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Broncho Basketball Men's basketball wins Lone Star North Division, defeating Cameron Aggies. See story on page 6

Feb. 24. 2009

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=v oice of the University of Central Oklahoma Since 1903

MO breaks ground on English-only bill new learning center may reach House Caleb McWilliams StagWriter

Several measures in the Oklahoma legislature that propose making English the official language of the state are advancing through both the House and the Senate. One of them, House Joint Resolution 1042, written by Rep. Randy Terrill, R-Moore, would make English the official language of Oklahoma to prevent the state from having to provide taxpayer-funded services in any language other than English, Terrill said. "Census data shows that learning to speak English is

a near guarantee that immigrants will increase their earning power," Terrill said. "This, bill will improve the lives of immigrants, foster better relations between all citizens and grow our economy." Terrill, known for the sweeping immigration reform bill passed in 2007 known as HB 1804, tried to pass a similar "English Only" bill last year that died in the Senate. '"I think [the measure] is a feel good idea but really sends the wrong message," Dr. Wayne Stein, professor of English, said. "Oklahoma see ENGLISH, page 5

Club studies language as a "human phenomenon" Language and Linguistics Conference. Features Writer Weatherholtz, who is currently the president of If you're trying to get in the UCO Language Society, touch with senior English cofounded the group in fall major Kodi Weatherholtz of 2007 with UCO graduate these days, you had better Whitney Vandiver and Dr. take a number. Amy Carell of the English Between finishing his department. The organidegree, preparing for gradu- zation became official in ate school, tutoring at the February 2008. UCO Writing Center and his Founding the group was obligations to the English one of Weatherholtz's favorSociety, the Language ite things about being a part Society and Sigma Tau Delta, of the organization. Weatherholtz is a busy man. "I really enjoyed founding He especially has a lot to the group — going through do to prepare for the UCO the process and seeing if Language Society's 2009 see LANGUAGE, page 5 Chase Dearinger

Photo by Laura Hoffert

UCO President Roger Webb shovels the first pile of dirt last Thursday, during the groundbreaking for the new Transformative Learning Center. The center will be west of the Liberal Arts building. It will provide additional office space for faculty and will focus on a more student-based method of learning and teaching. The building is scheduled to open in 2010.

Ambassador-in-residence performs premiere with UCO symphony The University of Central Oklahoma Symphony Orchestra takes a musical voyage with UCO Ambassador in Residence Kyle Dillingham for the premiere performance of the original composition "Arogsy Overture" at 7:30 p.m., March 10 at the Oak Tree Country Club, 700 W. Country Club Drive, in Edmond. The event celebrates the one-year anniversary of the UCO Centre for Global Competency, a certification program recognizing students who have studied abroad, studied international subjects or foreign languages and met other requirements headed by Dennis Dunham, UCO executive director of international affairs. The original piece, "Argosy Overture," composed by Callen Clarke, an Edmond resident and professional musician, depicts the travels of a global explorer. An argosy is a large merchant ship, which Dunham said is used as a metaphor for travelers in the composition. The composition will begin with a violin solo by Dillingham. He represents the adventurer, who begins by asking questions - with his music - and providing his own answers. "Pretty soon, he asks a question and the

world answers - that's the orchestra. But it's not what he expected," Dunham said. "The highlight for me is when he is going into China, the sound of his violin changes into that of an erhu." "This music was written for a special purpose and written to tell a story. It is about a transforming experience of a global experience. And you experience that transformation in about ir minutes," Dillingham said. Last fall, Dillingham played his violin for audiences in Thailand and Korea when he and Dunham traveled there for UCO. Another "fitting" selection for the global theme of the concert is an Austrian composition, Haydn's "Farewell Symphony," conducted by Dr. Ralph Morris, director of the UCO symphony orchestra. The event also will feature the performance of Hanson's Symphony #2 Romantic. Though the 20th century American compcser produced some avant-garde pieces, Morris describes it as a romantic, beautiful work. Tickets are $10 per person or $5 for UCO faculty, staff and students and may be reserved by calling (405) 974 - 3375. "Argosy Overture" CDs will be available for sale.

MEN'S BASKETBALL TAKES LONE STAR DIVISION TITLE

Add another Lone Star Conference North Division championship to Central Oklahoma's resume. Lance Harper and Brent Friday ignited a 16-3 secondhalf run that sparked the No. 9-ranked Bronchos to an 85-62 drubbing of Cameron here Saturday. Continued on page 6 TWELVE OAKS : FIVE-STAR SERVICE IN THE COMFORT OF HOME

If you are looking for the next place to take that special someone, Twelve Oaks Restaurant could be the next restaurant to program into your GPS. We heard it was a converted two-story home turned into a restaurant, we wanted to see this for ourselves. Continued on page 2 BOLLYWOOD GOES HOLLYWOOD AT OSCARS

Hollywood has met Bollywood at the Academy Awards. The makers of Oscar champ "Slumdog Millionaire" came away with eight Oscars, including best picture and director for Danny Boyle. "We're Brits, really, trapped in the middle, but it's a lovely trapped thing," Boyle said backstage. Continued on page 2

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EV/STAONL NE,COnf Liquid Assets with Caleb McWilliams

From Vista finance reporter Caleb McWilliams comes a blog about the financial, political and other relevant happenings in Central Oklahoma affecting UCO.

Inside the Lines with Chris Wescott

Photo provided UCO Ambassador in Residence Kyle Dillingham will be the featured soloist when the UCO Symphony Orchestra performs the original composition, "Argosy Overture" at 7:30 p.m., March 10 at Oak Tree Country Club in Edmond. The piece, depicting the travels of a global explorer, was commissioned by the UCO Centre for Global Competency to celebrate its one year anniversary.

Sports reporter Chris Wescott brings you all sports, all the time, with Broncho scores, mini articles and quotes from players' and coachs' interviews.

Snap. Crackle. Pop Culture. with Stephani Tobin

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Stephani writes about day-to-day pop culture, new and old movies, shameless celebrity gossip, the music she has playing repeatedly on her iPod and her American Idol obsession.


Bollywood hits Hollywood: "Millionaire," Penn, Winslet take home top awards David Germain AP Movie Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) Hollywood has met Bollywood at the Academy Awards. The makers of Oscar champ "Slumdog Millionaire" came away with eight Oscars, including best picture and director for Danny Boyle. The low-budget production was a merger of India's brisk Bollywood movie industry, which provided most of the cast and crew, and the global marketing reach of Hollywood, which turned the film into a commercial smash, said British director Boyle. "We're Brits, really, trapped in the middle, but it's a lovely trapped thing," Boyle said backstage. "You can see it's going to happen more and more." It was a theme Oscar voters embraced through the evening with other key awards honoring films fostering broader understanding and compassion. Sean Penn won his second best-actor Oscar, this one for playing slain gay-rights pioneer Harvey Milk in "Milk," while Kate Winslet took best actress for "The Reader," in which she plays a former concentration camp guard. As expected, Heath Ledger became just the second performer to win an Oscar posthumously, receiving the supportingactor award for playing the Joker in -The Dark Knight." Penelope Cruz was the first Spanish actress to win an

AP Photo

"Slumdog Millionaire" director Danny Boyle, right, holds his Oscar for Best Director alongside cast members Dev Patel, far left, and Freida Pinto at the official Oscar After Party for Fox Searchlight's "Slumdog Millionaire" and "The Wrestler" in West Hollywood, Calif., Sunday, Feb. 22, 2009.

Boyle earned the directOscar with her supporting prize as a volatile art- ing prize with his first Oscar ist in Woody Allen's "Vicky nomination of his career. "Slumdog" writer Simon Cristina Barcelona." Ledger's award was Beaufoy, who won the accepted by his parents adapted-screenplay Oscar, and sister on behalf of the said the film clicked with 3-year-old daughter he audiences stung by the had with actress Michell& recession and the realizaWilliams. lion that "this money thing, "Slumdog Millionaire"_ it's been shown to be a real started as an unlikely candii.-false idol." Song-and-dance man date for the sort of industry and audience recognition Hugh Jackman was host it has garnered, presenting : instead of the usual standup a cast of unknowns and a comedian, and he kept the Dickensian tale of an Indian show to three and a half orphan rising above his hours. The Oscars have been street-urchin roots. The film tells a universal criticized in the past for story of optimism that has devoting so much time been eagerly embraced by to technical categories that average movie fans U.S. audiences.

care little about. This time, the show abridged many of those awards, with Will Smith hammering through four such categories in quick succession. Each acting prize was presented by five past winners of the same awards, among them Halle Berry, Nicole Kidman, Kevin Kline, Sophia Loren, Anthony Hopkins, Shirley MacLaine and Robert De Niro. Wmslet finally walked off with an Oscar after five previous losses. While Wmslet said she had been practicing Oscar speeches since childhood, she still felt like a little girl from Reading."

UCO professor nominated for Literary Award University of Central despite political pressure, Oklahoma English profes- Jefferson refused to negotisor Dr. Kevin Hayes is one ate with nations that sponof three finalists for the sored forms of terrorism. Hayes, who has taught George Washington Book Prize, one of the nation's at UCO for 17 years, is the author of A Colonial biggest literacy awards. Hayes' book "The Road Woman's Bookshelf, An to Monticello: The Life and American Cycling Odyssey, Mind of Thomas Jefferson" Melville's Folk Roots, Poe was published last summer and the Printed World, by the Oxford University and The Library of William Byrd of Press, and Westover, for was widely which he won reviewed the Virginia as one of Library the counHistory try's best Award. new history T h e books of the $50,00 0 year. George Hayes Washington wrote the book as a ill' I %IL\ ,,,;(,, / 1 Book Prize Allaj ,-211:///, award-copersonal sponsored by response Washington to the 9/11 Photo provided College, terrorist the Gilder attacks. "After 9/11, I was ready Lehrman Institute of to join the army, but my American History and wife said, 'You can't join George Washington's the army. You're too old. Mount Vernon-is the largYou have arthritis in your est prize nationwide for a thumbs.' Then I started book on early American wondering how I could history, and one of the use my academic specialty largest literary prizes of in the service of my coun- any kind. It recognizes the year's try. I decided to write the intellectual life of one of its best books on the nation's Founding Fathers," Hayes founding era, especially those that have the potensaid. The book follows tial to advance broad Jefferson's education from public understanding of a young man to lawyer; American history. The award winner will from his original estate-which burned down—to his be announced on May 28 time in Europe, his time during a gala celebration in office, and finally to his at George Washington's Mount Vernon Estate and retirement at Monticello. Hayes' book states that Gardens in Virginia.

Lawton students to get recruited by UCO on Tour The University of Central Oklahoma will bring its "UCO on Tour" recruiting event to Lawton's Eisenhower High School from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 26. The event is a "one stop shop" for information regarding admissions, student life, scholarships, financial aid, academic advisement and housing. Representatives from each of these areas will be available to answer questions. Plus, there will be free pizza, pop and UCO prizes. The "UCO on Tour" events are a part of a university outreach initiative to bring the UCO experience to students and par-

ents throughout Oklahoma and the region who may not have the opportunity to visit the campus in person. "Our goal is to make the UCO experience accessible to students no matter where they live. We are making this valuable information as easy as possible to get with the hopes of helping Oklahoma students make their college dreams a reality," said Adam Johnson, director of Recruitment and Scholarships in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. The event is free and open to students and parents throughout the area who want to learn more about UCO. In addition to

all Lawton area high schools, students from high schools in surrounding cities like Apache, Cache, Chattanooga, Comanche, Elgin, Empire City, Fletcher, Geronimo, Grandfield, Indiahoma, Marlow, Snyder, Sterling, Temple and Walters are encouraged to attend. Registration is not required to attend the event. The University of Central Oklahoma is the largest metropolitan university in the state, serving approximately 16,000 students in five undergraduate colleges and a college of graduate studies and research. UCO offers a transformative educational

experience, emphasizing their core values of character, civility and community through innovative leadership and service-learning programming. Students can apply for admission at the event, provided they bring an official transcript and ACT scores. UCO will waive the application fee for those who apply at the event, and some students may be eligible for on-site admission to the university. For more information about the UCO on Tour in Lawton event, contact UCO's Office of Undergraduate Admission at (405) 974-2727.

Photo provided

The UCO on Tour recruiting event will come to Lawton's Eisenhower High School from 4-6 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 26. Future students and parents can learn all about college life at UCO and can apply for admission on site. The event is free.

Twelve Oaks: Five-star service with the comforts of home Daviyion Johnson and Ryan Kolb Restaurant Reviewers

If you are looking for the next place to take that special someone, Twelve Oaks Restaurant could be the next restaurant to program into your GPS. You will need it because this place is out there. Its zip code is technically still in Edmond and because we heard it was a converted two-story home turned into a restaurant, we wanted to see this for ourselves. We found this quaint little place about halfway between Sorghum Mill and Waterloo Roads on North Midwest Boulevard. At night, it can be easily spotted due to the white Christmas lights that make

the place look like a palace serving elegant and delicious food. Oh, did we mention the free valet parking? Unfortunately, we did not notice it until we had already done the hard task of finding our own spot. This is definitely a place you should call ahead to make reservations and dress nicely for. We had to make a last minute turnaround to grab a pair of slacks. Twelve Oaks truly offers the fine dining experience that most people dream about, and the selections we choose for dinner further reinforce this. Ryan decided on almond-crusted shrimp, which was four large breaded shrimp served with a house salad and baked potato. While it didn't have the largest quantity of shrimp, --

the size and quality is worth the trade off. It was amazing. Ryan enjoys the little things Twelve Oaks has to offer. For example, pre-sliced butter squares, unbeatable dinner rolls and a lazy Susan full of bacon bits, sour cream and yet more butter for the baked potato. Daviyion had a meal that can only be defined as exquisite - quail. Now by default, every meat that's not beef or pork supposedly tastes like chicken. However, quail is in a poultry league all it's own. It came served with a house salad and a side of alfredo pasta that was second to none. Having never tried quail before, Daviyion did not know what to expect, perhaps a mix between duck and chicken, but that was not the case. Ryan had to think long and hard on what

numerical value to assign Twelve Oaks. With complimentary valet parking, delightful food presentation, a warm and friendly atmosphere and pleasant countryside location, Ryan gives Twelve Oaks a cool 4.9 out of 5 stars. Twelve Oaks is indeed a tough place to beat. Daviyion said the dining experience at Twelve Oaks is comparable to many things in life: winning the lottery and not going broke afterwards, getting a new car with no payments due for five years or making it big in the stock market during an economic crunch. Unfortunately, while none of these dreams seem to be possible, Twelve Oaks Restaurant is a dream come true for fine dining.


UCO ROTC rifle teams place high Caleb McWilliams Stain'

Hill

Three rifle teams from the UCO ROTC took first, fifth and sixth places out of 13 teams in a recent competition. The Broncho Battalion Bronze, Blue and White teams competed in the Gateway Rifle Competition at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. against seven different universities in the region. Out of 6o individual shooters, UCO placed four in the top 10, including cadet Ray Beckman in the top spot overall. "Notably, we beat Washington University, who gets to practice everyday," one of the team members said. UCO's team only gets to practice two days a week. "They pride themselves on their program, so it was cool to beat them," he said. The competition is based on scoring per target. Participants shoot from a prone, or flat, position, as well as standing and kneeling positions. Cadets Alnico, Boudreau, and Valencia also placed in the top 10 individual shooters overall.

'Promises, Promises' to provide a lively evening at UCO "Promises, Promises," a lively, fully produced musical, will be performed in a cabaret-style setting at 7:30 p.m. March 2-4 and March 10-12 at the UCO Jazz Lab by the University of Central Oklahoma's musical theatre division. The musical, based on the 1960 movie "The Apartment," revolves around a naive, but ambitious young executive who finds himself loaning the key to his bachelor apartment to the older executives for their liaisons. The musical will be staged at the Jazz Lab because of the ongoing restoration of Mitchell Hall

Theater. The Lab is located at the corner of Littler Avenue and East 5th Street in Edmond. "The surroundings are nice and intimate and nobody will be very far from the stage. It's good for the audience - they are really close and right there," director Billie Thrash said. Staging the musical in close quarters posed certain challenges. "It's very creatively done, both in the staging and the way we are able to bring in a set in a venue where bringing a set in is not easily done," Thrash said. Christopher Domanski, scenic

designer, said the set was designed for the smaller stage. "Everything we are using has multiple uses, so the desk for the office also becomes a table. So that everybody knows where we are, we are using titled projections that say `the apartment' or the 'Chinese restaurant,'" Domanski said. "Promises, Promises" was originally staged in 1968, with Tony award-winning actor Donna McKechnie as one of the three lead dancers. McKechnie, who has continued to work on New York stages, traveled to Edmond recently to teach master classes in voice and

dance, as well as coach the UCO musical's cast members. The music for "Promises, Promises" is by Burt Bacharach, lyrics by Hal David and book by Neil Simon. One of the songs, "I'll Never Fall in Love Again," became a hit for singer Dionne Warwick. Tickets are $15 and may be reserved by calling the Mitchell Hall Theater Box Office at (405) 974-3375. Reservations are recommended, as seating is limited. The doors will open at 6:0o p.m. A fullservice cash bar will be available from Hideaway pizza.

NONE OF YOUR NUMBERS ARE just

UCO choirs to sing for spring Three University of Central Oklahoma choirs will present their spring semester concert, featuring the choral imitation of bird sounds during "Le Chant des Oyseaux," at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 28 in the sanctuary of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 308 NW 164th Street in Edmond. The choirs - the Chamber Singers, the Cantilena Women's Chorus and the Concert Chorale - are part of UCO's Choral Department. They are directed by Dr. Karl Nelson, assistant music professor. "There are bits of springtime and the ending of winter in the different pieces. But that is not necessarily the theme of the concert. "It is to show a variety of different styles and the breadth of knowledge students have acquired while participating in the UCO music program," Nelson said. The event will begin with the Chamber Singers performing music for small vocal ensembles by two loth century composers, Francis Poulenc and Paul Hindemith. The Cantilena Women's Chorus will sing works ranging from the classical period to today, including music from composers Hasse, Rachmaninoff and Casals. Both the Cantilena Women's Chorus and the Concert Chorale will perform pieces from "Frostiana," Randall Thompson's collection of Robert Frost poems set to choral music. Besides the French chanson, "Le Chant des Oyseaux," the Concert Chorale also will sing two pieces by Johannes Brahms and "Sleep" by contemporary composer, Eric Whitacre. The concert - is free and open to the public.

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CIRCULATION

Pelosi in Italy: Why is this better than auto executives flying?

Chris Albers

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Campus Quotes "How would you describe transformative learning?" "Nontraditional styles of teaching' for blind and deaf people." Andrew Tretiak Chemistry ACS — Sophomore

and their staff for a week House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in Italy. Do eight people and seven fellow Democrats went really need to go? Why not to Italy on the taxpayers' dime last two? Do they need to be week, only a few months after critthere an entire week chargicizing the executives of the Big ing their hotel rooms and Three automakers for flying on perper diem on the US tax sonal jets to Washington, D.C. for payer?" their hearings. "It is ironic she decides Chief executives from Ford BY NELSON SOLOMON to go on her Italian taxpayMotor Co., Chrysler LLC and er funded vacation after General Motors Corp. were blasted by lawmakers in November last year for using the jets to ask signing the biggest government spending bill in history. "Well she appears to be doing her part to spend governfor public funds, and failing to make personal sacrifices in ment money." exchange for federal assistance. Pelosi has also been in Italy for talks with top officials "Couldn't you have downgraded to first class or something, or jet-pooled or something to get here?" Rep. Gary focusing on the global economic crisis and other leading issues, according to the ANSA Italian News Agency. Ackerman, D-NY, asked during the hearings. But besides these talks and a few luncheons and speakSo, it's not okay for these executives to use their personal ing engagements, Pelosi is simply taking a vacation on the jets to travel to ask for money. That's agreeable. But why is it acceptable for Pelosi and the other lawmak- taxpayers' tab. When Congress was considering the enormous stimulus ers to go on a weeklong Italian vacation? The eight legislators are in Italy to attend a World War II package, why was Pelosi pushing for passage of the bill before the weekend? commemoration on Sunday. She was thinking about her flight out of Washington This begs the question, as put forth on a forum at and the delicious Italian food she was going to have on the rokdrop.com: "So to attend a service she needs to bring eight people taxpayers' tab.

The Bottom Line

Even though Chris Brown did it, don't abuse your Rihanna

"I have no idea." Gereme Collins Photography — Freshman

"Receiving a well-rounded education." Lanese Edmond Accounting — Junior

"Helping students learn to study better." Garrett Valdez Business - Freshman Photographed & compiled by Matt Danner

For a brief while, Rihanna and Chris Brown were hip-hop's young It Couple. She had a multi-platinum album with several hit singles, bold fashion sense and industry connections. He was an R&B sensation with several big endorsements, and he'd successfully crossed over into film and television. Between the two of them, they have 14 Grammy award nominations. So I suppose it's fitting that on Feb. 8, the day the 2009 Grammy awards were held, Brown was arrested for assaulting Rihanna. Of course, this is where gossip bloggers and Perez Hilton speculated what exactly caused the altercation. Was he jealous of her fame? Was there another woman? Did she fall upon some shady text messages? They canceled their appearance at the awards ceremony, Brown made a public apology of sorts and nearly two weeks of speculation passed before a post-assault photo of Rihanna was leaked to TMZ. Her face, which often graced glossy magazine pages, "best dressed" lists and CoverGirl ads, was beaten nearly to a pulp. Needless to say, Rihanna has had her album sales soar as a surge of sympathetic goodwill, and Brown has fallen off the pedestal of wonderboy success he's built over the

West Coast Bias

past few years. But the important thing to note here is the fact that Brown was seen as a teen idol, a "safe" sex symbol for parents to introduce to their tweens and teens. These are young people — Brown is 19 and Rihanna just turned 21.

Even though no one will condone what Brown did, he's still been a role model for teenagers and aspiring hiphop artists around the country. When someone this young and successful with the potential to break out into the stratosphere falls this hard, it leaves people wondering. If anything is taken away from this, it should be a cold, hard lesson in domestic relations. Teenagers are the demographic targeted here because of the youth involved. No matter what's going on with your significant other —if they're cheating, if you're cheating, if they get drunk at a party and make you angry — it is never okay to abuse them. Even though punching something — or someone — can release a bevy of energy, the end result can destroy your permanent record. Any young couple can look at Brown and Rihanna and say they'd never stoop that low. But now that they see the consequences — that even someone as popular as Chris Brown can fall this far from grace — we can only hope that it sinks in for good.

Confiscation of sign 'aborting' First Amendment rights? Caleb McWilliams

Chris Harrison had his First Amendment right violated by Oklahoma City police. Or did he? Can we know? Is that the point? Oklahoma City Police stopped Harrison because he had a homemade sign on his pickup. "ABORT OBAMA NOT THE UNBORN," Chris Harrison's sign stated. Two police officers had a discussion with Harrison about the meaning of the word "abort." The police officer said the word abort meant kill, and Harrison said the word meant to terminate or remove. The officers then confiscated the sign. Oklahoma City police later returned the sign to him, but passed on the information to a focal field office of the Secret Service

who ultimately determined he was not a threat. Initially, I was ambivalent about this story. I thought someone had a slow news day, but after thinking a bit more, came to some conclusions. Often, we hear anti-abortion (pro-life) arguments that equate abortion with murder. But if aborting "the unborn" is murder of a human being, then, is it much of a leap for the officer who pulled Harrison over to equate "Abort Obama" with murder? You could go your whole life and never meet anyone who is FOR abortion, and many people are still (myself included) antiabortion. I just think defining life, abortion and murder are the key arguments in the abortion issue, and readjusting your definition of "abort" to fit with your situation,

the police in this case, is dangerous and counter-productive.

However, when it comes to the First Amendment issue, my inner journalist activates. "Someone wasn't allowed to say something? How dare they! This isn't like yelling 'Fire!' in a crowded theatre!" I actually didn't say that last part, and do not like overused examples. But that may be the example the officers had in mind when they chose to confiscate the sign. To be fair, I need to mention that Capt. Steve McCool, spokesman for the police, said the sign was taken in error and that residents should not worry about their rights. This is a muddled mess that mixes so many topics that people get angry about that it's no longer simply about rights, either abortion or First Amendment. I know I can't

figure it out, and I'm sure few of the people commenting and blogging can't either. And maybe that's a problem. We hear abortion and perk up, but when a First Amendment issue is brought up without an emotional tie, many ignore it and move on. Maybe I can say we've mixed one larger issue with another. Maybe, to borrow Dr. Mark Hanebutt, Edith Kinney Gaylord Professor of Journalism Ethics, we've confused the "Can we" and the "Should we" with the "How do we." Maybe we should concentrate less on emotional, specific cases that mix in other hot-button issues, like this one, and concentrate more on rationally discussing the concepts and consequences. Maybe, after all, someone did have a slow news day.


ENGLISH Continued from page 1

needs to be inclusive and not exclusive." Stein, former president of Oklahoma Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, said these bills don't help people learn English. "The bills we try to pass do not provide more English classes for adults to learn," Stein said. "So how are they supposed to learn English when we don't have a system in place to teach them?" Another English-only legislation by Terrill, HB 2254, would keep driver's license exams to be given in any language other than English. "The use of a language other than English during the examination for or provision of driver licenses," the bill noted, "shall be presumed to diminish or ignore the role of English as the official language of the state." Stein said these types of provisions are hypocritical.

"We don't mind cheap labor," Stein said, but "We want the Hispanic community to take driving tests written in English only." This forces them "to drive without a license and no insurance as they continue to wash our dishes, cut our grass and clean our houses," Stein said. "The bill does not address the realities, for it is simply about punishing those whom we feel should not be here in the first place." "It is a xenophobic bill based on fear," Stein said. Another similar bill, HB 1598 by Rep. Eddie Fields, R-Wynona, would have similar effects and provisions, including exemptions for Native American languages. "This bill would not infringe upon the rights of Native American Tribal Governments in Oklahoma to conduct official business in their native language," said David Jenkins, UCO College Republican Senator and Chairman of

the Senate Oversight Committee. Leaders of several Native American tribes in Oklahoma have come out against the bill, however, including Cherokee Chief Chad Smith. Last year, in House committee about Terrill's similar but ultimately failed bill, Smith interrupted Terrill after he said the law's purpose was to encourage immigrants to assimilate into society. "What do we assimilate to?" Smith said. "We assimilate to Mr. Terrill's mind, which is spooky in itself." While all the bills make provisions for Native American languages, Stein said we need to "remember what we did to them before we pass such bills." "We all need to be a bit more humble and recall our very own Oklahoma history and what we did to the Native Americans as we forced English only upon them," he said.

LANGUAGE Continued from page 1

there was student interest," Weatherholtz said. The Language Society started as an opportunity to broaden opportunities within the English department to study different aspects of language. There were already several organizations in the department, but Weatherholtz, Vandiver and Carell felt like and organization that was fully devoted to language and linguistics would be an important contribution to students at UCO. "We wanted something that would focus more on language itself," Weatherholtz said. This dedication to language makes the Language Society a unique group on the UCO campus. "There is no other organization on campus that is dedicated to language in general," Weatherholtz said. "There's the English Society, there's a group dedicated to Spanish, there's the French Club — they study a particular language. "But we were more interested in language as a human phenomenon and a communicative process, however that takes place."

Membership in the Language Society requires very little. There are no dues and you do not have to be a student of any particular discipline. "We just hope you have an interest in language," Weatherholtz said. The group is represented on Facebook, where interested students can learn about the organization and join. Weatherholtz said one of the major interests of the group has been a series of student presentations, which commenced last spring and continued into the fall. "It's an opportunity for students to give a presentation to their peers in an effort to tweak those papers or develop them into something that might be presented at a conference," Weatherholtz said. "We basically wanted to provide presentation experience to make students better candidates for graduate school or to help them prepare for whatever their future endeavors are." The group's original intent was to grow the organization into an interdisciplinary organization. "It started small, but our hope is that

Rejected Minnesota Senate absentee ballots re-opened

it will grow into an organization. that welcomes anyone that wants to study an aspect of language — not just written language, not just the English language, but music as a language, art as a language, various other spoken languages. "Any type of communicative effort is welcomed," Weatherholtz said. This discussion of language takes place in both regular meeting and through the student presentation series. These presentations and informational group meetings have slowed down, however, as the group gears up for their first big project: the 2009 Language and Linguistics Conference, which is corning up at the end of March. The conference is not only the Language Society's first major event; it marks the group's movement beyond the walls of the Liberal Arts building. The conference has drawn some international attention. "We received submission s internationally," Weatherholtz said. "I stayed on top of all of the submissions as they came in, so I've been able to speak with people from Nigeria, France and _

Germany as they had questions. That was much more than I expected. "I was expecting some people from UCO and the Oklahoma area, but I got to speak with some people around the world and that was pretty cool." The 2009 Language and Linguistics Conference will start at 8 a.m. on Saturday, March 28 in the presentation rooms on the third floor of the Nigh University Center. The conference will feature keynote speaker Dr. Victor Raskin of the University of Purdue, who will be speaking abclt humor and semantics. There will also be a roundtable panel on careers in language and linguistics. "It's a great opportunity for students to present their research related to the field of language and linguistic studies," Weatherholtz said. For more information on the UCO Language Society or the 2009 Language and Linguistics Conference, contact Kodi Weatherholtz at kweatherholtz@grnail. corn.

Ticketmastei pays New Jersey in Springsteen concert settlement

that they followed all the rules and their Associated Press ballots were rejected due to mistakes by county officials. Under state law, there are four legal reaST. PAUL, Minn. — The judges in EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Minnesota's Senate trial on Tuesday ordered sons to reject absentee ballots: a misplaced Ticketmaster agreed Monday to change its that 23 previously rejected absentee ballots signature on the envelope; the name and online sales process after it directed people be opened and added to the race, giving address on the envelope don't match voter seeking Bruce Springsteen tickets to a subRepublican Norm Coleman a shot at eras- rolls; the voter isn't properly registered; or sidiary that charged up to 50 times the face the voter also voted on Election Day. But value. ing Democrat Al Franken's 225-vote lead. The ballots belong to voters who sued to the trial has established that at times, counTicketmaster reached a settlement with have them counted. They have been identi- ty officials have made mistakes in enforcing New Jersey, where the Springsteen concert fied as Franken supporters, but Coleman's those rules. in question had been scheduled, said state The judges said the secrecy envelope Attorney General Anne Milgram. lawyers were encouraged by the order because they want another 4,700 rejected holding a 24th ballot should be opened and Ticketmaster said in a statement Monday checked for registration information, and that the problem over the May 21 and absentee ballots to be counted. "It's basically what we've been asking for the ballot should be counted if the registra- May 23 concerts at East Rutherford's Izod all along," Coleman attorney Ben Ginsberg tion is there. Center was caused by a software glitch. The judges wrote that they didn't have said. When the tickets went on sale Feb. Franken's attorney, Marc Elias, also enough evidence to order the counting of 2, Springsteen ticket seekers were redipraised the order. "We're obviously pleased, the remaining 37 ballots, but said those vot- rected from the main Ticketmaster site to having said all along that these witnesses ers could present more evidence that their TicketsNow, a subsidiary. ballots should be counted. should have their votes counted," he said. Springsteen said on his Web site that he Coleman's attorneys are in the process and the E Street Band were "furious." The 23 voters "have provided unrebutted evidence that their absentee ballots were of trying to get about 4,700 rejected absenTicketmaster did not admit wrongdolegally cast and should be counted," read tee ballots opened and counted. Ginsberg ing but agreed to pay the state $350,000, said Coleman's lawyers were likely to seek Milgram said. The company will also comthe order signed by judges. The voters were among a larger group of affidavits from voters whose ballots were pensate ticket holders who complained and 61 Franken voters who filed affidavits to get rejected for reasons similar to those 23 the change how it handles secondary sales, she their rejected absentees counted, arguing judges ordered counted. said. Associated Press

"What is critical is that consumers understand what is happening on any Internet site during a sale of tickets," Milgram said. "The (Ticketmaster) Web site suggested that consumers could continue their search on TicketsNow, making it seem there was no difference in the two markets when, in fact, of course there is." Milgram said her office received about 2,200 complaints from people unable to buy Springsteen tickets for a face-value price of $65 or $95. They were directed to TicketsNow, where tickets retailed for $200 to $5,000 apiece. Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal said he was studying Monday's settlement but would continue an investigation into Ticketmaster sales of Springsteen tickets in Connecticut. The settlement comes as Ticketmaster faces scrutiny for a proposed merger with the concert promotion giant LiveNation. "While we are pleased Ticketmaster has acknowledged its mistake ... giving Ticketmaster near total control over the distribution of concert tickets here in New York and across the country is a recipe for disaster," he said.

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Tuesday Feb. 24 2009 Page 6

Bronchos clinch title in Chandler trade Lone Star North Division rescinded, goes LAWTON Add another The Bronchos also limited CU Lone Star Conference North to 36.8-percent shooting (21-ofDivision championship to 57) and won the battle of the Central Oklahoma's resume. boards 46-32. Harper led the Lance Harper and Brent way with 24 points and nine Friday ignited a 16-3 secrebounds, hitting io-of-15 shots ond-half run that sparked from the field. the No. 9-ranked Bronchos Friday was 7-of-lo shooting in to an 85-62 drubbing of scoring a season-high 16 points Cameron here Saturday as while adding five rebounds and UCO clinched at least a share three assists. David Thomas of the LSC North title for the chipped in 12 points, Michael fourth time in five years. Sosanya had nine points and It was the 12th win in 13 eight rebounds and DeAngelo outings for the Bronchos, Garrett had seven boards and who improved to 22-3 overthree blocked shots. all and 9-1 in the LSC North Friday started the big run with with games remaining next a tip-in, Harper had a layup after week against Texas A&Ma turnover and Friday answered Commerce and Southwestern one CU free throw with two of Oklahoma. his to make it 53 - 47. The Lions and Bulldogs The Aggies ended a long are tied for second in the drought with a bucket at the North Division at 7-3. It was 10:36 mark, but UCO came right also UCO's seventh straight back with six consecutive points road win dating back to early as Thomas made two foul shots December, with the Bronchos then Victor Driver and Adam using a potent offense, stingy Terneus had back-to-back defense and an overwhelmlayups. ing rebounding advantage to The Bronchos trailed 3o-23 subdue the Aggies. at the 5:oi mark before ending "We got off to a slow start the half with a 15-4 rim to go on again, but got things going top 38-34 at the break. Photo provided toward the end of the half Thomas started that spurt and played really well in the Senior forward DeAngelo Garrett shoots against with a 3-pointer from the top of second half," UCO coach the key and followed a CU turnthe Cameron Aggies on Jan. 31, in a game that Terry Evans said. "This can over with a layup before Harper be a tough place to play and brought the Bronchos to clinch the Lone Star got an inside bucket off a Driver to come in here and win like Conference North Division championship. feed to tie it at 30-all. this means a lot." The Aggies went back on top UCO was off target most 33-3o, but UCO came back with of the first half but ended up shooting 50.0 percent (3147 eight straight points — all on free throws — to make it 38-33 62) for the game, including 60.o percent (18-of-3o) itutipt before Cameron got one foul shot in the final second to get second half. e,uq within 38-34 at intermission. —

back to Hornets were excited to add Tyson, but at the same time we Chris Wescott have to make tough deciSpores sions. There were some things in the medical process, and outside consulSome really believe that tants, that gave us some the Oklahoma City Thunder concern." dropped the ball this past The fans were not the week, when they rescinded only ones who were thrown their trade with the New for a loop. Tyson Chandler Orleans Hornets to send himself was left confused young, rising star Tyson after his trade was rejected. Chandler to Oklahoma "This is absolutely City. crazy," Chandler told ESPN Tyson Chandler is a by phone Wednesday night. 7-foot-1 center who is a "I'm super shocked. This is defensive powerhouse with nuts." a knack for getting the The New Orleans rebound. Chandler would Hornets are happy to have have been a great addition Tyson back. The Thunder, to the strong young core of however, may be re-thinkplayers the Thunder are try- ing this decision next season ing to build a team around. when they will be forced to The story that was pay the expiring contracts released to the public was of Wilcox and Smith, and that Tyson Chandler took will be without the talented a physical for the Thunder Tyson Chandler. and they were bothered by The Thunder did not let his turf-toe injury. Chandler the rescinded trade of Tyson has missed the past 14 Chandler stop them from games, so it is not a secret making some movements that he has been hampered on trade deadline day. They by injuries. Oklahoma City sent a first round draft decided to rescind the trade pick to the Chicago Bulls late Wednesday night. for guard Thabo Sefolosha. Thunder general manag- They also sent Chris Wilcox er Sam Presti told the press to the New York Knicks for Thursday, "Yesterday we forward Malik Rose.

Lady Bronchos crush Cameion Aggies LAWTON Brianne Grisham's outside sharpshooting sparked a first-half run that put Central Oklahoma in control and the No. 17-ranked Bronchos went to throttle Lone Star Conference North Division rival Cameron 62-47 here Saturday afternoon. Grisham, who entered the game averaging 2.4 points a game with 14 3-pointers on the season, came off the bench to hit four straight long-range shots as UCO turned a 16-15 lead midway through the half into a 34-25 halftime advantage. The Bronchos then opened the second half with a 10-2 run to seize a commanding 44-27 cushion and CU got no closer than to the rest of the way as UCO won for the 11th time in 12 outings, improving to 21-4 overall and an LSC North-leading Grisham finished with a season-high 14 points while adding four rebounds, four steals and two assists. Lizzie Brenner had to points and io rebounds, with Cristina —

Yarbrough, Ashley Beckley and Rose Anderson chipping in nine points apiece. "Brianne came in to hit some big shots for us and gave us a lift we really needed today," UCO coach Guy Hardaker said. We didn't shoot the bail very well and made too many mistakes, but anytime you go on the road and win in this league you have to be happy." Neither team shot well, with the Bronchos hitting just 22-of-58 shots (37.9 percent) and the Aggies 16-of52 (30.8 percent). UCO made 7-4-14 (5o.o percent) in the first half against CU's zone defense, but hit only 1-of-i3 (7.7 percent) in the final 20 minutes. Grisham saved the Bronchos in the first half, hitting back-to-back 3-pointers in a 52-second span to give the Bronchos a 22-15 lead and then answering four straight CU points with a long-range bomb from the corner. The junior hit again from the wing at the 3:46 mark to make it 28-23,

with Anderson making four free throws and Yarbrough a fast-break layup off a Grisham pass the rest of the way to give UCO its 34-25 halftime lead. Cameron opened the second half with a bucket to get within seven, but the Bronchos answered with 10 straight points to make it 44-27 as Beckley had a pair of layups. The Aggies cut it back to to at 46- 36 with 13:30 left to play before UCO finally put the game away with an 11-0 spurt. Beckley had two more layups and Grisham a steal and layup before Mallory Markus finished it off with a 3-pointer that made it 57 36 at 7:05. The Bronchos scored just five points the rest of the way, but Cameron never threatened. UCO plays its final two regular season games next week, going to Texas A&M-Commerce Wednesday for a big showdown before finishing at home next Saturday against Southwestern Oklahoma. -

Photo provided

Senior forward Lizzie Brenner charges past a player from Texas Woman's on Feb. 18. The Lady Bronchos played against the Pioneers at Hamilton Field House, winning 103-84. Brenner scored a career-high 33 points in this game, keeping UCO ranked at 17th in the Lone Star Conference North Division.

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Hockey to take on Texas Tech 1-13 on the road this season. They have only scored 40 goals the entire season while away from home. This does not mean that Texas Tech isn't any good, because they've had their moments this season. The Red Raiders pulled off a major upset early in the year when they posted a 10-5 victory over Lindenwood University. "Its definitely nice to get another two in front of our fans. We didn't want last weekend to be the way we repay them for their loyalty and support," team captain Brian Thompson said. Thompson was referring to last weekend, which was supposed to be the final two games of the season before UCO scheduled games against Texas Tech. "As for Texas Tech, we cannot afford to overlook them because these are huge for our team as we prepare for

Chris Wescott ,S'ports I l rile,-

The Bronchos closed out their regular season last weekend versus their rivals, the OU Sooners. However, with a month off before the championships in Ohio, the Bronchos do not want to get rusty. UCO has scheduled two more games for Feb. 27 and 28 to serve as a tuneup and to make sure they stay focused. Both will be at home against Texas Tech. Texas Tech is an American Collegiate Hockey Association Division II team. The Red Raiders are 8-18 this season after they faced a brutal home and away schedule. Something that should help the Bronchos is that the Red Raiders are

nationals" Thompson said. Thompson is not the only UCO captain who thinks these games will help prepare the team for nationals. Fellow team captain AJ Alfrey shares his opinion. "The series against [Texas Tech] won't help us in the rankings but will prepare us for the national tournament," Alfrey said. "The biggest advantage for us is that these games will keep us focused." Alfrey also shares Thompson's thoughts about giving the fans something more. "I think that it gives the fans something to look forward to," he said. The UCO Bronchos host the Texas Tech Red Raiders on Friday, Feb. 27th and Saturday, Feb. 28th. Both games will be played at Arctic Edge Arena in Edmond at 7:3o p.m. Tickets are $3 for UCO students.

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Bronchos split twinbill at home DURANT — Casey Bruns delivered a dramatic walk-off home run to lift Central Oklahoma to a thrilling come-from-behind win the first game before No. 15-ranked Abilene Christian rebounded to take the nightcap as the two split a Lone Star Conference doubleheader Sunday afternoon at Broncho Field. Both games went extra innings, with the Bronchos pulling out an 8-7 victory in the opener on Brims' threerun homer in the eighth that capped a five-run rally. ACU won three of the four games in the series improving to 10-3 overall and 7-1 in the LSC. UCO fell to 5-7 and 3-5"We battled hard today and never gave up," UCO coach Wendell Simmons said. "It didn't look good in the first game, but we came back with a big inning and Casey gave us a win we

really needed to have and we almost did it again in the second game." ACU looked in command in the opener after it pushed across four runs in the top of the eighth to take a 7-3 lead and put relief ace Brent Rutherford on the mound for UCO's final at bat, but the Bronchos were up to the challenge. Blake Mitchell led off the inning with a walk, Nate Mitani singled and Andrew Foshee was hit by pitch to load the bases with no outs and pinch-hitter Kellin Sheets followed with a clutch single up the middle to score Mitchell and Mitani. That brought up the right-handed hitting Bruns and the junior third baseman drove a 2-1.pitch from Rutherford over the right fieldwall for the winning three-run shot that gave UCO its only lead of the game. The Bronchos needed another dra-

matic homer to force the game into extra innings after ACU had broke a 1-1 tie with two runs in the top of the seventh and John Bryant came through that time with a two-run bomb that scored Luke Yost, who had drawn a one-out walk. The Wildcats jumped to a 3-o lead in the first, with UCO getting two runs back in the second on Bryant's RBI single and Brent Hodge's run-scoring fielder's choice. Monko drew a one-out walk in UCO's final at-bat and Bruns reached on an error before Yost plated Monko with a single through the left side. A groundout advanced Bruns to third and Yost to second, then Hodge followed with_ a single to right field that scored both runners to make it 7-7. Yost went 4-for-5 with three RBI to lead UCO's nine-hit attack.

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The Vista Feb. 24, 2009  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Feb. 24, 2009  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.