Challenges Fall 2017

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CHALLENGES in theory & practice THE J. A. PANUSKA, S. J., COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

VOL.16 NO.2 FALL 2017

Ignation Spirituality in ACTION

018 marks the Spring 2 versary of Leahy Commun ity Health & Family Center 15th Anni & the Center’s 10th A nniversary of Leahy Clinic


CONTENTS contents conten 3 Message from the Dean 4-5 Department News • Presentations • Publications 6-8 The Leahy Community Health & Family Center • 10-Year Mark for Leahy Clinic • Leahy Center Reflection • Jesuit Values in Practice

9-14 Engaged • Freshman Lecture Reflection • Fleming-Castaldy Receives National Honor

The Edward R. Leahy, Jr. Endowment

• Hanson Appointed to Committee

was founded in 1995 by Edward and Patricia Leahy

• National Recognition for Student Pro Bono Services

to honor the life and memory of their son, Edward R. Leahy, Jr., whose personal disabilities were attended to with compassion and skill by many health

• Julie Ann Nastasi, Ph.D., given the Ambassador of Sight award • Counseling and Human Services Department hosts Student/ Parent Post-Secondary Education Readiness Night • PEK –Phi Epsilon Kappa Exercise Science Honor Society Community Effort

professionals over the course of his life. The Leahy

15-16 Integrated • Patricia Leahy Receives Honors

Endowment provides financial resources to support

• A Sophomore Occupational Therapy Student reflects on disAbility Conference

theoretical and applied research, faculty development

• Inaugural Maria Gervasio Award is Presented to Occupational Therapy Student

and support for programs that advance the cause of

• Royal Spartan Tutoring

disabled persons who need long-term assistance. The

endowment supports the work of persons practicing

• International Service Program (ISP) trip to Ecuador

17 Global

in physical and occupational therapy, nursing science

• Clinical Mental Health Counseling Graduate Student Interviewed by MSNBC

and related health care areas, with particular interest

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Donor List

in individuals and groups that approach their practice as scholars, teachers and practitioners. Primary recipients are University of Scranton faculty from the

VOL.16 NO.2 FALL 2017 CHALLENGES IN THEORY & PRACTICE PUBLICATION COMMITTEE

of the Depart­ ments of Coun­ seling and Human

Raymond Schwenk, M.S., Editor Patricia Connolly, Editorial ­Assistant Office of External Affairs, The University of Scranton

Services, Educa­ tion, Exercise Science and Sport,

PANUSKA COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

Panuska College of Pro­fessional Studies, consisting

Health Adminis­tration and Human Resources, Nurs­ ing, Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy. The endowment was established and is supported, in part, by the Leahy family and is enriched annually by gifts from corporations and individuals who wish to support the work of the Edward R. Leahy, Jr. Endowment.

Debra A. Pellegrino, Ed.D., Dean Victoria Castellanos, Ph.D., Associate Dean Dianne Posegate, M.S., Assistant Dean, Director of Advising Center Raymond Schwenk, M.S., Assistant Dean Diane S. Muniz, Office Manager/Secretary to Dean Patricia Connolly, Secretary to Associate Dean

PCPS BOARD OF VISITORS Barbara Bossi Michele Rees Finn Melinda C. Ghilardi William Grant Monsignor John W. Jordan

JoAnne M. Kuehner Edward R. Leahy Timothy Mooney Maureen Pesavento Gerald Savitsky

CHALLENGES 2

T HE UNIV ERSIT Y O F S C R A N T ON • PA N U S KA C OL L E GE O F P R O F E S S I O N A L S TU DI E S


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN message from the dean messag

Debra Pellegrino, Ed.D.

Dear Friends, In the Panuska College of Professional Studies (PCPS), we encourage myriad opportunities for student- and faculty-led research, student engagement and leadership development. It begins with our PCPS strategic plan that is rooted in Ignatian spirituality and finishes with the achievements of each graduating class. In fall 2017, PCPS welcomed the class of 2021. Their smiling faces, full of potential, are prominently displayed on the front cover of this issue. It is our goal to take these wonderful students, full of potential, and transform them into the leaders in the Ignatian tradition, a tradition we have all come to expect from our great University. Here at PCPS, we will continue to implement the TAPESTRY program. This program, which provides academic and professional development activities, will be woven into The University of Scranton’s mission. And like a gorgeous finished tapestry, the results will be stunning. My hope is that when looking at this incoming class in four years, we will think of the Carole King song “Tapestry.” “Tapestry of rich and royal hue; an everlasting vision of the ever-changing view; a wondrous, woven magic…” PCPS is weaving a tapestry that is engaged, integrated and global. Won’t you come add your threads? Thank you for showing the love in your heart every day,

Debra Pellegrino, Ed.D. Academic Dean of the J.A. Panuska College of Professional Studies

The Edward R. Leahy, Jr. Endowment

Founder’s Society • $5,000 and more

Patrons • $1,000-$2,499

Benefactor’s Circle • $2,500-$4,999

Friends • up to $999


DEPARTMENT NEWS department news department news Bryon Applequist, Assistant Professor, Exercise Science & Sport Bryon Applequiest is expected to receive his Doctorate of Philosophy degree in Exercise Science—Biomechanics from the University of Nebraska at Omaha in December 2017. He received both an undergraduate and master’s degree in kinesiology from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Bryon has performed research in peripheral arterial disease, autism spectrum disorder, acquired brain injury, older adults, young children, as well as inertial sensors. He plans to establish a competitive research program involving autism spectrum disorder to improve the understanding of basic motor control deficits through biomechanics, and to aid in early diagnosis and implement enhanced movement therapy techniques.

Dr. Tiffany Bordonada, Assistant Professor, Counseling & Human Services Tiffany Bordonada received her Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision from the University of South Carolina in May of 2017. She holds two master’s degrees from West Virginia University, one in rehabilitation counseling and one in public administration with a certificate in healthcare administration and a B.S. degree in Psychology from Fairmont University. Dr. Bordonada gained counseling experience in both outpatient and inpatient mental health settings and has undergraduate teacher experience both online and face-to-face. She has a demonstrated commitment to research and scholarship.

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Janette Scardillo, DPT, Faculty Specialist, Physical Therapy Janette Scardillo received her DPT, MPT and BS degrees from The University of Scranton. Prior to her joining Scranton’s faculty, Scardillo was employed at Thomas Jefferson University as an assistant professor and co-director of Clinical Education. She has engaged in professional service with the American Physical Therapy Association, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Laurie Valunas, MSN, Faculty Specialist, Nursing Laurie Valunas received her Master of Science Nursing/Certification as Pediatric Nurse Practitioner from Duke University. She received her BSN from The University of Scranton. Over the years, Valunas has been providing health and medical care to children from birth through adulthood. She is nationally certified with Prescriptive Authority in the state of Pennsylvania. She has taught undergraduate BSN students and graduate MSN students.

Presentations Cerrito, J. A. & Eschbach, L.A. (2017, June). Connecting the Hope Centered Model of Career Development to the National Reach Higher Initiative. Paper presented at the meeting of the National Career Development Association Annual Conference, Orlando, FL. Chen, C. & Mbugua, T (2017, September). Keeping the balance between teacher-directed and child-initiated learning. Paper presented at the UNICEF-National College of Education Scientific Conference, Hanoi, Vietnam. Feeney, A., Calderone, E., Kampfe, J., McGowan, S., Nugent, J. & Vindici, J. (2017, April). College students’ knowledge and use of nicotine-tobacco products. Poster presented at the Eastern Nursing Research Society 29th Annual Scientific Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

THE UNIVERSITY O F S CR A NTO N • PA NU S KA CO LLE G E O F P R O F E SS I O N AL ST U D I E S


department news department news department news departme Presentations continued

Publications

Fleming-Castaldy, R.P. (2017, March). “A macro-perspective for occupation-based practice: Historical perspectives and contemporary tools to guide our future.” Reba Anderson Memorial Lecture. Nova Southeastern University. Fort Lauderdale, FL. 2 Mar. 2017.

Behun, R. J., Cerrito, J. A., Delmonico, D. L. & Campenni, C. E. (in press). Curricular abstinence: Examining human sexuality training in school counselor preparation programs. Journal of School Counseling.

Herrick, S., & Datti, P. A. (2017, April). Sexual minority individuals with autism spectrum disorder: Sex education implications. Presentation at the National Council on Rehabilitation Education Annual Spring Conference, Anaheim, CA. Lesneski, L. (2017, April). Sexually transmitted diseases: A health concern for occupations health nurses. Poster session presented at the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses 2017 National Conference, New Orleans, LA. Mantione, A., & Vital, M. (2017, October). What is the Association Between Diabetes and Lifestyle Changes Due to Acculturation in Hispanic Immigrants? Presentation at the National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics Symposium. Denver, CO. Mantione, A. (2017, November). Implementation of a Diabetes Mellitus Self-Management Education Program for Hispanic/Latinos in the Edward R. Leahy Jr. Center Clinic for the Uninsured. Annual Conference of the Pennsylvania Coalition of Nurse Practitioners. Erie, PA. Nicoteri, J. A. (2017, June). Drunkorexia: The Problem Exists, Now What Do We Do? Poster Presentation, American Association of Nurse Practitioners National Conference, Philadelphia, PA. Szydlowski, S., Ramirez, B., Costello, M., West, D., Ramirez, C., Belendez, A., & Miller, W.(2017, June). Using International Hospital Federation Competencies for Educating Participants in Healthcare Public-Private Partnerships. Paper presentation at European Academy of Management Annual Conference at Strathclyde University, Glasgow, Scotland. Zalon, M. L. (2017, May). Using innovative technology to improve health outcomes. Podium Presentation, International Council of Nurses 2017 Congress. Nurses at the Forefront of Transforming Care. Barcelona, Spain. Zalon, M. L. (2017, May). Preparing older citizens for the global challenges ahead. Poster Presentation, International Council of Nurses 2017 Congress, Nurses at the Forefront of Transforming Care. Barcelona, Spain.

Conyers, L. M., Richardson, L., Datti, P. A., Koch, L., & Misrok, M. (in press). Benefits of Employment for People with HIV: Health, Social, and Prevention Outcomes. AIDS Education & Prevention. Diana, M. L. and Olden, P. C. (2017). Modern Theories of Organization. In Johnson, J. A. and Rossow, C. C. (Ed). Health Organizations: Theory, Behavior, and Development, 2nd edition. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning. Hudacek, S.S., DiMattio, M.J.K, & Turkel, M.C. (2017). From academic-practice partnership to professional nursing practice model. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 48 (3), 104-112. Ledgister, K. & Fleming-Castaldy, R.P. (2017). The perceptions of persons living with HIV/AIDS about their experiences in regaining productive occupations: A Delphi study. Occupational Therapy in Mental Health, early on-line publication July 17, 2017. Nastasi, J. (2017). Chapter 7 – Meaning and dynamic of occupation and activity. In K. Jacobs, & N. MacRae (Editors), Occupational Therapy Essentials for Clinical Competence, Third Edition. Slack Incorporated. Nastasi, J. (2017). Chapter 37 – Consultation, referral, monitoring, and discharge planning. In K. Jacobs, & N. MacRae (Editors), Occupational Therapy Essentials for Clinical Competence, Third Edition. Slack Incorporated. Olden, P. C. and Diana, M. L. (2017). Classical Theories of Organization. In Johnson, J. A. and Rossow, C. C. (Ed). Health Organizations: Theory, Behavior, and Development, 2nd edition. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning. Spirito-Dalgin, R., Dalgin, M. H., & Metzger, S. A. (2017). A Longitudinal Analysis of the Influence of a Peer Run Warm Line Phone Service on Psychiatric Recovery. Community Mental Health Journal, 1-9. Spirito-Dalgin, R. (2017). The Complex Nature of Disability Stigma in Employment: Impact on Access and Opportunity. In S. B . Thomson & G. Grandy (Eds.) Stigmas in the Organizational Environment (55-70). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

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THE LEAHY COMMUNITY HEALTH & FAMILY CENTER

10-Year Mark for Leahy Clinic By Miranda Colburn ’18 On Nov. 17, 2007, The Edward R. Leahy Jr. Clinic for the Uninsured opened not only their doors to the underserved in the Greater Scranton community but also their hearts. The clinic began with only two patients. Now, local doctors, nurses, staff, students and community volunteers serve more than 5,000 patients from the community to fill a gap in health care, which every individual needs and deserves. On Feb. 18, 2008, The University of Scranton officially announced the opening of The Edward R. Leahy Jr. Clinic for the Uninsured. Now, 10 years later, the clinic opens its doors every day to provide free medical care to the underserved of Lackawanna County, offering physical therapy clinic twice weekly, counseling clinic every Wednesday, medical clinic every Thursday, and low vision clinic appointments throughout the week. Throughout the past 10 years, the community, staff and students have built a lasting relationship evolving into what is now a University- and community-wide achievement.

The president of The University of Scranton at the time, the Rev. Scott Pilarz, S.J., presents opening remarks at the dedication with Dr. Debra Pellegrino, academic dean and executive director of the Edward R. Leahy Jr Center Clinic for the Uninsured and Gregory Borowski, M.D., medical director, in the background.

Weaving a Tapestry Mr. Edward Leahy addresses the media at the announcement of the Leahy Clinic for the Uninsured in February 2008.

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THE UNIVERSITY O F S CR A NTO N • PA NU S KA CO LLE G E O F P R O F E SS I O N AL ST U D I E S


the leahy community health & family center the leahy communit Leahy Center Reflection By Renée M. Hakim, PT, Ph.D., NCS I first became involved with the Leahy Center in 2003 after the dedication ceremony described innovative opportunities for faculty, students and the community to work together to meet the health and wellness needs of underserved individuals. I recognized this as an opportunity to involve my students in a meaningful, community-outreach research project that combined teaching, service and scholarship. Subsequently, I devised a study that would allow my entire class (40 physical therapy students) to participate in a constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) program for persons with stoke. This was an ambitious project. I wrote a grant application and received funding from the Edward R. Leahy, Jr. Endowment in the amount of $10,000. This funding allowed me to conduct a Faculty-Student Research Program (FSRP) that focused on training functional movements of the arm/hand in persons with stroke. I worked with community partners to recruit participants who had completed usual care, but still had residual functional loss. In the fall of 2004, we completed the program in the multipurpose room located in the basement of McGurrin Hall. Several small groups of students completed testing and training activities with participants seated at large round tables, as others were able to observe all of the activities from behind a large two-way mirror that was located in the adjacent conference room. Because there was not much

organizational structure for health care programs at that time, I faced many challenges with scheduling, transportation and parking. However, in spite of these logistical issues, the Leahy Center clinic was a large, inviting space that enabled us to run a meaningful community-outreach program. Eventually, the Leahy Center implemented a more structured health and wellness program. Although I was not involved initially, a Physical Therapy (PT) clinic was founded by PT faculty to address a gap in health care access. The hours of operation were very limited and the services were provided by one PT faculty volunteer for a few hours weekly. This practice model continued for several years. As our students continued to express interest in having more patient care experiences, I returned to my Leahy Center roots two years ago as the faculty director of our newly reorganized student-run, pro bono PT Clinic. Consequently, I have become a part of the now thriving LCHFC under the direction of Andrea Mantione. On this 10th anniversary of the LCHFC, I can truly appreciate how far this clinic has come. The Leahy Family’s vision has enabled PCPS to have continued growth in programs and outreach in our community. There are local professionals, faculty, volunteers and students working hand-in-hand to provide much needed services to local residents, while simultaneously providing the opportunity for community-based learning (CBL) to our students. As I watch our PT students working as “men and women for others” each week, I am looking forward to many more years of continued growth and meaningful service in the LCHFC.

2009 Edmund Kosmahl, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, and third-year graduate students start the physical therapy clinic.

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THE LEAHY COMMUNITY HEALTH & FAMILY CENTER Jesuit Values in Practice By Alyssa Caucci ’17 The Leahy Community Health and Family Center is dedicated to the dual purpose of providing a practical educational experience while meeting the needs of the underserved. In doing so, the Center envisions a community where all individuals have access to those services that help them achieve, improve or maintain a quality of life that is consistent with optimal health and wellness. This vision encompasses the Jesuit ideal of cura personalis of caring for the “whole person” in more ways than one. As you walk around on any given clinic day at the Leahy Center, you can see the Jesuit ideals being demonstrated in action. Each individual you encounter, whether it be a patient, a student volunteer, a student nurse or the medical providers, are all engaging in the practicum of Jesuit tradition and value of educating the “whole person.” In addition to the medical and administrative practicum of the clinic, students and community volunteers alike engage with individuals from all backgrounds and learn from the patients they serve. Students and providers are able to use the Leahy Clinic to develop a better understanding of the values and beliefs from different cultures and how to interact with these individuals right here in Scranton. On the patient side, the Leahy Clinic attempts to serve its patients using the same cura personalis ideal instilled in its students. The main objective is to treat the whole person to achieve a state of wellness that encompasses both physical and mental health. In addition to receiving

2010

treatment for their medical condition, they are engaging with, and being educated by, their physician on diet, nutrition, exercise and the importance of preventative screenings. Furthermore, patients are offered a variety of services that go beyond medical treatment. Throughout the semester, Leahy offers its patients physical therapy, low vision therapy and counseling services to achieve that state of physical and mental wellness. Patients are assisted with food security from the Alice V. Leahy Food Pantry including fresh fruit and vegetables grown in The University of Scranton Community Garden. Leahy also provides diabetes management classes, exercise/nutrition classes and even the after-school enrichment Peacemakers program for the children of our patients. In everything that Leahy practices, the vision of learning from each other and for each other to develop the “whole person” is never forgotten in order to fulfill the Jesuit ideal and duty of cura personalis.

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The food pantry housed in the Center is run completely by student volunteers.

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THE UNIVERSITY O F S CR A NTO N • PA NU S KA CO LLE G E O F P R O F E SS I O N AL ST U D I E S

The Edward R. Leahy Jr. Center Clinic for the Uninsured is appreciative of the many doctors who volunteer, including its own Lewis Druffner, M.D.


By Kate Wisner ’21 When I first booked a tour at The University of Scranton, the Jesuit mission was completely foreign to me. The University’s gleaming facilities and accelerated occupational therapy program drew me to campus, and from there, I fell in love with more than just the academic institution. Many years earlier, before I could conceptualize a college education, let alone a Jesuit education, my grandmother taught me to knit. It was quite an ordeal; a 5-year-old girl and a 60 year-old woman

The flu clinic, run by the PCPS student nurses, is up and running.

snuggled into an armchair, entangled in several feet of yarn. As I grew older and my knitting abilities advanced, I sought greater meaning in my craft. Armed with my mother’s support and encouragement, I established a church group to knit for charity. Each week, we would convene and share our projects, and a pile of hats in the corner of my living room, destination unknown, began to accumulate. Continued on page 10

Engaged engaged integrated global engaged integrated global

Freshman Lecture Reflection

Dr. Pancholy and Maria Vital prepare to assist patients on a Thursday afternoon.

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the Jesuit mission of compassion, charity and love. A fundamental conviction of the Catholic Church When the pile morphed into a large Rubbermaid is that all human lives have dignity; as such, every tub, we selected a charity to receive our hats: the human being deserves proper care. Likewise, Ronald McDonald House in Hershey. As I continued occupational therapy emphasizes the importance to produce countless hats, I began to imagine the of a client’s dignity, striving to enable patients to children who would wear them and the joy that I be self-sufficient in everyday life. Furthermore, the hoped the hats would bring to their lives. However, Jesuit aim for cura personalis, or “care for it wasn’t until I personally delivered a the whole person” parallels the goal of Reflecting box of hats and saw the faces of the occupational therapy to treat individuals children and families illuminate with on my in all facets of their lives. In occupational gratitude, that I truly understood the experiences, therapy, this often means helping meaning that my service could have in perhaps God individuals return to the activities others’ lives. Thus, my love for knitting that give them a sense of identity evolved into something much more: a called me and purpose, a goal that is perfectly passion for serving others. here to put my accentuated when underscored by a A lifelong Methodist, I had never education. had the slightest intention of attending passions to Jesuit As a helping professional, it is a Catholic university; nevertheless, from work. impossible to execute cura personalis the moment I set foot on Scranton’s without forging personal connections campus, the University’s commitment with patients. Similarly, the Corporal Works of to serving others overwhelmed me. Soon, I Mercy, based in the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, learned that this self-sacrificing service embodied stress the need for service to be sacramental, the Jesuit mission, and a more concrete concept that is, for the individuals to be both present and of a Jesuit education began to form in my mind. I connected. Regarding the helping professions, this quickly realized that many of my personal beliefs relationship is often established in physical touch. As about service and compassion toward others were an occupational therapist, I will, no doubt, support analogous with those put forth by St. Ignatius in the a client as she dresses herself, lifts herself from bed, Jesuit mission. As I continue to learn about Jesuit lowers herself into a shower chair; this is sacramental. values, I am even more certain of the capacity of my The faith that a client places in a therapist forges an education to mold me into not only a highly skilled occupational therapist, but also into an OT guided by effective client-practitioner relationship. However, Freshman Lecture Reflection continued from page 9

2012 The University of Success program, housed in the Leahy Center, continues to bring soon-to-be collegebound high school students to campus for support.

2013 Gerianne Barber NCC, LPC, director of the Counselor Training Center, works closely with the graduate students in counseling to reflect after their sessions with clients.

THE UNIVERSITY O F S CR A NTO N • PA NU S KA CO LLE G E O F P R O F E SS I O N AL ST U D I E S


2014 Under the direction of PCPS nursing faculty volunteers, student nurses rotate through the clinic.

It takes a village to run a center as a living-learning laboratory to assist the underserved population. PCPS is grateful to St. Gregory’s parish and all community agencies who volunteer to assist.

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Engaged engaged integrated global engaged integrated global

this faith exists only when a therapist honors the be an occupational therapy major seemed trivial to sacrament of therapy and is present for the client. me at first; I had simply chosen a field that combined A therapist’s actions must demonstrate her a number of my interests. But, reflecting on my devotion to her client, if she is to establish that experiences, perhaps God called me here to put my she is present for him or her. St. Ignatius of Loyola passions to work. In Jeremiah 1:5 the Lord proclaims: incites followers of the Jesuit tradition to show love “Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you, before “more by deeds than by words”; a mission that is you were born I set you apart”; could it be that He often fulfilled when Jesuits serve had drawn me here all along? in hospitals. In Father Rodgers’ Perhaps, when I was 5 years old “An Ignatian presentation, he recalled serving and curled in my grandmother’s lap, education does not in an AIDS hospital in the lateHe was forging a plan for me. He exist to make you 20th century. He contended that taught me the meaning of human serving individuals with such vile better than everyone dignity, as I served smiles and soup illnesses prevents the abstraction in a local homeless shelter; the else; it exists to of suffering. A Jesuit praying sacramental power of touch, as I with an AIDS patient cannot make you better for held my grandfather’s hand when pretend that victims of AIDS are the tumor that overtook his brain everyone else.” a faceless mass; rather, he must forced him into a coma; and the — F­ a ther Jim Skerl acknowledge the individuality and importance of deeds, each time dignity of the individual. In the my father reminded me to “walk case of helping professionals, they must indicate, the walk” if I wanted to “talk the talk.” Although He through the commitment to the patient’s dignity never appeared to me in a dream, God shaped my and individual needs, that they have a patient’s best experiences to call me to the University. interest at heart. Thus, a helping professional forms a Father Jim Skerl offers an apt appraisal of the value viable connection with his or her client. of Jesuit education: “An Ignatian education does Lastly, the Jesuit concept of a vocation, where not exist to make you better than everyone else; it “your greatest passion meets the world’s need,” is exists to make you better for everyone else.” As an applicable nowhere if not in the helping professions. occupational therapist, I do not need to be the best At The University of Scranton, Panuska College of in my field, only the best for my clients, and I know, Professional Studies students are “embracing the call unequivocally, that a Jesuit education will prepare to care.” The idea that a higher power called me to me for exactly that.

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Fleming-Castaldy Receives National Honor Rita P. Fleming-Castaldy, Ph.D., professor of occupational therapy, was honored on April 1, 2017, at the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Annual Conference when she received the AOTA Award for Excellence in the Advancement of Occupational Therapy. The AOTA presented this award “to express appreciation for extraordinary contributions to the advancement of occupational therapy” and acknowledge Dr. Fleming-Castaldy’s work in “advancing disability rights, empowerment, and historical literacy.” A staunch advocate for public policies and professional practices that enable full participation for all persons, Dr. Fleming-Castaldy has authored over 175 works, including peer-reviewed national and international journal articles, peer-reviewed national and international conference presentations and well-regarded textbooks and book chapters. Her most influential works are those that bring disability rights, empowerment and historical literacy to the forefront of the profession’s consciousness. An AOTA Fellow, Dr. Fleming-Castaldy is currently serving as the invited editor-in-chief for the AOTA Centennial history research project.

Julie Ann Nastasi, Ph.D., was awarded the Ambassador of Sight award from the Lion’s Club Low Vision Centers of Fairfield and New Haven counties in Connecticut.

Hanson Appointed to Committee Mary Jane S. Hanson, Ph.D., CRNP, CNS, has been appointed co-chair of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education’s (CCNE) Substantive Change Review Committee. The committee reviews substantive change notifications submitted by institutions that offer baccalaureate and/or graduate nursing programs for continued compliance with accreditation standards. In addition, Dr. Hanson was also appointed to the CCNE Standards Committee, which is responsible for reviewing and revising the nursing accreditation standards. Dr. Hanson currently serves on the CCNE Board of Commissioners.

2015 Electronic Medical Records are introduced in the Leahy Center Clinic. Director Andrea Mantione provides instructions to the physicians, nurses and student volunteers.

The “Peace Makers” program, under the direction of the PCPS Counseling Department, guides University of Scranton counseling students with mentoring activities. Andrea Mantione assists with PCPS student volunteers working with elementary children age 9 to 12 years.

THE UNIVERSITY O F S CR A NTO N • PA NU S KA CO LLE G E O F P R O F E SS I O N AL ST U D I E S


By Jennifer Schwartz, PT, DPT For the past two years, the Department of Physical Therapy has granted national recognition for physical therapy students with outstanding service. At our graduation celebration in May of 2017, the department awarded 20 Doctor of Physical Therapy students with membership into the Physical Therapy National Pro Bono Honor Society. This is over 50 percent of the graduating class! This number is evidence of students championing professional core values such as altruism, compassion and social responsibility. These are professional behaviors that faculty hope to see continue in our graduates as they enter their own physical therapy practice. Students who provide 20 hours of pro bono service by graduation are eligible for membership in the honor society. Students provide pro bono services in the student-run physical therapy clinic as part of the Edward Leahy Jr. Clinic. In the clinic, students provide examination and intervention to patients who would not otherwise have access to physical therapy care. In 2014, eight institutions founded the PT National Pro Bono Honor Society. Administered through the Widener University’s Institute for Physical Therapy Education, this honor society recognizes outstanding PT students who provide pro bono services as part of their education. In the fall of 2015, The University of Scranton Physical Therapy Department became a member organization. Membership allows our

institution to give out awards annually to outstanding graduate students. Nominees to the honor society have increased dramatically over the past two years. In 2016, our first member, Brandon Tunis, was honored for his efforts in organizing the clinic and increasing classmates’ participation. The following year, 20 graduates of the Class of 2017 were inducted into the Honor Society, including: Alexander Arrow, Nicholas Constantino, Daniel DiPaola, Daniel Dolphin, Coleen Joyce, Nicholas Laurente, James Leighty, Charles Lewis, Jennifer Lewis, Colleen McMahon, Joseph Martzen, James Moser, Katelyn Moyer, Jesse Myers, Megan Nevers, Cory Pasquarelli, Gabrielle Pierce, Dana Principe, Robert Roncek and Steven Roughton. Current students also follow the pathway to excellence; they continue to serve in the clinic, provide pro bono services, and reflect the core values of the profession before they even enter professional practice. No doubt their experience will shape their practice for years to come as they continue to serve marginalized people.

2016 The Leahy Center relies heavily on its faculty, staff and student volunteers, work study students and the many community volunteers.

Occupational Therapy students assist in the Low Vision Clinic started by Julie Nastasi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Scranton. FALL 201 7 • C H ALLE N G E S I N T H E O RY & PRAC T IC E

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National Recognition for Student Pro Bono Services

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Counseling and Human Services Department hosts Student/Parent Post-Secondary Education Readiness Night A student and parent postsecondary education readiness night was held on Sept. 26, 2017, at Wyalusing Valley High School in collaboration with the Counseling and Human Services Department. Invited school districts included Wyalusing Valley High School, Towanda Area High School, and Northeast Bradford High School. Drs. Julie Cerrito and LeeAnn Eschbach, along with University of Scranton graduate counseling students currently enrolled in practicums and internships, delivered the program in a “workstation” format where students and their parents moved from station to station to discuss relevant topics. Topics focused on preparing students and their parents for what comes next and included how to: choose a college; pick a college;

complete the Common Application; understand the college application process and how best to visit a college. They were offered a crash course in financial aid, SAT/ACT information and a guide to college housing. The goal for the event was to reach 100150 students and their parents to assist them in their planning and decision-making.

PEK –Phi Epsilon Kappa Exercise Science Honor Society Community Effort For the past four years, The University of Scranton Exercise Science Honor Society’s Phi Epsilon Kappa (PEK) students have supported Professor Emeritus Jack O’Malley and his family for Ryan’s ROAR 5K Walk/ Run in memory of his son, Ryan O’Malley. These efforts helped secure a scholarship in Ryan’s name. The 5th and final event was held this past spring at the Byron Center on the campus of the University. The honor society students were instrumental in providing the setup and break down of the event, along with collectively donating money each year and supporting the operations of the walk/run. Joan Grossman, Ph.D., serves as the PEK faculty advisor.

2017 Erik Schab, MHA graduate student, thanks Dr. Andrea Mantione, director of the Leahy Center; Dr. Maria Vital, operations manager of the Center; and the nurse manager Kirsten McIntyre for their support and tutelage after completing his health administration internship/ residency.

THE UNIVERSITY O F S CR A NTO N • PA NU S KA CO LLE G E O F P R O F E SS I O N AL ST U D I E S

The Leahy Community Health and Family Center welcomes clients to the Center’s school supply pantry to prepare for back to school days.


Patricia Leahy was recognized for her advocacy efforts on behalf of individuals with disabilities at multiple conferences this past summer. Leahy received the prestigious Dr. Patricia J. Livingston Public Policy Award from Metro New York City NRA conference at New York University. This award is presented to an individual who has shown particular sensitivity with regard to public policy at the local, state, or federal level, enhancing the quality of life for persons with disabilities. In addition to the Livingston Award, Leahy was also the recipient of the New Jersey Rehabilitation Association’s President’s Award at their annual meeting at Rutgers University.

A Sophomore Occupational Therapy Student reflects on disAbility Conference RJ Mitte, the keynote speaker for Scranton’s 16th Annual U.S. Conference on disAbility, was a very insightful speaker in addressing the abilities of those living with disabilities. I have never watched the show “Breaking Bad,” so I had no idea that he has cerebral palsy until it was mentioned in his introduction. I found him to be a downto-earth individual and very genuine. He is a determined young man. I think his attitude is something from which everyone can learn. Mitte truly believes that a person’s self is his or her biggest obstacle. By this, he means that we tend to limit ourselves when there is no reason to do so. According to Mitte, “Saying ‘I can’t’ is a choice.” I completely agree with this statement. People truly can do whatever they set their minds to do. This attitude is extremely important to have when working with people who have disabilities. If we do not have confidence in our clients’ abilities, it will be an even greater challenge for them to progress. As occupational therapists, we must be that extra encouragement for them during times of hardship

A second comment that he made that really resonated with me was his comment that businesses see disability and liability as one and the same. My heart hurts at this statement. Individuals living with disabilities should be given the same opportunities as people who do not have disabilities. A person who has a disability is limited by other people and the environment more than any other factors. Many people with disabilities can do everything people without disabilities can do, they might just complete tasks in different ways. The world must learn to embrace and encourage diversity. We as occupational therapists have an important role of advocacy for those who are wrongly labeled as being incapable. Listening to Mitte speak about becoming so successful with his acting despite others’ negativity was quite inspiring. It was heartwarming to hear the level of respect that he has for the allied health professions. I think he was a great guest to have and I look forward to hearing from the future disAbility conference keynote speakers. FALL 201 7 • C H ALLE N G E S I N T H E O RY & PRAC T IC E

Integrated engaged integrated global engaged integrated global

Patricia Leahy Receives Honors

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engaged integrated global engaged integrated global Integrated 16

Inaugural Maria Gervasio Award is Presented to Occupational Therapy Student Maria Gervasio ’14 was strongly committed to the therapeutic use of occupation and its power to improve quality of life. During her graduate year, Gervasio authored “Occupational Therapy (OT) and the Enablement of Quality of Life: An Historical Reflective and Critical Analysis of the Profession’s First Century.” Posthumously, her research was presented at the Pennsylvania OT Association conference by alumnus Tara Wisbauer G’14. The Maria Gervasio Award for Outstanding Commitment to Professional Development honors Gervasio’s life by recognizing an OT student who has completed exemplary research which reflects her spirit. On March 22, 2017, Maria’s parents Karen and Alex Gervasio presented Kaitlyn Jones this award for her honors thesis “The Effect of Bilateral Hand Transplants on the Perceived Quality of Life in Two Combat Veterans.” This award provided financial support for Jones to present her research at the 2017 American OT Association national conference.

Royal Spartan Tutoring The University of Scranton and the Mid Valley Secondary Center have agreed to partner for the purpose of creating an after school tutoring program available for students in the Secondary Center. The tutors for the program are University of Scranton students who are currently pre-service teachers in The University of Scranton’s Education Department. All University students involved in this program possess valid clearances. Royal Spartan Tutoring serves as a resource for Mid Valley Secondary students to receive instruction and support in a variety of content areas. Tutors are available up to three times a week in a variety of subject areas, beginning in early October, and culminating at the end of the fall semester. The tutoring program is maintained as allowable during intersession, and then is continued through the spring 2018 semester. Royal Spartan Tutoring runs from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., three days a week, with a Mid Valley administrator or faculty member present during this time as well.

The expected outcomes for the program are twofold, as this is a mutually beneficial endeavor. University of Scranton students have increased opportunities in a school environment to work with students in need under the guidance of a professional educator. Tutoring initiatives in the secondary level are rare due to the specialized nature of the content and instruction required of potential participants. Due to University of Scranton students’ knowledge and specialty areas, this opportunity is possible. Tutoring expectations and guidelines focus on three core components: preparedness, instruction and professionalism. Mid Valley students enjoy many benefits from the program as well. They receive individualized instruction in a specific area of need, under the direct guidance of their classroom teacher. They have the opportunity to increase their math, science, social studies or English/language arts achievement, and their organizational skills. Furthermore, time management and test taking skills and strategies may also be introduced and reviewed.

THE UNIVERSITY O F S CR A NTO N • PA NU S KA CO LLE G E O F P R O F E SS I O N AL ST U D I E S


Clinical Mental Health Counseling Graduate Student Interviewed by MSNBC By Amanda Lara I had the opportunity to be interviewed by Harry Smith of MSNBC as a part of a segment for “Sunday Night with Megyn Kelly” that aired on July 23, 2017, which featured Chicago Cubs Manager Joe Maddon and the Hazleton Integration Project (HIP). I currently serve as the assistant director of Education at HIP in my hometown of Hazleton, where I oversee a preschool and an afterschool program that serves about 90 children from pre-k to 7th grade. Over a decade, the Hispanic population rose by 30 percent in Hazleton, causing a noticeable shift in demographics. HIP was established to promote acceptance, unity and respect. Current initiatives include adult education programs offered in English and Spanish, citizenship classes, athletics programs and charitable drives for area foundations. In my interview, I talked to MSNBC about the

experience of being raised in Hazleton and returning after graduating college. As a Mexican-American, secondgeneration female, I struggled to integrate all the facets of my identity. Upon joining the staff at HIP, I discovered a space that allowed me to develop a more cohesive sense of self. As a graduate student in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program at The University of Scranton, I aspire to develop into a professional that promotes the empowerment and growth of individuals, especially those who have struggled with their identity as I did. My hope is that others can find the people and places that can help them discover and FALL 201 7 • C H ALLE N G E S I N T H E O RY & PRAC T IC E

Global engaged integrated global engaged integrated global

Students from The University of Scranton, with chaperones Synthia Guthrie Kretsch and Peter Leininger, Ph.D., from the Department of Physical Therapy, spent 10 days in the Quito region of Ecuador as part of an International Service Program (ISP) trip. The group worked primarily at the Working Boys Center, interacting with children, adults and Ecuadorian families in a life-changing experience. PCPS students in the group included Sarah Brown and Gabby Lins from occupational therapy, Courtney Loughlin and Delia Gavin from counseling, and Aileen Moore from education.

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DONOR LIST the leahy community health & family donor list t FOUNDERS Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Leahy

FOUNDERS SOCIETY AllOne Foundations Mr. & Mrs. Jack Bagley Mr. Stephen Whitney Bradley Mr. & Mrs. John E. Brennan Margaret Briggs Foundation CIGNA Corporation Mr. Michael Clark Community Medical Center Covenant Presbyterian Church CVS Caremark Mr. James H. DeGraffenreidt Jr. & Dr. Mychelle Farmer Gertrude Hawk Chocolates Mr. & Mrs. Hugh J. Gownley Mr. & Mrs. James C. Holcomb Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Judah Mr. & Mrs. Arthur J. Kania Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. Kolar Marshfield Associates Mr. & Mrs. Jack Olender Mr. & Mrs. Paul J. Ondrasik Mr. & Mrs. Robert O’Neil Philip Morris Companies, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. John Quinn Dr. Alfred & Kathleen Rotondaro Sanofi-Pasteur Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Savitsky Scranton Area Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Timothy H. Scully Jr. Joseph T. Sebastianelli, Esq. Mr. Guy T. Valvano Mr. & Mrs. John Valvano Willary Foundation Corbin A. & Dorice S. McNeill Foundation Northeastern Pennsylvania Health Care Foundation

BENEFACTORS CIRCLE AstraZeneca Mr. & Mrs. Peter J. Chepucavage Mr. & Mrs. James C. Doyle Mr. & Mrs. Joseph T. Doyle Lewis C. Druffner Jr., M.D. Mr. Michael Fasciana Mr. & Mrs. Andrew V. Fellingham Mr. & Mrs. Jack Gallagher Mr. & Mrs. George Grandison Mr. Adam Gurwitz Mrs. Meg Hambrose Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Russell Ms. Ellen A. Morgenstern One Point, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. David Steinfield Ms. Susan M. Swain Mr. James Wolf

PATRONS Col. & Mrs. Ali S. Alrakaf Anonymous Mr. & Mrs. John H. Appleton Mr. & Mrs. Thomas D. Aristide Bank Austria Creditanstalt 18

Mr. & Mrs. Larry Beckler Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Bloom Mr. & Mrs. Christopher P. Boam Mr. & Mrs. John J. Boland Mr. & Mrs. Keith Calhoun-Senghor Mr. Barry L. Corman Ms. Louise Corman Mr. & Mrs. Craig Diemer Employees of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates Mary F. Engel, Ph.D. Mr. & Mrs. William Finn Dr. & Mrs. Kamran Foroughi Mr. & Mrs. Grant Green Mr. David Hawk Ms. Elise Hoffmann Mr. & Mrs. Alan Holmer Mr. Peter F. Hurst Jr. Mr. John J. Kneiss & Mrs. Sharon Hurst-Kneiss Mrs. Sharon A. Walsh Kelly Mrs. Anne Lang Mr. & Mrs. Martin Lentz Mr. Eric Lewis Ms. Kristin Mathews & Mr. Tony Versaci Mr. & Mrs. Alan Mazzei Dr. & Mrs. Vincent K. McInerney In Memory of Mrs. Murray Dondy Mr. & Mrs. James A. Noone Drs. Michael J. & Martina A. O’Shea Mr. James Pasco & Ms. Cybele Daley Ms. Margaret Perez PNC Bank, Northeast PA Providian Corporation Mr. & Mrs. Joseph C. Quinn Rees, Broome & Diaz, P.C. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Mr. Henry J. Sallusti Mr. & Mrs. Christopher J. Schneider Mr. Roger L. Selfe Mr. & Mrs. Robert Shanks Mr. & Mrs. Russell L. Smith St. John Nuemann Regional Academy Mrs. Judy Stavisky & Mr. Alan Schiff Mr. & Mrs. Thomas N. Tate Mr. & Mrs. Olin Wethington Mr. & Mrs. Richard Whiting Williams Capital Group, L.P. Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin Wilson Ms. Diane Helyne Zyats & Mr. Michael E. Tyrrell

FRIENDS Mr. Dele Akinla II Amazon Smile Foundation Diane Ambler, Esq. Mr. Robert H. Angeloni Mr. & Mrs. David Arbucias Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Ashby Ms. Avisheh Avini Ms. Anne Azencot Dr. & Mrs. Harold W. Baillie Ms. Dona Bainbridge & Mr. Tom Owens Mr. & Mrs. Ernesto S. Baldo Mr. & Mrs. William Batdorf Mr. John Beckmann Mr. & Mrs. Paul S. Berger Mr. Pearce Bloom Professor & Mrs. Robert M. Bloom

THE UNIVERSITY O F S CR A NTO N • PA NU S KA CO LLE G E O F P R O F E SS I O N AL ST U D I E S

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur L. Bobbouine Sr. Ms. Megan K. Getz Bohensky Mr. & Mrs. Robert Boreck Mr. William Brady MS. Linda Bryan Judith A. Buckalew, Esq. Mr. & Mrs. Jeremiah S. Buckley Mr. & Mrs. Bobby R. Burchfield Mr. & Mrs. James Burke Greg F. Burke, M.D. Ms. Melina Capitanio Career Development and Employment, LTD. Mr. William W. Carpenter Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Casey Mr. & Mrs. Robert Casey Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Al Cassette Mr. Christian Chandler Mr. L. Cherington Ms. Sarah Chilton Church of St Gregory City Cafe Mr. Jordan J. Clark Mr. William M. Cloherty Ms. Ann Cloruri Mary M. Connolly, Esq. Friends of Joanne Corbett Mr. William J. Corcoran Covenant Women’s Association Catherine A. Richmond-Cullen, Ed.D. Eugene A. Cusick Funeral Home Ms. Amy M. Cutchineal Mr. & Mrs. William F. Demarest Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Dempsey Mr. Sean C. Denniston DFK, Inc. (T/A Now Hair Studio) Mrs. Michelle DiBenedetto Ms. JoAnn Diffendall Mr. & Mrs. James A. Doherty Ms. Christine Domson Donahue Funeral Home Mr. Paul Doucette Rev. Robert Drinan, S.J. Mr. & Mrs. John Dunworth Elm Park Methodist Church Mrs. Renee Esposito Mr. & Mrs. John P. Evans Ms. Elizabeth L. Ey Mr. David V. Falbo, Jr. Mrs. Julie Nicholas Fairman Ms. Christine M. Faller Ms. Dolores Farr Ms. Lauren C. Farrell Mr. & Mrs. Eugene P. Feeney Mr. & Mrs. Roger Feldman Mrs. Theresa M. Ferrari Debra Lynne Fetherman, Ph.D. Mr. & Mrs. Albert Foster Jr. Freddie Mac Foundation Frederick S. Upton Foundation A Friend Mr. James W. Fritzinger Georgetown University Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Gergel Melinda C. Ghilardi, Esq. & Sidney J. Prejean, Esq. Mr. & Mrs. Kevin Golden Mr. & Mrs. Terence E. Golden Mr. & Mrs. James Goodman


the leahy community health & family donor list the leahy communi FRIENDS continued Sean T. Granahan, Esq. Mr. Albert Grasseli & Ms. Frances Roller Mr. & Mrs. Robert Greenfield CPT. Keith R. Guglielmi, USA Mr. Jeffrey Haney Mrs. Catherine Harrington Dr. Patricia Harrington Dr. & Mrs. Gabriel J. Hauser Mr. Robert W. Hayes Mr. & Mrs. Robert Hendricks Ms. Elise Hoffmann Mr. & Mrs. Warren T. Hohn Mr. Timothy J. Holland Ms. Jill Yacone Hopper E. Paul Hornyak, M.D., Ph.D. Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Hudock Jr. Marc A. Incitti Jackson & Consumano Mr. & Mrs. Micardo L. Johns Msgr. John W. Jordan Sr. M. Gabriel Kane, I.H.M. Ms. Deborah Kennedy & Mr. William Kennard Ms. Margaret A. Kenyon Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Kizelevicus Mr. Stephen Klitzman & Mrs. Justine Lisser Mr. & Mrs. Peter J. Kneiss Mr. & Mrs. Walter Koprowski Edmund M. Kosmahl, Ed.D. Ms. Robyn T. Kowalski Mr. & Mrs. Don Krey Mr. & Mrs. Carl J. Kuehner Ms. Veronica Kulick Mr. & Mrs. George Lapin Drs. Bennett & Judith Lavenstein Linda L. Ledford-Miller, Ph.D. Mr. Michael Levitt & Ms. Laura Greenberg Mr. & Mrs. Mark Lieberman Mr. Dale A. Lindenmoyer Ms. Mary Theresa Litvin Mr. & Mrs. Michael E. Losito Mrs. Margaret A. Loughney Mr. & Mrs. John C. Lutkenhouse Mr. & Mrs. Ferdinand Magpayo Ms. Mary Ann Mangini Ms. Andrea Schall Mantione Mr. & Mrs. Richard Marcinko Honorable Edward J. Markey Mrs. Mary Ann Maslar

Ms. Kelly M. McAndrew Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. McCarthy Mr. & Mrs. Daniel J. McDermott Frank J. McDonnell, Esq. Ms. Marybeth H. McDonough Catherine A. McGeehan, RN, MSN Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. McGlotten Mr. & Mrs. Richard McGowan Mr. & Mrs. William McGrath Mr. Brian P. McKenna Mr. Kevin P. McLaughlin Mr. & Mrs. Fred McRobie Mr. & Mrs. William Mendelson Mr. & Mrs. Michael Mendelson Mr. & Mrs. Michael Miller Dr. Edward J. Miller & Dr. Jennifer A. Sylvia Zachary E. Miller Dr. & Mrs. John Minehart Hon. Jeffrey P. Minehart Ms. Karen Mitchell Mr. James Molloy Mr. Tim Mooney Mr. & Mrs. Chip Moreau Mr. & Mrs. James F. Morgan, Jr. Ms. Erica Morgan Mr. & Mrs. John J. Morrissey Joseph J. Mowad, M.D. Ms. Ethel Mullen Mrs. Diane Kuchera Muniz Mr. Timothy J. Murphy & Ms. Christen M. Mowad Ms. Nina T. Muto Dr. Georgia L. Narsavage Dr. & Mrs. David B. Nelson Mr. & Mrs. Eamonn O’Brien Mr. & Mrs. Michael O’Brien Mrs. Jaclyn R. Olszewski Order of Malta, Scranton Mr. Stephen Ornstein Mr. & Mrs. Terrence F. Osborne Michael J. O’Shea, D.D.S., LLC Ralph N. Pacinelli, D.Ed., CRC, LPC Ariane Palmasani Conaboy, M.D. Mr. Mark Paradise Neil Patel, M.D. Mrs. Cheryl Patton Debra A. Pellegrino, Ed.D. Mr. & Mrs. Louis J. Picciano Mrs. Mary Ellen Pichiarello

Mr. Joseph M. Piepul Mr. & Mrs. John Pilcher Dr. John V. Pilitsis Mr. & Mrs. Timothy B. Primerano Dr. John Prior, D.O. Ms. Laura A. Prosser Mr. Robert Purifico Msgr. Joseph G. Quinn Mr. & Mrs. James C. Riccobono Mr. & Mrs. Frank E. Roberts Mr. David L. Roll Mr. & Mrs. Barry Rosenthal Ms. Wendy M. Solensky Runco Nicholas D. Saccone, D.D.S. Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. Sadowski Mr. & Mrs. Gerard Salemme Mr. & Mrs. Stephen E. Sandherr Mrs. Theresa P. Sandrowicz Christine Byron Santora, M.D. Mr. Walter R. Schuster Mr. & Mrs. Ed Schwartz Ms. Virginia L. Slattery Sol-Air Techniques Ms. Karen E. Spadoni Ms. Nicole M. Spaldo Ms. Beverlee Stafford Amanda Stahl Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Steinmetz Stevens & Lee Cecilia C. Strauch Mr. & Mrs. Neal Sullivan Mr. & Mrs. Peter W. Thomas Ms. Mary Toler Msgr. David L. Tressler Tripp Umbach Healthcare, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Edward Ureta Wachovia Securities Ambassador & Mrs. James Walsh Mr. Roger E. Warin Mr. & Mrs. Mike Washo Mr. & Mrs. Jerry J. Weinberger Dr. & Mrs. Daniel J. West Jr. Ms. Dorothy Wrazin Mr. & Mrs. Linwood C. Wright Jr. Margarete L. Zalon, Ph.D. Mr. Robert P. Zelno Prof. Deborah A. Zielinski Mr. & Mrs. Paul Zocco

Contribution to The Edward R. Leahy, Jr. Endowment Contributions from friends and ­benefactors support the work of The Edward R.

Leahy, Jr. Endowment and its mission to explore new ways of delivering quality health care to underserved children and their families. Please help us to achieve these goals by making a contribution today. Founder’s Society • $5,000 and more Benefactor’s Circle • $2,500-$4,999

Patrons • $1,000-$2,499 Friends • up to $999

To make a donation, use the enclosed envelope or make a gift by visiting our secure website: scranton.edu/makeagift Please type Edward Leahy Jr. Endowment in the field indicating “other.”

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The University of Scranton is committed to providing a safe and nondiscriminatory employment and educational environment. The University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, religion, age, veteran status, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, or other status protected by law. Sexual harassment, including sexual violence, is a form of sex discrimination prohibited by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. The University does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational, extracurricular, athletic, or other programs or in the context of employment. Inquiries regarding non-discrimination and sexual harassment and sexual misconduct policies may be directed to Jennifer LaPorta, Executive Director and Title IX Coordinator, Office of Equity and Diversity, (570) 941-6645.