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contents FROM THE EDITOR

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The Secret is Out at Pure Sky Vault Club

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The UCLA Bruins Carry On a Tradition of Success

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Roosevelt High School Inspires a Community

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When Goals & “Entitlement” Sabotage

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C-Ram and Hergie Rock It!

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FROM THE EDITOR Welcome to spring! In this first issue of the spring season we, once again, bring you a magazine packed with great information and exciting stories. However, what makes our April issue a little more unique is the fact that it concentrates a little more on detailing special places to train and it focuses more on a coach’s/veteran vaulter’s perspective.

One special place we found is located at the home of Coach Robert Tilley in Henderson, Nevada. Up until now Coach Tilley’s backyard was a pretty secret affair, but we are proud to introduce you to Pure Sky Vaulting Camp. Many talented, young vaulters are enjoying the personal attention that Pure Sky has to offer. We hope you will find Coach Tilley’s vision and philosophy as exciting as we did.

Pole vault officials Michael Ramoska and Dr. Richard A. Hergenrather, widely known as C-Ram and Hergie, also shared their perspectives and philosophies with us and we know you will find them worthwhile to read about as well. This team has built quite an impressive following over the years.

The community of Riverside County, in Southern California, has seen pole vaulting grow in popularity thanks to Coach Livio Centanaro of Eleanor Roosevelt High School (Eastvale, CA). He has built up an impressive program at ERHS in his 4 years there. We always love to feature these stories and hope other communities will be inspired by this one. High school sophomore vaulter Kaitlyn Merrit is a young vaulter with a pure love of vaulting.

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In our interview with her, she can’t help but let the joy she has show through. If you are at a place where you need to be reminded of your love of vaulting, this article is especially for you. Daven Murphree, high school senior, is looking at a promising future. His strong work ethic and dedication have given him great college opportunities and the sky is the limit for him. If you are a young vaulter wondering where to take your vaulting career, please take a look at Murphree’s Shelby Poncik


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story. Parents of high school vaulters will love this article as well. We truly hope our young readers will take something away from reading about Merrit and Murphree. We need those young vaulters to get motivated and show us where else the sport can go.

One of our main articles for April is our feature on UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles). Coach Curran gave us a ton of wonderful information about his impressive 30-year career with the Bruins. And he extends his help to many young vaulters trying to make a go of it. He also gives us a valuable look into his philosophies and how he has achieved his level of success. We are grateful for this unique perspective into one of the best

vaulting programs in the country and we hope you enjoy it.

Finally, we bring you a feature on gold medalist Bob Richards. He was vaulting from the age of 13 to the age of 60 and stuck with the pentathlon after that, until almost 80 years old. This man has done so much good for America’s youth and he goes above and beyond to try to keep the sport of vaulting alive. Read on to learn about his incredible accomplishments. As always, thank you for reading. Please enjoy!

Doug Bouma Editor Vaulter Magazine LLC

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The Secret is Out at Pure Sky Vault Club By: Michelle Walthall

When Coach Robert Tilley Other equipment and facilities the like, here is what he says moved Pure Sky Vaulting Club, for keeping in shape are also of- was the most important piece originally started in 1997 as a fered, and all with the comforts in causing this all to come tovaulting camp at Green Valley of home to add to the fun. gether: “Really what it takes High School, to his backyard to build something like this is This one-of-a-kind club just the willingness to jump in Henderson, Nevada in 2006 a unique and through all the wonderful club hoops and want opportunity beto do something came available for the kids. And to young pole this is not about vaulters. Over me. It’s great a period of two that it’s conveweeks Coach Tilnient for me, ley laid a 110’ but this is never pole vault runabout me.” way himself and Pure Sky VaultHis desire to ing Club, as it is create someknown today, thing for the took off from kids he coaches there. Along with has turned into the runway came Cassidy Motis, Austin Bennett, Nicole Mason, Alex Poles, Derek something that a sand pit and Bouma, Marko Marin, Haleigh Piotrowski, Logan Griensewic, Ryanne is not easy to a full spectrum Bailey, Sena Kimura, Lynsie Udall, Alex Martin, and Austin Tilley come across. of pole sizes When asked (all by the same manufacturer- would leave anybody curious why his club is different he says, which is highly recommended so we asked Coach Tilley how “Being in the backyard changes by Coach Tilley to prevent prob- he was able to start a facil- the atmosphere of what’s haplems with changing poles due to ity like this. Other than dealing pening. I think it’s just a more fluctuations in manufacturing). with zoning requirements and relaxed setting. We’ve got mu-

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track team was lacking a pole vault coach. He and Coach Tilley met through coaching high school vaulting and it ended in Kashka becoming Tilley’s assistant coach at Pure Sky.

The Pure Sky philosophy of taking training back to basics also helps make this club so unique. Coach Tilley says, “Everybody starts in the sand every single year. We want to make sure that if we missed something along the way that we pick it up this time around. Obviously the kids that have been jumping longer progress faster, but I want everybody to go through that new beginning. And sometimes, if they had struggles last year, now they’re building confidence and maybe a new love for the sport.” This approach is very important to Coach Tilley and he holds it dear to him. He also told us, “I think that’s one of the things that made our kids fairly successful because a lot of coaches don’t want to start back at the beginning- they don’t want to do it progressively. We have a very progressive program and basically I’ve run my life that way- a little at a time, add a little bit at the end. And hopefully these kids will understand this and it will carry over into their lives.” Furthering the opportunities for vaulting exposure is a partnership that Pure Sky has formed with Sky Athletics (www. skyathletics.com) which takes a more traditional camp approach.

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Coach Tilley fell in love with their Kiss the Sky Summer Camp and he encourages his vaulters to be a part of it. Here’s what he has to say about it: “I got in with Todd Lehman and Greg Hull probably about thirteen years ago. They invited me to come to camp. I had no idea what kind of camp


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love the environment as much as Coach Tilley does. When we asked high school junior, Cassidy Motis (PR 9’6” at Desert Oasis High School) what the best part of Pure Sky is she replies, “It’s all of it. You learn so much and then the people are great and they’re like your family. It’s just a great time.”

Ryanne Bailey (PR 8’9”), senior at Foothill High School and three-year attendee at Pure Sky, says, “I like that it’s at his house

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because it feels like we can connect more with everybody else since we’re at a home environment. It’s just homey.”

A newbie to Pure Sky, Haleigh Piotrowski (sophomore at Coronado High School- PR 7’), says, “You get a lot more jump time and there are more coaches to help you and then you have all your friends.”

Austin Tilley, son of Coach Tilley (PR 14’6”), says, “Every-

one gets to come over- a whole bunch of new friends.” And freshman, Charleigh Allen (PR 6’ at Foothill High School) likes the part of Pure Sky that might not be true forever after the secret of this club is let out. She tells us her favorite part is that, “Not many people know about it.” Sorry Charleigh - many more may want to join you after hearing about this great opportunity. Visit www.pureskyvaulting.com for more information.


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From front of the line: Austin Tilley, Alex Martin, Logan Griensewic, Charliegh Allen, Alex Poles, Mia Claridy, Sena Kimura, Ryanne Bailey, Haleigh Piotrowski, and Rachael Buck

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Anthony Curran’s

NO LIMIT SPORTS presents

REDONDO POLE VAULT CLASSIC June 29 at Redondo Union HS PV Festival Vendor’s Showcase Live Music, Give-Aways & more Sign up today! redondopolevaultclassic.com anthony@nolimitsports.com 310.490.0849

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The UCLA Bruins Carry On a Tradition of Amazing Success By: Michelle Walthall Anthony Curran, currently the proud volunteer pole vault coach and Director of Track and Field/Cross Country Camps and Clinics at University of California, Los Angeles, gave us an exciting look into the UCLA Bruin vaulters, their accomplishments and the vaulting program. The detailed

information he has been kind enough to share with us is very impressive.

We first asked Coach Curran about his coaching history. Here is what he had to say: “I competed in the pole vault for UCLA from 1978-1982, and began coaching here in 1983. This year will be my 30th year of coaching at my alma mater. During my collegiate career, I was a 4-time AllAmerican placing 4th, 3rd, 2nd and 4th, respectively. In 1982, I was the Pac-10 champion a t 18’2½”. A t that

Allison Koressel

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time, the mark measured second all-time in Bruins history. Currently, it ranks number 5. I continued competing after college from 1983 through 1994 while volunteering for the UCLA pole vault squad. I had my career best jump in 1992 clearing 18’81/2”. After 17 years as a volunteer pole vault coach, I was hired as a full time assistant coach in 1999 and later took over all jumps responsibilities in 2006. The following year, I was named the NCAA Western Region women’s jumps coach of the year.” “In addition to coaching at UCLA,” Coach Curran continues, “I started No Limit Sports Track and Field Club in 1985 (http://nolimitsports. com/index.php). NLS is a track club focused on pole vaulting for all ages, ranging from middle school to the Olympic level. Recently, I have expanded NLS to include a


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sophomore at UCLA. On the women’s side, Allison Koressel (13’7”) and Natasha Kolbo (13’4.25”) both topped the 13’ mark to rank 8th and 9th alltime in UCLA history. In addition, six men’s vaulters and decathletes registered personal bests in the pole vault. The Bruin woman’s team recorded 8 personal bests with six pole vaulters registered marks over 13’1.”

As impressive as the above list is, Coach Curran kept going. He also tells us, “The Bruins have also had 11 Pac-10 champions in the pole vault over this span. Three of the last six UCLA conference champions have been walk-ons to our program (Greg Woepse-2001, Ingrid Kantola-2008 and Bobby Tally-2008). 16 men’s and women’s vaulters have been named All-Americans in that span. The Bruins have had two national collegiate record holders: Tracey O’Hara (14’7.25” on 4/22/00) and Chelsea Johnson (15’1” on 3/27/04). Johnson was also the first female collegiate pole vaulter to clear 15’. O’Hara was a 5-time NCAA champion in the vault. I have coached 25 of the men’s all-time top 30 best performances and all 30 on the women’s list.” We next wanted to know what kind of staff Coach Cur-

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ran works with. We know that he has been the coach for 30 years now, but he also says that, “Jack Hoyt was hired as the assistant head coach this year and helps run the jumps and heptathlon program as well as designing their workouts and recruiting. There are a total of 12 members of the UCLA track and field staff.”

So, what does the UCLA coaching staff look for when recruiting vaulters? “There are not any specific athletic requirements to try out for the UCLA team,” Coach Curran says, “but 13’ (female) and 16’6” (male) are heights I generally look for when recruiting an athlete. I am a firm believer in the development of athletes rather than strictly aiming for the nation’s or the world’s best. I take great pride in developing athletes.” He gives us these examples of successful vaulters he has helped develop: Katy Viuf (All-American- 4th at NCAA’s 2010 and 9th at 2012 Olympic Trials), Ingrid Kantola (heptathlete turned number 5 all-time vaulter at UCLA), Jay Borick (a 15’ vaulter turned 17’10.5” vaulter, ranking him 9th all-time in Bruins history) and Scott Slover (5-time AllAmerican and number 2 alltime at UCLA at 18’71/4”). Currently the team Bruin vaulters consists

of of

16 pole vaulters, including three decathletes, four male vaulters and nine female vaulters, according to Coach Curran. The team is made up of: Mike Woepse (18’4½”), Mark Sakioka (16’9¼”), Scott Cook (16’9¼”), Connor Stark (16’6”), Colin Barber (16’6”), Marcus Nelsson (15’9”), Dominic Giovanoni (15’5”),


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Sarah Greene f -12’, Connor stark f- 16’6”, Renee Greene f-12’8”, Scott cook s-16’9”, Natasha Kolbo j-13’6”, Colin MAGAZINE Kayla Mallott -s 12’7”, mark Sakioka s-16’9”, Barber-16’6”, Liz Goodrich sr 12’11 3/4”, Mike Woepse jr 18’4 1/2”, Allison Koressel sr -14’1 1/2”, Marcus Nilsson jr 15’9” Elena Clarke 12’9” Courtney Reginadojr 13’1 1/2” Karlye Marshall 12’11 3/4” Dominic Giovanoni 15’5”

Photo By Don Liebig

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title at MPSF Championships.” Coach Curran also says that, “Woepse also represented the Bruins last weekend at NCAA Indoor Championships, finishing seventh in the men’s pole vault final (18’0.5”). In 2012, Woepse claimed second in the Outdoor Championships. A week prior to his seventh place finish, Woepse competed at the USA Track and Field Championships and finished fourth in the final. He boasts a personal best of 18’4.5”.” Calling Woepse “a coach’s dream athlete”, it is clear that Coach Curran is happy with his leadership choices. He could not say enough about Woepse’s leadership and work ethic.

In addition to coaching history and team accomplishments and training, we asked Coach Curran to let us know about the division and competition for the Academy for the Bruins this school year. He says, “UCLA is in the Pac-12 Conference. It is considered to be one of the most competitive conferences for the pole vault in the country. Last year, Tori Anthony was unable to qualify for NCAAs despite a 13’ jump. Some of the girls from the east region made it in at 12’7”. This year, our biggest competition looks to come from Arizona State’s Shayla Sampson, a 14’ vaulter, as well as from the Sun Devils’ Derick Hinch who has

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For many years, I held a surf contest for vaulters, and we would get vaulters from all over the country to come join us for a fun day of surfing and friendly competition. Some of the most memorable days with the teams were just hanging out at the beach surfing and later having barbecues and sing-a-longs on my front patio. Many of the vaulters of the past were great musicians.” “Over time, I brought that surf mentality to the sport of pole vaulting. It’s definitely the cornerstone of my coaching philosophy today. I keep reminding my kids that they should only be doing it because it is fun. In my opinion, it is probably one of the reasons why we have had so much success at UCLA,” Coach Curran continues. He also works by these philosophies: “If you train hard and work smart, you will always improve. Don’t get me wrong, we train as hard as anyone in the country, but we also train smart and have a ton of fun doing it. Nothing is fulfilling unless you work hard for it. A quote I always tell my kids: ‘Once you think you got it, you don’t’.” His years of experience and the many successful vaulters to come out of his program back up the fact that this advice works.

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The strong work ethic of Curran’s team, combined with time to have fun together, makes a great combination to keep the vaulters coming back as well. “All the UCLA alumni vaulters have helped out coaching at my clinics and during the summer at the UCLA summer camps,” says Coach Curran. “We are a family at UCLA so we all support each other.” We encourage our readers to look up the many successful alumni and elite vaulters that flock to UCLA to train as there are too many to mention.

Here are some words from two of the Bruin team’s vaulters to even further prove how they really are a family:

Chelsea Johnson says, “Words cannot express how thankful I am for the four years I spent at UCLA under the guidance of Coach Anthony Curran. Anthony instilled in me the importance of dedication to the vault, love for the school I was representing and, most importantly, the notion that I could exceed in the sport so long as I was having fun; which I certainly did while at UCLA. While a Bruin, I never competed for myself, I always competed as a member of a team that was striving to be great. We were a talented group of athletes

that supported one another through the inevitable ups and downs of athletics. I will always be thankful for the ontrack success I had as a Bruin, but it is the friendships that I made and the memories that we share which i am most grateful for.”

Mike Woepse says, “First off, I could not imagine competing for any other school than UCLA. The coaching staff and teammates that I have make me excited to go out and train every day. The coaches I have could not be more supportive and it starts at the top with coach Maynard, and the atmosphere he has created in our program. He sets up the most competitive schedules in the country for us and gives us the opportunity to excel at the highest level. Coach Hoyt has been a great addition to the staff as he has given us a different perspective on training and certain aspects of the jump. And on top of all that we have one of the greatest vault coaches in collegiate history. Coach Curran has set up an unbelievable environment to train in, and there is no one I would rather work with everyday. He has coached so many great vaulters that on any given day athletes such as Mike Tully, Yoo Kim, Scott Slover, Dustin DeLeo, Katy Viuf, Tory Anthony, Chelsea Johnson and


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Tory Pena are out at the UCLA track. Coach Curran has built a program based off success, but has done so with an aspect of fun that most programs do not have, and I believe it is what makes all his athletes, past and present, so close and keeps our alumni coming around. Lastly, I cannot say enough about my teammates, both men and women. Most of my success is because of them. We are all so supportive of each other and they push me every day at practice. I have been able to work with some great athletes, including my brother Greg, that have made my experience at UCLA so great. I really owe

my teammates so much for everything they have done for me, and the support they have shown me the last three years. They are the unsung heroes. Overall, UCLA is a phenomenal place to train and live and I would not want to be anywhere else.”

For athletes interested in experiencing a glimpse of the UCLA Bruins’ vault training firsthand, Coach Curran wants you to know, “I am hosting The National Pole Vault Classic on June 29th in Redondo Beach, California. This will be a pole vault competition and vendor fair. I want to

give every vaulter a chance to enjoy a day of pole vaulting outside of the regular season, with no pressure in this fun and exciting setting.” Maybe some future elite vaulters can be encouraged to carry on the Bruin legacy. See what it’s like to train with the Bruins at the UCLA Summer Track and Field / Pole Vault Camps. Sign up at www.uclabruins.com. Thank you to Coach Curran and his vaulters for taking the time to share a part of your experience with us. We wish you many more years of high jumping.

69 SC STATE CHAMPIONS, 10 NATIONAL CHAMPIONS, AND 3 TEAM USA (WORLD TEAM) SINCE 1998. Please contact us for more information:

803-315-5998 Rusty@ShealyAthletics.com www.ShealyAthletics.com

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Roosevelt High School Inspires a Community By: Michelle Walthall

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Pole Vault Coach Livio Centanaro at Eleanor Roosevelt High School, located in Eastvale, California, took initiative to start a vaulting program and has seen amazing results in a short time. He says this of his start at ERHS: “Being a former high school pole vaulter I wanted my daughter to try the sport to see if she would enjoy it as much as I did. She came out

for the team and I noticed that there was no program established. I took over the program and I am now currently in my 4th year coaching (with 4 years of coaching total).” Since starting out, Coach Centanaro has not only helped his daughter, Gardenia Centanaro, achieve success, but he has also helped his school and pole vaulting community in many ways.

In his time as a coach, Coach Centanaro says he has seen pole vaulting take off in his community. “I have seen an increase in the popularity in the pole vault in the last 4 years in our area,” he tells us. “In the past it has always been Orange County schools that produce the highest vaulters. I am proud to say that we are giving them some good competition.”

Nick Weisheit

Gardenia Centanaro

Clint Suppe

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Livio Centanaro

season. “2012 was the first year I was fortunate enough to have a vaulter make it all the way to the State Meet, with Nick Weisheit nearly missing the 15’3” mark to move on to the State Meet from CIF Masters,” he tells us of this past year. “Gardenia Centanaro made it to the State Meet on a severe ankle sprain that she got in practice 3 days prior to our League Finals Meet, taking only 1 jump at 10’4” in League Finals to qualify for CIF. Resting and aiding her ankle for 1 week and no practice- this was the plan: to move on from week to week, jumping at a large height each week: 10’9” at CIF Prelims, 11’ at CIF Finals and 11’8 at CIF Masters to make it to the showSTATE MEET! This showed me

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that she was determined and wanted this more than anything.”

The success of the ERHS vaulters is, most likely, largely due to their rigorous training regiment Coach Centanaro has in place. What is also amazing about Coach Centanaro is that he does not limit helping young vaulters to only those at his school. He genuinely wants all vaulters to succeed, and for pole vaulting to continue to gain momentum in his area. When asked about his program, he says, “This season I have 13 vaulters that represent our school. I am always open to helping other pole vaulters in our community. I am currently coaching two vaulters in

a near-by league- one of them being number 1 in her league at 10’. We train hard- not just physically, but mentally as well. My athletes are aware that in the pole vault you always end your competition on a miss, so with that you take that as a learning tool and work on what is needed to perform well the next competition. We all go into a competition knowing that our biggest competitor that day is ourselves. I would rather my athletes come in last place at a meet and PR by 1’ than win the meet and vault 2’ under their PR.” “We utilize just about anything we can to incorporate a pole vault drill,” Coach Centanaro continues on about his program. “We have a  14’ trampoline, 6 mini trampolines, gymnastic rings, high bars, mini hurdles and a 2” rope that hangs 16’ in the air, just to name a few.” Coach Centanaro is also busy in the off-season as well, keeping the training opportunities open to his vaulters. He tells us, “I coach year-round, breaking down the vault in the postseason with gymnastic drills, a lot of basic pole drills and jumping all pre-season.” He offers clinics at ERHS as well. “In the off-season I offer training to any athlete interested in learning the sport or just im-


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proving their vault. Any clinics that I host go towards all equipment needed for our program,” he says. While he is the only pole vault coach for the Roosevelt High School Mustangs, Coach Centanaro has some much appreciated help. Scott Weisheit, father of Nick Weisheit, is the parent volunteer for the team. They are also fortunate enough to have sponsors. Coach Centanaro tells us, “Rick Foster at Cal Track supports and sponsors us. I purchase all my equipment from Rick. Chris Bradford is also a sponsor and supporter to our program. He is a friend that has donated equipment as well, and has gone to all our meets to support us and take pictures for us.” Coach Centanaro’s methods seem to be working for the Roosevelt High School vaulting team. We hope they will bring him even more success with his vaulters in the future. They certainly are making a name for themselves. If Coach Centanaro’s love for vaulting continues to catch on maybe there will be even more great things in store for ERHS and the Riverside County community. We will all be keeping an eye out for the Mustangs at ERHS.

Andre Elmore

Back Row: Ekemini Sam, Scott Weisheit, LivioC entanaro, Chissy Langston Middle Row: Nick Weisheit, Clint Suppe, Andre Elmore, Karina Chavez, ChristianEsplana, Julianne Perez,SaraLLabib, Serina Ross, Kristen Thompson Front Row: Jason Ross, Gardenia Centanaro

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When Goals & “Entitlement” Sabotage By: Buba Sparks

I’ve heard it a million times at meets and it still makes me cringe. I’ve had to let my athletes learn the hard way because they were determined to “break the curse”. Some goals NEVER work. Here are a few examples;

• “Today’s the day I’m going to become a 15’ vaulter”. Actually put any height in that slot and then expect the result to be 12-18” lower (30-45cm). Like a high school friend of mine vaulted a PR 15’ (4.57m) the week before Reno this year. Assured that once he got on his 16’1” (4.90m) poles that he would be at 16’ in Reno, he was severely deflated when only cleared 13’ (3.97m).

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• Speaking of Reno I had a high school kid once take ONE pole to Reno, because for him to PR (in his mind) he would have to be on that pole; a 1680/4.90m-81kg. The first jump he got rejected and landed on his step on the runway. The next one he made the front bun, and the last one he was so high over the bar he came down on it standing up with his feet. NH!!! • Another kid went out and said that at the regional meet he would only use a particular pole with a particular grip. There was a headwind and he did not change his plan and he nhd. • These are all samples of goals creating sabotage.

The problem? Entitlement!! Once an athlete vaults a certain height, he/she expects that this is their new standard. The truth is you have to earn your vault every single day. There is no entitlement. You have to map out what you need to do to be successful and then follow it. How do you do this?

• How you practice is how you compete. I’ve seen many athletes over the years take a jump and then make no significant or visible change from jump to jump. OR, they have a focus on a particular vault and by the time they land on the pit a new issue is being pointed out. All of the sudden there is no for the original goal for that jump. • The greatest reality I can express to you is that pole vaulting is about becoming comfortable with the uncomfortable, and then looking for the next uncomfortable, because there are MANY “uncomfortables” that await you.

• You have to consciously set out to do one thing correctly on each jump and only judge the merit of that effort for that specific goal and jump. I’ve mentioned


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t you many times that I create a “mechanical checklist” of things I MUST do right TODAY in order to be successful. This is meant to create progress by planned success. The “old” approach is simply hoping to be successful by creating random chaos.

Bubba Sparks Reno Summit 2013

• Don’t limit yourself to goals hat others set for you. In fact, ignore them. I made the mistake once of telling a kid who had just cleared 15’ 3” (4.65m) that I really thought he could vault 17’ (5.18m) by the end of the following year. He believed it and did absolutely nothing in the way of work to achieve this goal and was very disappointed that he fell so far short.

• Another kid’s father told me that his boy had set a goal for the year of 14’ (4.27m) and asked what I thought. Based on where the kid was I felt it was an unreasonable goal. I told his dad that the goal might be a little optimistic but he will never hear that form me, nor should he hear it from you. The boy came to me and said he had high goals that he would keep to himself but wanted my input on achieving them. I laid it out, he followed the work and he did not vault

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C-Ram and Hergie Rock It! By: Michelle Walthall “The C-Ram and Hergie Team [which is what vaulters/ coaches Michael Ramoska and Dr. Richard A. Hergenrather have named their team of pole vault competition officials] have been officiating So. Cal. pole vault meets for 10 years,” says Michael Ramoska. “Almost

every Saturday, starting the 1st weekend of March until the 1st weekend of June, we are running a pole vault competition- from the Eagle Invitational, Arcadia Invitational, Orange County Championships, CIF Prelims, CIF Finals, the Masters Meet and the California State Meet

1971 Mount Tahoma Pole Vault, Jim Young, Larry Cornell and Mike Ramoska

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the vaulter magazine 2013

when it is held in So. Cal. We have a regular team of 6 of us during the CIF season which has been together for 6 years.” During the 10 years this crew has been officiating they have worked with an extensive list of successful vaulters. Coach


VAULTER

MAGAZINE

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the vaulter magazine 2013

Vaulter Magazine April 2013  

Vaulter Magazine April 2013 UCLA Cover

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