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The blog of a single father Th eVistaatiline-acom -

Jan. 15, 2009

www.thevistaonline.com

11111.1111=111111=111=11=MID Former student Class in ‘inter'session gets prison for Ryan Croft bomb hoax Senior Reporler

Shandy sentenced to 27 months Nelson Solomon and Greg Newby

A federal judge sentenced a former UCO student to 27 months in a federal penitentiary on Dec. 19 for falsely reporting a terrorism threat against the university last spring. U.S. Attorney Photo Provided John Richter emphasized that SHANDY Jason Ray Shandy, 19, made his situation worse by not recanting his story when given the opportunity by investigators. "When he was repeatedly given the opportunity to take his story back, he only exacerbated the situation [by sticking with his story] and did nothing but increase the concern of UCO and law enforcement Officials," he said.

Timely graduation: it is one of the most intense pressures you will face during your college experience. Year after year, parents, teachers and advisement counselors hammer into students' heads the "graduate in four years" philosophy. That pressure can cause students to overload themselves with classes during the spring and fall

semesters to keep from slipping into the "5th Year Plus" senior category. There are often few options to help the overwhelmed student to lighten the load. To avoid lengthening their college careers, some students take intersession courses. "Intersession classes are condensed courses meeting during the weeks between the regular semesters." according to UCO's Frequently Asked Questions page. "Three

intersessions occur during the year (Fall—August; Winter— during Christmas Break; and Summer—May)." Winter intersession cours- TRANSPORTATION es, which count towards credit BUM-A-BIKE OFFERS NEW towards the spring semester, WHEELS FOR EVERYONE usually run for two weeks dur- Kick off the new year by leaving the car ing the break and last around in the garage and spinning a differfour and a-half hours each day. ent set of wheels. UCO's Bum-a-Bike "I was a little skeptical [about program gained six new women's-style intersession] at first, because bikes and one tricycle last Thursday. it's crammed into two weeks." see page 3 junior Helmer Johnson said. SPORTS see CLASS, page 7 Women's basketball send Cats home with 'I,' The UCO women's basketball team hosted a down-to-the-wire game against the Abeline Christian Wildcats last Thursday evening.

Hockey splits with Sun Devils UCO split two games against the Arizona State Sun Devils. The Sun Devils came to Edmond to play against the Bronchos last Friday and Saturday at Arctic Edge Arena.

see page 11

NEWS Wellness Center to offer kung fu classes Starting this week, the Wellness Center is offering a helping hand for students who are interested in increasing their fitness, but not sure where to start. The center has added two classes, Yoga Tai Chi and Five Animal Kung Fu.

see SHANDY, page 5

Oklahoma school safety discussed at conference Stephani Tobin

Roller Derby season kicks off Saturday

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Oklahoma public school administrators, library media specialists and counselors had the opportunity to network and confer about school safety last Thursday, after a request from public school officials to meet and discuss safety planning. The first annual Oklahoma Central Region Safety Conference, which was planned from this request, was held last Thursday afternoon at the College of Education and Professional Studies. About 100 people were invited from Oklahoma public schools. The conference was divided into three segments, focusing on adminstrators, counselors and library media specialists. Each segment allowed the group to discuss their roles in a crisis situation. At the end of the conference, an open forum was provided for guests to discuss ideas, strengths and weaknesses. "It is not just the school shooter," said Lea Ann Garcia, program coordinator for guidance and school counseling at UCO.

see SAFETY, page 5 TOP 3 THINGS TO DO THIS WEEKEND `Metropolis' art exhibit on display at the Paseo Gallery (2810 N. Walker) Friday at 6 p.m. . to 10 p.m. Sundance winning film "Ballest,"2 showing at the Oklahoma City Art Museum Friday and Saturday at 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m.

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My Bloody Valentine 3D opens in theaters on Friday.

Photo by Vista photographer Catie Dabney

A welder and two other construction workers labor on the Forensic Science building Wednesday. The new building is located on 2nd Street across the street from the OSBI Crime Lab and is scheduled to be completed in Fall 2009.

The Tornado Alley Rollergirls kick off their third season this Saturday with the "Busting Out Against Breast Cancer" derby.

see page 2

Webb reluctant to tap 'Rainy Day' reservoir Go online! find the best solution," President Webb said. .S'Ialf '11/ rit(•i. Last November, the State Regents called on UCO President Roger the Oklahoma Legislature Webb has not joined OU for $80.4 million in President David Boren's new money to help with recent call to tap the state's increased costs, such as "Rainy Day Fund" to help with energy and retirewith increased operating ment expenses. costs at the state's colleges Despite fears the and universities. national economic crisis In a statement, will cause state revenue to President Webb said he drop, by some estimates, "would be almost $309 reluctant to million, the recommend Regents have tapping into continued Oklahoma's to lobby for Rainy Day the money. fund for an Recently, OU ongoing operPresident ating budget Boren called item, as that on state lawfund is set makers to dip up for oneinto the emertime expendigency "Rainy tures." Day" fund. "We sup"That P Photo Provided port [Oklahoma request is preState Regents for mature," said WEBB Higher Education] Dr. Sue Lynn Chancellor Johnson, the State Regents, and our legislators in working to see FUNDING, page 5

Caleb McWilliams

WHAT IS THE RAINY DAY FUND? • The Oklahoma Legislature created the Rainy Day fund, or, officially, Constitutional Reserve Fund, in 1985, to take advantage of flush years in state revenue. As of September 2007, the balance in the Rainy Day fund was $571.6 million. • Three-eighths of the fund are set aside for revenue shortfalls in the current fiscal year, and another three-eights of the fund are set aside for expected revenue shortfalls in the next fiscal year. • The last quarter of the fund is set aside for emergencies, declared by the governor and 75 percent of the legislature. At current levels, that amount is approximately $142.9 million. • The Rainy Day fund, capped at an amount 10 percent of General Revenue fund for the previous year, is outlined in Article X, Section 23 of the Oklahoma Constitution. It stipulates that appropriations "made from said Fund shall be considered special appropriates."

Bffikaissas Slogs Liquid Assets with Caleb McWilliams

From Vista finance reporter Caleb McWilliams comes a blog about the financial, political and other relevant happenings in Central Oklahoma affecting UCO.

I nside the Lines with Chris Wescott

Sports reporter Chris Wescott brings you all sports, all the time, with Broncho scores, mini articles and quotes from players' and coachs' interviews.

Snap. Crackle. Pop Culture. with Stephani Tobin

Men do less than they ought, unless they do all they can. Thomas Carlyle

Stephani writes about day-to-day pop culture, new and old movies, shameless celebrity gossip, the music she has playing repeatedly on her iPod and her American Idol obsession.


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Roller Derby season kicks off Saturday Angela Morris Entertainment Writer

OKLAHOMA CITY - The Tornado Alley Rollergirls kick ' off their third season this Saturday with the "Busting Out Against Breast Cancer" derby. Thought this contact sport which originated in the thirties was dormant? Well, think again. The Oklahoma City league, the Tornado Alley Rollergirls, was formed in April 2006 and held their first bout on January 2007, league member Tobin Bounds, aka. Mya 0 Mya, said. Originally, the bouts consisted of four different Oklahoma City teams battling each other. However, starting last season, all the girls came together as one team and now battle other derby leagues in different states. "The Tornado Alley Rollergirls pride themselves in being a strong assembly of women who promote confidence, health and well-being through competitive women's sports," Mya 0 Mya said. This season, the girls are dedicating their first derby to help spread awareness of breast cancer and show admiration to those women who are battling this disease, league members inform. Proceeds from the derby benefit Shout, an organization consisting of young women cancer survivors. "These strong women in Shout are our age," Mya 0 Mya said. "Breast cancer doesn't discriminate against age or race; it could hit any one of us." Since this upcoming game's main focus is on breast cancer, the Tornado Alley Rollergirls will not be playing against another league. "The girls are drawing names to be split up into two teams, black vs. pink," Mya-O-Mya said.

AP Photo/ tar Tribune,

-'Minneapolis is shrouded in steam as cornrnunters make the co, !commute along 1-35W Tuesday„ jail. 13, 2009, on the coides in Minnesota since 2004. An Arctic blast has descended on rnuc of the Midwest causing tem DS to plummet with record breakin lows approaching minus 40 degrees In oarts of North Dakota.

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Wellness Center to offer kung fu classes , Laura Hoffert .Senior &porter

The parking lots are packed once again, the Christmas songs have seen their twelfth day and if all you got for Christmas was a bigger pant size, the Wellness Center is here to help. Starting this week, the Wellness Center is offering a helping hand for students who are interested in increasing their fitness but not sure where to start. With classes such as Indoor Cycling, Circuit Training, Total Strength, Cardio Kickboxing, Jazzercise, Abs and Core, Zumba, Cardio Kickbox, Yoga and Pilates, there are a variety of programs to match individual interests. If that list doesn't appeal to you, the Center has added two more classes: Yoga Tai Chi and Five Animal Kung Fu. The Center says it hopes to supply each student with whatever exercise routine they desire. "Tai Chi is a set of exercises or specific, carefully orchestrated movements that take on the appearance of a dance of sorts," Cassie Armstrong, Group Fitness Manager and Evening Supervisor of the Wellness Center, said. "[Tai Chi] is a non-contact way of improving health and energy and reducing stress," she said. "Its practice promotes flexibility, balance and physical control." Tai Chi is a calming way to exercise, whereas Five Animal King Fu is a more intense workout. Both martial arts are taught by group fitness instructor David Vidato.

"Five Animal Kung Fu is a class that will increase your strength, endurance and martial arts effectiveness through fighting techniques, stance training, breathing application and a mixture of internal and external energy training," Armstrong said. With the Wellness Center offering all classes for free to UCO students from Jan. 12 until Jan. 24, there is plenty of time to test which program best suits their lifestyles. After the waters of weight management have been tested, students have the choice to purchase a semester fitness pass for $50, which includes unlimited class visits throughout the semester. There is also a 10-visit punch card for $30, which will allow students into any 10 classes they choose. "The classes are 55 minutes long and we stick to the university schedule, the last week this semester is May 1," Armstrong said. Students do not need to register to participate in the free classes for the first two weeks of school. Those wishing to continue with their fitness class can register at the front desk in the lobby. "This is a time to let students try out all of our classes and see which ones they like," Armstrong said. "These are new and interesting classes and they are different from what we have had in the past," she said. "They offer something for everybody." The Wellness Center's goal is to sell 100 unlimited passes for the semester. A complete list of classes and class times can be found at the Center's Web site, http:// www.uco.edu/wellnesscenter/ or by calling the front desk at (405) 974 -3 101.

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A ;ins Irieediefainer To help raise money for Shout, the girls, with the help of several area artists, have made breast impressions out of plaster breast casts and will be auctioning them off during half-time, league members inform. There will also be merchandise vendors in case you want to pick up a little extra memorabilia. Tickets are available at the door for $12 or in advance for $10 at OKCtickets.com. All merchandise, beer, or tickets at the door must be purchased with cash. The Derby will be held at Farmers Market on 311 S. Klein in Oklahoma City. Tailgating starts at 5 p.m., the doors open at 6 p.m. and the bout will begin at 7 p.m.

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Abdul declares loyalty to 'Idol,' denies criticism Associated Press

AP Photo/Bolivia's Presidency/Jose Luis Quintana

In this photo released by Bolivia's Presidency, Bolivia's President Evo Morales, left, and U.S. film director US film director Oliver Stone, right, share coca leaves during a meeting in La Paz, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2009.

Director Oliver Stone, Bolivian president meet Associated Press

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — U.S. filmmaker Oliver Stone kicked a soccer ball and chewed coca leaves with Bolivia's leftist president Tuesday during an interview for a planned documentary. Stone's meeting with President Evo Morales is likely fodder for the director's 9cumentary on Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, a close ally of Morales. Bolivian government photos showed Morales and Stone chewing coca and kicking a ball around the lawn of the presidential residence in La Paz. Coca leaves are revered in Bolivia as a mild, traditional stimulant, but are better known abroad as the main ingredient in cocaine. Chavez said last week that Stone asked him "100 questions" during an interview in Caracas this month. 'Po is an admirer of the leftist Chavez.

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. (AP) — Paula Abdul, declaring her loyalty to "American Idol," denied criticizing the Fox TV series over airtime given to an alleged stalker. "I am a big fan of the show. I am blessed to be on the show. It's the greatest show on television all around the world and ... a gazillion people would love to be in my shoes," Abdul said at a meeting Tuesday of the Television Critics Association. In December, Abdul told Barbara Walters in a radio interview that the Fox network and "Idol" producers knew that Paula Goodspeed had stalked her but allowed the woman to audition anyway. Abdul told Walters that Goodspeed was brought on the hit program "for entertainment value." Goodspeed, who appeared on "Idol" several seasons ago, was found dead of an apparent suicide in a car near Abdul's Los Angeles home last November. Pressed about it Tuesday, Abdul denied saying "anything disparaging about 'American Idol' at all" or complaining to producers about Goodspeed.

Write this! Comedian Chris Rock has a book deal Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Chris Rock is making a comeback, as an author. Grand Central Publishing says Rock's new book — not yet titled — will be full of "comedic observations." It's tentatively scheduled for release next year. His "Rock This!" was published in 1997. Deb Futter, vice president and editor-in-chief of hardcovers at Grand Central Publishing, said in a statement Tuesday: "We are so excited to be publishing Chris Rock, especially because he hasn't published a book in many years so this one will be highly anticipated." Rock, 43, was a featured voice in the "Bee Movie" and "Madagascar" films, and he created the "Everybody Hates AP Photo Chris" TV series. Rock will have good comic company at Grand Central, which also publishes Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert. 4 r.


UCO bike program offers new wheels for different people Ryan Croft Senior Reporler

Kick off the new year by leaving the, car in the garage and spinning a different set of wheels. UCO's Bum-a-Bike program gained six new women's-style bikes and one tricycle last Thursday. "One of the complaints we kept getting ... was that [the bikes] tend to sit a little high and shorter females couldn't reach the pedals," Director of Transportation and Parking Mike Sokoff said. "No matter what we did to adjust the height, they couldn't seem to navigate it very well." • Tim Tillman, UCO's Director of Alternative Transportation, explained that the new bikes are not strictly gender specific and should be rode based on ease of use. "[For] some of the shorter females and even some of the shorter guys who are secure in their manhood ... it's much easier for a person of smaller stature to ride." Sokoff also revealed the purpose behind the new three-wheeler. "One of the things we wanted to do was ... provide alternative transportation for individuals who might be handicapped ... for individuals who might have balance problems ... who may not feel secure on a regular bicycle but still enjoy biking," Sokoff explained. "If it turns out to be ... checked out a lot, we plan on getting at least one more, maybe two." Sokoff said the program has had more than 300 participants since it began in January 2008. Photo by Vista photographer Catie Dabney Sokoff also said the program now has a total UCO's "Bum a Bike" program offers bicycles for students look of 31 bikes and averages three to five bikes being ing to avoid Edmond traffic and help the environment. Since checked out every week. January 2008, more than 3000 people have bummed bikes. "It's a huge success, the students love it, faculty -

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and staff check them out quite regularly ... we've received a lot of national attention for the program as well," Sokoff said. Bum-a-Bike started in January 2008 when UCO joined with Flatire Burgers and Al's Bicycles in Edmond to offer students free alternative .transportation. Flatire Burgers originally bought ten, sir glespeed Raleigh cruiser bikes from Al's Bicycles and donated them to UCO. UCO purchased five more bikes before launching the program and added bikes throughout the summer. "[The new bikes] are the same brand ... just a little prettier color," Sokoff said. Sokoff also said Bum-a-Bike hopes to add five to six more bikes by the end of the semester and would like to bring the total number of bikes to around 50. The Bum-a-Bike program emphasizes its importance in helping solve UCO's traffic problems and maintaining a cleaner environment. "Alternative transportation for the university is our `big push' for 2009," Sokoff explained. "We are doing everything we can to promote cycling, walking ... public transportation, anything besides bringing an individual vehicle to campus."

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Mid-East leaders have hope for 10 day Gaza cease-fire proposal Salah Nasrawi Associated .Press

CAIRO, Egypt (AP) — Egypt and Hamas were negotiating a proposal for a 10-day cease-fire in Gaza, officials said Wednesday, as the Palestinian death toll in the war passed 1,000 and smoke from Israeli airstrikes rose over Gaza City's devastated streets. Egyptian and Palestinian officials said they hoped to seal Hamas' agreement on a temporary halt in fighting, which would be presented to Israel for approval. Key uncertainties remained for a longer-term deal under which Gaza's borders would be open and Israeli troops would withdraw. The officials provided details of the deal on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the Egypt-Hamas talks. But Egyptian officials also expressed public optimism that momentum toward a deal was growing. "We're working with Hamas and we're working with the Israeli side. We hope to reach an outcome soon," Hossam Zaki, a spokesman for Egypt's Foreign Ministry, told the British Broadcasting Corp. A Hamas spokesman said he also believed an agreement was possible. "There is good progress in Egypt. We hope that now Egypt will contact Israel and talk about all issues," Ghazi Hamad, a senior Hamas adviser, told the BBC. Asked if a negotiated settlement could also include a deal between Hamas and the rival Palestinian administration, led by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank, Hamad said he was hopeful. "I am optimistic now because I think there is no other choice for us," he said. Egypt's foreign minister, Ahmed Aboul Gheit, said details on the proposed cease-fire would be kept "under a lid of secrecy" until all parties agreed but said issues included an Israeli withdrawal from Gaza, opening crossings into the blockaded territory and some kind of international monitors. Israel showed no signs of slowing its bruising 19-day-old offensive against Gaza's Hamas rulers, striking some 6o targets. One airstrike hit an overcrowded cemetery, spreading body parts and rotting flesh over a wide area. The army said the airstrike targeted a weapons cache hidden near the graveyard. Israel launched the onslaught in Gaza on Dec. 27, seeking to stop the ruling Hamas militant group from firing rockets into southern Israel. The offensive has killed more than 1,000 Palestinians, half of them civilians, according to the Palestinian Health Ministry. The toll included Palestinians killed Wednesday, medical officials said. Thirteen Israelis have also been killed since the offensive began, four by rocket fire from Gaza. The Muslim world has expressed outrage over Israel's Gaza offensive, and in a new condemnation Wednesday, al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden urged Muslims to launch a holy war against Israel. Iran's top leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, issued a religious opinion, or fatwa, declaring the purchase of any Israeli goods or trade with Israeli companies to be forbidden. Desperately trying to end the fighting, U.N. secretary-

general Ban Ki-moon opened a visit to the Mideast on Wednesday urging an immediate halt to the violence. "My call is (for) an immediate end to violence in Gaza," he said in Cairo after meeting Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. "It is intolerable that civilians bear the brunt of this conflict," he said, adding that the "negotiations need to be intensified to provide arrangements and guarantees in order to sustain an endurable cease-fire and calm." Ban is scheduled to arrive in Israel on Thursday. He will also visit Jordan, the Palestinian-controlled West Bank, Turkey, Lebanon, Syria and Kuwait. His itinerary does not include a stop in Gaza because of the ongoing conflict. Israel again postponed plans to send its lead negotiator, Amos Gilad, to Cairo, defense officials said. They spoke on condition of anonymity because the date of his departure has not been set. When Gilad actually travels, it will be a strong signal of progress. In the truce talks, Hamas has insisted that it would not agree to a cease-fire unless Israel pulls its troops out of the tiny Mediterranean coastal strip and allowed Gaza's borders to the outside world to immediately reopen. But the temporary cease-fire proposal being discussed in Cairo would allow Israel's military to stay in place and the borders closed during a io-day period of quiet, the Egyptian and Palestinian officials close to the talks said. During that time, Egyptian, Turkish and other international mediators would try to negotiate an arrangement for policing Egypt's border with Gaza to prevent weapons smuggling into the territory, the officials said. This would likely entail some kind of international monitors on the Palestinian side of the border — but the two sides remained far apart on who would make up the force, where they would be deployed and their mission. Hamas has so far publicly resisted deploying international monitors and has demanded a role in policing the crossings and borders. Israel — like the United States, the EU and other nations — considers Hamas a terrorist group and has always rejected a role for it policing the crossings. Egypt has also rejected any foreign troops on its side of the border, though it says it would accept foreign technical and financial aid to help control the border, which is riddled with smuggling tunnels. Only after a deal has been reached on border security — including control of the crossings — would the crossings be opened and Israel would withdraw its forces from Gaza, the officials said. That means negotiators potentially would have only io days to work out the contentious details or else risk a return to fighting. Efforts of Arab countries to contain the crisis were riven, meanwhile, with their own divisions. Qatar on Wednesday managed to get enough Arab countries to agree on an emergency summit meeting in its capital of Doha for Friday. Its efforts succeeded over the strong opposition of Egypt and Saudi Arabia who preferred a meeting a few days later in Kuwait on the sidelines of an economic summit. Overnight, Israeli warplanes and helicopter gunships pounded a police court in Gaza City, rocket-launching sites, gunmen, weapons-production and storage facilities and about 35 weapons smuggling tunnels, the military said. Later in the day, witnesses in southern Gaza reported air strikes on the house of a rocket squad leader and a militant's

car. Aircraft also struck the Sheikh Radwan cemetery in Gaza City, destroying about 3o graves — some just recently dug — and scattering bits of flesh and body parts, residents said. Fireballs and smoke plumes from Israeli bombing have become a common sight in the territory of 1.4 million people, who are trapped because Israel and Egypt have blockaded border crossings ever since the Islamic Hamas overran Gaza in June 2007. Palestinian rocket fire has dropped off dramatically since the offensive began. Twelve rockets were fired at Israel on Wednesday, down from as many as 8o a day early in the operation.


The Vista Comm. Building, Rm. 107 100 N. University Dr. • Edmond, OK 73034-5209 405-974-5549 • editorial@thevistaonline.com The Vista is published as a newspaper and public forum by UCO students, semi-weekly during the academic year except exam and holiday periods, and only on Thursdays during the summer, at the University of Central Oklahoma. The issue price is free for the first copy and $1 for each additional copy obtained. EDITORIALS

Opinion columns, editorial cartoons, reviews and commentaries represent the views of the writer or artist and not necessarily the views of The Vista Editorial Board, the Department of Mass Communication, UCO or the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges. The Vista is not an official medium of expression for the Regents or UCO. LETTERS

The Vista encourages letters to the editor. Letters should address issues and ideas, not personalities. Letters must be typed, doublespaced, with a maximum of 150 words, and must include the author's printed name, title, major, classification and phone number. Letters are subject to editing for libel, clarity and space, or to eliminate statements of questionable taste. The Vista reserves the right not to publish submitted letters. Address letters to: Editor, The Vista, 100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034-5209, or deliver in person to the editor in the Communications Building, Room 107. Letters can be e-mailed to editorial@thevistaonline.com .

MANAGEMENT

WELLNESS CENTER

Nelson Solomon, Co-Editor Greg Newby, Co-Editor Stephani Tobin , Copy Fikor ICayleighAdarnelc, Design Edtor Keith Mooney, Ad Manager

EDITORIAL Chase Dearinger, Feafteres Writer Kaylea Brooks, Fectoes Writer Laura Hoffett, Senior Reporter Ryan Croft Senior Reporter Caleb McWilliams, StaffWriter Angela Morris, Staff Writer Chris Wescott, Sports Writer

SO, WHAT WAS YOUR NEW YEAR'S RESOWTION?

MULTIMEDIA Catie Dabney, Photographer Chris Athos, Multimedia Producer Joshua Gilbreath, Multimedia Assistant

L

CARTOONIST Jared Aylor

WELCOME SACK BRONCHOS.

ADVERTISING

Cartoon by Jared Aylor

Stacey McEntire

CIRCULATION Chris Albers

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Tresa Berlemann

ADVISER Kelly S. Wray

Campus Quotes "What is your New Year's resolution?"

"I need to concentrate on school."

Tori Ortiz Fashion Marketing, Sophomore

"Not to drink as much pop." Andrea Sanders Elementary Education, Freshman

Bush should be judged on keeping nation secure President George W. Bush stood behind the podium in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in the White House for the last time on Monday, acknowledging the "mistakes" and "disappointments" of his two turbulent terms in office. The legacies of presidents tend to be based on the major decisions and accomplishments of their administrations, and in Bush's case, the Iraq war will be the starting point in future discussions of Bush's legacy. Was Bush right in pushing the United States into the current conflict in Iraq and attempting to establish a democracy? In his own words, time will tell. "When the history of Iraq is written, historians will analyze, for example, the decision on the surge," he said. "The situation looked like it was going fine and violence for a time began to throw the progress of Iraq into doubt. "Rather than accepting the status quo or saying 'it's not worth it' or 'politics makes it difficult' or 'the party may end up not doing well in the elections' because of the violence in Iraq, I decided to do something about it and send 30,000 troops in as opposed to withdrawing. That part of history is certain, and the situation did change. "The question is, in the long run, will this democracy survive? And that's going to be the challenge for future presidents," he said. As Ian Sims from The Crimson White at the University of Alabama wrote, if the situation in Iraq improves, and

5o to ioo years from now Iraq remains (or becomes) a true democracy, then historians may remember Bush as the one who started that change. We don't know what the situation will look like in Iraq, or in Afghanistan in the far future; but regardless, no historian can say Bush simply operated on opinion polls. Many will argue that entering into Iraq was unnecessary and I will join that chorus, but when it comes to the character of George W. Bush, he clearly stood on his principles and did not sway his stance based on public opinion. The mistakes of Bush in his two terms are aplenty, notably Abu Ghraib and Hurricane Katrina, but let's not forget some other minor but relevant facts: He increased funding for the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health in his first years of office, and created education programs to strengthen the grounding in science and mathematics for American high school students. Undeniably, history will primarily tell that President Bush was successful at defending the homeland. Critics cannot ignore that fact when his legacy is brought up. As Education Secretary Margaret Spellings succinctly put it, "You never get credit for things that didn't happen. Nobody says, 'Thank goodness no planes have crashed into any buildings lately. —

The Bottom Line

Obama's inauguration: History for many reasons

Next Tuesday, history will be made in Washington, D.C. It will be made for several reasons, one of them being a new presidential administration. However, those who may or may not have voted for him cannot deny that the United States has yet to have Adriene Lents a president who looks like him, who Forensic Science/Early Childhood is much of a breath of fresh air to the White House. The closest comparison Education, Freshman may be John F. Kennedy. Of course, we have no idea yet if President-elect Obama's legacy will match that of JFK. But there are parallel's: stylish, charismatic wife, two young children, being young himself. Obama is our first African-American president, and Kennedy was our first (and so far only) Catholic president. After Jan. 20, Obama will have a great deal to live up to. His hype is irrefutable, to the point where many complained that the media painted him as a messiah of sorts. His name has been known to many Americans since the 2004 Democratic National Convention, when he gave a speech so inspiring that people were already whispering about him running for president. Little did they know. John Bobb-Semple, II Most importantly, Obama and Sen. Joe Biden ran a campaign so effective, so financially successful, that several Political Science, Senior commonly red states went blue, including North Carolina, Photographed & compiled by Catie Dabney Florida and Virginia. His win could easily be described as

"Not to procrastinate, like I always do."

"To keep my word, to keep my commitments. Talking less, and not to eat as much fried food. To graduate from college in May 2009."

a landslide. The theme for Tuesday's inauguration is "A New Birth of Freedom," a phrase coined from President Lincoln's Gettysburg address. Whether or not this will accurately describe Obama's administration is yet to be seen. Many Obama fans believe this will be true. So what can we anticipate on Tuesday? Will we see thousands of politicians, celebrities and ordinary Americans clamoring for a look at the Obamas? Will we hear a speech that gets under the collective skin of our nation's people ; a speech that may have the ability to rally us together during a troubling era? Will we huddle together, at work or at school, watching history unfold as we carry on our daily schedules? Regardless of whether or not you voted for Obama, or if you're" skeptical about his ideas and beliefs, it is important to remember how revered and how significant Tuesday will be for the history of our nation. No matter how bitter and hostile the campaigns may have been, and no matter how you may have viewed the previous administration, the time for change has arrived, even if you only think of it as a campaign buzzword. It is here, and we have a great deal to look forward to.

West Coast Bias

Publishers swim in money while students drown in debt The economy may be slipping and, although the "experts" say Oklahoma will feel it here before long, there is one industry that will not share our pain. At this point in the semester, we've all had to deal with the bookstore. I took a stack of io books that I had collected over the course of a couple semesters to the bookstore, thinking I'd get a pretty good refund. I got $58. When I turned around to buy the six I needed this semester, the price tag was $204. Several studies have been done as to what exactly is going on in the textbook industry. According to a study conducted by the U.S. Department of Education in 2004, since 1986, textbook prices have risen about six percent per year. The same study also reported a three percent per year rise for other products in the market. Now, before we go running to the bookstore with our torches and pitchforks, let's take a look at the distribution of that $190 you just paid for your Spanish book. According to numbers released by the National Association of College Stores, the publisher takes 64.3 percent, 22.4 percent is kept by the bookstore, the author gets 11.6 percent and 1.7 percent for shipping. The reason for this, aside from attempting to increase profits and royalties, says a study

conducted by the Government Accountability Office, is the increasing number of new editions and supplemental materials available from publishing companies. In the Internet age, we thrive on current information. Advances in the fields of science and technology abound, and we benefit from learning the most up-to-date information possible. We should be asking, "Do we need an updated version of The Complete Works of William Shakespeare' every semester?" or "How much did Jean Paul Sartre's `Existentialism is Humanism' change in the last year?" The point here is this: yes, college textbooks are expensive, but it's not really the fault of the bookstores. Just like any customer-related industry, they receive the brunt of the complaints while the publishers sit in their offices counting their money. This industry is gaining more and more attention from various watchdog groups, but the progress is slow. For now, the best thing we can do is sell/buy online. Buyers can buy for cheaper than bookstore prices, and sellers can sell for a little bit more than they'd make at the bookstore, without the extravagant prices.

Excogitate

THIS!


FUNDING Continued from Page 1

SAFETY Continued from Page 1

Sasser, associate professer of economics and director of the Center for Economic Education. "We're early in the budgeting process, and we don't know what the state's revenue will be yet," Sasser said. Sasser said while she shares Boren's concern about higher education funding in our state, she said this was probably not the type of emergency the legislature had in mind when it set up the fund. "We're in a situation where funding higher education is critically important for the state's interests, but dipping into the Rainy Day fund is probably not an appropriate use of the fund," she said. IS UCO PREPARED FOR BUDGET CUTS? "Every day's a rainy day for us [UCO]," Sasser said. "Universities would do well to learn how to spend like UCO does. We don't have the bells and whistles that other schools might have." President Webb has said that UCO has been preparing for a budget shortfall by making fewer purchases and asking departments to reserve money they can carry over. "The administration always asks us to be lean with our money, so when there are hard times, it may not be as drastic for us as it may be for other schools," Sasser said. "Because our tuition is so much cheaper, and because our school has much more flexible schedules, UCO tends to grow during those lean times." IS THE TUITION FREEZE STILL POSSIBLE? The campus presidents had promised to freeze tuition next year if the new $80.4 million was given to cover the increased costs. As economic outlook in the state has dimmed because of dropping energy prices and the national economy, so have hopes of the freeze. "The only way for higher education to get more money right now is for something else to get cut out," Sasser said. Glenn Coffee, Oklahoma State Senate President Pro Tempore has said "under the current budget constraints, it will be difficult to promise any agency an increase in their funding in the coming fiscal year."

"It is the death of a student, a school-wide illness, or a school-wide evacuation as we saw at Adams Elementary School [in Oklahoma City] last week." Garcia said safety plans must be constantly evaluated and practiced with staff, faculty, students and community so they can be workable in times of emergency. "We want to work on prevention and be proactive on all safety issues," Garcia said. Barbara Siano, the principal of Sunset Elementary School in Edmond, spoke in the segment that focused on adminstrators. "Safety never goes under the number one priority in any situation," Siano said, "and [UCO] hosting this keeps it at the forefront." Siano said each district has its own set of rules and standards, and each district has state and federal safety guidelines to uphold. This conference, she said, offered educators and counselors the opportunity to share suggestions and rules in their district to take back to their respective districts. Dr. Katherine Hughes, the assistant superintendant for the Mid-Del school district, also spoke in the administration segment of the conference. She is an adjunct professor at UCO, teaching a course through Rose State College to help Mid-Del teachers become administrators. "[The conference] focused on sharing a strategy of what we're doing across the state in regards to safety," Hughes said. "It was a learning experience for everyone." She said the conference focused on not only the physical safety of students, but also the safety of students outside of school, including mental health, tragedy, the loss of a loved one and depression. "When we think about school safety, we also have to think about the aftermath of a crisis, and that students remain safe," Hughes said. Sherry Ward, also a program coordinator for guidance and school counseling at UCO, said participants have asked for this to be an annual event, and the conference will be expanded upon next year. "This conference just proves how much we care about students, both at the university and the public schools," Ward said. "We want to do everything we can do to help make sure all students are safe in public education."

SHANDY Continued from Page 1 Shandy called the Edmond Police Department on April at 10:32 p.m. and falsely reported that he had overheard three men plotting to bomb UCO, according to court documents. He said he was walking out of a 7-11 convenience store and identified a white male, an African American male and a Middle Eastern male as the three individuals who made the threat. Shandy quoted the three men as making statements such as, "The professor was a d---" and "He doesn't think I'm capable of doing this, but he'll see tomorrow when UCO blows up." Shandy pled guilty on June 3o. R. Scott Adams, Shar dy's attorney, said it was a very tough case and said the defense team did everything they could on Shandy's behalf. He said Shandy made a huge mistake and did not realize how serious this incident was until Friday's proceedings. The university's crisis response team, consisting of Steve Kreidler, Vice President of Administration and Finance, Kathryn Gage, Vice President for Student Affairs, William Radke, provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Charlie Jolmson, Executive Director of University Relations, Jeff Harp, UCO's chief law enforcement officer, and Cynthia Rolfe, Vice President of Information Technology, reacted immediately when reports of the threat initially were heard from the Edmond Police Department, said UCO President Roger Webb. • Webb also said the crisis response team chose not to inform the entire UCO community because they didn't want to risk creating a panic across campus without knowing for sure that lives were in danger. The UCO Police Department, the Edmond Police Department, the Oklahoma County Sheriffs Office and the Federal Bureau of Investigation all took part in the investigation. Shandy agreed to pay restitution to each organization as part of his plea agreement, totaling $21,512.23. The court recommended that Shandy be sent to the Federal Correctional Facility in Texarkana, Texas. Shandy has until Jan. 18 to self-report to a detention facility yet to be determined by the Federal Bureau of Prisons. 22

New APIlWriter. Senate set forgovernor impeachment trial SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Hours after impeached Gov. Rod Blagojevich convened a new Illinois Senate and urged lawmakers to "find the truth," senators took the first steps Wednesday toward a trial to determine whether the governor is ousted from

office for corruption and abuse of p er. stuck to the formalities of o seeing the The Democratic governor presided over ceremony during the hour or so he presided the first meeting of a Senate whose most over the chamber. urgent task is putting him on trial. He was But as he handed the proceedings over to greeted by silence as he entered the Senate incoming Senate President John Cullerton, a chamber through a back entrance, took the fellow Democrat from Chicago, Blagojevich podium without introduction and banged a said he hoped senators would "find the gavel to call the session to order. He mostly truth and sort things out, to put the business

of the people first." He also called on state senators to act "with malice toward none, with charity for all," referring to Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address, delivered near the end of the Civil War, when he implored his countrymen to "bind up the nation's wounds" and work toward peace.


Variety, flavor and an Sweeney Todd: Dark portrayals and international taste chilling humor at the Tropical Cafe Mrs. Lovett (Carrie Cimma), and seeks his revenge on Judge Turpin and London. Enterlainmenl It viler Mrs. Lovett's kooky character adds the Sweeney Todd (Merritt David Janes), the dark humor to this dark tragedy, and Carrie demon barber of Fleet Street, made his way Cimma really became the star of the show to Rose State College Jan. 5 in the title role with her unusual comedy and radiant presof the musical thriller produced by UCO's ence on stage. Broadway Tonight. Supporting roles Tobias (Chris Marchant) Although neither Tim Burton nor Johnny and Pirelli (Ruthie Ann Miles) were also Depp were involved in this production, the impressive. multi-talented cast, in charge of not only Marchant not only brilliantly played the singing and acting but also playing the role of a jumpy little kid but he also played musical instruments which accompanied the violin, clarinet and piano throughout them, put on a chillthe show. ing performance full of "Although neither Tim Miles picked up twists and dark humor. Burton or Johnny Depp were an Italian accent for Benjamin Barger, the involved in this production, her male character best barber in London, and also took on the is wrongfully convict- the multi-talented cast ... put tasks of playing the ed and shipped away on a chilling performancefull accordion, keyboard to Australia, enabling and flute. of twists and dark humor." Judge Turpin to pursue Catchy songs like Barger's beautiful wife "The Worse Pies in and daughter. London," "Epiphany" --Angela Morris When Barger finally and "City on Fire" returns to London with might be singing in hopes of seeing his famyour head for a few ily, he learns how things days if you get a have tragically changed in his absence. chance to the musical production, which I Sweeny Todd, Barger's ruthless alter- would highly recommend. ego, teams up with a twisted pie baker,

Angela Morris

Visit Angela's blog at vvww.thevistaonlineucom

Daviyion Johnson and Ryan Kolb Restaurant Reviewers

Well, students, faculty and staff, school is back in session and so are we. We hope you had a very enjoyable and relaxing Winter Break. Congrats to all the Fall 2008 graduates (including the both of us) and best of luck in all your future endeavors. We are excited to bring newer, better and stronger reviews this semester, so let's get down to business. We ate at a few places we recommended for lunch, and this week's choice is right up there with the best. The Tropical Cafe is on the corner of 2nd and Kelly. Their prices are fair, portions, lunchappropriate and their food tasted simply delightful. This is the only place we revisited before we wrote the review. It was that good and its travel time from campus is hard to beat. We arrived at the Tropical and right in front of us was a larger than life menu with a plethora of options ranging from Panini to Salads to Crepes and even . . . Sushi? You heard right, and for you sushi lovers, they offer a different kind of sushi that is "crispy." We had a lot of trouble deciding what to order due to the monstrous menu and the choices of A-mazing smoothies, crepe desserts and Seattle's Best coffee choices. Ryan decided on The Italiano sandwich,

Gran Torino: American Made Mason Pain Special 10 the Vista

When you hear the name "Gran Torino," chances are the first thing that comes to mind is the classic muscle car produced by Ford Motors in the early '70s. So, when you hear about Clint Eastwood's new film, you might jump to the conclusion it revolves around the hot rod its title is derived from. Let me warn you in advance, this is not the case. Although it does play a semi-important role, throughout most of the film, the car is more of a spectacle to lighten up the grim Detroit neighborhood in which it resides. Instead, "Gran Torino" revolves more around, Walt Kowalski (Eastwood), a disgruntled, chauvinistic, Korean War Veteran who has recently become a widower, and the changes taking place in his neighborhood. One ofthose changes being that it has become overrun by several Hmong (Asian ethnic group) families. Of the families, a very considerable one is just next door to Walt. Amongst the multitude of members are two children; Sue, a motherly, nimble minded teen, and her younger brother Tao. As Walt goes Photo provided about snarling, drinlcing beer, smoking cigarettes, and polishing his prized Torino, Tao is experiencing the pressures of adolescence in the big city. After a confrontation with a Mexican gang on his way home, Tao's cousin tries

to persuade him into being a part of their rival crew for protection. Although Tao is reluctant to comply, he does so in fear of no other choice. His initiation is to steal the souped-up Torino next door. It's during this attempt we see the gun-wielding Eastwood we all know and love for the first time. To make amends for his wrong doing, Walt's mother and sister propose to have Tao work as a helping hand around Kowalski's house. Although he accepts, Walt doesn't cease to denigrate Tao's character. As the film rolls on, however, he becomes more and more a father-type figure to the boy - showing him the tools of the trade and how to be a man. When Tao's gangbanging cousins reappear, Walt's role quickly changes from sectarian to sentinel. Although the transition takes place late in the film, it is a big step forward from the closed-off man we meet at the beginning. It is in this moment we are shown the complexity of Walt, which makes way for the riveting finish. Even though it's not a fast-paced, chase

`ern down flick about muscle cars, "Gran Torino" does not disappoint. It deals with many powerful underlying themes, such as racism, isolation and the decaying of American ideals. Themes we need to be reminded of, but very seldom are. It has become increasingly rare in today's entertainment industry for a film to come along that depicts the life of true America, as opposed to just entertaining us. "Gran Torino" places a mirror in front of society's face with great precision. Rookie screenwriter Nick Schenk gives us much to look forward to with his screenplay debut of "Gran Torino." Directed and produced by Clint Eastwood, it isn't loaded with special effects and breathtaking cinematography to reel us in; but instead proves to us a movie can still be great without utilizing those things. Despite some very mediocre acting by some of the predominately Hmong cast, the movie goes unblemished. Eastwood's presence and continual old man whit seem to somewhat mask the bump anyway. Although the racial slurs and mediocre acting are questionable at times, one thing is indisputable; "Gran Torino," like the car, was made in the U.S.A. and is a breath of fresh air to classic American Film lovers. Starring Clint Eastwood, Christopher Carley, Bee Vang, Ahney Her, "Gran Torino" is rated R for language throughout, and some violence with a run time of 1 hr and 56 min.

Need more alaition? Adviitise with the MAI vistantediaoyahoonim 405/914-591S

2009 — 2010 Student AcIlivity Funds Appilarlions fir fuming or university-wide programs or evenis through Student Activity Funds are now being accepted. Any campus department or orgarization seeking fuming for a new program or event is encumaged to subrna a requimit to the DInce of the iroce Pmmident for Student Affairs. Applicatiors are available try lanis Ferguson at 974-3515. The application deadline is February 2, 2009_ Examples of programs currently receiving Student Arlivily Funds include Earth Day and Winter Glow. Fixurrxig requestz for prograrns or events benefiting the entire student body are encouraged_ Stholarships), department"l academic activity, and activities not accessible 1p all students will not receive consideration.

which came with Italian Genoa salami, spicy pepperoni, provolone cheese, spring mix, roasted red peppers and pesto spread. It came with a bag of chips and only took a little more than 6 bucks out of his wallet. Not bad for a Panini that easily compared to any he has had before and delivered a 1-2 punch to his tummy. The sandwich was served toasted and was complemented by a tasty cup of water. You can never have too much Hp in your diet. Daviyion had a Maui Grilled Chicken Hot Crepe sandwich which came with grilled chicken breast, cheese, onions, lettuce, tomatoes, red peppers and honey mustard sauce. WOW! That's all that really needs to be said about this sandwich. If you like crepes for breakfast, then you'll love them for lunch. It also came with your choice of chips. It came with a very reasonable $6.25 price tag. Ryan gives Tropical Café an honest of 4.7 out of 5 stars for fair prices, good food, and being a top-notch place to grab a quick bite for lunch. They also have free internet access for those of you who need a change of scenery as the semester kicks off. Daviyion suggests taking a break from deciding whether to get your textbook online or in the overpriced bookstore and check out the hot and cold selections that Tropical Cafe offers.

Freeze before seeing 'Paul Blart' AP Writer The biggest crime of all in "Paul Blart: Mall Cop" is not the bank heist that goes down at a New Jersey mall on Black Friday, the busiest shopping day of the year. Rather, it's the egregious way in which Kevin James' innate likability goes to waste. The "King of Queens" star showed he could play an underdog with some sweetness and depth as a lovesick accountant in the 2005 romantic comedy "Hitch" — and he practically stole the movie away from Will Smith. This time, he plays yet another misfit, but one who's so twodimensional, needy (and frankly annoying) that it's difficult to root for him. Trouble is, James himself created the character: "I just love this guy," he says in the film's production notes. He'll probably be one of the precious few who do. James' Paul Blart is a portly pushover who tries hard to be the tough guy as a shopping center security guard. Hypoglycemic and woefully out of shape, he's failed the New Jersey state trooper exam eight times; nevertheless, he squeezes into his polyester uniform and takes his job as seriously as if he were out keeping the highways safe from speeders and drunk drivers. (His vehicle, by the way, is a Segway, which is repeatedly played for laughs but isn't particularly amusing the first time.) In an anemic take off on "Die Hard," Paul gets his chance to prove himself when a bunch of skateboarding, bikeX-Games refugees infiltrate the mall with plans to rob the bank, taking a few hostages in the process. One of them is Amy (Jayma Mays), the wide-eyed salesgirl at the hair extension kiosk, for whom Paul has the geeky hots. He awkwardly tries to woo her with boring trivia tidbits, which is meant to be endearing; instead it's yet another conceit that quickly grows wearisome in the script from James and his longtime writing partner, Nick Bakay. Paul bumbles his way around and manages to thwart the bad guys, one by one, with his in-depth knowledge of the shopping center's intricacies as well as a borrowed pink, sparkly cell phone that allows him to connect with cops on the outside. Their leader is the sniveling Veck (Keir O'Donnell, who played tortured artist Todd in "Wedding Crashers"), who took a job as a security guard trainee under Paul's tutelage to learn the way the mall works. This being a Happy Madison Production — Adam Sandler is James' friend and domestic partner from "I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry" — there are, of course, plenty of obligatory adolescent sight gags to go along with the man-child hero fantasies, all of them flatly staged and observed by director Steve Can. ("Dr. Dolittle 2," "Daddy Day Care"). Surprisingly, though, given our would-be hero's girth and the physical humor that goes along with it, "Paul Blart: Mall Cop" has a soft spot for fat people. In an early dinnertable scene with his mother and young daughter, the single dad smears peanut butter on top of a slice of blueberry pie mere moments after finishing his meal. "Go away, pain," he says quietly to himself as he prepares to savor his favorite comfort food. It's a rare moment of believable humanity. You couldn't buy another one here if you tried. "Paul Blart: Mall Cop," a Columbia Pictures release, is rated PG for some violence, mild crude and suggestive humor, and language. Running time: 87 minutes. One star out of four.


CLASS Continued from Page 1 "But it really helped me and it's a great way to get more hours." Johnson, a broadcast major with an emphasis in production, took the Internet Broadcasting course during the winter 2008 intersession. "I really enjoyed the class. It was very educational," Johnson said. "I didn't realize so much would go on." Acquiring extra hours is perhaps the most obvious benefit, but intersession students gain many other advantages from taking classes during the regular-school break. Senior Laura Parish has taken numerous intersession classes and said she believes they are often more valuable than courses offered during the school semesters. She further explained that the extended daily class periods allowed her to fully immerse herself in the class. Johnson said he feels intersession is even a little easier than many of the regular semester classes. ""It's an easy way to get hours," he

explained. "The only downside is that it is crammed into two weeks...but it didn't seem like an overload for me and I'm not the best student out there." Intersession also offers students the opportunity to make professional connections and gain an inside look into the "real world" side of their career. "The most interesting thing to me was the guest speakers we had," Johnson said. "It was a great way to make connections and meet people ... and the tours we took... showed me more of what is out there." Senior Bonita James agreed that her intersession class not only gave her more hours, but also reaffirmed her career choice and opened up professional opportunities she otherwise might have missed. James has also taken numerous intersession courses and she expressed a warning to students considering taking one. "[Intersession] did have a lot of elements ... they're all like that," James explained. 'They're all intense, you learn a lot and you have to know that you're going to be going,

ya'know, balls to the wall." Broadcast Professor Keith Swezey has taught intersession classes at UCO since 1999. "The advantage for students is getting upper-division elective credit," Swezey said. "And that's always something that people are short on when they come down to graduation. Intersession is a very easy was to quickly get upper-division electives." If you are still not convinced to give up your precious school break, consider this: professors often use the time to teach interesting courses over more obscure or less broadly focused topics such as Creative Problem Solving, Cinematic Communication, Propaganda, and Fun with iWeb: How to Design Your First Web Site. "If you can't get a class during the semester and it's offered during intersession...it's a great way to pick up that credit," Johnson said. Some intersession courses are less intense than others. Professor Sherri Massey taught the first

Fun with iWeb course in winter 2008. "It was pretty laid back," Massey said. "It's designed to let the students have a lot of time to work on their projects and to be creative." Students in Fun with iWeb designed and created their own Web site and created and uploaded podcasts, among other things. James credits her winter 2008 intersession course with helping get her an internship for the summer. "When Kyle Malar came and spoke, from Branded News, he sealed the deal with m James explained. "I not only wanted to work for him, but I wanted to work for him right now...So, I landed an internship." James further explained that, without intersession, she probably would not have met her educational goals. "I had a three-year [until graduation] goal to be completed...and I'm going to make that goal...because of intersession," James said. "I definitely got a lot out of it."

Apple CEO Steve Jobs focuses on health, takes leave from work Associated Press SEATTLE (AP) — Apple Inc. co-founder and Chief Executive Steve Jobs said Wednesday he is taking a medical leave until June, even though just a week ago the cancer survivor tried to assure investors and employees his recent weight loss was caused by an easily treatable hormone deficiency. Apple's stock dropped 7 percent. Jobs, 53, said in a letter last week that he would remain at Apple's helm despite the hormone problem, and that he had already begun a "relatively simple and straightforward" treatment. But in an- e-mail to employees Wednesday, Jobs backtracked. "During the past week I have learned that my health-related issues are more complex

than I originally thought," he wrote. Apple's shares have surged and crashed over the last year in step with rumors or news about the CEO's health and his gaunt appearance. While the top executive's health is an issue for investors in any company, at Apple the level of concern reaches fever pitch because Jobs has a hand in everything from ideas for new products to the way they're marketed. Jobs co-founded Apple with Steve Wozniak in 1976 at the dawn of the personal computer revolution. He was forced from the company in 1985 but returned as CEO in 1997, slashing unprofitable product lines and helping rescue the company from financial ruin. Since then, under Jobs' demanding leadership, Apple has churned out a string

of sleek gadgets, from the iMac and the iPod to a new line of aluminum-covered Macbooks and the coveted iPhone. Many investors fear that without Jobs, Apple would not be able to sustain its growth or its high-end minimalist style. Last week, Jobs said his disclosure of his hormone problem was "more than I wanted to say, and all that I am going to say" about his health. It came on the eve of Macworld, the biggest Apple trade show of the year, and Jobs said he wanted everyone to relax and enjoy the event. Even so, the limited amount of information in that announcement did little to soothe Wall Street's nerves. Medical experts not involved in Jobs' treatment said it was unclear what was behind his weight loss, but some specialists said Jobs' past

pancreatic cancer could be the problem. Apple's history of keeping information about Jobs' health under wraps is only fueling the speculation. The company waited until after Jobs underwent surgery in 2004 to treat a very rare form of pancreatic cancer — an islet cell neuroendocrine tumor — before alerting investors. That type of cancer is easily cured if diagnosed early, unlike the deadlier and more common adenocarcinoma. And last summer, Cupertino, Calif.based Apple insisted Jobs' weight loss was due to a common bug, even as The New York Times cited anonymous sources who said Jobs had undergone "a surgical procedure" to address the problem.

AY

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Biting cold affects families in Northeastern, Southern states John Curran Issociated Press

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — The cold wave that stunned the nation's midsection expanded into the Northeast on Wednesday with subzero temperatures and biting wind that kept even some winter sports fans at home. The wind chill hit 33 below zero during the night at Massena, N.Y., and the National Weather Service predicted actual temperatures nearly that low in parts of the region by Thursday night. The weather service said Flint, Mich., set a record low early Wednesday at 19 degrees below zero. Forecasters also issued a lake effect snow warning Wednesday night for southwest Michigan, where a foot of snow or more could fall. Wmter-hardened people across northern New England bundled up amid warnings about how fast exposed skin can freeze. "Anyone who sends their kid out today is out of the running for parent of the year," said Eric Friedman, a spokesman for Mad River Glen ski area in Fayston, Vt. A frostbite caution sign was posted at the ticket office, but few skiers were there to see it because of the 5-below-zero cold, Friedman said. Schools from Iowa to North Carolina opened late so kids would not have to be out in the coldest part of the morning. Some schools closed altogether. "Awful," said University of Dayton student Lauren Weining, who put on two pairs of pants and three sweaters under her coat for a 10-minute walk to her job on the Ohio school's campus. "It's the longest ro minutes I ever had this year." No deaths were reported in the Northeast, but snowy conditions caused a 14-car crash Wednesday on Interstate 75 in Ohio and a truck that slowed to avoid the wreckage slammed into a car, killing the car's 55-year-old driver, said Tipp City patrol-

man Greg Adkins. A day earlier, a Wisconsin man died of exposure after wandering from his home; relatives said he was prone to sleepwalking. Poor visibility in blowing snow was blamed for a 20-car pileup that killed two people Wednesday in Indiana. Snow also cut visibility in Chicago, where airlines canceled around 25o flights Wednesday afternoon at O'Hare International Airport. In New York, where light snow was forecast and overnight lows Thursday near Albany were expected to be around minus 10, the frigid conditions caused complications for highway managers because road salt doesn't melt ice in subzero temperatures. "Once we get into minus 10, minus 20, in some cases we have to go to just straight sand, a light dusting of sand, on the highway to get some grit, provide some traction," said Mike Flick of the state Transportation Department in Pamelia. This was just arctic cold, the kind that numbs the face, kills car batteries and freezes unguarded water pipes. Residents of Ironwood, Mich., were told to keep faucets running to prevent freeze-ups after a major break left the city without water, said Gogebic County emergency services coordinator Jim Loeper. "It slows you down a little bit. Your body doesn't move as fast as it should," said Shane West, 35, a roofer working on a house in Montpelier in 2-below cold. "Even for us, it can become a problem sometimes," he said, referring to Vermonters accustomed to cold weather. But people who had a choice stayed inside — even skiers. Vermont's Bolton Valley ski resort, where it was 10 below Wednesday morning, canceled night skiing through Friday night for fear that skiers could freeze if they were marooned on a malfunctioning ski lift. A couple of ski areas in northern

AP Photo

A snow plow works to clear Interstate 465 in Carmel, Ind., Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2009. Snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches is expected. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy) Minnesota closed for the day because of temperatures that reached 38 below zero at International Falls, with the wind chill during the night estimated at so below. "We don't want anyone out there," said Kathryn Paquette, homeless outreach specialist of Southern New Hampshire Services in Nashua, N.H., which found rooms at rooming houses, motels and shelters for dozens. Maine residents braced for nighttime readings down to 4o below zero. And in the Midwest, Iowans were warned that temperatures could drop as far as 27 below zero during the night, matching a Jan. 15 record set in 1972. Temperatures on Thursday were expected to range from 10 below zero in the far

north to the low teens in southern coastal areas. Farther south, morning temperatures were in the 205 from Texas to Georgia, and along the Gulf Coast the weather service reported a low of just 28 at Mobile, Ala. Even northern Georgia and Kentucky could see single-digit lows by Friday, with zero possible at Lexington, Ky., the weather service warned. Kentucky hasn't been that cold since December 2004. But as the Gulf Coast city of Pensacola, Fla., fell to 40 degrees, Brazilian tourist Vitor Rocha wore shorts and sandals for a stroll with a friend. "We are not disappointed in the weather today, this is something unusual for us," he said.


Crossword Puzzle

Across 52. Ballet move 21. Horse opera 1. Low in pitch 54. and aahs 22. "Bleah!" 5. Star Trek character 56. Situation in which a 25. Encouraged, with "on" 10. Blemish favourable outcome is impossible 26. United States journalist 14. Asian nurse 27. Fan 62. Bypass 15. "The Nutcracker" lead 63. Eye drops 29. Holy text 16. 100 kurus 64. "0" in old radio lingo 31. Exchanges 17. Apprentice 66. Bills, e.g. 32. Braid 18. Like Cheerios e.g. 33. Corporate department 67. Santa's reindeer, 19. "Idylls of the King" 68. Pesky insects 35. lab character 37. "A rat!" 69. "Trick" joint 20. "Everyone for himself" 70. Marsh growth 40. Single whole piece 23. noir 71. Increase, with "up" 41. Dusk to dawn 24. Gluttons 42. Deliberate acts of omission 25. Enthusiastic approval Down 47. Cheerful 28. Schuss, e.g. I. Dracula, at times 48. Appetite 30. Ropes used by a hangman 2. nitrate 50. Gone bad 34. Spurred 3. " Smile" (1976 hit) 53. Mary of "The Maltese 36. " moment" of Falcon" 4. Give an exhibition 38. grecque (cooked in 5. Knock, with "at" 55. Kilns olive oil, lemon juice, wine and 6. Dishes 56. Make small marks into herbs, and served cold) surface of 7. "@#$%!," e.g. 39. Governor of high rank 8. Going stealthily or furtively 57. Arab League member 43. Barely get, with "out" 9. System for writing Japanese 58. Cheeky 44. Alicia of "Falcon Crest" using adapted Chinese character 59. "Soap" family name 45. Shoe with a fringed tongue 10. Strip blubber or skin from 60. Final notice that flaps over the instep suffix 61. Do, for example II. Diminutive 46. Churchill Downs event 12. Husk 65. Clairvoyance, e.g. 13. 1973 Supreme Court 49. "Star Trek" rank: Abbr. 51. Central points decision name

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TheVista Thursday, Jan. 15, 2009 Page 10 - w4iw*4esp,ribi

DEADONES: All classifieds MUST be submitted by noon Tuesday for the Thursday publication and Friday noon for the Tuesday publication. PRICES: Classified ads cost $7/day for the first 20 words and $.10/word thereafter. PAYMENT IS DUE WHEN AD IS PLACED. Classified Display ads (one column boxed ads on classified page) have same deadlines and prices as regular display ads. Call 974-5549 or 974-5918 for info

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BUSINESS STUDENTS 4 to 9 hours per week. PART-TIME Hourly pay, plus comOFFICE ASSISTANT Needed for small busi- puter/internet experiness near Memorial ence helpful. Earning Rd. and Brdwy Ext. Mi- potential excellent. crosoft Excel and Word 623-2857 experience is required. Flexible hours - willing PART-TIME to work around your TEACHER class schedule. $9.00 & FULL-TIME PRE-K per hour. Please fax TEACHER NEEDED At brand new child deresume to 751-5101. velopment center. Call MOLIERE My Small Wonders at 285-7752 or apply BRIDAL SALON Part-time, flexible online at hours. Email resume mysmallwonders.com to molierebridal@ PREVIEW sbcglobal.net MAGAZINE www. Seeking molierebridal.com Advertising/Sales in728-0485 terns. Commission of 25% is paid with sold NEW HORIZONS ads. Call Carol, CHILD 728-1990. DEVELOPMENT Now hiring part-time teachers to join our team. Apply in person at 14300 N. Western or call 748-4424. EOE.

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NEED PART-TIME CAREGIVER For 20 year old boy. He has autism and is very high functioning. Need help in mornings and some evenings. Must have own transportation. Please call Margo RIVER OAKS Price at 850-7603. GOLF CLUB Looking for a friendly, DUE TO EXPANSION energetic person to fill PROGRAM weekday shifts and/or Starbucks Coffee Corn- weekend shifts in the pany is looking for Ac- Bar & Grill. Located 10 counting Reps. Please mins from UCO. $8-$12 contact us for more per hour. Call Chris or details. Requirements Cindy @ 771-5800 for - Candidate should appointment or stop by have internet access. 10909 Clubhouse Road, Mr. Marlon Paul Edmond OK to fill out an M a rlo n s 19 @ yahoo. application. corn Services SERVER, POSITION Available @ Pearl's EDMOND Lakeside. Apply within. LANGUAGE 748-6113 INSTITUTE Conveniently located on SHOGUN'S the UCO campus, offers STEAKHOUSE English as a second Hiring for wait staff, language classes for bussers, dish washers, international students/ host, bartender. Apply in individuals. NOW FEAperson at Northpark Mall TURING a specially (NW 122nd & N. May) designed program with: after 5:30pm. 749-0120 Strong emphasis in listening & speaking, HighTEACHER NEEDED ly interactive classes, IMMEDIATELY Comprehensive TOEFL for Edmond Daycare. program. Enjoy small FT/PT. Experience pre- classes and the campus ferred, competitive wag facilities. Contact us at es. Apply in person (405) 341-2125 or 24 NW 146th. Call Cam- www. elot C.D.0 @ 749-2262 thelanguagecompany. corn

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Hockey splits with Sun Devils Chris Wescott ,s,)„,,t,

UCO split two games against the Arizona State Sun Devils. The Sun Devils came to Edmond to play against the Bronchos last Friday and Saturday at Arctic Edge Arena. Although the Bronchos were ranked No. ii in the nation at the time, each game By Vista photographer Chris Albers becomes a must-win in the eyes of the voters as it gets Jake Roadhouse attemps to score Saturday night closer to the championships. against Arizona during a shoot out after a tied overIn the first of the two time at the Artic Edge Ice Arena. The Bronchos lost games, the Devils jumped the match during the post-overtime shoot out. out to an early lead in the Devil defense and jumped out to an early first period. It didn't take too long for them to widen the gap, with a Sun Devil goal 4 1-0 lead. However, the second period would be all minutes into the second period. Arizona State as they completely dominated The Bronchos were not finished yet, howthe ice in every way, capitalizing on turnever. Right after Arizona State scored their second goal, UCO had a wave of sustained overs and a lethargic Broncho team that did pressure in the attacking zone. At 14:34 left not resemble the team from the first game. in the second period, they had already put Arizona State would eventually take a one point lead and would hold on until about 2 UD two goals to tie up the match. The Bronchos took the lead 12 minutes minutes left in the final period. It would take a Cohn goal with under later with a goal from Matt Cohn, who took two minutes left to tie up the game. The a pass off the goalie's right side, put one Bronchos fended off a late Devil's push move on, and scooted the goal in for the and sent the game to overtime. After neilead. The Bronchos continued their second ther team could get a score in the overtime period dominance with a goal by Mike period, they went to a shootout. Team captain for ASU, Patrick Lind, Haszto with 1:41 left in the period. The scored a goal on the second rotation and it Bronchos would not score again, but they was all up to the Broncho's game-tying scoralso would never let Arizona State catch up er, Matt Cohn, to win the game, but Cohn's and won the game, 4 -3. shot fell just outside the goal after it banked The second game, played on Saturday off the left pad of the ASU goalie. night, went a little differently. Much like The Bronchos play again this weekend, the first game, there was a lot of sustained when they travel to Oakland University to pressure by both offensive attacks early. play the Bears Friday and Saturday. UCO took advantage of a slow-to-react Sun

Women's basketball sends Cats back to Abeline with the 'I,' Chris Wescott Spoils Writer

The UCO women's basketball team hosted a down-to-the-wire game against the Abilene Christian Wildcats last Thursday evening. Most of the game was cat and mouse style, with the wildcats just nipping at the Broncho's heels. Both teams seemed tired out of the gate. The Bronchos would score, then the Wildcats would use their size in the paint to score as well. The game never got out of hand though, as the biggest lead of the game was only an 8-point lead by the Bronchos. The Wildcats would not let up as they battled back and eventually took a 1-point lead in the closing minutes. With 19.1 seconds left on the clock, the Bronchos were all but finished. UCO guard Kasey Tweed drove down the court, bobbing and weaving through the defense. With 9.2 seconds left in the game, Kasey drew a foul under the basket and would shoot two, one for the tie, and

another for the win. The first shot went up and through. The second went up and was also good, and gave the Bronchos the lead with 9.2 seconds on the clock. Abilene drove the ball down the court and went up for two baskets with the clock waning. However, there was excellent defense under the net from the Bronchos. Abilene missed both shots including the at-the-buzzer tipped ball that would have won the game. The Bronchos pulled out a 68-67 win. Ashley Beckley had a career night with 27 points, leading the team to victory over the Abilene Christian Wildcats. "We just did not shoot well all night, other than Ashley," head coach Guy Hardaker said after the game. Coach Hardaker was adamant about not shooting well. The Bronchos did not sink a single three until 5 minutes into the second half from Cristina Yarbrough. "[Cristina] is . . . a girl in this league that no one wants to cover," Hardaker said. "She just makes you uncomfortable to cover or be covered by her. She'll take the ball from you."

e are seeking 50 talented and diverse students who are energetic about UCO--

Bronchos start slow, finish big against ACU Chris Wescott .Spoils

It was a game that started off extremely slow for both sides last Thursday as the Broncho men played host to the Abiline Christian Wildcats. After a close first half, the Bronchos' offense exploded on route to a 76-58 beating of the Wildcats. Both offenses seemed to just be going through the motions at the beginning. After 10 minutes of play, the score was 16-15. The Bronchos got a quick scare when Lance Harper went up top to sink an alleyoop, but was slammed hard into the backboard by a Wildcat and fell down, hitting the ground hard. Lance got up under his own power however, and came right back into the game. At the half, the Bronchos had the lead, 31-24. It was all UCO the whole second half. The Bronchos got a boost from their bench players as Blake Livingston, DeAngelo Garrett and Keith Marks combined to score 33 points. "Blake, DeAngelo and Keith came in and did what we need them to do and they gave us a big lift," said coach Terry Evans. When asked earlier in the season if he thought his team was a defensive one, Evans said that the main goal was to keep a team under 70 and you can win almost every time. The Bronchos made good on that, holding the Lone Star Conference leading scoring team to just 58 points. That is almost 30 points under the Wildcats season average.

Bronchos survive Saturday, Jan, 10 UCO 96, Angelo State 92 •

• • •

The Lead: The Bronchos moved to 13-2 overall after a thrilling victory over Angelo State. Leading Scorers: UCO- Lance Harper, 24; Angelo State- Ryan Bennett, 28 Leading Rebounders: UCOLance Harper, 10; Angelo State- Johnny Barnes, 12 Key Stats: Harper hit 8 of 13 shots and 8 of 9 free throws. He had 24 points and 10 rebounds. Quote: "We made some big plays in the second half and came through with a great win,"- UCO coach Terry Evans

The Bronchos shot only 40.5 percent from the field and 19 percent from three point range while committing just to turnovers. Some key players in the game for UCO were Michael Sosanya, David Thomas and Lance Harper. Harper and Thomas both had

10 rebounds a piece, and Sosanya racked up 10 points. The No. 4 Bronchos improved to 12-2 on the season before improving to 13-2 later that week.

Applications are available at U00. edui orientation and in the Campus Activities and Events Office - MSC 424. Due Mon.? Jan. 26. ,*• DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS


The Vista

Thursday, Jan. 15 2009 Page 12 ,

BASKETBA

BASKETBALL

USA TODAY poll has Lady Bronchos at No. 20

WRESTLING

Minn. StateMankato fells UCO grapplers

LII,BURN, Ga. (Jan. 13) - Central Oklahoma fell six spots in the USA TODAY/ ESPN Division II women's basketball poll that was released Tuesday, dropping from 14th to loth in the weekly rankings. The Bronchos, 10-3 on the year, dropped an 82-75 decision to Angelo State last Saturday. UCO ends a three-game homestand and opens Lone Star Conference North Division play Wednesday with a 6 p.m. contest against Texas A&MCommerce. Lone Star Conference rival West Texas A&M, which handed UCO its other loss back in December, is ranked 14th. USA TODAY/ESPN Division II Women's Basketball Poll 1.Northern Kentucky 2. Alaska-Anchorage 3. Minnesota State-Mankato 4. Hillsdale (Mich.) 5. Tusculum (Term.) 6. California (Pa.) 7. Washburn (Kan.) 8. Rollins (Fla.) 9. Emporia State (Kan.) 10. Stonehill (Ma.) 11.Fort Lewis (Colo.) 12.Indiana (Pa.) 13. Barry (Fla.) 14. West Texas A&M 15.Michigan Tech 16. Seattle Pacific (Wash.) 17.Clayton State (Ga.) 18. South Carolina-Aiken 19. Indianapolis (Ind.) 20. Central Oklahoma 21.Arkansas Tech 22. Minnesota State-Moorhead 23. District of Columbia 24. Gannon (Pa.) 25. UC-San Diego

Keith Marks plays basketball for the UCO

CEDAR FALLS, Iowa (Jan. to) -- No. 3-ranked Minnesota State-Mankato scored falls in the final three weights to break open a close match and claim a 27-14 win over No. 5 Central Oklahoma here Saturday afternoon in the quarterfinals of the NWCA/Cliff Keen Division II National Duals. Tommy McCarty's 14-9 UCO Photo Services win at 174 pounds gave the Bronchos a 14-9 lead, Bronchos on Jan. 10. but the Mavericks finished with a flourish in scoring three straight pins to claim the victory and advance to Sunday's ir a.m. quarterfinals. The Bronchos fell into a 5 p.m. consolation Evans said. "Angelo has a good team and it was a match against Pittsburghbattle, but our guys played hard and found a way to Johnstown. get the job done." UCO took an early 7-0 UCO used an 11-2 run to break away from a lead as Tim Elliott opened 68-68 tie and grab a 77-68 lead with 6:2o left to the dual with an 11-1 major play and the Bronchos were up lo (87-77) after two decision and Scott Berens Thomas free throws at the 2:33 mark. followed with a 5-o shutIt was still a seven-point cushion at 9o-83 folout, but the Mavericks lowing a Cazenave layup with just 1:26 left to play, pulled out overtime wins at but the Rams hit three long-range bombs the rest 141 and 149 before winning of the way to make it interesting. a third straight at 157 to Cazenave followed a Johnny Barnes 3-pointer move in front 9-7. with two free throws at 0:58 to keep UCO in front The Bronchos got a by six (92-86) and Thomas made one of two foul 20-8 major decision from shots at 0:31 after a Lionel Brown trey to make it 165 Mikey Morgan and 93-89. Tommy McCarty won 8-5 The Bronehos open defense of their LSC North at 174 to make it 14 -9. Division title Wednesday, hosting Texas ASEMCommerce at 8 p.m.

No. 4 Bronchos drop Angelo State Saturday at Hamilton EDMOND (Jan. io) - Lance Harper scored 18 of his team-high 24 points in the second half and No. 4-ranked Central Oklahoma hit some big free throws down the stretch to stave off Angelo State's late 3-point barrage in an exciting 96-92 triumph Saturday at Hamilton Field House. It was the 21st straight home win for the Bronchos, who overcame a six-point second-half deficit in improving to 13-2 on the season in their final Lone Star Conference crossover game. The Rams had a four-game winning streak snapped in falling to 12-3. Harper hit 8-of-13 shots and 8-of-9 free throws in his 24-point outing and he added to rebounds for his fourth double-double of the season. Eric Cazenave had 18 points while making 7-of-12 shots with two 3-pointers, while Michael Sosanya had 17 points and David Thomas 14. "We made some big plays in the second half and came through with a great win," UCO coach Terry

rUCO Men's Basketball Remaining Schedule 4 p.m., Jan. 17 - Southwestern Oklahoma State University (Weatherford, Okla.) 8 p.m., Feb. 11 - East Central University (Home) 8 p.m., Jan. 21 - East Central University (Ada, Okla.) 8 p.m., Feb. 14 - Southeastern Oklahoma State University (Durant, Okla.) 8 p.m., Jan. 24 - Southeastern Oklahoma State University (Home) 4 p.m., Feb. 21 - Cameron University (Lawton, OK) 4 p.m., Jan. 31 - Cameron University (Home) 8 p.m., Feb. 25 - Texas A&M University - Commerce (Commerce, Texas) 8 p.m., Feb. 4 - Northeastern State University (Home) 4 p.m., Feb. 28 - Southwestern Oklahoma State University (Home) 8 p.m., Feb. 7 - Northeastern State University (Durant, Okla.) March 5 - 8 - Lone Star Conference Tournament (Bartlesville, Okla.)

UNIVERSITY OF

Central Oklahoma Congratulations to our Inasmuch Foundation Living/Learning Community Academic Scholars! Adriance Denick

Edwin Jackson

Luray Bar

Mary Katheryn termady

Rebecca Moore

Amanda Martin

Ear Grimes

Katrina Watson

Meng= Smidt

Rynaa Wear

Autumn Miller

Erdoo Segher

Kelsey Stephen

Nathan photon

Manioc. Randle

On:intim Lathe

Fanny Lean Ho

rimbedy Indergand

Olivia &Mona

Shannon Hale

Donald Junin II

Hu Yids

Lim Cashew

Qin Leng

Vanessa Andrade

www.uco.ed al ea rni nprom m unities

The Vista Jan. 15, 2009  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.

The Vista Jan. 15, 2009  

The University of Central Oklahoma's student voice since 1903.