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Whatas-Inside

Feb. 10. 2009

www. thevistaonline. corn The Student

oice of the University of Central Oklahoma Since 1903

Guns on College Campuses: Are state lawmakers just taking another shot in the dark?

Firearms bill sees new life Kory Oswald Correspondent

Photo provided

An unidentified gunman takes aim at a target. Oklahoma congressmen are trying to revisit a measure to allow concealed carry on campus.

Oklahoma lawmakers are trying to resurrect a bill that would make it legal to carry concealed weapons on campus. House Bill 1083, a rewrite of last year's House Bill 2513, is Rep. Jason Murphey's second attempt to allow licensed students and faculty to bring guns into classrooms and other certain places.

Leadership staff brings fitness to the office

In an office found on the first floor of the administration building, something is happening that few would expect. Not only are the employees balancing ways to create, promote and support leadership development opportunities for faculty, staff and students, they are also taking turns balancing on a fitness ball.

"The legislation is ... bad legislation," said Jeff Harp, executive director of safety and transportation services. By allowing people to carry concealed weapons on this campus it will create a campus environment that is more dangerous," Continued on Page 3 A veteran of police duty on college campuses with over 21 years of experience, Harp is essentially the Miss Black UCO ready to chief of police at UCO, and he claims help with relationships that allowing people to carry guns on The audience erupted joyously see GUN, page 5 Saturday with the announcement of Nikki Webber as Miss Black UCO 2009. Miss Black UCO 2008, Raychelle Breux, asked each of the six contestants a projection question: What do you plan to do if crowned Miss Black UCO 2009?

Stimulus U.S. PROFESSOR OF THE YEAR offers options 4411for local students Caleb McWilliams suf/ft' rue,As the Senate prepares to pass its version of the stimulus package as early as today, many college students remain confused about the education-related aspects of the stimulus and what it means for them. The Senate's version of the stimulus bill differs from the House of Representative's bill in several ways, including less spending on education and more tax cuts. The Senate rejected many of the original package's elements, including $20 billion for construction and repair of schools and university facilities. However, the Senate's plan retains almost $14 billion from the House's proposed $15.6 billion to increase the Pell Grant and eliminate shortfall in the system, but reduces the House's plan of $39 billion in aid to state schools and public colleges to $26.7 billion. Other differences between the two bills include about $100 billion more in tax cuts in the Senate's plan, and elimination of up to $40 billion in aid to individual states from the House's plan. The Senate's bill, if passed, will need to be resolved with the House's bill before the final package can be sent to President Obama to sign. WHAT DO ES THESTTMULUS MEAN TO STUDENTS? The biggest change for students in both versions of the stimulus would be in the Pell Grants, which would be raised to a maximum of $5,350. The see BILL, page 5

Continued on Page 2

Saudi students celebrate for guest speaker

The ballroom in the Nigh University Center exuded music and culture from another part of the world last Friday when the Saudi Student Organization hosted a festival in honor of Dr. Mohammed Elisa, the cultural attachĂŠ to the Saudi Arabian ambassador, and his visit to UCO. Continued on Page 3

Gun Bill Reaction:

Hear response from faculty and students to the gun bill in a video at www.thevistaonline.com .

A

Photo Services

Dr. Wei Chen, professor of engineering and assistant dean of UCO's College of Mathematics and Science and 2009 U.S. Professor of the Year, poses in his classroom. Chen was recognized for the honor at a presentation yesterday in the Great Room in Evans Hall. Accounting professor Dr. Robert Terrell and economics professor Dr. Mickey Hepner were also honored at the event as 2009 Oklahoma Professor of the Year and 2008 Oklahoma Professor of the Year, respectively. Each was selected from a national pool of more than 300 top professors.UCO is the only university in the country to have both a state and national winner this year.

Go online!

ilikkahiszeit B/ogs

Liquid Assets with Caleb McWilliams

See page 3 for the story.

Chartwells stops use of peanut butter Laura Hoffert Senior Reporter

Since the official peanut butter recall was made last week, Food and Dining Services at UCO aren't taking any chances on students getting sick. Greg Schwartz, director of UCO dining services, received an alert from the corporate offices of food service management company Compass Group North America and followed protocol in banning the sale of peanut butter products on campus.

"Everyday it changes, the FDA authorizes some foods then recalls others," Schwartz said. "We receive bulletins of cleared items everyday

From Vista finance reporter Caleb McWilliams comes a blog about the financial, political and other relevant happenings in Central Oklahoma affecting UCO.

and we maintain that list." Because the recall Inside the Lines with Chris is on a national level, Wescott peanut butter products have been banned until further notice. "Go into a grocery store and there's holes on the shelves where peanut butter usually is," Schwartz said. Sports reporter Chris Wescott brings Although there have you all sports, all the time, with Bronbeen national health concerns, cho scores, mini articles and quotes UCO has not reported any cases of from players' and coachs' interviews. salmonella poisoning. Snap. Crackle. Pop Culture. with Stephani Tobin

Go online!

Good habits result from resisting temptation.

Ancient Proverb

Stephani writes about day-to-day pop culture, new and old movies, shameless celebrity gossip, the music she has playing repeatedly on her iPod and her American Idol obsession.


Miss Black UCO ready to help with relationships Rehan Sweis l'orrespondent

The audience erupted joyously Saturday with the announcement of Nikki Webber as Miss Black UCO 2009. Miss Black UCO 2008, Raychelle Breux, asked each of the six contestants a projection question: What do you plan to do if crowned Miss Black UCO 2009? Webber did not hesitate. She quickly informed Raychelle, the judges and the crowd that regardless of the crown and title she plans to make a difference and has already begun to do so. Webber's platform • is called F.A.I.T.H.: Facing Abuse with Inspirational Teaching and Healing. Photo Services Her platform will provide support Miss Black UCO 2008 Raychelle Breaux crowns the groups for unhealthy relationships. 2009 pageant winner Nikki Webber on Saturday, Webber announced a large forum in Feb. 7 October for discussing healthy rela-

tionships. With the title of Miss Black UCO 2009, Webber will receive an $1,800 scholarship. She has received the official crown, sash and plaque, wardrobe allowance and gift basket. Webber was also awarded the Future Business Woman AWard of a plaque and $300 scholarship. She won this by selling the most advertising space in the pageant booklet. Brittany Carradine, Miss Black UCO 2007, opened the pageant with, "The Black National Anthem" by James Weldon Johnson, after which the six contestants competed in a barrage of events. The openening number featured Breux and the contestants in a choreographed rendition of "Damaged" by Danity Kane. The talent competition followed the swimwear competition. Each girl displayed a musical, theatrical or poetic talent. Each performance was

received well by the audience, including Webber's talent of mime. Following the evening wear competition and the projection question was the announcement of the winners. Amber Young won The Jackie Shaw Photogenic Award. Aurielle Hairston won the Lindell Laws, Jr. Award and Scholarship as well as first runner-up. Telana McCullough was fourth runner-up and Chelsie Antelope was second runnerup. Claudia Williamson walked away with the most awards. Williamson won Miss Congeniality, Sheryl] Sins Talent Award, the coveted People's Choice Award as well as the position of third runner-up. No contestant walked away emptyhanded. Each competitor received a plaque.

Black History Month Keynote Address Thursday, Feb. 12, 2 p.m. Black History Month Keynote Address Will Rogers Room, Nigh University Center Featuring: Justice Tom Colbert, first African American to serve on Supreme Court of Oklahoma

J.W. King

This photograph was taken by J.W. King, a member of UCO's f/64 organization, on a club trip to Mt. Scott in Lawton, Okla.

Photography club offers travel and experience Chase Dearinger S/ailli

file/

Ansel Adams once said that there are not - rules for good photographs, only good photographs. The opportunity to cultivate these - , "good photographs" is one of the central missions of UCO's f/64 Camera Club. The group's name, f/64, echoes back to a group of San Francisco photographers, including Ansel Adams, which began in 1932 - and went by the same name. "f/64" refers to a setting on the lens of a camera that produces _ sharp, rich images. Don't worry if you can't remember the name, though; they're satisfied with simply "Photo Club." The club, which is in its 12th year at UCO, aims to bring photographers across the spec- trurn of experience together in the same place. Jesse Miller, assistant professor of photography and advisor to the group, said the organization's purpose is to get students who are interested in photography together and offer them opportunities to take pictures that they may not normally be able to. "We try to do outings for the photography students so that they don't feel like they have to go out and do pictures by themselves," Miller said. "We provide opportunities to go places that they might not go to on their own. *: We also give students the opportunity to talk ' about their photos. If they're not in a class, they can bring in their photos and we can talk about them." Last year the group went to both Guthrie and the Wichita Mountains on day trips to shoot and even took a trip over spring break to shoot Chicago. The trips are Miller's favorite part of the •f)up. "We've always had really good trips," Miller said. "For photography, getting out and taking pictures is what it's all about, so we always - have something going on where we get people : together." The spring break trip is a major happening fir the group; this year the club plans on :'-'

going to both Jas Vegas and Los Angeles for the week. "We just try to schedule a major trip to places where students normally wouldn't go," Miller said. However, trips aren't the only thing the group does. "We also have guest speakers and demonstrations," Miller said. "If any student wants to learn about a particular technique we try to do demonstrations. In the past, the group has brought in wedding and portrait photographers. This semester the group is discussing bringing someone in to talk about fashion photography, among other things. The group is really for anyone that's interested in photography, not just professionals. "We have members that are not photo students," Miller said. "Usually they've either taken a photography class or know someone that's taken a photography class." However, knowing someone in a photography class is not a requirement. `There's always students who aren't photography majors who are just interested in photography and want to be a part of it," Miller said. Right now, the club has approximately 6o members, but not all of them are actively involved in the meetings. "Some students can't come to the meetings but still want to come to the events so they just give us their e-mail addresses and we send them an e-mail every time we do an event so that students know about it," Miller said. So what is Miller's advice for students interested in the photo club? Just come by and pay them a visit. "If you can, come to a meeting," Miller said. "We're always discussing what the next even or who the next speaker is going to be. We're always open for new people to come in. It's pretty laid back — it's not formal in any way. It's a good opportunity to come in and ask questions or just sit and listen."

Colbert was born in Oklahoma City and Tom Colbert graduated from Sapulpa High School, earned an associate's degree from Eastern Oklahoma State College in 1970, and a bachelor, of science degree from Kentucky State University in 1973. After completing =law school s the was -appointed to the Oklahoma Court of Civil Appeals and served as the Chief Judge of that court in 2004. On Oct. 7, 2004, Gov. Brad Henry appointed Justice Colbert to the Supreme Court of Oklahoma.

2008-2009 Student RCSA Call for Grant Proposals

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Leadership staff brings Saudi students fitness to the office celebrate for Laura Hoffert

guest speaker

.Senior Reporter

In an office found on the first floor of the administration building, something is happening that few would expect. Not only are the employees balancing ways to create, promote and support leadership development opportunities for faculty, staff and students, they are also taking turns balancing on a fitness ball. When Patti Johnston, the executive assistant at the Leadership Central Offices, brought in a stability ball, a few curious eyebrows were raised. "Everyone in our office has been focused over the last two years on various ways to increase wellness," Dr. Cheryl Steele, vice president for university leadership, said. "Some of us have exercised and watched our diets for a number of years," she said. "Others became more interested based on health issues which came up." After Johnston brought her stability ball in, a fitness schedule was devised for all the employees in the office. Emily Overocker, director of student leadership development, had a stability ball at home and brought it for the office as well. "Neither lady wanted to use the ball all day and everyone is trying to squeeze as much into the day as possible in terms of wellness, so the stability balls became one piece of the wellness puzzle for us," Steele said. With Johnston's exercise routine in place, the office began to implement her fitness regimen into their routines. "Patti's exercise routine called for use of the stability ball to build core strength," Steele said. "That is something we all need, so we all adopted use of the ball." For 6o minutes a day, the office takes turns using the ball while working at their desks. "Patti and I work a bit on flexibility as we move between desk, computer, telephone and files," Steele said. "I also use it to focus on good posture. I notice less fatigue in my back at the end of the day, and the stretching it causes really feels good." Although the workers are dedicated to their fitness routines, Johnston's famous "Patti Cake" still makes its way into the office. Even with the occasional sweet treat, there are still fruit and almonds available around the office. Not only are having healthy alternative snacks around the office making it easier to maintain their fitness, having employee support has shown to have great benefits too. "Having a support group is always helpful," Steele said. "It makes it more fun and also you feel more accountable. We share the use of the stability ball, but beyond that we each have our own wellness routine. Knowing that we are each going about this in our own way, helps support all of US.

Some of the employees have branched off integrating their office workouts into home workouts.

Stephani Tobin and Ryan Croft Staff Writers

Photo by Laura Hoffert

Graduate student Katie Harris uses one of the stability balls found in the Leadership Central office to work on her posture and strengthen her core while working.

"Everyone in the office uses the stability ball," Steele said. "Then we each have our other specific things we do to increase wellness; some have special diets, some go to the Wellness Center, some have home gyms, some swim at the Y, some take classes, some have worn pedometers, etc." Whatever choice these employees have selected to work best for themselves, they are still managing to lead healthy lifestyles. "I think wellness is a core component of leadership," Steele said. "Leaders should set examples for followers, and the leader with balance in life is more likely to be effective for the long-term. We all have opportunities to lead. We all have much to gain from efforts to maximize our health and well-being."

MO professors awarded state and national recognition Caleb McWilliams Staff Writer

Three UCO professors received recognition Monday for winning the prestigious Professor of the Year awards on both the state and national levels. Dr. Wie Chen, professor of biomedical engineering, received the 2008 national "Outstanding Master's Universities and Colleges Professor" award. Dr. Robert Terrell, professor of accounting, won the 2008 Oklahoma Professor of the Year award; and Dr. Mickey Hepner, associate professor of economics, received the 2007 Oklahoma Professor of the Year award. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. William Radke began the ceremony in Evans Hall by pointing out that the U.S. Professors of the Year Awards Program is the only national award for undergraduate teaching, and that the achievement was high for UCO. "We are the only institution to have both a state and national winner this year," Radke said. Radke said the award reflects a commitment of the leadership of UCO to transform the look of UCO and how the external community perceives the institution. UCO President Dr. Roger Webb said this occasion is one of many indicators of the perception of the university catching up with the reality. "The reality is that we know we have a very strong faculty," Webb said, "but we needed public acclaim and public validation of what was happening on campus. This gives validation as we hold our heads high, that we do have outstanding faculty at this school and in this state." Webb also said that these awards show how the professors understand the chemistry for the faculty/student relationship, and respect the communication that is so important. The professors, in spite of their commitment and talent, have a genuine sense of humility, Webb said, and "as far as we know, it was all done without the benefit of performance-enhancing drugs." After Webb spoke, Dr. William Shirley, dean of business administration, said this award was not only an incredible honor for the professors who won, but also for the whole faculty. "The benefit is really for the students," Shirley said. "To be called a teacher carries with it a requirement of commitment of dedication and passion," Shirley said. "Students know when you have it in your heart, and when you desire to see them learn."

Shirley then introduced Dr. Hepner and Dr. Terrell, 2007 and 2008 Oklahoma Professors of the year. Hepner, speaking of the honor, said he felt like a turtle because "when you see a turtle on top of a fencepost, you know it had to have help getting up there." Hepner said that the focus was not on him, but on UCO, and its focus of teaching the next generation of leaders. Terrell, said he echoed what Hepner said about UCO's focus of teaching the next generation of leaders, but joked that this award "really is all about Dr. Bob," his nickname. "This really is one of the greatest groups of people I've ever worked with," Terrell said. After Terrell spoke, Dr. John Barthell, the dean of mathematics and science, introduced Chen. "I could name all the numerous scientific publications Wei [Chen] has published, or all the grants he has received, but really it's about how Wei is involved in taking students and moving them to the next level," Barthell said. Chen, who said he had prepared only a few sentences that Barthell already said, mentioned that he was nervous to have his picture next to Miss America in the Nigh University Center. Chen thanked the leadership, faculty and students of UCO, and said "this award is as much for my students as it is for me." Chen said he was honored to work with people like Hepner and the rest of the faculty at UCO.

Dates, a type of fruit commonly grown in the Middle East that sometimes taste like "sweet candy," are "big business" in Saudi Arabia, Thabet said. "You can survive by eating dates and drinking milk all day," he said. Middle Eastern dishes were served free, including rice with meat, a lamb soup and hummus with wheat bread. Friday night featured Elisa as a guest speaker who held a discussion session done almost entirely in Arabic with Saudi students. Elisa said the main purpose behind his Friday night discussion with the Saudi students was to "hear from them" and gain and understanding of how they are doing at UCO. Elisa said it is his goal to travel to every university in the United States and speak to as many of the Saudi Arabian students as he can. "We ... have more than 18,000 Saudi students all over the nation," Elisa said. Elisa said he wants both Saudi and American students to gain a better understanding of each other and integrate comfortably. "Cultural exchange is ... important," Elisa said. "We don't want [the students] to assume it's best to isolate themselves." Elisa said he feels some Americans might have the wrong image of Saudi Arabians, often as a result of still-lingering feelings from the Sept.

The ballroom in the Nigh University Center exuded music and culture from another part of the world last Friday when the Saudi Student Organization hosted a festival in honor of Dr. Mohammed Elisa, the cultural attachĂŠ to the Saudi Arabian ambassador, and his visit to UCO. The organization invited Elisa several months ago. He is responsible for about 18,000 Saudi Arabian students in the United States. Fifty of those students attend UCO. "It's good for American students to see how Saudi culture is so good and amazing," said Omar Thabet, a senator for the organization. Thabet was one of several Saudi students who wore a traditional robe and headdress and mingled around the ballroom, greeting students and explaining different facets of Saudi Arabian culture. Dennis Dunham, executive director of international affairs at UCO, said the Saudi students were honored Elisa accepted their invitation to speak. "[American] students can see what it's like on the other side of the world," Dunham said. "We enjoy having Saudi students for this kind of cultural experience." Green and white balloons were tied to tables and chairs, 11, 2001 honor- "Our students are very terrorist ing the friendly and have nothing attacks. colors of to hide ... We ask our "Our the Saudi students Arabian students to be good are very flag. One ambassadors to represent friendly table had our country." and have three nothing female --Dr. Mohammed Elisa to hide," Saudi Elisa said. students "We ask creating our stuhenna designs on guests and dents to be ... good ambasanother table offered infor- sadors to represent our mation about the Arabic country." alphabet, where you could Elisa said he is working have your name spelled out expand the number of Saudi in Arabic on an index card. Arabian students receiving One of the visual focal higher education scholarpoints of the festival was a ships in the United States. large tent in the ballroom, "We are expecting to filled with red patterned reach 45,000 by the end of cushions with a Saudi 2010," Elisa said. Arabian flag hung in the Elisa said he hopes many back. of the Saudi students in the Saleh Alsugair, interna- US will graduate college and tional student and vice pres- return to Saudi Arabia to ident of the organization, teach students there. said many Saudi families Elisa re-emphasized his who live in the United States primary goal in the coming have a tent in their home to years will be to help increase remind them of their roots. the number of Saudi stuThe tents are used as dents and further a sense shelter in Saudi Arabia, and of unity between Saudi and people can drink coffee and American students. milk and enjoy dates while relaxing.

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Stimulus bill advances in Senate David Espo Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — An $838 billion economic stimulus bill backed by the White House narrowly advanced in the Senate on Monday over strong Republican opposition, and Democratic leaders vowed to deliver the emergency legislation for President Barack Obama's signature within a few days. The vote was 61-36, one more than the 60 needed to move the measure toward Senate passage on Tuesday. That in turn, will set the stage for possibly contentious negotiations with the House on a final compromise on legislation the president says is desperately needed to tackle the worst economic crisis in more than a generation. The Senate vote occurred as the Obama administration moved ahead on another key component of AP Photo / Susan Walsh its economic recovery plan. Officials said Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner would outline rules on Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks Tuesday for $350 billion in bailout funds designed during a news conference on the stimulus legislation, to help the financial industry as well as homeown- Monday, Feb. 9, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. ers facing foreclosure. Monday's vote was close but scarcely in doubt once the White House and Democratic leaders opponents attacked it as too costly and unlikely to have the agreed to trim about $100 billion on Friday. desired effect on the economy. "This is a spending bill, not As a result, Republican Sens. Susan Collins and Olympia a stimulus bill," said Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. Snowe of Maine and Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania broke All 36 votes in opposition were cast by Republicans. ranks to cast their votes to advance the bill. The two remaining versions of the legislation are rela"There is no reason we can't do this by the end of the tively close in size — $838 billion in the Senate and $819 week," said Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada. As billion in the House, and are similar in many respects. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said, he declared he was Both include Obama's call for a tax cut for lower-income prepared to hold the Senate in session into the Presidents wage earners, as well as billions for unemployment benDay weekend if necessary, and cautioned Republicans not efits, food stamps, health care and other programs to help to try and delay final progress. victims of the worst recession in decades. In a bow to the He said passage would mark "the first step on the long administration, they also include billions for development road to recovery." of new information technology for the health industry, and Moments before the vote, the Congressional Budget billions more to lay the groundwork for a new environmenOffice issued a new estimate that put the cost at $838 tally friendly industry that would help reduce the nation's billion, an increase from the $827 billion figure from last dependence on foreign oil. week. Ironically, the agency said provisions in the bill At the same time, the differences are considerable. intended to limit bonuses to executives at firms receiving The measure nearing approval in the Senate calls for federal bailout money would result in lower tax revenues more tax cuts and less spending than the House bill, largely for the government. because it includes a $70 billion provision to protect mid"This bill has the votes to pass. We know- that," conceded dle-class taxpayers from falling victim to the alternative Sen. John Thune, a South Dakota Republican. minimum tax, whiCli Was intended to make sure the very As if to underscore its prospects for passage, the U.S. wealthy don't avoid paying taxes. . Chamber of Commerce, a prominent and powerful_busiBoth houses provide for tax breakstfOtho buyers, but ness group, issued a statement calling on the Senate to the Senate's provision is far more generous. e Senate bill advance the measure. also gives a tax break to purchasers of new cars. Even so, in the hours before Monday's vote, Republican

GUN Continued from Page 1 on school grounds will hamper an officer's ability to stop and prevent a crime. "Accidental discharges, wrong decisions [to use the gun] are one factor ... another factor of deep concern to us is ... looking for someone with a gun," Harp said. "If you are standing with your gun out that is a recipe for disaster, because the police officers are looking for that scenario." This could lead to a licensee being shot and/or slowing the police in their search for the real perpetrator. Harp said we could avoid many worst-case scenarios if the lawmakers continue to only allow police officers to carry weapons on campus. David Jenkins, a sophomore and founder of the UCO chapter of Students for Concealed Carry on Campus claims he supports 1083 because he believes an armed and trained student or faculty member may be the only way to save lives in the event of a Virginia Tech-style massacre. "A school shooter ... is an unlikely scenario," Jenkins said. "But the only thing that would save lives is an immediate response, which having students and faculty in classrooms with a concealed weapon would allow." College shootings like the ones at Virginia Tech and Northern Illinois are rare, and Harp asserts that UCO is a very safe college in a very safe city. Murphey, who was home-schooled and received his degree from Charter

Oak claims in his blog that legislation like 1083 is created to allow students to "defend themselves in what is becoming a very dangerous environment: the college campus." Murphey may be a well-intentioned victim of "the mean world syndrome," or he could be using the issue of student safety to push an agenda of expanding gun-rights. Some professors dismiss his arguments for the legislation. "[The American Association of State Colleges and Universities] and a lot of people associated with universities ... contradict arguments that are made about deterrence," Dr. Keith Eakins, a political science professor, said. "If someone wants to commit mass murder on campus...the point...is to kill people and possibly die, so the deterrent argument doesn't work," Eakins said. Eakins also said that these laws seem to be a highly symbolic "ploy for gun activists to expand gun rights." The Oklahoma Rifle Association awarded Murphey the 2008 Legislator of The Year award, and the National Rifle Association supports 1083. However, Jenkins points out that students from Virginia Tech started the SCCC, it is driven by college students, and is not affiliated with the NRA or any other organization. "We are as concerned about student safety as college administrators are because we have to deal with their

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grant, aimed to recipients whose families make under $40,000, covers about three-quarters of the cost of an average four-year university, according to the Associated Press. The compromise between the House's $79 billion to local school districts and public higher education institutions and the Senate's $39 billion is being closely watched by higher education officials. It's unclear how that amount would be divided between the elementary and secondary schools and higher education institutions. Both versions call for expanding the Hope tuition tax credit to $2,500 and making it partially refundable. Currently, the Hope tax credit is at $1,800, and is not

decisions," Jenkins said. Last year House Bill 2513 passed in the House by a vote of 65-36, but was defeated in the Senate. UCO President Roger Webb has been outspoken against this legislation and there are many groups, like the Oklahoma Chamber of Commerce, that are opposed to 1083. However, Republicans now have a majority in both houses of the Oklahoma House of Representatives, therefore 1083 has a better chance of passing than its predecessor. "I am a believer [in gun rights] ... and I believe that by allowing anybody who can pass a qualification course ... to carry a gun on a college campus in Oklahoma is a mistake," Harp said, "I hope that we can pursue other measures that will continue to make our campuses safe." If House Bill 1083 passes it will become effective in November and will allow Oklahoma universities to join the ranks of 11 other colleges that allow guns at school. All nine public universities in Utah, Colorado State University and Blue Stem Community College in Virginia allow guns. Oklahoma is currently one out of 26 states that prohibit guns on campus; 23 states leave it up to the schools to decide, and Utah recently passed a mandate to allow it. In 2008 17 states attempted to reform campus gun laws.

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Campus Activators to offer screening The University of Central Oklahoma Campus Activators organization will partner with the non-profit organization Invisible Children fora free screening of a new media presentation at 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 19 in the Nigh University Center Ballrooms. The new media will focus on a call to action to remove Uganda's Joseph Kony, Lord's Resistance Army leader, from power. "The purpose is to make people aware of world affairs, along with providing an outlet to directly affect them," said Jacob Newton, Campus Activators member. The road crew from Invisible Children will be present to talk about their experiences in Africa and to answer questions. They will also be selling merchandise, with proceeds going directly to rebuilding of a school in Uganda. For more information on the screening or Campus Activators, contact Newton at jnewton8@uco.edu For more information visit wWw.invisiblechildren. corn.


Broncho men stampede First-year rugby club at UCO toward success on court brings high hopes for future Chris Wescott

Chris Wescott

Sports Writer

Sports Writer

The UCO men's basketball team's success is a not a very well-kept secret. With the way they have been playing, it is hard not to notice. The Bronchos are a cool 18-3 overall and a solid 5-1 in conference play. They had an outstanding 24 home-game win streak before Northeastern ended that in an 83-80 defeat of UCO on Feb. 4. The Bronchos are a cool 18-3 overall and a solid 5-1 in conference play. They had an outstanding 24 home-game win streak before Northeastern ended that in an 83-8o defeat of UCO on Feb. 4. The Bronchos are currently ranked third in the nation by the latest Division II men's basketball polls. UCO head coach Terry Evans didn't know what kind of success would be in store before the season due to the loss of some key seniors. "We are doing real well right now," Evans said. "We are on cloud nine. Going into the season, we didn't know how well we'd do." The seniors really have stepped it up Photo provide for the Bronchos. Senior forward Lance Harper leads the team with an average 16.4 Forward Lance Harper plays against points per game. Seniors David Thomas the Cameron University Aggies on Jan. and Adam Terneus have also been chipping 31, 2009. in with their own contributions. Thomas The Bronchos are looking ahead to averages 5.5 rebounds per game which is accomplishing some of their goals, which second to Harper who has a 7.7 average include winning the Lone Star Conference per game. North Division, the NCA regional and even"It's really hard to tell what it (signature tually the National championship. win) is," Evans said. "The best win could "It's never been done before at UCO," possibly be Angelo State. When the region Evans said. rankings came out they were ranked fourth Their goals of winning the division, in the region." UCO won that game 96-92. sweeping the tournament, taking the elite The Bronchos have a unique way of eight by storm and winning a National focusing on the task ahead. "We don't worry Championship don't seem to just be a about the wins and losses," Evans said. "We dream anymore. UCO is a team that prides just try to play at a certain level. We just themselves on "playing at a certain level." focus, and try to play good on [defense] and If that lever is how the Bronchos played play together on offense." during their eight game stretch, then the Evans stressed that a big key to their mindset and success thus far has been on Bronchos are on the verge of doing somethe defense, saying they like to try to keep thing special this season. their opponents under 70 points.

The Vista spoke to rugby captain Tyler McNamara last week, only days after UCO had launched its conference season with a big win over Tulsa. The win lifted UCO to a 1-1 start overall, as the Bronchos lost to No. 12-ranked Oklahoma in the season opener. "OU was ranked No. 12 in the nation, but I'm glad (our) team didn't let that intimidate them," McNamara said. "We came out and gave OU a tough match. OU is a team that has been around since 1974 and has a long winning tradition, so to go out and give them such a tough match in UCO's first official year as a rugby club is a testament to how tough and competitive our players really are." Q: What is the best part about playing college rugby? A: Unlike some sports everyone gets to play, everyone gets to run with the ball, everyone plays both offense and defense, and everyone has the opportunity to score. It's a great way to meet people and get in shape. It is a game for everyone with positions for people of every shape, size, ability level and fitness level. It doesn't matter if you've never played rugby before or if you never even played a sport before. We have people that have never seen a rugby ball, or even played sports before, play rugby and excel at rugby. You get to grow as a player and see yourself transform before your own eyes. Q: Describe the UCO team. Are you defensive, offensive, balanced? A: The UCO team has developed throughout the season into a more balanced team. It seems lately that we have really made great strides defensively but at the same time our offense has seen great improvement too. Every week, as more players come out and contribute to the team and our current players learn more about rugby, we grow stronger and stronger as a rugby team. Q: How is college rugby regulated? Is there some sort of NCAA conference or division for rugby? A: In 2002, women's rugby was classified as a National Collegiate Athletic Association emerging sport. As an emerging NCAA sport Women's rugby has until 2012 to prove to the NCAA that it is a viable sport by having 40 teams.

Bronchos catch Defense helps up to defeat Lady Bronchos Boll Weevils claim victory

In the HOARFU, a Territorial Rugby Union (TRU), we are a Division II team in the south conference with four other teams. Above the TRU is the Western Rugby Union, which is made up of several TRU's. Above that is USA Rugby, which presides over all the rugby unions and rugby clubs in the [United States]. Q: Who are some players to watch for UCO? A: Rugby is a team sport, so the success of any one player depends on the team as a whole. The forwards don't usually get a lot of the glory but they are the players who win the ball and retain possession of it. But when the forwards get the ball, you are sure to see some hard-charging runs from Jesse Vanhuss and Treyson "Moose" Marks. It's a scary sight to see "Moose on the Loose." Jake Cole at fly half is a shifty runner with great speed, sure to break a lot of tackles. Q: If you could say anything to your teammates about their performance thus far, what would it be? A: To use an analogy, I feel kind of like Moses leading the Israelites to the promised land. My only regret is that I'll be graduating and leaving for graduate school in the fall. Like Moses, I will not be able to see the promised land, the glorious future of UCO rugby. For more information about UCO rugby, please point your Internet browser to www.thevistaonline.com .

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TAHLEQUAH -- Stout defense down MONTICELLO, Ark -- A double play bailed Central Oklahoma out of a bases-load- the stretch fueled a Central Oklahoma ed jam in the bottom of the ninth inning as comeback that carried the No. 14-ranked the Bronchos held off Arkansas-Monticello Bronchos to a rugged 56-51 Lone Star Conference North Division victory over 5-4 here Sunday afternoon. UCO took a 5-3 lead into the final frame, Northeastern State here Saturday afterbut the Boll Weevils scored one run on three noon. UCO overcame a seven-point deficit in hits to get within 5-4 and had the bases full with just one out against Austin Baker, the the final 10 minutes and scored the final five points of the game — all at the free third pitcher of the inning for the Bronchos. Baker got Tyler Henry to hit a grounder throw line — to break away from a 51-51 tie to second baseman Casey Brims, who flipped and claim its second win in four days over the ball to shortstop Luke Yost at second for the RiverHawks. The Bronchos forced four turnovers and the first out before Yost got the throw to first baseman Brent Hodge to complete the game- blocked a shot in the final two minutes in ending double play and give UCO two wins in winning their eighth straight game. the three-game series. For the rest of the story, please point your Internet browser to www.thevistaonline.com .

For the rest of the story, please point your Internet browser to www.thevistaonline.

Men score big in Lone Star Conference win TAHLEQUAH -- Michael Sosanya scored eight points during a 1613 second-half run that put Central Oklahoma in control and the No. 3-ranked Bronchos went on to a 73-59 Lone Star Conference triumph over Northeastern State here Saturday. UCO never trailed in avenging an 83-80 loss to the RiverHawks Wednesday in Edmond that ended an eight-game losing streak, but didn't put the game away until the Sosanya-fueled spurt that turned a precarious 43-42 lead into a 59-45 cushion with 10:08 left to play. NSU never got closer than 11 the rest of the way as the Bronchos improved to 19-3 overall and stayed atop the ISC North standings at 6-1. "We made some adjustments after the

first game and played pretty well," UCO coach Terry Evans said. "Rebounding was a big key today. We didn't give them any second chances and did a great job with our perimeter defense." UCO was outrebounded 35-26 in Wednesday's loss, but won the battle of the boards 34-27 this time while also limiting NSU to 29.4-percent shooting (5-of-17) from 3-point range after allowing the RiverHawks to hit 10-of-17 long-range shots in the first game. For the rest of the story, please point your Internet browser to www.thevistaonline.com .

For more on these stories and more sports, visit www.thevistaonline.com

in the spirit dike ad to action presented by newly inaugurated President Barack Mama, the UCO Volunteer & Service teaming Center MK) would tike to NO* the fallowig suite opportunilies this spring and invite the entire UCO family to be active in swif t the Edmond and Oklahoma City communities to bring about posiiiive thaw at a local keel. PkaSe visit the VW (NUC 212) for more information.

tomedate Service Opportunities: -Wm Crisis Services,Inc.: veminfantarisis.org -Hope tends. of Edmond www.ecknondhqecentecolx -Feed the Children : wrivitfeedthethildreet.org -Headline 2-1-1 of Cabal Oklahoma : wwwheartlineoklahoma.org These bur agaties represent only a small set of opportunities for Americans to help one an I yau already vokinteer m your community, please take time register your sericite at wwwiumeduhokinteer , or let us help you locate a service opportunity that Rigs los interests. late this THE BIG on Sabato% April 18th will find hundreds of UCO students, faculty, and staff gathering for a single day of service at mare than 30 sites around Edmond and Oklahoma C. Join us for this special day to give back to the community that strongly supports UCO.. Volunteer sign-ups begin March 23.

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The Vista Feb. 10, 2009  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Feb. 10, 2009  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.