4-21-22 Villager

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VOLUME 40 • NUMBER 21 • APRIL 21, 2022

Since 1982

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One caring fifth-grader brought a healthy change to her neighborhood composting BY FREDA MIKLIN STAFF WRITER

According to the U.S. Public Interest Research Group in a report from June 2019, “Americans landfilled or incinerated over 50 million tons of compostable waste in 2015. That is enough to fill a line of fully-loaded 18-wheelers, stretching from New York City to Los Angeles ten times. The system of collecting, landfilling and incinerating waste is a costly one that contributes to global warming and creates toxic air and water pollution. Composting could reduce the amount of trash sent to landfills and incinerators in the U.S. by at least 30 percent.” It continues, “A growing number of cities, towns and states are recognizing the benefits of composting programs. In just the last five years, the number of communities offering composting programs has grown by 65 percent. By following the best practices of programs around the country, American communities can launch successful composting programs that reduce waste, contribute to a sustainable food system, help tackle global warming, and reduce harmful air and water pollution. Compost can help create a robust and sustainable agricultural system.” One day last year, Julia Lace, then a fourth-grader at Greenwood Elementary School, was visiting her aunt in Denver, where composting is a service available to residents through the city. Julia told The Villager, “I was eating a banana and my aunt told me not to throw away the peel. I learned that it helps the environment and stops pollution.” Julia, who lives in Greenwood Village, told us she “wondered why we didn’t have composting in our neighborhood,” and began researching companies that could provide the service. She found Wompost, a woman-owned company located in Aurora, and decided to contact them. That led to a meeting with Carolyn Pace, Wompost’s Continued on page 2

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“I was eating a banana and my aunt told me not to throw away the peel. I learned that it helps the environment and stops pollution.”

- Julia Lace, fifth-grader at Greenwood Elementary School

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PAGE 2 | THE VILLAGER • April 21, 2022

Continued from Page 1

founder. Julia explained that she met with Carolyn, who told her that, “in order for Wompost to start servicing a new zip code, she needed 50 customers.” Continuing, Julia said, “It was scary going up to their door,” but (along with her mother Norah), she did it. Julia said that, “Some people understood but most didn’t know what composting was. I gave them a flyer that told them what it was and how it worked. I told them that Wompost picks it up and would also bring them compost for their gardens.” She even met with her neighborhood HOA and talked to them about it, Greenwood Elementary fifthgrader Julia Lace is pictured with Wompost founder Carolyn Pace.

Photo courtesy of Norah Janosy

after which they told her they plan to pursue the idea of promoting the availability of composting. Next, she plans to meet with her school principal about getting composting at her school. Julia’s mom, Norah, told us it took about six months to get 50 new people to sign up, but Julia did it and now the service is available through Wompost to customers in the 80111 and 80121 zip codes. We reached out to Carolyn Pace, who told The Villager that, “Composting the millions of tons of mineral-rich food material that goes into landfills each year could help reverse climate change.” She explained that, “Composting

This is the three-part poster that Julia made to help her explain the importance of composting to her neighbors.

is a process that mimics what was once a natural process by which organic material naturally enriched the soil and made it increasingly fertile. Compost can enhance food nutrition, increase crop yields, strengthen plants immune systems, and increase the ability of soil to hold water. More plant growth also takes more carbon out of the atmosphere. Compost is a regenerative substance. It is an essential microbial source, a probiotic for the land. Currently, more than half of material going into landfills in the U.S. are compostable food scraps, paper, yard trimmings, and wood. Only 5% of food scraps get composted, 95% go to landfills. There it rots, creating methane gas, a greenhouse gas 86 times more potent than CO2.” Carolyn shared that Boulder, in addition to Denver, makes this service available to their residents. In Denver, residents who opt for compost-

ing, pay to receive it. Wompost, which has been around since January 2019, charges $9 per month if you drop off your compost. For $29.29 per month, they will pick up your compost weekly for a small bin or $39.39 for a larger one. If you want to skip a week for any reason, you can just let them know and you’ll get a $5 credit for any week that is skipped. Back in September 2020, as it was preparing to issue requests for proposal for a new contract for the trash and recycling service that it provides for free to over half of its residents, City of Greenwood Village staff asked the city council if it should explore including composting in the contract. Council was told that, in Denver, approximately 20% of residents, opt to get it. City Council Member Donna Johnston said, “There are so many people in my district who want an option for com-

posting,” she favored making it available in some manner. Council Member Anne Ingebretsen recommended that the city survey residents to determine if they want to have composting available and whether they want to increase recycling pick-up from biweekly to weekly. No survey was conducted, recycling bins are still picked up bi-weekly, and composting has not been offered through GV to its residents. John Jackson, GV city manager, told The Villager that there is no plan to conduct a survey of GV residents about composting, because, composting “is not being considered, at this time, as a provided service by the city.” However, GV intends to host an event sometime in the late spring or summer “to offer information and resources to citizens who are potentially interested in composting,” so that they can purchase the service themselves if they choose to do so. Wompost is just one of several local companies who provide composting service in the metro area. We wanted to know why composting has not caught on more. Carolyn told us, “We got distracted with recycling, even though composting is more beneficial for the environment. It all happens locally, stays within the state. Back in the 1970s, we created this large, confusing recycling system.” There’s also the issue that, “A lot of people think it’s stinky but it isn’t.” She added that it is part of everyday life in Europe and it was in the U.S., as well, until chemical fertilizers were created. In an article penned for The Villager last year by GV resident Bob Doyle, we found out that in 2017, the European Parliament said that, “46% of all municipal waste in the EU is recycled or composted.” fmiklin.villager@gmail.com


Police/Crime

April 21, 2022 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 3

Sheriff to swear in new therapy puppy ‘Zeke’

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wo canine siblings are now serving as therapy dogs for Littleton Public Schools. Zeke, a 4-month-old black Labrador Retriever is the sibling of Rex, our school therapy dog who is a year old. The two dogs have the same parents (dam & sire), but Zeke comes from a different litter. The pup is the newest member of the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office and will be officially sworn in by Sheriff Tyler Brown. Zeke and his handler, School Resource Officer Deputy Travis Jones, are assigned to Newton Middle School in Littleton. The pair will work with all students, including those with special

GV police issued arrest warrant for auto theft - suspect arrested in Aurora

In March 2022, the Greenwood Village Police Department investigated several vehicle trespasses and an auto theft in Greenwood Village’s Coral Place neighborhood. One of the suspects was seen on surveillance cameras wearing a uniquely bright hoodie type jacket. The suspects later eluded GVPD officers in the stolen vehicle, damaging several other cars on Interstate 25 as they fled. On April 12, 2022, a GVPD arrest warrant was issued through the Arapahoe County combined courts for twenty-six-year-old Timothy Raider Mundell, charging him with multiple crimes stemming from this investigation. Mundell was arrested in Aurora without incident on April 14, 2022, after a cooperative fugitive apprehension operation between GVPD detectives and the FBI Rocky Mountain Safe Streets Task Force. Mundell was jailed in the Arapahoe County Detention Facility on the Greenwood Village arrest warrant and numerous other arrest warrants for similar crimes in the metro-Denver area.

needs. The dog will also help comfort students in crisis or times of stress and help those who suffer from anxiety or depression. “I’m excited to be a part of the SRO Therapy Dog K9 Program. Over the past year, I’ve had the opportunity to spend significant time with Rex, and I’ve seen the amazing and positive work he does. I look forward to working with Zeke in this same program and building on the foundation Rex has created,” says Deputy Travis Jones. Over the next year, Zeke will train in basic obedience, then he’ll attend an American Kennel Club (A.K.C.) good citizen and intensive class to become a therapy dog. “The program we implemented a

year ago with Rex at Littleton Public Schools has proven to be a huge success and we’re so proud of the partnership we created with the LPS School District,” says Sheriff Tyler Brown. “I have no doubt the kids at Newton will love Zeke and he’ll touch lives in a very positive way.” Deputy Jones has been with the sheriff’s office for 13 years and assigned to the SRO unit for 2 years. He also teaches classes on internet safety, social media, peer pressure, bullying, interpersonal conflict and the dangers of drugs. He’s looking forward to incorporating Zeke into many new and exciting programs for LPS schools.

ARAPAHOE COUNTY C NVERSATIONS

C NVERSATIONS

Get to know your County commissioner! In May, our Conversations with a Commissioner events return to in-person gatherings! Learn more about our latest efforts to address homelessness and provide feedback to your district commissioner about all County business. Featuring special guest Kathy Smith, director of Arapahoe County Community Resources. All events are from 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m., and refreshments will be provided. Visit arapahoegov.com/townhall for full details. • • • • •

Thursday, May 5, Carrie Warren-Gully (District 1), Malley Rec Center, Englewood Wednesday, May 11, Jeff Baker (District 3), Byers American Legion Hall Thursday, May 12, Bill Holen (District 5), Aurora Public Library, Central branch Thursday, May 19, Nancy Sharpe (District 2), Greenwood Village City Hall Thursday, May 26, Nancy Jackson (District 4), Mission Viejo Library, Aurora

arapahoegov.com

Visit arapahoegov.com/osmasterplan to read the DIVE summary report.


PAGE 4 | THE VILLAGER • April 21, 2022

The Villager

,

Let the games begin/Start your engines The Ukrainian invasion weighs heavily on Americans at this time in history. It is hard to stop writing about the situation. This past week, one bright spot was when two Ukrainian Neptune missiles sank the Russian Black Sea flagship “Moskva,” named after the historic city. There is a famous song, Moonlight over Moscow a music staple of that city. Russia is warning the United States about sending sophisticated weapons to Ukraine; those missiles and the technology of how to strike a Russian warship in the Black Sea sounds like Americans may be stepping up to the plate. It will be a world tragedy if NATO and the UN allow Kyiv, a beautify, historic city, to be destroyed. We will be featuring a story of a young Ukrainian woman who comes from a Ukraine dairy farm asking for financial help for that state’s dairy industry. She relates that they may have to slaughter the dairy herds if the war continues. *** Kudos to readers if you made it through the trilogy of the GOP state assembly held in Colorado Springs last Saturday. As a follow-up, last week Ron Hanks was criticizing State GOP chair Kristi Burton Brown on not giving a platform to the group that attempted to change the assembly rules to cast paper ballots rather than the electronic hand-held devices distributed to delegates by their county chairmen. By late afternoon the 3700 delegates were languishing through the eight GOP governor nomi-

nations and speeches. Still to go in the late afternoon was the highlight of the day with six nominations and speeches by U.S. Senate candidates. To change the rules and go to paper ballots would take a two-thirds vote. Brown called a vote with the rule change motion failing. But, the ballot proponents came back two more times with paper ballot demands. She wisely, and bravely, stood her ground as assembly chair, ruling them out of order. The electronic devices worked extremely well, showing the voting numbers on the screen counting as delegates voted to the number of allocated delegates voting. The votes were tabulated accurately in minutes, not days. Brown responded to Hank’s criticisms saying that he should be happy as he was the only survivor of the electronic balloting, attaining slightly over the necessary 30 percent vote count to make the primary ballot June 28. Bottom line, some Republicans are questioning electronic voting devices that created such a stir in the 2020 election. Paper ballots would have been a nightmare in timely distribution and counting procedures. The assembly rule change motion would have derailed the entire voting process that was concluded by late Saturday afternoon. In case you are wondering about the wording of a state assembly versus a state convention. State political conventions are only held on presidential election years when delegates attend the state convention and elect delegates to the national presidential conventions. Assemblies are always on the non-pres-

idential election years.

*** GOP Legislator, Ron Hanks, will face Denver construction company owner, Joe O’Dea, in the June primary election. The winner will face incumbent U.S. Senator Michael Bennet, according to recent media reports he already has a war chest of over $6 million dollars. O’Dea petitioned onto the ballot. Otherwise Hanks would have been unchallenged for the Nov. 8 general election ballot. Former United States Senator Hank Brown has endorsed O’Dea for the senate nomination. *** I have a story about Bennet whom I’ve known since he was Denver School Superintendent. Bennet is now finishing his sixth year as Colorado’s senior senator. It was during the winter, prior to his election to the Senate, that we had a serious winter snowstorm that dumped two feet of snow on the metro area. I was fortunate to be driving an all-wheel drive SUV that could plow through the snow. I was the only person able to deliver newspapers to the post office and vending machines that day. I came up the alley behind the Denver Public school administration building and in the alley was a BMW with three men attempting to push the stranded “Beamer” through the several feet of deep snow. It was an impossible task, and the car was mired in the deep wet snow. One of the vehicle pushers was then Supt. Bennet. He was wearing leather loafers , no hat or gloves, and looking very cold and distressed. We were able to push the stalled car back

out of the alley into the parking lot, and I told Michael,“Jump in, I’ll take you home.” We plowed through the deep snow, and unplowed roads, trekking to the school leader’s home, somewhere in the Washington Park area to his circle drive front door. He was forever grateful for my rescue and whenever I see the Senator we laugh about that experience. Bennet, Hanks, or O’Dea, only one will be the next United Senator joining Senator Hickenlooper in Washington D.C. next January. Along with the Senate race, voters will have to choose eight congressional leaders this year, with one new 8th district due to population gains. There will be hardfought races in all the redrawn Congressional Districts. Along with the national races there are three candidates still standing for governor, Democrat incumbent Jerald Polis; top assembly GOP vote receiver Greg Lopez, former Mayor of Parker, and Trump administration appointee; and Heidi Ganahl, the only statewide elected Republican office holder who has served as a University of Colorado Regent. Regarding the June 28th primary, registered Democrats will received Democratic primary ballots. Registered Republicans will receive Republican primary ballots. Unaffiliated voters will receive both the Democratic and Republican primary ballots and can vote either one, but not both. Casting that vote will not impact the unafiliated status. This is because of Proposition 108 passed by voters in 2016. Let the games begin!

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Reverend Martin Niemoller “In Germany, the Nazis first came for the communists and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a communist. Then they came for the Jews and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics and I didn’t speak up because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me and by that time there was no one left to speak for me!”

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Opinion

April 21, 2022 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 5

Relationship challenges and celebrations I love holidays, especially delighting in Easter as the start of Spring, warmer weather, greener lawns and more outside events. I love the tradition of the Easter egg hunt, dressing up in pastels, going to church and celebrating new life in both religious and secular dimensions. What stresses me out is the potential of emotional and logistical strain wrapped up with holidays. Blended families, even with adult children with children of their own, can be stressful. Will everyone get along? Will the older grandchildren, on my husband’s side, enjoy

the Easter egg hunt as much as the younger grands on my side? Where will people sit for dinner? Should the older children sit at the children’s table? Should we feed them first so they can play while the adults enjoy their dinner? Even for the most happily married couples, the holidays can be complicated and fraught with conflict and compromise. It is exponentially more tangled for parents and grandparents who are trying to walk the tightrope of pleasing all and making memories in a blended family. What we will do this year is plan well. The food will

be plentiful, and there will be items that both children and adults enjoy. We will set several tables so individuals, families, siblings, cousins and stepchildren could arrange where they want to sit after going through the abundance of choices on the buffet. We will host the Easter egg hunt with the littles and a treasure hunt for the older ones. The older kids will be paired with a younger partner from their stepcousins so they could compete together. There will be prizes for all. Since there is a diversity of thought and even some animas regarding politics or religious traditions, we will make a pact to keep these types of

LETTERS

A charging station is not $30,000 to $100,000 The statement from Evelyn Lim about the cost of a charging station in my case is totally untrue. I got a

SUBMITTED BY PERI SILVERMAN

Has anyone seen the latest Tik Tok trend where you list all of your top three favorite things in each category? Each user has taken their own spin and decided on their own classes, so I thought I’d give it a go! The first category is workouts. Coming in #3 is SoulCycle. The closest one to my house is the location in Cherry Creek. My favorite teacher is V- she always plays the best music. #2 is the Summits 60 at Sumits Yoga. Nothing better than a good sweat. Rounding out the first category is Barry’s Bootcamp. The only location in Colorado is in Cherry Creek, and the parking isn’t ideal, but the workout makes up for it! It’s a circuit class. In 50 minutes, you run, do abs, use weights, and get an entire body and cardio workout. I am not a natural runner, but this class has been so helpful in boosting my cardio. Next is online shopping. I feel like I have a lot of knowledge in this area due to my shopping addiction. To start off, #3 is Zara. This website is so hard to navigate, but the clothes are so cute once you get the hang of it! The second is Princess Polly. They always have a sale, and they ship in four days or less. It’s so consistent! My favorite online store is Revolve. While things are definitely on the more expensive side, it’s worth it. You can find anything from a prom dress to a workout set all in one place. Everyone has their favorite apps, so here are mine! #3 is obvious, but I love Instagram. Say what you want about so-

discussions either limited or off limits. We need to try to maintain relationships, rather than being right. One of the strategies to keep stress low and connection high is to not be offended or sensitive about inartful or harsh comments that could be misinterpreted. We must try remembering that there is no guile in anyone, and we should seek to be graceful and forgiving with one another. We will expect everyone to act with emotional restraint, maturity and kindness making the time together peaceful and calm. We will continue to try new ways to connect with our growing blended family working hard to make them memorable,

even magical, with so many moving parts. Divorce is never easy; the ensuing challenges afterward continue long after the breakup. When remarriage occurs, life gets complicated when there are children on both sides. Add to that, spouses of adult children and grandchildren on each side. Creating a new tribe and developing new rules, traditions and memories is challenging. The tribe we created is a delight, filled with diversity, grace and patience. This did not happen by chance. It was done with love, kindness and intention. Every holiday I am thankful for the foundation that has been built to create our new family. Happy Spring! joneen@myrelationship center.org

charging “station” [part] with my new Nissan LEAF, and all I had to do was wire it up, which I know how to do since I’m an apprentice electrician with Habitat.

I have no idea what she’s thinking of that would cost $30,000 to $100,000. Larry McLaughlin Aurora

Policy for letters to the editor

The Villager encourages letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words and are subject to editing for length, clarity and libel. Priority will be given to submissions about the newspaper’s content and/or issues of community concern. A phone number, not for publication, should be included for verification purposes. Letters must be emailed to gerri@villagerpublishing.com. Please include city of residence. The contributor’s name, hometown and phone number must accompany all letters to the editor for verification and we reserve the right to edit contributions for space. We attempt to verify all matters of fact but hold contributors liable for the content, accuracy and fairness of their contributions. Letters deadline 10 am Monday. Please limit to 300 words.

cial media- but I find it fun to share my whereabouts with my friends. My second favorite app right now is Dispo. This is my favorite picture-taking app. You snap your flick and let it “develop,” It comes out the following day looking like a picture straight from a film camera. My top app is trending right now- it’s new! BeReal is such a fun way to share with your friends. It sends you a notification saying you have two minutes to snap what you’re doing and post it to your feed every day. The best part about this new trend is that it never has to end! I could list TV shows, beauty products, and anything else all day, and I have a feeling this won’t be the last article about my top three’s. silvermanperi@gmail.com

Submit your letters by email to: gerri@villagerpublishing.com 303-773-8313

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PAGE 6 | THE VILLAGER • April 21, 2022

Redstone Bank; Stronger than ever… “The last two years have brought challenges to the banking industry I have not seen in my 40 years of banking” said Ryan Johnson, Redstone President. “We certainly did not plan to open a bank when the businesses around us were closing.” “Our timing was not what we had hoped for” said Stefan Katsampes, Littleton Branch Manager. “The pandemic closed many businesses two weeks after our Grand Opening. We provided full service to our current customers while helping many local businesses survive the shut-down by processing more than 125 PPP (Paycheck Protection Program) loans.” Due to the work of the entire team, Redstone Bank was just named the 2021; Emerging SBA Lender of the Year from B:Side Capital, a mission-based non-profit small business lender. Redstone Bank was founded in 2008 by a group of local business owners and investors who banded together to open a Community Bank for personal and business needs. The first branch was opened in Centennial at the intersection of Arapahoe and Parker Road. Redstone Bank was excited to open its second location in downtown Littleton, February of 2020, and plans to open a third location in Parker in 2023. “We are excited to be in downtown Littleton, everyone

has been very welcoming” said Katsampes. “We have created a Community Advisory Board that will help us identify and support underserved individuals

and businesses in our community.” Redstone sponsored Western Welcome Week in 2021 and is hoping to be more involved this year with Commu-

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April 21, 2022 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 7

Fort Logan – Final Roll Call April 14 “Never again will one generation of veterans abandon another”

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n Thursday, April 14 the Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 1071 held a Final Roll Call and Honors Committal Program at Fort Logan National Cemetery. The beautiful and deeply moving ceremony recognized seven men who had served in the military services of our country. Their cremains had been abandoned and never claimed by family members or friends. The ceremony gave final closure to these men as they were interred at Fort Logan. The men honored were: · PFC Harvey Thomas Taylor, US Army – World War II · CPL Allen Stephan Bralley, US Army – Korean War · 2nd Lt. Charles Franklin Lowell, US Army – Korean War · AA Jerry Burton Blodgett, US Navy – Vietnam War · PVT William Dobraninch, US Marines – Peacetime · SPEC 4 John Larry Schulte, US Army – Unknown service · SPEC 4 Anthony Troutner, US Army – Unknown service The Honor Guard of the VVA received from the hearse the wooden box containing each man’s remains, together with a folded American flag. The remains were then taken inside the shelter with all guests standing at attention and rendering salutes to the heroes. The guests were welcomed by Stan Paprocki, the VVA President and then Cliff Fejfar shared an invocation and led the group in the Pledge of Allegiance. Col. Bill Bleau spoke briefly of the challenges faced by returning veterans, particularly those who have seen the horrors of combat duty. The final roll call for each of the men was conducted by VVA members Jeff Fossum and Ted Hildebrand, followed by Taps performed by Ms. Robin Braun. The ceremony closed with a benediction by VVA Chaplain Randy Ziemer. The commemoration was made possible through the efforts of Fort Logan National Cemetery, Aspen Mortuary, Colorado Woodworkers’ Guild, Colorado Patriot Guard Riders and the Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 1071.

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PAGE 8 | THE VILLAGER • April 21, 2022

BE INFORMED

Vote with confidence GOP primary for U.S. Senate gives voters something to think about BY FREDA MIKLIN GOVERNMENTAL REPORTER

When the dust settled on April 9, Colorado’s crowded GOP field with seven people vying for the chance to challenge incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Michael Bennet on November 8 had been whittled down to two men, Ron Hanks and Joe O’Dea. On his website, O’Dea, a Greenwood Village resident, is described as the CEO of a 30-year-old Colorado construction company that he started from nothing and now employs more than 300 people. It says that O’Dea is “a political outsider who supports term limits and a balanced budget, opposes higher taxes, and is a conservative.” The website also states that O’Dea has been endorsed by former U.S. Senator Hank Brown, rural state Senators Jerry Sonenberg from Sterling and Ray Scott from Grand Junction, and “the largest association of police officers in Colorado, who called him a man of guts and integrity.” In a meet-and-greet event at Tap and Burger in Denver’s Belleview Station on April 18, O’Dea talked about the importance of returning this country to energy independence. The Villager asked O’Dea how he would accomplish that. He said, “Turn on the spigots. Let’s approve federal permits so that we can get Colorado gas out of our ground again. Let’s get our oil going in Weld County again. Let’s get big government out of the way.” We asked, “What about the policy of moving away from fossil fuels due to the impact of greenhouse gases on the environment?” O’Dea told us, “We need to do it smart. That means you can’t turn one off before the other one is ready to take over. You can’t cut off the supply until you’ve got something to replace it with. We don’t have an electrical grid right now or enough electric cars to make a difference. We need to pace ourselves… Look at what China is doing overseas, where they don’t have regulations like we do.” (In the April 14 issue of The Villager, we reported on the significant negative impact on the environment from building projects around the

State Rep. Ron Hank was nominated for the GOP primary for U.S. Senate by the delegates to the Republican State Assembly.

world that China is doing using fossil fuels.) First-term State Rep. Ron Hanks is a “social and fiscal conservative” from Cañon City, and “retired from the U.S. Air Force at the end of 2017 after more than 32 years of active and reserve service, (having) served as an intelligence officer, performing duties in Iraq, Kuwait, and United Arab Emirates.” On his website, it says that he attended the rally held by President Trump on January 6, 2021 and afterward walked down to the Capitol, but there is no indication anyplace that he entered or attempted to enter the Capitol building that day. In a video about his position on current issues, Hanks can be heard saying, “I don’t want to sit here and pretend that climate change is a real issue. It’s called weather.” The website goes on to say that, “We still have enough coal, oil and gas supplies under our feet to meet our production and transportation needs for hundreds of years. If we extracted it, we could restore American manufacturing.” Hanks’ campaign website does not list endorsements. At the GOP state assembly held in Colorado Springs on April 9, Hanks said, “I fully expected Donald Trump to win in 2020, and he did. When we saw what we saw on election night in 2020, it changed everything. Just like the changes we felt after 9/11.” That speech won Hanks the support of 39% of the 3,772 registered assembly delegates who were there on April 9, simultaneously

Construction company owner Joe O’Dea was nominated for the GOP primary for U.S. Senate by getting signatures on petitions from over 12,000 Colorado residents from all areas of the state.

eliminating the rest of the field except for O’Dea, because none of the other five candidates hit the 30% mark necessary to move on to the primary. Deborah Flora got 29%, but that didn’t matter. It wasn’t enough to place her name on the GOP Senate primary ballot. O’Dea is on the primary ballot because he earned his spot by submitting petitions containing at least 1,500 valid signatures from registered Republicans in each of Colorado’s eight congressional districts, the alternative to the state assembly. In a Republican Senate candidate forum in Weld County on February 3, when the moderator asked all the participants if the 2020 election was “stolen from President Trump,” O’Dea said he did “not believe the election was stolen.” Hanks went further than agreeing that the election was stolen, adding that, “Former Vice President Mike Pence “had options,” and that he could have used them on January 6, 2021 when the election was certified. When we spoke with O’Dea at the April 18 meetand-greet event, we asked him how he planned to win the GOP primary. He said, “I’m going to stick to the issues of high gas prices, high inflation, and the fact that it costs $100 more to heat your home.” How does he compare to his opponent, Rep. Hanks, we wanted to know? O’Dea told us, “I haven’t heard him say anything about those issues. He’s busy talking about what happened

When we spoke with O’Dea at the April 18 meet-andgreet event, we asked him how he planned to win the GOP primary. He said,“I’m going to stick to the issues of high gas prices, high inflation, and the fact that it costs $100 more to heat your home.” How does he compare to his opponent, Rep. Hanks, we wanted to know? O’Dea told us,“I haven’t heard him say anything about those issues. He’s busy talking about what happened in 2020 and I’m moving forward. That’s what our electorate wants. I want to win and that’s how we’re going to do it. I’m not looking back.”

in 2020 and I’m moving forward. That’s what our electorate wants. I want to win and that’s how we’re going to

do it. I’m not looking back.” Dick Wadhams, who was twice elected chair of the Colorado Republican Party in 2007 and 2009, is now a highly regarded GOP political consultant. In an editorial he penned on March 27, he said, “I voted twice for Donald Trump…I strongly support Trump’s achievements…But Trump’s pathological inability to accept defeat and his obsession with the conspiracy theory that the 2020 presidential election was stolen, imperils Colorado Republican candidates at every level in 2022.” He went on to point out that, “Colorado’s electorate is now 43% unaffiliated, 29% Democratic and 26% Republican,” adding that in 2020, Trump “lost the big suburban metro counties of Arapahoe and Jefferson by 60 – 40 margins where a Republican must be competitive to win statewide,” and, when the totals were counted, “Trump lost to Clinton in Colorado by four points in 2016 and he lost to Biden by 14 points in 2020.” Based on Hanks continued support of the “Big Lie” that Trump won and the election was stolen from him, Wadhams concluded that, “If Colorado Republicans nominate State Rep. Ron Hanks…Bennet will be inevitably headed to a third term.” On April 14, after Hanks had officially ascended as one of only two GOP primary candidates for the Senate, Wadhams penned a commentary in the Denver Post that characterized the possibility of Hanks winning the GOP nomination for U.S. Senate (along with Weld County Clerk Tina Peters, who is under criminal indictment, winning the GOP nomination for Secretary of State) as creating, “The threat of Colorado Republicans indefinitely becoming an impotent and irrelevant political party.” The GOP primary will be held on June 28. Along with the state’s 956,734 active Republican voters, Colorado’s 1,669,365 unaffiliated active voters, will have the opportunity to weigh in on who the Republicans will nominate to challenge Bennet. (Voter registration numbers are as of April 1, 2022, no fooling.) fmiklin.villager@gmail.com


April 21, 2022 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 9

BE INFORMED Vote with confidence

South Suburban board candidates answer questions

O

BY FREDA MIKLIN GOVERNMENTAL REPORTER

n April 9, the League of Women Voters sponsored a forum for residents and property owners in the South Suburban Parks and Recreation District (SSPRD) to have a chance to hear the eight candidates (there were originally nine, but one candidate, Kate Arkin, withdrew from the race) for the three board seats up for election on May 3. SSPRD residents can vote in person at the Goodson Recreation Center at 6315 S. University Boulevard in Centennial or the Sports Complex at 4810 E. County Line Road in Douglas County between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. They can also vote by requesting a ballot by calling Jennifer King at 303-4837011or by emailing elections@ ssprd.org by April 26 for an application for an absentee ballot. Maureen Whalen appeared on behalf of candidate Alexis Barrere, who was out of the state. She said that Alexis is running to make SSPRD, “truly cutting edge and innovative,” be good stewards of the district’s land and facilities, and fulfill the goals of the 2017 master plan “in a financially and environmentally sustainable way.” Whalen was not permitted to answer the questions put to board candidates during the forum. Pete Barrett, running for re-election, said he has been involved with SSPRD since 1971 and has raised over $200,000 for the district. Michael Kohut, a new candidate, said he is running to get a bridge built across the canal in his neighborhood. Dave Lawful, running for re-election, said that, since he was elected three years ago, “through engagement with fellow board members, professional staff, district residents and local leaders…we have delivered this beautiful new facility (the Sports Complex), replaced three aging swimming pools, been accredited by CAPRA (Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies) for our best practices…while maintaining robust financials in the face of a global pandemic.” John Priddy said he is running, “to preserve, maintain and build upon the facilities and programs of the district.” Susan Pye, running for re-election and current board chair, said that when the pandemic hit, “the board and the staff came together…when everything could have fallen

apart… We focused on healthy living through stewardship of our environment, parks, trails, open space, providing amazing recreation services and programs. Experience matters.” Kathy Turley, running on her experience as a former Centennial City Council member and Mayor Pro Tem who served as liaison to SSPRD from Centennial, Alexis Barrerre said she is most con-

John Priddy

Susan K. Pye

cerned about sustainability and fiscal responsibility. Elizabeth Watson “is running to appreciate the in-district taxpaying community.” She vowed to “inform, involve and respect the input that we received from the community,” if elected. Some districts, including South Metro Fire Rescue, which has over 500,000 residents, automatically mail ballots for board of directors’ elections to all eligible voters. SSPRD does not. In each of the past three elections for the SSPRD board of directors, less than 10% of the district’s 157,000 eligible voters cast ballots. All the candidates were asked why SSPRD does not mail ballots to all eligible voters. Watson said she didn’t know, but she feels that they should do so. Barrett said that it would be “extremely expensive,” and that there is “adequate opportunity for those most interested” to vote. Kohut said, “It’s expensive, and I don’t know if I’d want to go that route, but if it could be put into the budget, I would go along with it.” Lawful said it would cost, “Half a million dollars,” to do so, thus it would be, “cost prohibitive,” and he believes it is better to encourage people to get on the absentee voter list. Priddy said that only 1,900 of the 157,000 residents in SSPRD (that is 1.2%) are on the permanent absentee ballot list (meaning they do automatically receive a ballot in the mail), adding, “Yes, it’s cost prohibitive, but there’s got to be a better way to demonstrate more citizen

Pete Barrett

Michael G. Kohut

Kathleen Turley

engagement.” Pye said that the majority of the people who vote in SSPRD elections are 73 years of age or older. Sending ballots to everyone would not be “a good budget decision,” but she believed that, “There probably is a better way for us to get younger voters to understand the importance of the services that we provide at SSPRD and the opportunities that are here for everyone of all ages.” Turley “would support a line item to encourage people to get more involved and vote for their board of directors.” The three incumbents were asked how they would improve SSPRD. Lawful said he would like to get more public input for the new five-year strategic plan currently under development. Pye would make sure SSPRD always had a balanced budget. Barrett said, “The district has done a wonderful job of completing the 2017 strategic plan…The new five-year strategic plan is going to be aspirational.” The five new candidates were asked what they would do differently as a board member than the three incumbents. Kohut said, “I’d be working with the staff, getting involved in projects.” Priddy agreed with Lawful that he would get district residents’ input for the new strategic plan. Turley would talk to the incumbents to learn about SSPRD and get to know the staff. Watson would increase the distribution of e-newsletters and start a volunteer ethics review committee to address any questions about contracts and improve public outreach. Asked to name three things

Elizabeth Watson

SSPRD can or should do to address climate change, Barrett said that SSPRD is already: 1) increasing the use of non-potable water, 2) having sprinkler systems that shut down automatically if it rains; 3) evaluating the environmental impact of all projects. Kohut said SSPRD is doing an excellent job already and he would not change anything. Lawful said SSPRD 1) has been replacing aged irrigation systems; 2) is replacing old lighting with energy-efficient lights; 3) has a solar energy system that could be expanded; 4) is replacing gasoline-powered vehicles with electric ones; 5) is building structures that are more energy-efficient, including two new sports domes. Priddy agreed with prior speakers, commending SSPRD with making good decisions for sustainability. Pye pointed to the successful efforts of the current board on energy and water use. Turley pointed to the new Sports Complex as a good example of SSPRD’s efforts on sustainability. Watson said that more solar and wind-powered energy could have been used at the new Sports Complex. Asked if mitigation is necessary in any of SSPRD’s open spaces to prevent disasters like the recent Marshall fire, Kohut said, “We need to clean the canal.” Lawful said, “It’s physically impossible, with current technology, to stop a fire in 100-mile winds, but (we should) understand the conditions in our open spaces…and monitor them…to catch any fire that occurs early.” Priddy said he would find experts in fire mitigation and make sure

David Lawful

SSPRD staff is engaged with them. Pye said SSPRD “has processes in place to plan for progress after a fire,” counting on area residents to notify the fire department should one occur. Turley said that the High Line Canal Conservancy has a program to keep the canal clean. As to mitigation, she said, “I like what you (SSPRD) have in place already.” Watson would start a volunteer fire mitigation committee of residents. Barrett said, “SSPRD currently has staff that is participating at ever level to determine processes and procedures to fight fires in open spaces.” To a question about how the SSPRD board could be more approachable and transparent to the public, Priddy said it starts with the people who use SSPRD facilities. He suggested that the board concentrate on the disparate lived experiences of residents. Pye reminded listeners that the board’s semi-monthly meetings are open and residents can always speak there, adding that board members are always available and attend community events in the district. Turley said SSPRD could put more information in local newspapers and increase its use of social media. Watson said that all board meetings should be broadcast online and in SSPRD rec centers. She would also increase the ability of residents to sign up for email blasts. Barrett said that SSPRD’s “current communications are exceptional.” Kohut said that “the board has to get out there and find out how people are feeling.” Lawful said that SSPRD has become more communicative during the past four years and he would like to see it continue, adding that he uses SSPRD facilities at least twice weekly and talks to others who are there. To see and hear the entire two-hour video recording of the forum, go to: https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=MIDFu5RqQP4. fmiklin.villager@gmail.com


PAGE 10 | THE VILLAGER • April 21, 2022

R

Arapahoe Road bridge reconstruction: Traffic switch starting April 14

econstruction of the bridge on Arapahoe Road, east of University Boulevard is underway. Road closures are expected during the project. Work hours are 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. One lane of traffic will be maintained in each di-

rection during construction. Please pay attention while driving in the work zone and never drive distracted. All construction activities are weather-dependent and subject to change for the safety of crews and the traveling public.

Upcoming Construction Impacts

Starting April 14 traffic will be shifted to a new lane configuration to accommodate the next phase of construction. One lane will be provided in each direction for the duration of the next

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phase which will continue bridge demolition and begin construction of the new bridge. Restricting traffic to one lane in each direction will provide additional room for construction activity and an additional buffer between the traveling public and construction equipment, increasing safety for crews and commuters alike. This phase of construction is expected to last through August, 2022. Detour routes on University Boulevard and Dry Creek Road are highly encouraged.

Project Summary

The existing bridge over Big Dry Creek was built in 1945 and is past its useful life. This reconstruction project will:

Replace the existing bridge with a wider and taller structure

Improve pedestrian access over and around the bridge Make improvements to

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the Big Dry Creek drainage and waterway system Road closures are expected during the project. Prior to any closures an announcement will be sent to advise the public of alternate travel routes. People living in the nearby neighborhoods will still be able to get to their homes. Learn more about the Arapahoe Bridge over Big Dry Creek Replacement Project by visiting the project page at centennialco. gov/arapahoebridge. To stay informed about this project either sign up for our project announcements here, or follow us on social media @ CentennialGov. • Updates: centennialco. gov/arapahoebridge • Facebook: https://www. facebook.com/Centennial Gov • Twitter: https://twitter. com/CentennialGov • Hotline: 720-758-8298 • Construction Team (Benesch): Ryan Garringer, PE Construction Engineer rgarringer@benesch.com

Supreme Court selects Bryon Large as new Presiding Disciplinary Judge The Colorado Supreme Court announced it has appointed 17th Judicial District Magistrate Bryon Large to the position of Presiding Disciplinary Judge. Magistrate Large will replace the Hon. William R. Lucero, who is retiring. The vacancy will occur on May 31, 2022. A sixth-generation Coloradan, Magistrate Large earned his undergraduate degree at the University of New Mexico and his law degree at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law. Since August 2020, he has served as a magistrate in

LETTERS

Rich Sokol for South Metro Fire Rescue Board

As a person who has always tried to believe the best about our public officials, regardless of their party, the past few years have been especially difficult for me. Locally, I have come to know an individual who has the caliber and integrity of a top-flight leader. He is Rich Sokol, candidate for the South Metro Fire Rescue (SMFR) Board. Rich Sokol above all else, aims to keep our communities safe. The brave men and women of the SMFR District respond to over 45,000 fire and medical emergency calls each year. The costs of maintaining such fast-response, well-trained personnel forces is in the tens of millions of dollars. Rich Sokol will work tirelessly, scouring the SMFR budget and analyzing every operation of our fire district. He will find efficient and creative new ways to wisely manage our resources so

Adams County, where he presides over domestic relations cases. Before that, he served for four years as Assistant Regulation Counsel in the Office of Attorney Regulation Counsel, where he was responsible for investigating and prosecuting attorney discipline cases. He was in private practice from 2007 to 2014, handling a variety of immigration cases. The Presiding Disciplinary Judge presides over attorney discipline, attorney disability, unauthorized practice of law and certain bar admissions cases.

that we will never have to sacrifice the world-class protection we receive for our lives and property. Rich Sokol’s background as a healthcare entrepreneur, successful investment analyst and CFO, with a BA from Yale and an MBA from Harvard Business School, taught him the unique know-how to ensure smart financial planning for the South Metro Fire District. Rich has earned recognition for his ability to run organizations, analyze budgets and determine the well-run companies. He currently is a successful local businessman and active community leader. There are two simple qualities that I care about and trust to find in the people I elect- care for the preservation of our communities, and the knowledge and ability to do it. Rich Sokol has proven he has both! His election to the South Metro Fire Rescue Board will ensure good government. Edie Marks Englewood


WHAT’S HAPPENING?

April 21, 2022 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 11

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PAGE 14 | THE VILLAGER • April 21, 2022

How Should We Teach Race? How the critical race theory debate reached CCSD BY CARLY PHILPOTT Editor-in-Chief

T

he United States has a long, complicated history with race. For centuries, racially-motivated divisions have sowed hatred, fear, and violence. And as America faces yet another racial reckoning, schools have become the center of complex debates about how we discuss race. You may have heard of critical race theory, a method of studying history that looks through the lens of how racial prejudices have shaped the nation. Critical race theory, or CRT, isn’t that new – it was created in the 1980s as a grad-school level way of thinking and learning, according to a New York Times article by Jacey Fortin. But it’s become a center of controversy more recently. Dr. Jennifer Koshatka Seman, who teaches American and Latin American history at Metropolitan State University of Denver, as well as graduate courses for K-12 teachers who want to expand their expertise in social studies, said that for many teachers, controversies and legislation surrounding curriculum have made it harder to teach. “This depends, of course, on which state you’re in,” Seman said, “and what school district and the kind of backlash you get. Obviously, in places like Texas [and] Oklahoma, some teachers are rightfully scared.” Some Creek teachers, especially in the English and

social studies departments, have often used pieces of literature, depending on the class, to introduce difficult conversations about race. “I used to, but I won’t anymore,” one English teacher, who preferred to remain anonymous, said of discussing race in their curriculum. “I’ve had a parent question my entire curriculum before, so once this controversy started, I opted to stay out of conversations involving race as much as possible. This is disappointing because I feel like our classes can be safe spaces for students to explore their thoughts and feelings about difficult topics as they navigate their way to adulthood.” But part of the problem with the critical race theory debate is the general misunderstanding, from all sides, of what CRT actually is. “I think there is a huge difference in teaching kids ‘Critical Race Theory’ and ‘understanding the world around us,’ and unfortunately the two are getting confused,” English teacher Jenna Chapman said. “Exposing ourselves to others and their lived experiences allows us to understand perspectives other than our own. This exercise helps us develop as empathetic people and allows us to better connect as humans.” The History The debate around teaching race history has been going on longer than you might think, although it hasn’t always taken the same name. In fact, almost directly after the Civil War ended, there were already

United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) formed

Civil War ends

170

W. E. B. DuBois, a Black scholar, attacks the Dunning School in a book called “Black Reconstruction”

The Dunning School originates, a scholarly interpretation that enshrines the “Lost Cause” narrative in American history

conflicts over how to teach race in schools. Immediately, there were people, primarily in the South, who tried to cover up some of the atrocities that had occurred. “After the Civil War was fought, and slavery was overturned legally, there was this period of Reconstruction,” Seman said. “And in the South, those that were resentful of that, and those that thought that the war was unjust and their society was ‘taken’ from them, began to promote this alternative idea of the past, this ‘Lost Cause’ mythology.” The Lost Cause of the Confederacy, or just Lost Cause, refers to a widely spread myth that the Confederacy’s motivations were heroic and not simply centered around slavery. Tracy Thompson, writing for Salon, calls the Lost Cause ideology “a vigorous, sustained effort by Southerners to literally rewrite history.” The narrative was pushed by organizations such as the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which is an organization founded by female descendants of Confederates. The main problem with this narrative, and the subsequent propaganda surrounding it, is how intentionally misleading it is. Often, you will hear the argument that the Civil War was instigated over states’ rights. But, according to most historians, every other motivating factor in the Civil War boils down to one thing: slavery. Thompson describes it like this: even as the South claimed its motivations were financial or a matter of states’ rights, “there was never any doubt that the bilProfessor Kimberlé Crenshaw organizes a scholarly workshop that first articulates the principles of CRT

First African American studies department is founded at San Francisco State University

$20 Published Quarterly

Continued on page 14


April 21, 2022 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 15

Continued from page 14

lions of dollars in property represented by the South’s said. roughly four million slaves was somehow at the root Legislation was recently passed in Colorado to inof everything.” But despite this, the UDC and oth- clude more conversations about race in elementary er related organizations were often successful in social studies curriculum. Navarro said many of the re-painting history and reframing the Confederacy. guidelines laid out in this curriculum risk alienating The problem began there, with a division of how histo- white students. Other parents disagree. ry was taught depending on who wrote your textbooks. CCSD parent and former Creek PTCO President Blatant racism in textbooks, in fact, continued on Andrea Davoll said that what’s at stake here isn’t CRT for decades. In the 1900s, this language could be found at all, but rather an accurate depiction of history in in textbooks even outside of the South. schools. And, as one New York Times report by Dana Gold“We don’t really teach that [CRT] in Cherry Creek stein found, textbook problems are still apparent today, Schools anyway,” she said. “We try to portray history as even though textbooks now are unlikely to blatantly honestly and clearly as we can. And we try to talk about excuse the KKK.But more recently, there have been race in ways that honor and respect all cultures.” movements to correct widespread myths about race, Kristin Allan, school board members and High the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Plains Elementary School parent, said that this curricuOne prominent example of this is the 1619 Project, lum change is another step in CCSD’s mission of equity. a set of articles and artistic pieces featured by the New “You’ll hear [Superintendent Christopher Smith] say York Times, published three years ago on the 400th of this over and over again: everything we do must be the first arrival of enslaved Africans in North Ameri- viewed through the lens of equity,” Allan said. “I beca, that is meant to be used when teaching slavery to lieve that this history curriculum does that by opening students. so much by providing so much “[The 1619 Project] was obmore information about all Students who viously very successful among parts of our history and teachthink curricula should cover good K-12 educators,” Seman said. ing honestly and accurately.” and ugly history “The Trump administration Allan said that in no way is equally very, very openly took a stance this meant to shame white kids. against what now everyone’s “The goal is not to make people lumping together as critical feel bad. We can teach uncomStudents who race theory, coming out of The fortable topics without making said CRT is at 1619 Project.” our kids feel bad,” Allan said. least partly an In response to the 1619 Proj“No child should feel bad about important issue to ect, Trump called an advisory learning about our history. But them board that he called the 1776 there is no shame in teaching an Commission. The dates are honest and accurate history.” Students who symbolic; 1619 asks us to conFormer school board presisaid the purpose sider slavery as the focal point dent and parent of Creek garof history class of American history, whereas duates Karen Fisher said that should be at 1776 focuses our attention on she often feels that parents who least in part to the Revolutionary War, when have spoken out against the discuss American Americans were supposedly recent curriculum change in achievements united in a patriotic cause. CCSD seemed “misinformed” The 1776 Commission laudand that they didn’t give much INFOGRAPHIC BY CARLY PHILPOTT ed the idea of “patriotic educaconcrete reasoning behind their tion” in which history classes concentrate on American stances. When the district was deciding whether or not achievements and ideals rather than the nation’s more to pass the new social studies curriculum, several parcomplicated and uncomfortable history. Out of the ents came to speak at board meetings to express their clash between CRT and patriotic education came what concerns about the curriculum. The problem, accordwe have now. And much of this debate has been from ing to Fisher, was that those parents “didn’t give us any vocal parents who are concerned about what their chil- reason” to veto or delay the curriculum. dren are being taught. “I think that many of them probably were driven by politics,” Fisher said. “I think that some of the people The Parents who came didn’t have anything specific about Cherry One CCSD parent, Schumé Navarro, 2021 school Creek Schools, but were just sort of angry about how board candidate, described how she thinks CRT is, or divisive everybody [was].” has the potential to, “ruin kids.” She raised the concern Nonetheless, CCSD’s curriculum change served as that CRT and similar teaching methods are teaching a microcosm of the CRT debate, and the way parents children to see people by the color of their skin. have become so involved in it. So why have parents be“It’s [CRT] creating these environments where...a come so ingrained in the CRT debate? relationship could happen, where you could work to“I think it’s that they’ve been targeted,” Seman said. gether, where you could find your new best friend, your “I’ve had some conversations with people [and] they’re new partner...and we just aren’t allowing that to happen like, ‘What is this thing? Critical race theory? It sounds because we’re so concerned with skin color,” Navarro so scary,’ but it’s really not. It’s just honestly assessing White supremacist Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, VA, clashes with a movement to remove the city’s statue of Robert E. Lee, leading to a broader critique of the “Lost Cause” narrative

A mass shooting in a Black church in Charleston, SC, prompts a reexamination of the history of the Confederate flag and slavery

Murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis Police helps to spark Black Lives Matter protests

1619 Project created by New York Times to help teach race

where we’re at in this nation. But I think [some are] purposefully targeting parents, and it spreads. You know, people talk.” The Students When it comes down to it, though, students are the ones who will learn CRT or not and take that knowledge with them into the future, regardless of what happens. So are Creek kids for or against CRT? From a poll of 147 Creek students, the answers were fairly split. 37.5% said they hadn’t heard of CRT at all. Another 37.5% said they were in favor of CRT, while 11.1% said they were against it. And many Creek kids have a lot to say when asked about this issue. “Bias is present in everything humanity does, but that doesn’t mean it has to be pervasive,” senior Kalisi Loveridge said. She characterized herself as in favor of critical race theory. “History has many different sides and perspectives; we should do our best to learn about them all. By teaching more comprehensive content concerning past events, schools can better prepare future citizens to understand and participate in current events.” A fairly low percentage of Creek students said they were against critical race theory, but few chose to answer why. “Let’s not teach kids what political opinions to believe but instead let them figure it out themselves,” one anonymous student* who characterized themselves as against CRT said. There isn’t a lot of data out there on what students have to say about critical race theory. Instead, polls of parents and their opinions have usually been at the forefront of the CRT debate. But of the 147 students polled, 87.5% said students should at least sometimes have a say in what’s taught in school curricula. When adults are in charge of deciding what students learn, kids’ voices aren’t always heard, some students say. “[Students] should have control in terms of making sure what is taught is true, secular, and appropriate for the age level,” sophomore Toby Shu said. Shu also cited some real-world examples of where CRT laws – made by adults – have caused issues, saying that “the ban of teaching [CRT] by laws is overbroad and ridiculous.” No matter what students thought about CRT, the consensus on what we should be taught was clear. With a 95.1% consensus, Creek kids overwhelmingly said they thought students should be taught the whole historical narrative, even – and perhaps especially – the parts that aren’t easy to hear. “I think if we choose to leave out certain parts of history in our curriculum that are considered ugly, we are actively choosing ignorance,” senior Kayla Robinson said. “I firmly believe that the ability to turn a blind eye to certain issues because they don’t or didn’t affect you is a privilege. If we put America on a pedestal so we can celebrate it, we refuse to acknowledge the bad.”

Colorado legislation leads to a change in CCSD social studies curriculum for teaching history of race in elementary schools

1776 Project created under Trump Administration as a counter response to the 1619 Project. It releases its report in early 2021

INFOGRAPHIC BY CARLY PHILPOTT

171


PAGE 16 | THE VILLAGER • April 21, 2022

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April 21, 2022 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 17

The 2022 Masters was Tiger’s ‘finest hour’ The list of Tiger Woods’ achievements in his storied golf career goes on and on: • 82 PGA Tour tournament victories • 15 Majors, including five Masters titles • 683 weeks— that’s more than 13 years—as the world’s topranked player • Etc . . . Etc . . . Etc But in his finest hour as a pro, he finished in 47th place, 13 strokes over par. That was in the 2022 Masters. If you read the headline ‘Tiger shoots worst-ever 78 in third round,’ the story the next day that referred to his final score as “his highest ever at the Masters” or another that called his finish “disappointing,” you might not realize what he accomplished in his 25th trip to Augusta. His score or his place on the leaderboard is not what mattered. In one of the greatest feats in the history of sports—not just golf, all of sports—the man: • broke par on Day One; • made the cut on Day Two; and • walked more than 18 hilly miles on what is widely considered the toughest walk on the PGA Tour, plus practice rounds earlier in the week, by the time he trudged up No. 18 on Day Four. And he did all of that less than 14 months after a spectacular single-car crash that easily could have killed him. He nearly lost his right leg—his surgeons said amputation was seriously considered. And many medical experts said he might never walk—normally—again. But there’s very little that’s “normal” about Tiger Woods. He transitioned from wheelchair to crutches to walking-without-assistance to swinging a golf club again— all in about eight months’ time. Ben Petrick, who saw his “sky’s the limit” future as a Rockies catcher completely destroyed by young-onset Parkinson’s disease 20 years ago, described what separates the elite in any endeavor in his book, Forty Thousand To One. It explains how Tiger made it back to Augusta National: All excellence requires deliberate practice . . . hour after hour . . . day after day .... Grit is your essential self. It’s who you are when you’re left with nothing but the air in your lungs and a decision to make.

In a television interview following his final round, Tiger talked about his grueling rehab, and admitted that, on many days, his ordeal “sucked.” But he did it. And through superhuman perseverance, he overcame the greatest physical adversity of his life. That interview impressed me as a prime example of how far Tiger has come since the days when he dominated golf. He was a young man then, the best in golf by a mile, and he was condescending in interviews. He seemed impatient, granting a few of his valuable minutes only because it was expected. By contrast, his on-camera interview following each round at Augusta this time was relaxed, courteous, friendly—humble. The 46-year-old version of Tiger today is more likable, more human. On the course, too, he was different. In the past he was, at times, intemperate, given to lapses in the behavior expected on a golf course. He treated his adoring fans as subjects. His air was almost regal. In this Masters, though, he seemed to genuinely appreciate the resounding applause and lengthy ovations of the galleries that were so thrilled to have him back. They hoped for more of the shots they’d seen only from Tiger in the past, but his score was secondary. He was there, and he was smiling and waving his cap to them.

If anyone doubts that this Masters was his finest hour, they should look at who failed to make it to the weekend. Among those who did not survive the cut were eight Major champions who are Tour regulars: • Padraig Harrington • Zach Johnson • Brooks Koepka • Jordan Spieth • Mike Weir • Gary Woodland • Justin Rose • Bryson DeChambeau Woods also bested a half-dozen senior former Masters champions: Bernhard Langer, Fred Couples, Jose Maria Olazabal, Larry Mize, Vijay Singh and Sandy Lyle. And a youthful winner of the Tour Championship and Fed Ex Cup, Xander Schauffele, went home early, too. Who among these 15 would have made it back to Augusta after such a horrific experience? What would they have shot had they played? Would any one of them have lasted all four rounds? The day after the Masters, Tiger was quoted saying he’d definitely be in the British Open at St. Andrews, the birthplace of golf,where he has won twice. He didn’t rule out next month’s PGA Championship or the U.S. Open in June, though he did allow that he’d have to “see” how things were before each. Regardless, he has already gained a new level of admiration from his legion of fans. His 2022 Masters is an achievement that stands alone. Denny Dressman is a veteran of 43 years in the newspaper business, including 25 at the Rocky Mountain News, where he began as executive sports editor. He is the author of 14 books, eight of them sports-related. You can write to Denny at dennydressman@comcast.net.

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PAGE 18 | THE VILLAGER • April 21, 2022

A common heart problem that’s often ignored

Dear Annie, Heart palpitations can be harmless if they are brief and infrequent. But if you’re experiencing an erratic heart rhythm, you need to get checked out by a doctor for atrial fibrillation, or AFib. AFib – which is marked by rapid, fluttering beats – can lead to serious complications such as stroke and heart failure, when the weakened heart can’t pump enough blood to the rest of the body. Normally, your heartbeat

follows a steady rhythm as your heart contracts and relaxes. But when you have AFib, the upper chambers of your heart (atria) beat rapidly and irregularly, sending blood to the lower chambers (ventricles) less efficiently. These episodes can last for minutes to hours or longer, and can cause palpitations, lightheadedness, fatigue, and/ or shortness of breath. Over time, AFib tends to become chronic. Age is a common risk factor for AFib, which affects roughly 10 percent of people older than 75. Other factors include genetics, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and alcohol and tobacco use. The condition has also been linked to viral infections, including COVID-19.

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risk of developing AFib is greater than 20 percent, yet many people don’t even know they have it.

not feel the shocks. Catheter ablation is another outpatient treatment for AFib that scars a small area of heart tissue that causes irregular heartbeats. This procedure is becoming more common based on evidence of its safety and ability to normalize the heart rhythm and ease symptoms. Ablations can be effective in people 75 and older, but medication may still be required afterward. If you’re at higher risk for stroke, you may be prescribed a blood thinner, too. In the past, Coumadin (warfarin) was the only such drug widely available, but it requires monitoring with regular blood tests. Newer anticoagulants, like apixaban (Eliquis) and rivaroxaban (Xarelto), don’t have that requirement and have been shown to be just as effective at preventing strokes.

military honors. All veterans are entitled to a burial flag and a Presidential Memorial Certificate. You will need to provide a copy of the veteran’s military discharge papers. Social Security pays a one-time death benefit to a spouse or dependent child of $255.00. Additional benefits may be available for spouses and legal dependents. The survivors can contact Social Security at 1-800-772-1213, or visit: www.ssa.gov/pubs/ deathbenefits/htm.

care for you and to achieve your overall estate planning goals, the following documents create an effective medical/estate plan package: 1. Healthcare Power of Attorney; 2. General Financial Power of Attorney; 3. Advanced Directive for Medical/Surgical Treatment (“Living Will”); and 4. Will (or a Will with a Trust). Careful medical/estate planning should include preparation and signing of these documents, to accomplish your goals and protect you, both during your lifetime, and at the time of passing. The Power of Attorney documents allow you to designate those agents whom you authorize to help you on your behalf during your lifetime, and the Will/Trust documents allow you to nominate others to help with your estate after your passing, as well as to identify the beneficiaries and the distributions to them, to accomplish your estate planning goals.

If you’re experiencing AFib-like symptoms you need to see your doctor who will listen to your heart and likely Treatment Options recommend an elecA growing body of trocardiogram (EKG) research underscores or a treadmill heart the importance of lifetest, or you may wear style steps such as exa portable monitor for ercise, a healthy diet, BY JIM MILLER several weeks to look and limiting alcohol for abnormal heart for treating AFib. rhythms to confirm a diagDepending on your age and nosis of AFib. Such tests can symptoms, your doctor may help distinguish AFib from prescribe drugs to help conless serious conditions that trol your heart rate, like beta may cause the heart to flutter, blockers such as metoprolol like anxiety and stress. (Toprol XL); and/or rhythm, AFib affects some three such as antiarrhythmics like million adults in the United flecainide (Tambocor). States, a number that is exYou may also need an pected to quadruple in the electrical cardioversion, an coming decade as the popuoutpatient procedure that delation ages and risk factors livers an electrical shock to like obesity, diabetes and high the heart to restore a normal blood pressure become even rhythm. You will be sedated more common. The lifetime for this brief procedure and

SAVVYSENIOR

Dear Savvy Senior, What can you tell me about atrial fibrillation? Every so often, I’ve noticed my heart starts beating rapidly for no particular reason. Is this something I should be worried about? Anxious Annie

Is it permissible to plan and pay a funeral in advance? The Colorado Division of Insurance regulates funeral goods and services paid for in advance of need. Monies collected in advance must be placed into an insurance policy or into a trust fund. By law, goods and services paid for in advance of need must be guaranteed by the seller. This means that the prices on the sales agreement must be funded by the proceeds of the insurance policy or trust. The primary motivation for such pre-planning is the peace of mind in not leaving these details to one’s survivors, according to consumer surveys. Pre-funding can be an effective means of “spending down” issues for those who desire Medicaid/SSI coverage. In such cases, the contract amount pre-paid is made “irrevocable” and these funds are not counted when the County Department of Human Services determines eligibility.

What Veteran’s and Social Security Benefits are available?

Veterans of military service (active duty) are entitled to a headstone and burial at Ft. Logan National Cemetery (303-761-0117; website: www.clm.va.gov/CEM/cems/ nchp/ftlogan.asp) in southwest Denver. There are no cemetery charges for burial of the veteran, the veteran’s spouse and dependent children; however, mortuary expenses do apply. For those who are retired or disabled, other benefits are available, including financial consideration and

What are the four key medical/estate plan documents you need now?

Many of my clients have asked what are the critical documents needed, particularly in view of the COVID-19 pandemic. Simply being married does not give you the legal right to gain access to your spouse’s medical records or make medical decisions on your spouse’s behalf, even in an emergency. To avoid this problem and to help others

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April 21, 2022 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 19

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April 21, 2022, THE VILLAGER | PAGE 21

LEGALS —Continued from previous page— √ Contacted family, friends, and employer. (Provide names, dates of contact and briefly describe findings): Dong Shon, 8/19/21; Sang & Juyeon Han 9/12/21; Eunha Jung 8/20/21; Doug & Hye Young Kim 10/2/21. Asked if anyone has been contacted or knows where he is at. He has contacted Dong and doug, but don’t know where he is. √ Respondent’s last known mailing address is as follows: 5500 DTC Parkway #611, Greenwood Village, CO 80111 Petitioner last saw Respondent on 5/12/21, at my place, 6340 S. Havana St.

COURTS PETITIONER’S VERIFIED MOTION FOR: PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS Arapahoe, County, Colorado Court Address: In re: √ The Marriage of: √ The Civil Union of: √ Parental Responsibilities concerning:

Petitioner: Kim, Sun M. And Co-Petitioner/Respondent: Hyon U.

Kim,

Case Number: 21 DR 914 Division: Courtroom The Petitioner moves for an Order to serve the Respondent by the method checked above for the following reasons: 1. Petitioner has filed: Dissolution of Marriage.

2. Petitioner has been unable to locate an address for service and/ or complete personal service of the Respondent despite diligent efforts, as follows: √ Personal Service unsuccessful documentation attached. √ lnternet search (Provide site names, dates of search, and briefly describe findings): √ FaceBook: October 2021, March 2022 √ Instragram: October 2021, March 2022

COUNTY TREASURER NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to

JAMES I BURTON, CITY OF AURORA

SHARON L WILSON, CITY OF AURORA

ABIGAIL A DUMAS, HEATHER GARDENS ASSOCIATION

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 2nd day of November, 2017, A.D., the then County Treasurer of the County of Arapahoe, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to FIG CAPITAL INVESTMENTS CO13 LLC, the following described real estate situate in the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado, to-wit:

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 2nd day of November, 2017, A.D., the then County Treasurer of the County of Arapahoe, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to FIG CAPITAL INVESTMENTS CO13 LLC, the following described real estate situate in the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado, to-wit:

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 2nd day of November, 2017, A.D., the then County Treasurer of the County of Arapahoe, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to FIG CAPITAL INVESTMENTS CO13 LLC, the following described real estate situate in the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado, to-wit:

LOT 16 BLK 6 AURORA HIGHLANDS SUB 1ST FLG aka 1316 S SALIDA WAY

LOTS 10-11 EX REAR 10 FT BLK 8 BROOKLYN aka 1200 BEELER ST

and said County Treasurer issued a Certificate of Purchase therefore to FIG CAPITAL INVESTMENTS CO13 LLC; Whereas, the said FIG CAPITAL INVESTMENTS CO13 LLC did, on the 17th day of November 2021 duly assigned the certificate of the sale of the tax lien on the property as aforesaid, and all its rights, title, and interest in said property, to BUFFALO PLAINS 22, LLC.

and said County Treasurer issued a Certificate of Purchase therefore to FIG CAPITAL INVESTMENTS CO13 LLC; Whereas, the said FIG CAPITAL INVESTMENTS CO13 LLC did, on the 17th day of November 2021 duly assigned the certificate of the sale of the tax lien on the property as aforesaid, and all its rights, title, and interest in said property, to BUFFALO PLAINS 22, LLC.

UNIT 106 BLDG 223 AS PER CONDO DECLARATION RECORDED IN B2095 P436 HEATHER GDNS SUB 15TH FLG LOT 1 BLK 1 CONDOS aka 14091 E MARINA DR 106

That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent general taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2016;

That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent general taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2016;

That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of JAMES I BURTON for said year 2016;

That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SHARON L WILSON for said year 2016;

That said BUFFALO PLAINS 22, LLC, on the 17th day of November, 2021, the present holder of said Certificate, who has made request upon the Treasurer of said County for a deed to said real estate;

That said BUFFALO PLAINS 22, LLC, on the 17th day of November, 2021, the present holder of said Certificate, who has made request upon the Treasurer of said County for a deed to said real estate;

That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said BUFFALO PLAINS 22, LLC, on or about the 17th day of August, 2022, A.D., unless the same has been redeemed.

That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said BUFFALO PLAINS 22, LLC, on or about the 17th day of August, 2022, A.D., unless the same has been redeemed.

Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed.

Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed.

Witness my hand this 7th day of April, 2022, A.D.

Witness my hand this 7th day of April, 2022, A.D.

Sue Sandstrom Treasurer Arapahoe County

Sue Sandstrom Treasurer Arapahoe County

Published in The Villager First Publication: April 14, 2022 Last Publication: April 28, 2022 Legal # 10730 ___________________________

Published in The Villager First Publication: April 14, 2022 Last Publication: April 28, 2022 Legal # 10731 ___________________________

and said County Treasurer issued a Certificate of Purchase therefore to FIG CAPITAL INVESTMENTS CO13 LLC; Whereas, the said FIG CAPITAL INVESTMENTS CO13 LLC did, on the 17th day of November 2021 duly assigned the certificate of the sale of the tax lien on the property as aforesaid, and all its rights, title, and interest in said property, to BUFFALO PLAINS 22, LLC. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent general taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2016; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of ABIGAIL A DUMAS for said year 2016; That said BUFFALO PLAINS 22, LLC, on the 17th day of November, 2021, the present holder of said Certificate, who has made request upon the Treasurer of said County for a deed to said real estate; That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said BUFFALO PLAINS 22, LLC, on or about the 17th day of August, 2022, A.D., unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 7th day of April, 2022, A.D. Sue Sandstrom Treasurer Arapahoe County Published in The Villager First Publication: April 14, 2022 Last Publication: April 28, 2022 Legal # 10732

Published in The Villager First Publication: April 7, 2022 Last Publication: May 5, 2022 Legal # 10729 ___________________________

CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD BEFORE THE PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION FOR THE CITY OF CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE ON TUESDAY, MAY 10, 2022, AT 5:00 P.M. FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING WRITTEN AND ORAL COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC CONCERNING A FLOODPLAIN VARIANCE AT 7 RANDOM ROAD. THE APPLICATION IS AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW AT THE CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, 2450 E. QUINCY AVENUE, CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE, CO 80113 MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY FROM 8:00 A.M. TO 4:30 P.M. OR YOU MAY CALL 303-783-2729 FOR MORE INFORMATION. PROTESTS OR COMMENTS MAY BE SUBMITTED IN WRITING TO THE CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, 2450 EAST QUINCY AVENUE, CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE, CO 80113 OR PWORKMAN@CHERRYHILLSVILLAGE. COM ON OR BEFORE THE DATE OF THE PUBLIC HEARING, OR BY PERSONAL APPEARANCE AT THE PUBLIC HEARING. Published in The Villager Published: April 21, 2022 Legal # 10742 ___________________________

SPECIAL DISTRICTS NOTICE OF CANCELLATION OF REGULAR ELECTION BY THE DESIGNATED ELECTION OFFICIAL GOLDSMITH METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the Goldsmith Metropolitan District, City and County of Denver and Arapahoe County, State of Colorado, that at the close of business on the sixty-third day before the election, there were not more candidates for director than offices to be filled including candidates filing affidavits of intent to be write-in candidates; therefore, the regular election to be held on May 3, 2022, is hereby canceled pursuant to Section 1-13.5-513(6), C.R.S.The following candidates are hereby declared elected: Michael Brown to a 3-year term until May 2025 John Forhan to a 3-year term until May 2025 Peter Culshaw to a 3-year term until May 2025 GOLDSMITH METROPOLITAN DISTRICT By: /s/ Brenden Desmond Designated Election Official Published in The Villager Published: April 21, 2022 Legal # 10746 ___________________________ INVITATION TO BID Suburban Metropolitan District (hereinafter called the “Owner”) will receive sealed Bids for the 2022 Median Landscape Improvement Project located within the Suburban Metropolitan District on Arapahoe Road, So. Holly Street and So. Quebec Street Medians (the “Project”) at the office of McGeady Becher, P.C.; 450 E. 17th Avenue, Suite 400, Denver,

CO 80203 or electronically by Lisa Jacoby at Ljacoby@specialdistrictlaw.com until 12:00 noon, Friday, May 13, 2022. At such time, Bids received will be publicly opened and read aloud at the office of McGeady Becher, P.C.; 450 E. 17th Avenue, Suite 400, Denver, CO 80203 and via Zoom at: https:// us02web.zoom.us/j/81021869681 ?pwd=SEdPOFYrcG9zTEtXN0Nl YjlrQ01UZz09 or by phone: 1-346248-7799. Meeting ID: 810 2186 9681; Passcode: 989492. A description of the Work to be performed is: Demolition and disposal of select plantings, rock areas, etc.; New plantings; trees, shrubs, perennials; Irrigation system modification; Traffic control; and, Creation of new planting beds for annual flowers Bid packages will be available via email anytime on or after April 28, 2022, upon request from Lisa Jacoby c/o McGeady Becher P.C by emailing Ljacoby@specialdistrictlaw.com. A mandatory pre-bid conference will be held with Mike Owens, Owens Landscape Design & Management, Inc., at the intersection of South Forest Way and South Holly Street in the City of Centennial at 10:00 a.m. on May 4, 2022. Bids shall be made on the forms furnished by the Owner and shall be enclosed in a sealed envelope and endorsed with the name of the Bidder if delivered in person. A Certified Check or a Bid Bond in an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total Bid amount will be required. The Bid Bond will be retained by the Owner as liquidated damages should the Successful Bidder fail to enter into a Contract with the Owner in accordance with the Bid. Attention is called to the fact that Bidders offer to assume the obligations and liabilities imposed by the Contract Documents. The Successful Bidder for the Project will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Labor and Materials Payment Bond in the full amount of the Contract Price, and proof of Insurance, in conformity with the requirements of the Contract Documents. Bidders are hereby advised that the Owner reserves the right to not award a Contract until sixty (60) days from the date of the opening of Bids, and Bidders expressly agree to keep their Bids open for the sixty (60) day time period. Owner reserves the right to reject any and all Bids, to waive any informality, technicality or irregularity in any Bid, to disregard all non-conforming, non-responsive, conditional or alternate Bids, to negotiate contract terms with the Successful Bidder, to require statements or evidence of Bidders’ qualifications, including financial statements, and to accept the proposal that is in the opinion of the Owner in its best interest. Owner also reserves the right to extend the Bidding period by Addendum if it appears in its interest to do so. Any questions concerning this bid shall be directed in writing to: Suburban Metropolitan District Name Michael B. Owens Title Designer, Owens Landscape Design & Management, Inc. Address com

owenslandscape@aol.

Published in The Villager Published: April 21, 2022 Legal # 10747 ___________________________ GOLDSMITH GULCH SANITATION DISTRICT 8390 East Crescent Parkway, Suite 300 Greenwood Village, CO 80111 Phone 303-779-5710 Fax 303779-0348 INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that Goldsmith Gulch Sanitation District (District) will accept sealed bid proposals for the 2022 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Project in Greenwood Village. The project is located within the City of Greenwood Village, Colorado and includes, but is not limited to: 4,241 linear feet of 8-inch CIPP rehabilitation, remove 112 manhole steps, various minor manhole repairs, and coordination with the Owner, all as described in the Contract Documents Competitive Sealed Bids will be accepted until 2:00 p.m., May 24, 2022, at the office of CliftonLar-

sonAllen, LLP, 8390 E. Crescent Pkwy., Suite 300, Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111. Proposals shall be submitted in an envelope marked “GOLDSMITH GULCH SANITATION DISTRICT: 2022 Capital Improvement Program Project”. An Electronic (PDF) Competitive Bid will also be accepted in lieu of a paper copy until 2:00 pm, May 24, 2022. Provide Electronic Competitive Bids to: JamieOvergaard@kennedyjenks. com (ATTN: Jamie Overgaard). Any bids (electronic or paper copy) received after 2:00 pm shall not be accepted. Bids may not be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after said closing time. Bid packages will be available electronically starting on April 21, 2022 at www.questcdn.com under Login for a $15.00 charge. The user will be directed to enter a project code of 8182533. Contact QuestCDN.com at 952-233-1632 or info@questcdn.com for assistance in membership registration and downloading this digital project information. Bidder pre-qualifications will NOT be required for this project; provided, however, upon evaluation of bids for recommendation to the District for award of the Contract, Bidder(s) must be prepared to demonstrate his qualifications by submitted evidence to the District such as financial data, previous experience, authority to conduct business in the jurisdiction where the project is located, and other requirements as may be specified in the Contract Documents. Bid security in the form of a Bid Bond, Cashier’s Check or Certified Check, payable to “Goldsmith Gulch Sanitation District” in the amount equal to ten (10%) percent of the total amount of the Bid, to be retained by the District, will be required until a Contract is executed. If the successful Bidder should fail to enter into a contract with the District, its check or bid bond will be held as liquidated damages, in which event the Contract may then be awarded to another qualified bidder. The Owner reserves the right to reject any and all Bids, to waive any informalities or irregularities therein, and to accept the Bid that in the opinion of the District is in the best interest of the District. Published in The Villager Published: April 21, 2022 Legal # 10748 ___________________________

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Alan J. Gilbert, a/k/a Alan Jay Gilbert and Alan Gilbert, Deceased Case Number 22PR30383 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the personal representative or to District Court of Arapahoe, County, Colorado on or before August 21, 2022, or the claims may be forever barred. Barry S. Gilbert, Personal Representative 2751 South Clarkson Street Address Englewood, CO, 80113 Published in The Villager First Publication: April 21, 2022 Last Publication: May 5, 2022 Legal # 10745 ___________________________

NAME CHANGE

ARAPAHOE COUNTY, COLORADO 1790 West Littleton Blvd. Littleton, CO 80120 Case No.: 2022 CV 100202 PUBLIC NOTICE OF PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME Public Notice is given on April 8, 2022 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The Petition requests that the name of DARAIN ARMOND BROWN be changed to DARAIN ARMOND MCCLAIN The court orders the following publication for a change of name: Date: July 19, 2021 Shana Kloek Clerk of Court/Deputy Clerk Published in The Villager First Publication: April 21, 2022 Last Publication: May 5, 2022 Legal # 10749 ___________________________

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April 21, 2022, THE VILLAGER | PAGE 15

LEGALS PAGE 22 | THE VILLAGER • April 21, 2022 —Continued from previous page—

What Is Generally NOT Known About Acid Reflux! (Part 1 of 2) [Including its Role in Developing Degenerative Diseases!]

The lack of this knowledge by those who suffer from over-acid conditions, like Acid Reflux, will in time result in far worse health conditions and diseases. For example, cancer cannot grow in a body that is pH balanced; but will proliferate when the body is too acidic.

In Part 1 of this 2-Part article, I will share the first of three causes of Acid Reflux. So, let’s begin… Acid Reflux is a modern diagnostic term for a condition that has, for centuries,

been known by many other names, such as heartburn, indigestion, and

over-acidity. And now longterm Acid Reflux is called, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Its original terms, “heartburn” or “indigestion” described the backward flow (or Reflux) of stomach “acid” into your esophagus, hence the new term “Acid Reflux.” Symptoms resulting from this backward flow are mild to severe burning of the esophageal lining and chest pain. Ongoing stomach-acid assaults on the esophagus will, in time, damage and ulcerate the esophageal lining causing other esophageal-related conditions, and worse.

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The commonly known causes of Acid Reflux are lifestyle-related and include diet, drugs, smoking, inhaling secondhand smoke, alcohol, caffeinated beverages, and tight clothing around the abdomen. However, there are other causes, including other lifestyle practices, that interfere with the laws (or principles) of digestion and lead to Acid Reflux that you may not be aware of. HOW THE BODY WORKS: When you do not

understand and/or respect the Law of Gravity, you cause injury to yourself. The same applies to the nutritional biochemical laws that govern the healthy function of your body, and in this case, specifically, the laws that govern the healthy function of the Digestive System and prevent Acid Reflux. Here is how the body works: At the onset of smelling, tasting, or chewing food, the stomach lining is signaled to release gastric acids into the stomach, so it is ready to digest the foods you consume. Hydrochloric Acid (HCL) is its primary gastric (stomach) acid. CAUSE #1: However, when your body is unable to produce sufficient gastric acids, the undigested food sits too long in the stomach and begins to ferment and rot. Sufficient gastric acids in the stomach are the signal for the small intestines to open and receive the stomach contents to begin the next phase of digestion. However, when this does not occur due to insufficient gastric acids, the fermented, rotting stomach contents try to escape in the opposite direction, thus backflows into the esophagus, causing the symptoms of Acid Reflux. So, one cause of Acid Reflux (which also causes stomach ulcers) is the acids of the fermenting and rotting foods due to insufficient HCL and other gastric acids.

Also, without sufficient gastric acids in your stomach, you have lost one of your body’s first lines of defense and that is to destroy pathogenic bacteria and other germs that come in by way of the esophagus. ELIZABETH HAS NO MORE ACID REFLUX. Elizabeth suffered from severe Acid Reflux 4 to 5 times a week until she started Clinical Nutrition Therapy. In Part 2 of this 2-part article, I will share the 2nd and 3rd causes of Acid Reflux, what is actually happening to your body when you take anti-acid and acid-stopping drugs, and provide you with healthier solutions to end Acid Reflux once and for all. FOR HELP no matter where you live, please call me at 940-761-4045. First Consultation Free! Dr. Smith is the owner of ADVANCED CLINICAL NUTRITION (Est. 1981) in Wichita Falls, Tx, with clients residing in 37 U.S. states and seven international countries. Since opening her business, she has continued to hold a successful track record of over 90% in helping her clients improve their health. Information for Nutritional and Bioenergetic Education only and not for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition or disease.

GLENDALE CERTIFICATE OF ELECTION REGULAR MUNICIPAL ELECTION APRIL 5, 2022 At a Mail Ballot Election held in the municipality of the City of Glendale, County of Arapahoe, and State of Colorado, on April 5, 2022, the following were the number of votes annexed: CITY COUNCIL ................................................... VOTES ..............................................................................TERM NUMBER OF VOTES FOR DARIO KATARDZIC: ..................................... ONE HUNDRED TWENTY (120) ...................... Four Year Term NUMBER OF VOTES FOR DORIS RIGONI: ............................................. ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-NINE 129) ............. Four Year Term NUMBER OF VOTES FOR RYAN TUCHSCHERER: ............................... ONE HUNDRED TWELVE (112) ........................ Two Year Term BALLOT ISSUE 2A: SHALL THE CITY OF GLENDALE’S TAXES BE INCREASED $642,000 FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2023, AND BY ANY ADDITIONAL AMOUNTS THAT ARE RAISED ANNUALLY THEREAFTER, BY THE IMPOSITION OF AN ADDITIONAL AD VALOREM MILL LEVY OF 3 MILLS (TOTAL OF 21.67 MILLS) ON ALL TAXABLE PROPERTY IN THE CITY COMMENCING JANUARY 1, 2023, FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSTRUCTING AND MAINTAINING PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS WITHIN THE CITY, INCLUDING THE PARKS, SPORTS CENTER, SIDEWALKS, BIKE PATHS, LANDSCAPING AND PUBLIC PARKING, AND SHALL THE CITY OF GLENDALE BE AUTHORIZED TO COLLECT, RETAIN AND SPEND SUCH TAX REVENUES, INCLUDING FOR EACH YEAR, ANY INVESTMENT EARNINGS AND INTEREST ON SUCH REVENUES, AS A VOTER APPROVED REVENUE CHANGE UNDER ARTICLE X, SECTION 20, OF THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION OR ANY OTHER LAW? NUMBER OF VOTES CAST:............................... ONE HUNDRED NINETY-ONE (191) NUMBER OF YES VOTES:................................. EIGHTY-NINE (89) NUMBER OF NO VOTES: .................................. ONE HUNDRED TWO (102) BALLOT ISSUE 2B: SHALL CITY OF GLENDALE TAXES BE INCREASED BY $246,000 IN 2022 AND $592,000 IN 2023 (FIRST FULL FISCAL YEAR INCREASE) AND BY WHATEVER AMOUNTS AS ARE RAISED ANNUALLY THEREAFTER FROM A SEPARATE ADDITIONAL MARIJUANA TAX ON THE SALE OF MARIJUANA AND MARIJUANA PRODUCTS IN THE CITY OF GLENDALE, SUCH TAX TO BE AT THE RATE OF ONE POINT EIGHT FIVE PERCENT (1.85%) OF THE RETAIL PRICE OF THE MARIJUANA OR MARIJUANA PRODUCT TRANSACTION COMMENCING ON AUGUST 1, 2022 FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSTRUCTING AND MAINTAINING PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS WITHIN THE CITY, INCLUDING THE PARKS, SPORTS CENTER, SIDEWALKS, BIKE PATHS, LANDSCAPING AND PUBLIC PARKING AND SHALL THE CITY OF GLENDALE BE AUTHORIZED TO COLLECT, RETAIN AND SPEND SUCH MARIJUANA TAX REVENUES, INCLUDING FOR EACH YEAR, ANY INVESTMENT EARNINGS AND INTEREST ON SUCH REVENUES, AS A VOTER APPROVED REVENUE CHANGE UNDER ARTICLE X, SECTION 20, OF THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION OR ANY OTHER LAW? NUMBER OF VOTES CAST:............................... ONE HUNDRED NINETY-THREE (193) NUMBER OF YES VOTES:................................. ONE HUNDRED FOUR (104) NUMBER OF NO VOTES: .................................. EIGHTY-NINE (89) BALLOT ISSUE 2C: SHALL SECTION 4.2 OF THE HOME RULE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF GLENDALE, COLORADO, BE AMENDED TO STATE THAT THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL MEMBERS SHALL SERVE NO MORE THAN FOUR (4) CONSECUTIVE TERMS?

NUMBER OF VOTES CAST:............................... ONE HUNDRED NINETY-THREE (193) NUMBER OF YES VOTES:................................. ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-EIGHT (158) NUMBER OF NO VOTES: .................................. THIRTY-FIVE (35) BALLOT ISSUE 2D: SHALL ALL REFERENCES TO THE WORDS “COUNCILMAN” OR “COUNCILMEN” IN THE HOME RULE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF GLENDALE, COLORADO, BE AMENDED TO THE WORDS “COUNCIL MEMBER” OR “COUNCIL MEMBERS”? NUMBER OF VOTES CAST:............................... ONE HUNDRED NINETY-THREE (193) NUMBER OF YES VOTES:................................. ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN (167) NUMBER OF NO VOTES: .................................. TWENTY-SIX (26) NUMBER OF BALLOTS MAILED TO VOTERS: 2380 NUMBER OF BALLOTS COUNTED: .................. 193 NUMBER OF BALLOTS IN POSSESSION AND NOT COUNTED: Unused supply ................................................ 196 Ballots Undeliverable ...................................... 69 a. ................. Ballots Returned after April 5, 2022, 7:00 p.m. ............ 5 b. ................. Spoiled ......................................................................... 0 c................... Discrepant Signatures not Cured ................................. 1 We, the undersigned do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct abstract of the votes cast at said election, as shown by the returns from the voting in said election. Witness our signatures this 13th day of April, 2022: Veronica Marvin, City Clerk Madeline Gauthier, Election Assistant Published in The Villager Published: April 21, 2022 Legal # 10743

CITY OF GLENDALE, COLORADO PUBLIC NOTICE OF VOTER APPROVAL OF HOME RULE CHARTER AMENDMENTS At an election held April 5, 2022, the following charter amendments were approved by the voters of the City of Glendale, Colorado: FIRST APPROVED CHARTER AMENDMENT: Full text of Amendment: Amend section 4.2(e) to read as follows: (words to be deleted are underlined, words to be added shown in bold type) SECTION 4.2 TERMS OF OFFICE — MAYOR AND COUNCILMEN. e. The Mayor and Councilmen shall serve no more than three (3) four (4) consecutive terms. For the purposes of this provision, a “term” shall include the balance

of an unexpired term served by a person appointed to fill a vacancy if such unexpired term exceeds twenty-four (24) months. SECOND APPROVED CHARTER AMENDMENT: Full text of Amendment: Amend Charter to read as follows: (words to be deleted are underlined, words to be added shown in bold type) All references to the words “councilman” or “councilmen” in the Home Rule Charter of the City of Glendale, Colorado, be amended to the words “council member” or “council members? Dated the 13th day of April, 2022 City of Glendale, Colorado Veronica Marvin, City Clerk Published in The Villager Published: April 21, 2022 Legal # 10744 ___________________________

— End oftoLegals — Continued next page— —


April 21, 2022 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 23

WHAT’S HAPPENING CENTENNIAL E-RECYCLING EVENT APRIL 23, 8-11 a.m. Electronic recycling services at the Centennial Civic Center, 13133 E. Arapahoe Rd. Donate nonperishable food items or a $5 minimum monetary donation benefiting the Salvation Army Centennial Corps.

CENTENNIAL ANNUAL CHIP AND MULCH EVENT APRIL 30 8 a.m. -noon at both the SSPRD Willow Spring Service Center, 7100 S. Holly St., and the Centennial Public Works Facility, 7272 S. Eagle St.Rouds larger than 10 inches in diameter will not be accepted. Free mulch starting at noon. Bring a tarp and shovel. SOUTH SUBURBAN BOARD OF DIRECTORS ELECTION MAY 3 Nine individuals have filed as candidates. There are three openings for three-year terms on the five-member board. Two polling sites open from 7 p.m. - 7 p.m. Goodson Recreation Center and South Suburban Sports Complex. Questions: email elections@ssprd.org or call 303483-7011. BECOME AN ARAPAHOE COUNTY ELECTION JUDGE

Election judges will be needed for the June 28 Primary Election and the Nov. 8 General Election. Form at arapahoe votes.com/election-judges

CENTRAL CITY OPERA GUILD EVENTS APRIL 29, THE THEATRE OF DREAMS GALA at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science honoring Pamela and Louis “Dutch” Bansbach with entertainment by baritone Will Liverman, appearing courtesy of the Metropolitan Opera. MAY 4, THE SPRING MEMBERSHIP RECEPTION at the Wellshire Event Center. L’ESPRIT de NOEL HOLIDAY HOME TOUR NOV. 18 & 19. Location announced later. Info: centralcityoperaorg/guild CANCER LEAGUE OF COLORADO HOPE BALL MAY 7 at the Hyatt Regency AuroraDenver Conference Center. Co-chairs are Arlene Mohler-Johnson and Dr. Saketh Guntupalli. After a two-year hiatus and 2022 Hope Ball will be LIVE AGAIN. Interested in being a sponsor, contact Barb at barbarasreece@aol.com

FRIENDS OF NURSING ANNUAL SPRING AWARDS LUNCHEON

APRIL 23, SOCIAL AT 11:00 a.m. and Luncheon and Program - 11:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Theme: “A World of Possibilities.” Presentation of the 2022 Scholarship Awards. Silent Auction Fund Raiser. RSVP by April 15. Information 720-891-3412.

WAR MEMORIAL ROSE GARDENING PRUNING WORKSHOP

APRIL 30, 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Sponsored by South Suburban Parks & Recreation. Free, but must RSVP. 5804 S. Bemis St., Littleton. Call Becky, 303-483-70141.

SOUTH METRO DENVER CHAMBER EVENTS

MAY 4, 4-7:00 p.m. Re-opening celebration at Uptown Suites Centennial Denver-Tech. Drinks & snacks will be served. Drawings at 6 p.m. Register. Call 303-795-0142. MAY 10, 7:30-9:00 a.m. - Lone Tree Arts Center. Program on the current and future economic standings of Lone Tree. Light breakfast and networking.

Colorado Statewide Network

To place a 25-word COSCAN Network ad in 91 Colorado newspapers for only $300, contact The Villager at 303-773-8313 AT&T WIRELESS DIRECTV DIRECTV for $79.99/mo for 12 months with CHOICE Package. Watch your favorite live sports, news & entertainment anywhere. First 3 months of HBO Max, Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and Epix Included! Directv is #1 in Customer Satisfaction (JD Power & Assoc.) Some Restrictions apply.

The 2022 Tiny House Community Development Conference is an educational summit defining a pathway for private investment of tiny house communities to become a viable solution for the affordable housing crisis. The conference is held May 12-13, 2022 at the Norris Penrose Event Center, Heritage Room, 1045 Lower Gold Camp Rd., Colorado Springs. Many tiny home owners and enthusiasts have discussed building or investing in the development of a tiny home community. There are many elements that need to be considered before one proceeds with such an undertaking. The presenters include: master planners, land acquisition specialists, real estate brokers. The presenters will outline for participants the items one must consider and the procedures one undertakes in the planning for the potential of a tiny home community development. The conference will focus on how to research, strategize and plan through the various stages of development including: due diligence, entitlements, site construction, building construction and sales/operations. The result of the conference will give independent developers the framework to assemble a professional team and the financial analysis that should be undertaken for a successful project. Admission: $295.00, May

12; $150.00, May 13. Web: https://www.great americantinyhouse.show/ agenda How can you be a part of the Tiny House Movement? Consider joining THIA. The Tiny Home Industry

Association, a 501(c)(6) nonprofit organization, is on a mission to advocate for regulation changes, develop standards and promote best practices in the construction, placement, and widespread use of tiny homes as permis-

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Register. Call 303-795-0142.

MEOW WOLF’S IMMERSIVE DANCE PARTY

MAY 29, 10:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. The Party Portal is open. Danceportation at Convergence Station. Renowed DJs and producers performing throughout four alien worlds in a live music experience. Featuring Anthony Naples, DJ Stingray 313, Gee Dee, Henry Wu, RE: Ni, Seb Wildblood and local favorites: Al V Dam, Black/Tuesday, Deedz, Joe Unit, Mars, and Wngdu. Book tickets at Ebarnes@ MeowWolf.com

CITY OF LITTLETON STATE OF THE CITY MAY 4, 7:30 a.m. breakfast; 8 a.m.

Tiny Home Community Development Conference In Colorado Springs May 12-13, Micro Developers Unite to Solve Affordable Housing Crisis

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sible and permanent housing. THIA’s success in legalizing Tiny Homes in numerous state laws and city ordinances, including the State of Maine, cities and counties across California, and Florida just to name a few, is on the right track to empower more states, cities, towns and counties to accept Tiny Homes as a way to help diversify the limited housing market. Our Partnership with Great American Tiny House Shows is a major win to get the word out about Tiny Homes and grow the movement. When people gather to educate themselves about the possibilities and

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program. Ashley Ridge - Wedgwood Event Center, 8199 Southpark Court, Littleton. Join Mayor Kyle Schlachter and the Littleton City Council long with other guests and speakers. R.S.V.P. by April 26 at the event website: www.littletongov. org/SOCtickets $30/person.

SOUTHMETRO DENVER CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS AT FIDDLER’S GREEN MAY 24, 5-7:00 p.m.Tours of the dressing rooms, stage, and backstage areas. Beer, wine, soft drinks, water, light appetizers, and desserts will be served. Appetizers compliments of Zink Kitchen + Bar Denver Tech Center. RSVP: 303-795-0142

options available, that’s when change happens. Great American Tiny House Shows are vital to the education of elected officials to see Tiny Homes as a solution to the housing crisis so many communities are experiencing across the US. Web: https://tinyhome industryassociation.org. Phone: 855.640.9944 ext 1002

CORRECTION In last week’s Villager, we mistakenly stated that state House District 45 candidate Lisa Frizell was a Democrat. She is a Republican. The Villager regrets the error.


PAGE 24 | THE VILLAGER • April 21, 2022

For teens, nothing serves up an addiction like flavored tobacco. Tobacco companies sell kid-friendly flavors, from Cherry Dynamite to Donut to Menthol. Over 2 million kids use e-cigarettes, and 85% use flavors. More than 1 in 4 Colorado high school students are hooked. We’re asking legislators to end the sale of flavored tobacco that the industry has used to addict our kids. Let’s put our kids’ health over Big Tobacco’s profits.

PROTECT OUR KIDS. END THE SALE OF ALL FLAVORED TOBACCO PRODUCTS.

PAID FOR BY TOBACCO-FREE KIDS ACTION FUND


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