills; ability to operate standard office equip. & computers; strong customer service skills. Send resume to: fpalmer@bankrcb.net or call (405) 463-5951. EOE

NOW HIRING XTREME NUTRITION FT/PT Position available in Penn Sqare Mall. Contact Jerran Huey (405) 843-1800. PHYSICIAN BILLING SPECIALIST FOR EDMOND PRACTICE Duties include: entering patient charges into computer system and reception. Knowledge of all types of insurance billilng, good accounting skills and attention to detail a must. Requires a minimum of 2 years experience in clinical billing office. Qualified applicants please call Karen at 370-0278

CITY OF EDMOND Summer positions @ Pelican Bay Aquatic Center: Asst. Pool Manager, Cashier & Cafe Managers, Cafe Staff/Cashiers, Lifeguard Staff, Water Safety Instructors, Golf Course, Arcadia Lake, Parks & Recreation jobs also open. Job Info line 359-4648 www.edmondok.com Apply at 100 E. First, Room 106 SENIOR SERVICES OF OKLAHOMA Is looking for students to fill part time positions. Several 9am 1pm and 1:30 pm - 5:30pm shifts are available for Mon-Fri. We pay $10 per hour for energetic phone work educating senior citizens on healthcare issues. No experience is needed we will train. Business is located at 1417 NW 150th St. in Edmond. Call 879-1888 to set up an interview. Ask for Hannah McMahan. TEACHER Needed immediately for Edmond Daycare. FT/PT. Experience preferred, competitive wages. Apply in person @ 24 NW 146th. Call Camelot C.D.0 @ 749-2262 UNDERCOVER SHOPPERS Earn up to $150 per day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail establishments. Experience not required. Call 800-722-4791. SERVER POSITION Available @ Pearl's Lakeside. Apply within. 748-6113.

PART-TIME POOL MANAGERS & LIFEGUARDS Positions for Summer '08. Good Pay. For info and to apply go online to www.nwpoolmanagement.com EDMOND LANDSCAPES Is interviewing for full-time landscaping, irrigation and mowing positions. EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. 417-5660. RIVER OAKS GOLF CLUB Looking for a friendly, energetic person to fill weekday shifts or Saturday & Sunday shifts. Bar & Grill, Cart Barn & Pro Shop. Great pay. Will train. Located 10 minutes from UCO. Call Chris, 771-5800 for appt. CUSTOMER SERVICE HELP M-F 4:45AM - 9AM. Occasional weekend shift. Apply in person. Edmond YMCA.

THE ATHLETE'S FOOT TECHNICAL SHOE STORE in North OKC is accepting applications for employment. 12-15 hrs. per week. Flexible hours & Saturdays. No retail experience needed. Call 848-3232. PART-TIME HELP NEEDED At local daycare, 2:30 - 6PM. Must love kids. Please call 330-3077.

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Services for Birth Mothers: • You choose the famil y for your baby

• Free housing, medical & legal fees • Continued contact with famil y available • Confidential counseling Please call or visit the website: (405) 216-5240 Or toll free (866) 397-7202 -

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DO YOU WANT MORE FOR YOUR CHILD THAN DAYCARE WHILE YOU ARE WORKING OR ATTENDING SCHOOL? Churchill Pre-School Academy's curriculum prepares your child for school. Estabished in 1986. Enrolling now for summer and fall. No enrollment fees. Located at 724 W. 15th St. Open 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m., all year. Please call 341-4314

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LOOKING FOR A JOB That will work around your school schedule? Well look no further. Papa John's is now hiring all positions at NW OKC & Edmond locations. Whether it's the quick fast money of our delivery drivers or your trying to build your resume by working for our management team. PJs has what's right for your college experience. Call or stop by today. 844-7900

NEARLY NEW! Walking distance to UCO. 2Bd, 2Ba, pool, $540. Bring in ad for $100 off first month's rent. 340-8147.

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NOW HIRING SERVERS Edmond location. Evening shifts. Flexible schedule. Come & fill out application between 2-5 PM.

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COLLEGE DISCOUNTS AVAIL. Spacious 1 & 2 bed units priced from $450.00-600.00. Limited availability. Call today to reserve your new home. (405) 341-8911.

SHOGUN'S STEAK HOUSE Hiring for wait staff, bussers, dish washers, host, bartender. Apply in person at Northpark Mall (NW 122nd & N. May) after 5:30pm. 749-0120.

FULL-TIME NANNY NEEDED FOR TWO FUN KIDS! Ages 8 & 9. Summer hrs 8:30 - 3:30. Must have reliable transportation. 471-3142. May continue p/t into next school year.

PART-TIME BANK TELLER/ NEW ACCOUNTS Immediate opening in the NW 122nd & May area. Hours are 1:00-6:00 p.m. M-F and every other Saturday morning. No experience necessary. Apply in person only, Mon.-Thurs., 9 a.m.-noon and 1-4 p.m. at our Main Bank. Yukon National Bank, 401 Elm Street, Yukon, OK (HR Dept.-2nd Floor). EOE M/F/DN Affirmative Action Employer

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April 1, 2008

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Family finds closure after soldier's remains found in Iraq by AP Writer • BATAVIA, Ohio (AP) _ The father of a soldier listed as missing-captured in Iraq since 2004 said Sunday that the military had informed him that his son's remains had been found. Keith Maupin said an Army general told him DNA testing had identified the remains of his son, Sgt. Keith Matthew Maupin, or "Matt" as he was commonly known. He said the Army didn't say how or where in Iraq his son's remains were discovered, only that officials found a shirt similar to the one his son was wearing at the time of his disappearance. "My heart sinks, but I know they can't hurt him anymore," Maupin said, speaking in the soldier's hometown near suburban Cincinnati. The Army was continuing its investigation, he said. Lt. Lee Packnett, an Army public affairs officer in Washington, confirmed that the Maupins were notified Sunday that their son's remains had been identified. Packnett said an official statement about the identification would be released Monday. Matt Maupin was a 20year-old private first class when he was captured April 9, 2004, after his fuel convoy, part of the Bartonville, Ill.based 724th Transportation Company, was ambushed west of Baghdad. a stunnedlooking Maupin wearing camouflage and a floppy desert hat, sitting on the floor surrounded by five masked men holding automatic rifles. That June, Al-Jazeera aired another tape purporting to show a U.S. soldier being shot. But the dark and grainy

tape showed only the back of the victim's head and not the actual shooting. The Maupins refused to believe it was their son, and the Army had listed him as missing-captured. The Maupins lobbied hard for the Army to continue listing their son as missing-captured, fearing that another designation would undermine efforts to find him. The Pentagon agreed to give the Maupins regular briefings, and President Bush met with them when he traveled to Cincinnati. Keith Maupin said the Army told him early on that there was only a 50 percent chance his son would be found alive. He said he doesn't hold the Army responsible for his son's death, but that he did hold the Army responsible for bringing his son home. "I told them when we'd go up to the Pentagon, whether he walks off a plane or is carried off, you're not going to leave him in Iraq like you did those guys in Vietnam," Maupin said. Keith Maupin and his exwife, Carolyn, held a candlelight vigil Sunday night outside the Yellow Ribbon Support Center in Batavia, an office they used to package thousands of boxes of donated snacks and toiletries for shipment to soldiers in Iraq. "It hurts," Carolyn Maupin said of her son's death. "After you go through almost four years of hope, and this is what happens, it's like a let down, so I'm trying to get through that right now." The Maupins were told by an Army official on Friday to expect an update on their ,son _over the weekend4Keith Maupin said. The Army broke

AP Photo

A United States flag flies at half staff near a memorial for U.S. Army Sgt. Keith Matthew Maupin, Monday, March 31, 2008, in Cincinnati. Sgt. Maupin's remains were found last week in Iraq. He had been listed as missing since 2004.

the news about their son's remains at a somber meeting with the family at the Yellow Ribbon Support Center. "When you look out there in the parking lot and see a three-star general get out of a car, you know it ain't good news," Keith Maupin said. Two U.S. soldiers remain missing in action in Iraq.

Ahmed Qusai al-Taayie, a 41year-old Iraqi-born reserve soldier from Ann Arbor, Mich., was abducted while visiting his Iraqi wife on Oct. 23, 2006, in Baghdad. Capt. Michael Speicher, a Navy pilot, has been missing since the 1991 Persian Gulf War. Matt Maupin graduated from Glen Este High School,

just east of Cincinnati, in 2001 and attended the University of Cincinnati for a year before joining the Army Reserves. Dan Simmons, the athletic director at Glen Este, remembered Maupin as a quiet but hardworking backup player on the school's football team. "Matt was a selfless kid on the lobtball field," Simmons

Summit to address ongoing campus violence by Nelson Solomon Staff Writer

UCO will host the second National Campus Security Summit on April 13 and April 14 at the Nigh University Center. The summit will bring together university presidents, administrators, counselors and law enforcement officers from throughout the region to discuss practical ways to keep their campuses safe, according to Dr. Cynthia Rolfe, vice president of Information Technology. According to their official Web site, the first summit that UCO hosted was held last year on May 30, and focused on the issues that arose from the April 16, 2007 shootings at Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg, Va. "Nearly a year after the tragic shooting on the Virginia Tech campus, violence on college and high school campuses continues to make headlines," UCO President Roger Webb said in a release from University Relations. "We must continue this important dialogue and learn what we can from our colleagues who experienced these tragedies. There is no greater priority than keeping our students, faculty and staff safe," he said. Rolfe said the summit will focus on ways to prevent these situations "so that we can be prepared to deal with various types of crises on campus." Rolfe added that the summit will begin with a Crisis Response Scenario, at 3 p.m., on April 13 in the Business Administration Building. She said students or summit participants could be in a scenario, where they would take part in or observe just as if you were in a classroom

and someone came in with a gun. "It allows law enforcement to practice dealing with that kind of situation," she said. Following that, there will be a scenario debriefing in the Business Building at 5:30 p.m. The summit opening reception will take place at 6 p.m. in the ballrooms in the University Center. This year's summit is the first to be held since the February shooting at Northern Illinois University, in which five lives were lost. Lt. Darrin Mitchell and Lt. Todd Henert, two members of the NIU Police Department who responded to the shooting, will deliver a closing key_ note address, according to a press release from University Relations. Some of the speakers include J. Steven Tidwell, executive assistant director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Brett Sokolow, founder and director of the National Center for Higher Education Risk Management. Tidwell will give the opening keynote address on "Forging Security and Safety" and Sokolow will present on "Best Practices for Campus Behavioral Intervention and Threat Assessment." Gene Desinger, commander of the Special Operations Unit with the Iowa State University Police Division and Maria Randazzo, president of Threat Assessment Resources International will also present about dealing with threats on campus. Several local speakers will also speak at the summit, including representatives from the state mental health department and Dr. Kathryn Gage, Vice President of Student Affairs, Rolfe said.

by Vista photographer Chris Albers

Clinton Van Zandt delivers his keynote address at last year's summit, held May 30, 2007. One mental health department will debunk the myth that a certain profile of a person, such as someone under stress, is most likely to be a shooter, and another will focus on cultural considerations, Rolfe said. Right after the Virginia Tech shootings on April 16 last year, President Webb testified to a Senate Committee on Homeland Security with

Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), Rolfe said. "About that time, because of President Webb's interest in law enforcement, protection and in education, he felt that it was prudent for us to bring together experts in the field to talk to us in higher education about those items that we should watch for," she said. This led to the first sum-

mit, which was held last May, Rolfe said. Around the same time as the first summit, Gov. Brad Henry called together a task force of leaders of Oklahoma education, Rolfe said. "Those were higher education and CareerTech, and some other state agencies, and he called that the C.L.A.S.S. Task Force," she said. The purpose of the Campus Life and Safety and Security task force is to review and evaluate current safety and security plans and student counseling services already in place for higher education and career technology institutions and to make recommendations for any needed changes, the official Web site stated. "This is all about practical ideas, affordable and attainable ideas that will improve protection while maintaining an environment of openness," Webb said in the release.

said. "He did whatever the coaches told him. He wasn't a starter, but he made the other kids play harder." A month after his capture, Maupin was promoted to the rank of specialist. In April 2005, he was promoted to sergeant.

CONTEST from page 1

"It gets better and better every year. The level of performance and the level of volunteers," Freeman said. The evening also consisted of guest performers. Mr. UCO International 2007 Michael Hermann; Rendezvous Dancers; Sony KC/ Ayush Satyal and UCO student John Alan Flores-Hideones. The judges consisted of Linda Lofton, director of admissions/records processing; Camille Kilbourne, academic advisement; Dr. Catherine Webster, modern languages; Charles Sager, career services; and Dr. Michael Hirlinger, political science.

Athieitise with the VISTA! vletaniedlacyahoo.eos, +05/974-591S

OKLAHOMA CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE ENGINEERING & PHYSICAL SCIENCE LAB ASSISTANT PFIN SICAL SCIENCE LAB ASSISTANT Tutor and assist students in the Lab. Deadline: April 11, 2008 ******************************** For details and to apply, visit our College Website www.occcjobs.com

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SPORTS

April 1, 2008

Bronchos win 3 of 4 games

MLB Preview

by Jeff Massie Sports Writer

Picks by Jordan Richison Staff Writer

Once again Baseball season is upon us once again and after an off-season filled with the Mitchell • Report, Alex Rodriguez's free agent drama and the Roger Clemens/Brian MacNamee steroid saga, America's favorite pastime couldn't start soon enough. The Boston Red Sox open up the season as the defending World Series champions for the second time in four years. The Red Sox are the favorites to repeat as American League champions and return back to the Series. The Sox will once again have stiff competition for the crown. Among them include their bitter rivals from the Bronx, the New York Yankees. The Yankees, who are playing their last season at Yankee Stadium, are looking to win one last Word Series title in "The House that Ruth Built." The AL Central will be a battle between the Cleveland Indians and Detroit Tigers in a race that is expected to go down to the final few games. The Tigers are one of the most improved teams in all of Baseball. With the edition of the young slugger Miguel

Cabrera, the Tigers will have one of the strongest lineups from top to bottom in recent memory. The AL West should come down to the Seattle Mariners and the LA Angles of Anaheim. The Mariners, led by hit machine Ichiro Suzuki and pitcher Erik Bedard, are the odds on favorite to win the division. But Vladimir Guerrero and the Angels are a team people shouldn't count out, as they will be going for their third division title in four years. In the National League, there is no clear favorite and the chase for the National League Championship is up for grabs. The NL East produces three of the strongest contenders in The Atlanta Braves, New York Mets and Philadelphia Phillies. The Mets are the popular pick to win the NL after getting Johan Santana from the Twins in the offseason. A team people should look out for are the Atlanta Braves. The Braves' re-acquisition of pitcher Tom Glavine mixed with the power switch-hitting duo of Chipper Jones and Mark Teixara, the Braves should be a team in contention when October comes

around. In the NL Central, The Chicago Cubs are the favorites to win the division. The Cubs, who have experienced their share of heartbreak over the years, are hoping this will be their year. They are going on 100 years since their last World Series title in 1908 and 56 years since their last World Series appearance in 1952. The NL West is looking like a battle between the defending National League Champions Colorado Rockies and the upstart Arizona Diamondbacks. The Rockies, led by Oklahoma native Matt Holliday, are hoping to build on the momentum they got from their amazing run to the World Series last year. The Diamondbacks, led by the 1-2 pitching punch of Brandon Webb and Dan Haren are looking to derail any momentum the Rockies have to capture their second straight division title. When it is all said and done, I think this is finally the year the Cubs win the World Series title and the people of Wrigleyville will have a celebration 100 years in the making.

Jordan's Predictions American League - AI., Boston Rcd Sox Coitid1 ckind Indkins - Al, NN/ci Seattle Mariner - AI, Wild Card Detroit

NatiOnal League - NL East Atlanta Braves - NL Central Chicago Cubs - NL West Arizona Diamondbacks NI. Wild Car New York Mets -

World Series Chicago Cubs

over Detroit Tigers -

The Bronchos took three of four from Angelo State last weekend, the second place team in the Lone Star Conference. This series came one week after UCO dropped to fourth after losing three games to Cameron. The first game didn't go the way the team from Edmond would have liked it to. UCO was beaten 1-4. Miguel Moctezuma scored the lone run in the seventh inning. Kenny Elkind threw a complete game for the Rams. He's been a tough opponent for batters all season. His ERA of 3.57 ranks fifth best in conference. During the course of the game, UCO only managed three hits, the first came in the seventh inning by Moctezuma. Elkind improved his record to 7-2 and struck out seven swingers while only walking a pair. The loss was registered to UCO's Dean McIntyre, his second of the season, compared to seven wins. The Bronchos ended their four-game skid on Saturday. In the first game of the day's double header UCO turned the tables and earned a 4-1 victory itself. Much like the first game, this victory was also attributed to dominant pitching. Up in the rotation was the ace — Clint Straka. He leads the conference with a 2.26 ERA. Straka pitched all nine innings and caused nine to whiff and only surrendered three hits and no earned runs. He was on the mark through the course of the game and

gave up no walks. It didn't take much, but the five Broncho hits scored four runs, a different batter accounting for each of the quartet of RBIs. Tyler Carroll, Michael Pollock, Bryan Covington and Jeff Lamb each knocked in a runner. Lambs shot left the confines of the park. Carroll was the only UCO player to earn multiple hits, he went 2 for 3. Pitching continued to dom-

inate in the third game of the series, a seven-inning contest. It was Kyle Head's turn on the mound. He threw a dominating one-hitter shutout. The Bronchos again marked up five hits and it was Breck Draper and McIntyre who accounted for the RBIs. Finally, in the fourth game, the runs began to rack up. UCO prevailed 18-12. The bats were red hot as UCO was able to put the ball safely into play a remarkable 17 times. Even more impressive was the plethora of players who sent the ball soaring over the fence. All in all, five Bronchos slammed homers — McIntyre, Draper, Carroll, Lamb and Ryan Schoonover went deep. It was Lamb's second of the series and Draper's 13th of the season. Draper leads the team in homers and is second in conference, one behind Brian Schupp of West Texas A&M University. Carroll is tied for fourth with 10 shots past the fence. UCO has amassed a record of 25-11 this year and is 1710 in conference. Besides a single game against Ouachita Baptist today, UCO has only one home series remaining.

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The Vista April 01, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista April 01, 2008  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.