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Special PLACES FOR MEMBERS AND SUPPORTERS OF THE TRUSTEES OF RESERVATIONS

FALL 2005 VOLUME 13

NO. 3

The Women of Appleton Farms


because of it! And, with thriving apprenticeship

T H E T R U S T E E S O F R E S E RVAT I O N S

programs for both farm and dairy operations,

We are over 40,000 people like you who want

Appleton is training a new generation of farmers,

to protect the places they love or who simply

© TTOR/J.NAPOLI

a surprising number of whom—mirroring a

KENDALL’S CORNER

distinct character of our communities and inspire

dozens of farms across Massachusetts, new

a commitment to special places across the

farmers, new products, new approaches to

Commonwealth. Our passion is to share with

distinct character of Massachusetts. There are about 550,000 acres of farmland left in Massachusetts, just over 10% of which is permanently protected. With our neighbors and partners, we are working in communities across the state to help conserve farmland using the best conservation tools available. In Westport alone, we have assisted in preserving five farms—adding almost 600 acres of protected land to this beautiful agricultural community—and bringing the total number

landmarks that we care for––as we know how

keep farms alive.

valuable they are to our every day lives.

Farms and farm stands are some of my favorite destinations in the fall, but we hope to enjoy the foliage, too. Autumn is a great time of year for exploring new properties––and a great time to introduce a new generation of

feature in this Special Places called “Something Will Happen” to offer reassurance that you don’t need to be Edmund Hillary to explore and connect with the fascinating natural world waiting right outside your door. This issue, we are highlighting four of our most familyfriendly properties. With 95 reservations we have a place, near you, where we’re sure “something will happen” to delight and inspire you––so please tell us about your adventures. You can write to us at FindYourPlace@ttor.org. Finally, our annual appeal for your support is on its way. Look for it in your mailbox. Your gift will be included in the Landscapes and Landmarks campaign and will help meet The Kresge Foundation Challenge. Please make your move and be counted!

securing the land is only part of the solution. Perhaps the best thing we can do to preserve we are helping grow a new generation of farmers

Andy Kendall Executive Director

you’ll pick up your property guide and get out

of preserved farms in the town to 20. But

farms is to make them viable, and to that end

everyone, the irreplaceable landscapes and

marketing, and new customers are helping to

you along with that, we’re launching a new

As leaves are to autumn, farming is to the

Together with our neighbors, we protect the

national trend—are women. Here, and at

future conservationists to the outdoors. To help

Farms and Families

like to be outdoors.

John Bradley Director of Membership Sarah Carothers Director of Planned Giving Tom Foster Director of Field Operations Melanie Ingalls Director of Education & Outreach Ann Powell Director of Development

Chris Kennedy Islands Regional Director Steve McMahon Western Regional Director Wayne Mitton Northeast Regional Director Dick O’Brien Central Regional Director Steve Sloan Southeast Regional Director

Richard Ryan Director of Finance & Administration Wes Ward Director of Land Conservation EDITOR

Melanie Ingalls

DESIGNERS

Kate Wollensak Creative Director

MANAGING EDITOR

Matthew Selby Communications Director

Nicole Polillio Graphic Design Coordinator

We invite your articles, photographs, letters, and suggestions. Please send them to: Special Places Moose Hill Farm 396 Moose Hill Street Sharon, MA 02067 TEL 781.784.0567 FAX 781.784.4796 EMAIL selby@ttor.org

Andy Kendall EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

and exploring new business models, including

For information about becoming a member please contact us at 978.921.1944 x1858, email us at membership@ttor.org, or visit our website

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA).

at www.thetrustees.org.

The Appleton Farms CSA in Ipswich and Special Places, September 2005.Volume 13, Issue

Hamilton, now five years old, is a remarkable

Number 3. Special Places (ISSN 1087-5026) is

venture: a market, an education, an outing, a

published quarterly and distributed to members

calling. With hundreds of shareholders—and a long waiting list—it has caught the imagination of a whole community that is actively supporting local agriculture and eating better

and donors of The Trustees of Reservations. Copyright © 2005. All rights reserved. Printed ON THE COVER: Jenny Hausman, CSA Manager

on recycled paper.

Appleton Farms, Hamilton & Ipswich © TOM KATES

Please recycle this newsletter by passing it on to a friend or donating it to a school, library, business, or wherever it might be read.


Contents W W W. T H E T R U S T E E S . O R G

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S P E C I A L P L AC E S FA L L 2 0 0 5 VO L . 1 3 NO. 3

C OV E R S TO RY

The Women of Appleton Farms The number of women farmers is on the rise across the country. Brion O’Connor spends the day with several who are getting their hands dirty at our own Appleton Farms in Hamilton & Ipswich.

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L O C A L F L AVO R

The Best Food is in Our Own Backyards Jay Murray, executive chef at Grill23 in Boston, knows the best ingredients are often found close to home.

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L A N D C O N S E RVAT I O N

What’s the Plan? Wes Ward, our Director of Land Conservation, explores the mapping of greenspace conservation––and our role in it.

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SOMETHING WILL HAPPEN

Slowly Into the Wild Introducing your children to the natural world is as simple as just taking them with you.

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ANNUAL GIVING AND MEMBERSHIP

It’s Time to Make Your Move We need to raise just $3 million more to reach our $50 million goal and meet The Kresge Foundation Challenge.

14 CONSERVATION COUNT 16 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Notchview, Windsor

© R.CHEEK

24 FIND YOUR PLACE


COVER STORY

The Women of While farms are being squeezed out by high land costs and low profits, farms run by women are on the increase. Why would they choose careers promising thirteen-hour days and sore backs? The reasons are many––chief among them are independence, being outdoors, a passion for cultivating the land, nurturing plants and animals naturally, and providing for others. By Brion O’Connor


©TOM KATES

Appleton Farms U N D E R S L AT E G R AY S K I E S , B E S I D E T H E R E N O VAT E D

“She might have calved,” replies Ekstrom. The pair walks

dairy barn at Appleton Farms in Ipswich, Katie Ekstrom straddles

toward the farm’s ATV. Ekstrom remarks: “I have a feeling I’m

a rambunctious calf clearly more interested in the bottle of milk

going to be here really late tonight.” McLaughlin quips: “There’s

in Ekstrom’s right hand than in being cooperative. Ekstrom

always an element of ‘you never know’ with this job.”

grins, delighting in the calf ’s spastic enthusiasm. “It’s important

Moments later, in the tall grass of Appleton’s rippled pasture,

for them to feel your warmth, your touch, to be healthy,” says the

we find Number 45, nestling with her newborn. McLaughlin

25-year-old Needham native.

scoops the wobbly, maple-colored calf into her arms, and with

Before the calf finishes, Amy McLaughlin strides from the

its mother trotting alongside, we motor back to the barn. There,

barn, after prepping the farm’s herd for their afternoon milking.

Ekstrom prepares a small pen for the pair, and McLaughlin and

McLaughlin, who under the direction of livestock manager Mike

Ekstrom return to their chores.

Victor helps run the Appleton dairy with Ekstrom, announces: “I’m missing Number 45.” SpecialPLACES | FALL 2005

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COVER STORY

Welcome to the world of farming at Appleton, the 1,000-acre

“If you go back in history, women have been the primary

reservation where women play a major role in both dairy operations

farmers since Day One,” says Appleton manager Wayne Castonguay.

and crop production. These women, including lead farmer Jenny

“It’s only recently, perhaps as farming has become more mechanized,

Hausman and apprentices Amy Kohut and Melissa Maxwell,

that men have become more involved. I’m aware there are a lot

come from dramatically diverse backgrounds, but all share a

more women getting back into farming, and it’s following the

zeal for the land and livestock. The farm, established in 1636

trends away from heavily-mechanized, commercial-scale operations

and acquired by The Trustees in 1998, has nearly 20 acres under

to smaller-scale, sustainable, organic, and diversified operations.”

cultivation and produces more than 200 varieties of 40 different

The days at Appleton are long, but enriching. “I can’t think of

crops, ranging from strawberries and squash to tomatoes, carrots,

anything more important to do,” says Ekstrom, who has a degree in

cauliflower, and beans. The livestock operation has 130 head of

linguistic cognition for the University of Rochester. “If you grow

cattle, divvied between dairy and beef production. In its entirety,

up in Needham, you go get a degree in something esoteric. I

the farm mirrors a cultural shift recognized by the US Department

didn’t know you could go to school to become a farmer. I thought

of Agriculture––namely, more women are returning to the

you had to be a farmer’s daughter.”

©TOM KATES

agrarian life.

Amy McLaughlin

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©TOM KATES

If you grow up in Needham, you go get a degree in something esoteric. I didn’t know you could go to school to become a farmer. I thought you had to be a farmer’s daughter.

- KATIE

EKSTROM

Ekstrom wanted to work outside, and parlayed a chance encounter with a farming family into a new career. “When you work with livestock, you’re accountable to the livestock. They’re just like babies,” says Ekstrom, “It’s good motivation.” McLaughlin was motivated from the start. A pre-veterinarian major at the University of New Hampshire, the Pelham, N.H., native worked at the school’s dairy program “to get large animal experience,” and discovered her calling. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in animal sciences, and came to Appleton in 2002. At the time, the farm was milking three cows. Today, there Katie Ekstrom

are more than 40, and most are milked twice a day. After bringing in the calf, McLaughlin resumes her intricate ritual, cleaning udders, attaching milking machines, treating the udders a second time after the milk has been pumped. “It has been challenging, but I’ve learned a lot,” she says. She also likes getting to know her herd––“They are very curious, and have very different personalities”–– which veterinarian work wouldn’t allow. “If I was a vet, I’d be going from farm to farm,” she says. “But we still have a lot of medical interaction, like the calving.” A hundred yards away Jenny Hausman prepares the stand that presents the day’s harvest to hundreds of shareholders of Appleton’s CSA, or Community Supported Agriculture, program (SEE SIDEBAR ON PAGE 8 ). From six in the morning until noon,

Hausman and her crew of part-time employees, apprentices and volunteers (last year the CSA alone logged roughly 2,000 volunteer hours) collect the fruits of their labors for afternoon distribution. “That’s part of the reason you see more women [in CSA operations],” she says. “There’s the community aspect, the face-to-face interaction.” Hausman, who oversees crop production with her husband, Bruce Wooster, is originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated from Washington University in St. Louis with a degree in anthropology and women’s studies. The farming bug bit 10 years ago.

SpecialPLACES | FALL 2005

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COVER STORY

“I’d always been a gardener, and did some landscaping before I started volunteering at the Arboretum in Jamaica Plain,” she says.

“I really find it rewarding that our work, everyday, is physical, but it's also doing something for others. There's no downside to this.”

“It’s always been a passion, but I never thought it would be a job.” That opinion changed after Hausman attended an organic

Meanwhile, Amy Kohut, a slight but sturdy woman, deftly maneuvers a giant orange Kubota tractor. At 45, Kohut acknowl-

farming conference. She took a summer job at a small farm,

edges that her decision to pursue farming is tantamount to a

which led to work in the Pioneer Valley and eventually to Ipswich.

second career, though the basic tenets are consistent with her 25

As a lead CSA farmer at Appleton, Hausman stresses education as

years with Project Adventure, an experiential learning organization.

well as production, to ensure that people understand where food

“We’ve always used adventure as a tool for personal growth, and

comes from.

helping people learn about themselves,” she says. “I’d like to do

Hausman expects the CSA to break even this year, which is on target for the farm’s 5-year plan. “Then there’s the stress of having

that with farming, to teach people about the environment within the concept of self-improvement.”

to produce for 430 families who are encouraged to think of this as their farm.” “It’s been really rewarding, and really challenging, for Bruce and me, and our partnership,” says the 34-year-old Hausman, who is expecting the couple’s first child in November. “There have been a few bumps in the road, farming this land while we’re learning about this land. But we’ve had the opportunity to grow with this land.” While Hausman greets shareholders, others spend their afternoons working the fields. Melissa Maxwell, a 23-year-old graduate of the University of Michigan and first-year apprentice, takes pride in knowing the shareholders are counting on her and the Appleton crew. “I like that the customers are from this area, and that the farm is part of the community,” she says. “I want them to have some of the same experience that I've had.” Integral to that experience, says Maxwell, is the emphasis on teamwork fostered by Hausman and Wooster. “They're great role models,” she says. “And they have an internship program that really lets you get hands on.” The proof is in Maxwell’s hands, which seem dyed a rich, dark brown, the same shade as Appleton's soil. “The dirtier I am, the happier I am,” she laughs. For Maxwell, her infatuation with farming started with a summer fling––a post-graduation job at a farm in Ann Arbor. “I thought it would be fun at first, but that feeling didn't wear off. I just totally fell in love with it,” she says. “Every day I'd come

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THE TRUSTEES OF RESERVATIONS

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www.thetrustees.org

©TOM KATES

home beaming, even though I could barely stand up.”

Melissa Maxwell


©TOM KATES

Amy Kohut

Kohut admits she knew “nothing about farming” when she made the leap, but was undeterred. “It’s like going back to graduate school, but in a different classroom,” she says. “And it’s a whole lot of fun.” The hours, typically six to five, initially surprised Kohut, “but there’s so much to do, it goes by so quickly.” She credits the support she’s gotten from Hausman and Wooster, and the farming community at large, for easing her transition. “It’s a very strong

©TTOR /J.NAPOLI

circle, filled with people who are passionate about what they do,” she says. “There’s so much teamwork that’s involved here, a lot of problem solving, and working together.” Now in the second year of her apprenticeship, Kohut hopes to buy her own farm in Ithaca, N.Y. before next spring. “My mom calls it my mid-life crisis,” she says, smiling in the shadow of her mammoth tractor. “Some people get a Mercedes. I got a Kubota.” North Shore resident Brion O’Connor is a freelance writer and longtime member of The Trustees of Reservations.

For more information on Appleton Farms, visit WWW. APPLETONFARMS . ORG .

©TOM KATES

Check out upcoming farm events on page 18.

SpecialPLACES | FALL 2005

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What is Community Supported Agriculture?

The Best Food is in Our Own Backyards

Agriculture is a risky business. Rainfall (either too much or too little),

by Jay Murray

pests and disease can all affect a farmer’s crop, and once harvested, farmers still have to sell their produce in order to make a living.

T H E R E ’ S A T I M E E V E RY Y E A R W H E N I W O N D E R

Because farming is a tough line of work, many Massachusetts farms

what life would be like in Provence. Heck, I speak French…

are being sold to development, changing the landscape of the state

why not? Bright young wines, herbs growing in the wild,

and the character of our communities.

freshly foraged mushrooms, the daily markets with their

With the advent of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA),

crusty organic breads and artisanal cheeses, and then I

however, communities are rediscovering the real value of having

remember ––I have all that right here in Massachusetts. And

working farms close to home, and are eating better because of it.

while L’Isle sur la Sorgue is a beautiful town, it sure doesn’t

CSA is a partnership of mutual commitment between a farm and a

have the Red Sox.

community of supporters, whereby supporters cover a farm’s annual operating budget by purchasing a share of the season’s harvest in advance of the growing season–providing seed money as well as funds for fertilizer, water, equipment maintenance, labor and other costs. In return, the farm provides shareholders with a healthy

The best food can usually be found in our own backyards. Now, I don’t yet belong to a CSA, but I do eagerly await my chance. Instead I am a regular presence at the many area farm stands and farmers’ markets. Nothing––and this is

supply of fresh produce throughout the growing season. CSA provides a farm with the support it needs to stay in business––keeping fertile fields in our communities and local flavor on our tables. To find a CSA near you, visit

WWW. CSACENTER . ORG .There

are

more than 60 CSAs in Massachusetts, including: 1 Indian Line Farm CSA Great Barrington 413.528.8301 WWW. INDIANLINEFARM . COM

5 Kirk Farm Groton 978.448.5871 WWW. KIRKFARM . COM

2 Ol’ Turtle Farm East Hampton 413.527.9122 WWW. OLTURTLEFARM . COM

6 Green Meadows Farm South Hamilton 978.468.3720 WWW. GMFARM . COM

3 Brookfield Farm South Amherst 413.253.7991 WWW. BROOKFIELDFARM . ORG

7 Golden Rule Farm Plymouth 508.224.3088

L OC my professional opinion––compares to the delectable bounty available practically next door. From the asparagus, peas, favas, and parsnips of spring to the strawberries,

8 First Lyte Organic Farm Truro 508.487.0154

4 Heirloom Harvest Community Farm and CSA Westborough 508.963.7792 WWW. HEIRLOOMHARVEST. ORG

peaches, corn, and tomatoes of summer, and the hearty greens and heirloom squashes of fall; I can’t bear to stock my produce drawer from the supermarket. I am privileged to work with local farmers to ensure that my customers get the very best. Admittedly I am an herb nut. For me, too many herbs would hardly be enough. In season, Trustees of Reservations’ member Eva Sommaripa supplies my restaurant from her organic garden in South Dartmouth. She grows the most wonderful and delicate herbs, and we work together to match local ingredients and menus. A personal favorite, African Blue Basil, comes from her fields, as do sweet cicely, lovage, garlic chives,

5

oregano and the most delicious Italian parsley you can

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imagine. With it we make our chimichurri, and once you give it a try, it will become a permanent, and much appre-

1

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4

ciated, part of your kitchen repertoire. This Argentinian

8 7

delight can be used to baste beef, chicken, pork or shrimp, or used as a sauce on the side of just about any meat or vegetable dish. Jay Murray is Executive Chef at Grill23 in Boston, a Slow Food partner. He is also an occasional guest chef at the Inn at Castle Hill in Ipswich.


A L Flavor Chimichurri 4 bunches flat leaf parsley, washed 1/2 cup loosely packed oregano leaves 1/2 cup garlic chives, chopped 2 cloves garlic 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon chile flakes 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar juice of 1 lemon 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 1) Trim and discard the mostly leafless stem ends of the parsley, and rough-chop the remainder. 2) Combine all ingredients in a blender and process until smooth, stopping to

ŠTOM KATES

rearrange the content as necessary.

SpecialPLACES | FALL 2005

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LAND CONSERVATION

What’s the Plan? Mapping the future of greenspace conservation by Wesley T. Ward OV E R T H E PA S T

120 Y E A R S , T H E S TAT E O F M A S S AC H U S E T T S

and non-profit groups, including The Trustees, have conserved more than one million acres, or roughly 20% of the state’s territory —an amazing achievement, especially considering it has all been accomplished without an integrated overall plan. However, the challenges of land conservation are evolving as quickly as our landscape, and we must ask ourselves: Can this success continue without a clear, cohesive vision? Over the years, several attempts have been made to chart what we should conserve. In 1929, Charles Eliot II of The Trustees created a map that focused on enlarging the network of state lands, including parks, forests, and wildlife management areas. Seventy years later, The Trustees published Conserving Our Commonwealth, an updated vision for a network of scenic, historic, and ecological open space, to be conserved by a variety of entities, including non-profit organizations. More recently, we worked with our conservation colleagues to prepare a statewide vision and map showing about one million acres of land that should be protected by federal, state and local governments and groups like The Trustees over the next 25 years. Unfortunately, that plan—which some interpreted as a call for purchasing $3 billion worth of land—was never refined or officially adopted. No statewide plan ever seems to last more than one election cycle. But the urge to envisage a holistic network of

10

©R.CHEEK

protected landscapes has not diminished among conservation

THE TRUSTEES OF RESERVATIONS

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www.thetrustees.org


colleagues in government agencies or in our non-profit land vision more compelling, economically realistic and less abstract. We are particularly interested in illustrating the application of conservation principles and best practices to urban areas, which have been neglected by previous visions. We need to show urban, suburban, and rural residents alike how the state’s investment in greenspace and the work of conservation groups benefits their communities and quality of life for all. Most recently, a group led by David Foster, Ph.D., Director of the Harvard Forest in Petersham, has published Wildlands and Woodlands: A Vision for the Forests of Massachusetts––a plan

©S.LAPIDES / ROCKY NARROWS, SHERBORN

conservation partners. We need ways to make our conservation

consistent with The Trustees’ vision and statewide conservation

A Sure and Steady Stream

plan. They propose adding 1.5 million acres of forest land to the

By donating a charitable gift annuity to The Trustees

state’s protected land base. Total forest land would be divided

you can ensure the future of scenic areas like Rocky

between 2.25 million acres of “Managed Woodlands” and

Narrows while receiving a steady stream of income

250,000 acres of “Wildland Reserves.” The two categories

and favorable tax benefits. Charitable gift annuities

complement each other and provide a variety of long-term

offer fixed, dependable payments, and are

benefits––including abundant clean water, wood products, wildlife

guaranteed for life.

habitat, natural

We need ways to

flood control, and educational,

make our conservation

recreational,

ONE-LIFE GIFT ANNUITY RATES * YOUR AGE

60

65

70

75

80

85

ANNUITY RATE

5.7%

6.0%

6.5%

7.1%

8.0%

9.5%

aesthetic, and

vision more compelling, economically realistic and less abstract.

spiritual experiences.

*Rates recommended by the American Council on Gift Annuities, effective 7/1/03

While offering several interesting suggestions and proposals, Foster’s

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT PLANNED GIVING AT THE TRUSTEES OF RESERVATIONS , PLEASE VISIT WWW. THETRUSTEES . ORG / PG . CFM

report offers a broad vision but, intentionally, no map, leaving that to all of us and our governmental representatives. So how do we get to a shared vision? By rolling up our sleeves

o Please contact me about a charitable gift annuity and other gifts that provide income to me or another beneficiary. DATE(S) OF BIRTH: __________

__________

and taking the lead on a map once more. Over the next year, we will create an updated blueprint for conservation in Massachusetts. We want to stretch our reach, broaden horizons, and make sure

Mr. Mrs. Ms. Miss _____________________________________________________________ First Middle Initial Last

that the individual projects we take on, small or large, urban, suburban, rural, or near wilderness, contribute to the larger

_____________________________________________________________ Address

whole. And equally important, we need a blueprint capable of sparking passion for conservation across the state, helping people find their voices to protect the quality of life in their communities.

_____________________________________________________________ City / Town State Zip Code

Conservation leadership requires people with vision to step forward and persuade their friends, neighbors, and colleagues that positive

(_______)___________ ___________________________________________ Day telephone E-mail

change can occur. Wesley T. Ward is Director of Land Conservation for The Trustees of Reservations.

For more information, please contact: Sarah Carothers, DIRECTOR The Trustees of Reservations

OF PLANNED GIVING

572 Essex Street, Beverly, MA 01915

call 978.524.1876 or email scarothers@ttor.org YOUR INQUIRY IS CONFIDENTIAL AND DOES NOT OBLIGATE YOU IN ANY WAY


SOMETHING WILL HAPPEN

Slowly Into the Wild By Brion O’Connor M Y T W O YO U N G D A U G H T E R S L O V E B E I N G O U T D O O R S

father of four, who shook me free of my paralysis by putting

––in sprawling, windswept fields, lush green forests, and soothing,

parenting in proper perspective. “Brion, you only have to stay

sandy beaches that stretch forever. Whether that's the result of

one step ahead of a six-year-old.” He’s right. We weren’t planning an Everest expedition. Armed

nature or nurture, I don't know. They’ve never had a choice. My wife, Lauri, and I possess a primal need to flee from our work-a-day

with Sean’s sage advice, I decided not to let things get too

worlds. We’ve always found that escape in unspoiled settings. And

complicated. We started with small trips, for an hour or so, and

ever since our girls came into this world, they’ve accompanied us.

then just let them build (the girls, we found, are particularly adept

Still, it’s not like we’ve got a pair of wool-clad, granola-chomping

at telling us when they are ready to take the next step). We kept

nature imps. They’ll zone out in front of the Boob Tube as quick

it simple. We packed snacks, an extra sweater, bug spray and sun

as any kid, immersed in the hypnotic pull of SpongeBob Squarepants,

block. Without lesson plans or itineraries, we set out with faith in

Fairly Odd Parents, Jimmy Neutron and Lizzie Maguire. In short,

the idea that when kids and nature mix––something wonderful

they’re “normal.” To get them outside and engaged, they need a nudge.

will happen. And it did. The girls just romped. And we joined

That wasn’t always easy, especially when the girls were toddlers.

them, from the fruitless-but-wildly-entertaining chase of butterflies

But we managed, graduating from Baby Bjorns to backpack-style

to the energizing investigation of intricate tidal pools and shadowy

kid carriers to all-terrain strollers. What we learned was that children

forest floors. Today, my oldest, eight-year-old Maddi, craves open spaces. As

are incredibly adaptable. The key is getting them out before they know any better, so they accept the great outdoors as part of the

we crest the boardwalk at Crane Beach in Ipswich, she inevitably

natural order of being a kid.

picks up the pace, her spontaneous giggle revealing the unfettered

The adjustment, ironically, may be tougher for the parents.

joy of a child with room to run. Six-year-old Brynne takes a different

We're the ones who fret about everything that we think we need to

approach, aware that keeping up with big sister is a big undertaking.

do to make it a great experience. It was my older brother Sean, the

Instead, she delves into the minutiae of small, secret places, whether on the leaf-filled serpentine trails of Ravenswood or in the scrubpine woods behind the dunes at Crane, uncovering frogs and worms and salamanders. Watching Maddi and Brynne, something else quite remarkable happens. Lauri and I realize that our girls, with their unbridled enthusiasm for the natural world, spark our own imaginations.

©TOM KATES

With that, they help rekindle our passion for the great outdoors.

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North Shore resident Brion O’Connor is a freelance writer and longtime member of The Trustees of Reservations.

Photograph above taken by Jennifer Bishop at Ashintully Gardens in Tyringham. Jennifer was the winner of our photo contest in Summer ‘04.Visit www.thetrustees.org for more information about our annual photo contest.


Four Family-Friendly Reservations Property

Features

Amenities

Hours & Rates

ROCK HOUSE RESERVATION Route 9 West Brookfield 978.840.4446

A great place for a short hike. Lots of interesting places to explore, including a pond, boulders, butterfly garden, scenic overlook, and plenty of benches for a rest. A baby jogger could work here, but this area is best for ages 2 and older under their own power.

Seasonal restrooms and small trailside nature center overlooking Carter Pond.

Year-round, daily, sunrise to sunset. FREE to all.

RAVENSWOOD Western Avenue (Route 127) Gloucester 978.526.8687

10 miles of hiking trails and hard packed carriage paths. Great for baby joggers and wheelchairs. Vernal pools, a boardwalk through the Great Magnolia Swamp, and views of Gloucester Harbor.

There are no facilities available at this reservation.The closest public restroom is at Stage Fort Park, one mile away on Hough Street, open May-Oct.

Year-round, daily, sunrise to sunset. FREE to all.

ROCKY WOODS Hartford Street Medfield 508.785.0339

Very family friendly, with wide paths perfect for baby joggers, several ponds, a playground with swings and teeter-totters, and picnic tables galore. There are 6.5 miles of trails to explore––some sections can be rugged for small folks, so pick up a map and plan your route carefully.

Restrooms, handicapped-accessible fishing platform, picnic tables, and a pavilion with seating for 80.

Year-round, daily, sunrise to sunset. Sign at entrance indicates time gates are locked. Members FREE*. Nonmembers: Adult $3, Children (12 & under) FREE.

WORLD’S END 250 Martin's Lane Hingham 781.740.6665

With wide, tree-lined, stroller-friendly roads, World’s End is a great place to introduce your children to open spaces. 4.5 miles of carriage paths and trails with benches in the most scenic areas.

Restrooms, benches, drinking fountain.

Year-round, daily, 8AM to sunset. Members FREE*. Nonmembers: Adult $4.50, Children (12 & under) FREE.

*Don’t forget your membership card when visiting reservations that charge admission to nonmembers. SpecialPLACES | FALL 2005

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We Can’t Do It Alone, Nor Do We Want To We are inspired by the generosity and determination of our partners

Land Conservation Projects Across the State MCLEAN CONSERVATION RESTRICTIONS (CR), BELMONT:

As a result of complex rezoning for new development, McLean Hospital has set aside 120 acres surrounding its campus as public greenspace. The effort to protect the land was lead by longtime Trustees’ member Judy Record and carried on after her death by her husband, Eugene Record. The Trustees will monitor the agreement with volunteer support from the Belmont Land Trust. CHARLESCOTE FARM (CR), SHERBORN: Sally and Dudley Willis

have permanently protected 40 acres of their farm in Sherborn— pasture and mixed woodland near the Charles River—which helps safeguard Sherborn’s aquifer, provides a buffer for nearby rare species habitat and offers scenic views of the countryside. FERRY FARM, WESTPORT: The Trustees have helped the Westport Land Conservation Trust (WLCT), the town and the state protect a 73-acre dairy, the 19th farm to be permanently protected in Westport. The Trustees and WLCT put together the project’s intricate funding partnership; the owners sold the restriction at a generous discount. We also purchased a separate 5-acre wooded portion of the farm along Bread and Cheese Brook. FORGE POND CONSERVATION AREA, WESTPORT: In another Westport win, we helped WLCT and the town secure public access to walking trails and prime fishing spots along Forge Pond and its tributary, the Noquochoke River. WLCT will own and manage the 9-acre property and the town will hold the CR.

conservation count LAND OWNED

95 reservations

The Agricultural Preservation Restriction (APR) program is a state-funded mechanism for helping keep farmland in families and in communities. By selling the APR and reducing the value of prime farmland to its agricultural value (rather than what it may be worth to a developer), farmers can reduce gift or inheritance taxes and help avoid the need for second-generation farmers to sell the land in order to pay the taxes. By stabilizing prices and ensuring that farms remain farms, APRs also give young farmers an opportunity to buy land at affordable prices.

ASSISTS*

101 projects

15,108 54,269

*Assists include land protected with or for The Trustees’ partners as well as lands owned in fee by MLCT. This total may decline from time to time when certain MLCT properties are re-categorized as Trustees’ properties or CRs.

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A conservation restriction (CR) is a tool that helps landowners permanently protect scenic and natural areas from development. When you donate or sell a CR to a land trust (or agency), you voluntarily give up some of the rights associated with the land. Future owners are bound by the terms and the land trust is responsible for making sure they are followed. CRs offer great flexibility. For example, if your property contains rare wildlife habitat the CR might prohibit any development; a CR on a farm might allow continued farming and building of additional barns. A CR may apply only to a portion of the property, and doesn’t require public access.

23,697 15,465

TOTAL

What is a Conservation Restriction?

What is an Agricultural Preservation Restriction?

238 parcels

)

EASTOVER FARM PROJECT, MARION AND ROCHESTER: The three-year land protection phase of the Eastover Farm project is nearing completion. Recent events include: purchase of a CR on 103 acres of cranberry bogs and woodlands in Rochester; transfer of 238 acres of woodlands to the Marion Open Space Commission and 80 acres to the Rochester Conservation Commission; and sale of an APR on 72 acres to the Commonwealth. We expect to open a new Trustees’ reservation in Rochester in spring 2006.

ACREAGE PROTECTED

LAND UNDER CR

As of 6/30/05

BURES FARM, NEW BRAINTREE: An Agricultural Preservation Restriction (APR) on the 106-acre Bures Farm west of Worcester links an existing network of protected farms in New Braintree, strengthening the agricultural community and preserving the classic beauty of the village. Now that the land is protected, it will be sold to a local farmer and five acres donated to the town for recreation. The project was made possible by generous local support.

For more information visit the land conservation section of our website, WWW. THETRUSTEES . ORG . THE TRUSTEES OF RESERVATIONS

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www.thetrustees.org


Oh, Friendly Comfort! ©TOM KATES / THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH

Life on a gentleman’s farm in the Berkshires P E R C H E D A B OV E T H E V I L L AG E O F S TO C K B R I D G E , N A U M K E AG

was the summer home of Joseph Hodges Choate, a prominent New York attorney who, with his wife and five children, began summering in Berkshire County in the 1870s. Best known for its 44-room, shingle-style “cottage” and world-renowned gardens, it was also a gentleman’s farm—a must-have for a Gilded Age Berkshire estate. A team of farm workers at Naumkeag produced fruit, vegetables, meat, and dairy products for the family’s table year-round, shipping milk,

It’s Time to Make Your Move

cream, butter, and eggs to New York by train several times a week in the winter months. Joseph Choate relished the life of the farm, too. In a letter from 1891 he wrote, “I do miss Stockbridge and every dear thing in it so much––wife, children, friends, house, garden, lands, horses, cows, pigs, not to speak of the donkey…”

ANNUAL APPEAL 2005

By the time the Choate’s second daughter, Mabel, owned Naumkeag, farming at Berkshire cottages had fallen out of fashion, but she kept cows

EACH YEAR WE ASK YOU ,

until her death in 1958. The stanchions in the barn still bear some of their

our members, to make a

whimsical names: Camellia, Clematis and Columbine.Violet Switzer, who lived at Naumkeag with her superintendent uncle, remembers: “Some

contribution above and

people thought it was silly to have all the cows and they told Miss Choate

beyond your much-appre-

that she ought to sell them all. Miss Choate just said they were jealous of

ciated membership dues.

her, that was all.”

Contributions to the

It was clearly a lovely life. Miss Choate’s niece, Helen, remembers its

Annual Appeal provide the

simple pleasures: “In the evenings we would drag the reclining chairs to

critical funding needed to sustain stewardship efforts

the very edge of the West terrace and watch the sun go down (one of

at our ever-growing network of reservations, to

Margaret’s martinis in hand).Then we would go in to a heavenly dinner,

undertake new conservation projects, and to expand

the simplest and the best; tiny vegetables, fresh from the garden, butter

educational outreach to ensure that our children and

and cream from the farm. Oh Friendly Comfort!”

grandchildren become inspired stewards of the Massachusetts landscape. This year your Annual Appeal gift will be included in the Landscapes & Landmarks campaign and will help meet The Kresge Foundation Challenge. The Kresge Foundation will contribute $1.5 million if we raise at least $50 million and get more people like you to support our work. We are within $3 million of our financial goals which you can help us reach— please contribute and be counted! Look for the Annual Appeal in your mailbox or simply mail a check to The Trustees of Reservations marked “Annual Appeal.” You can also make your contribution ©TTOR

online at WWW. THETRUSTEES . ORG . Please make your move for the places you love! If you have questions about how you Join us on Sunday, September 18 at 1PM for the inaugural “Behind the Scenes -

can help, please contact Ann Powell at 978.921.1944 x1860 or apowell@ttor.org.

©TTOR

Farm and Barn Tour” at Naumkeag.

SpecialPLACES | FALL 2005

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FALL EVENTS! SEPTEMBER THROUGH DECEMBER 2005 Search for our events online––visit us at www.thetrustees.org Daily, Memorial Day through Columbus Day 9AM through 5PM (Duration 4 or 8 hours)

CAPE COD & THE ISLANDS

Pocha Pond Self-Guided Discovery Tour CAPE POGE WILDLIFE REFUGE, CHAPPAQUIDDICK

FOR EVENTS BELOW WITH *

508.627.3599

Transportation from the Chappy side of the Edgartown Ferry is available.

Paddle on your own by canoe or kayak through Pocha Pond. Follow a self-guided map that highlights points of interest in the area including osprey, salt marshes, grassland restoration and much more. Members only: 4 hours, $25 or 8 hours, $35 per canoe or kayak.

Daily, Memorial Day through Columbus Day 9AM & 2PM (Tour duration: 2.5 hours)

Natural History Tours* CAPE POGE WILDLIFE REFUGE, CHAPPAQUIDDICK 508.627.3599

Daily, June 15 – September 15 | 8:30AM, 11AM, & 1:30PM (Tour duration: 1. 5 hours)

Open Lighthouse

Cape Poge Lighthouse Tour* CAPE POGE WILDLIFE REFUGE, CHAPPAQUIDDICK 508.627.3599

Travel by oversand vehicle to the historic and remote Cape Poge Lighthouse. Learn about the fascinating history of the lighthouse and the keepers and their families who lived there. Members: Adult $15, Children (15 and under) $10. Nonmembers: Adult $20, Children $12. Daily, Memorial Day through Columbus Day 8:30AM & 1:30PM (Tour duration: 4 hours)

Fishing Discovery Tour* CAPE POGE WILDLIFE REFUGE, CHAPPAQUIDDICK 508.627.3599

Travel by oversand vehicle to the legendary fishing beaches at Wasque Point and Cape Poge. Learn how to surf fish and read the waters with a skilled fishing guide. All equipment is included. Members only: Adult $60, Children (15 and under) $25. Special membership offer available.

THE TRUSTEES OF RESERVATIONS

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Wildlife Discovery Tour LONG POINT WILDLIFE REFUGE, WEST TISBURY 508.693.7392

Daily, June through October | 1–2 PM

Daily, Memorial Day through Columbus Day 9AM, 12NOON, & 2PM (Tour duration: 1.5 hours)

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© TTOR

Travel by oversand vehicle across the remote sands of Chappaquiddick to the Cape Poge Lighthouse and beyond. Learn about barrier beach ecology, wildlife and property history. Members: Adult $30, Children (15 and under) $15. Nonmembers: Adult $35, Children $18.

GREAT POINT LIGHTHOUSE, COSKATA COATUE WILDLIFE REFUGE, NANTUCKET 508.228.6799

The lighthouse is open! Trustees members are invited to climb the Great Point Lighthouse and enjoy the view, while learning about its history.Transportation to Great Point is not provided. Members only. FREE.

Daily, Memorial Day through Columbus Day 9AM & 2PM (Tour duration: 2.5 hours)

Wildlife Kayak or Canoe Tour* CAPE POGE WILDLIFE REFUGE, CHAPPAQUIDDICK 508.627.3599

Paddle by canoe or kayak with a naturalist guide though Pocha Pond and Cape Poge Bay. View the great expanse of the salt marsh and tranquil tidewaters and look for wildlife. Members: Adult $30, Children (15 and under) $15. Nonmembers: Adult $35, Children $18.

www.thetrustees.org

Explore Tisbury Great Pond by canoe or kayak. Learn basic paddling techniques, local ecology, and natural history of Long Point Wildlife Refuge. Leaves from special tours-only parking area, offseason entrance gate located at the end of Deep Bottom Road. Members:Adult $15, Children (15 and under) $10. Nonmembers: Adult $20, Children $10. Daily, June–October | 9:30AM & 1:30PM (Tour duration: 2.5 hours)

Natural History Tour COSKATA-COATUE WILDLIFE REFUGE, NANTUCKET 508.228.6799

Join our naturalist guide on an oversand vehicle tour and witness Nantucket’s most expansive salt marsh, learn about the geology, ecology and history of this special place and climb the Great Point Lighthouse for an incredible “birds eye” view. Members: Adult $30, Children (12 and under) $15. Nonmembers: Adult $40, Children $15. On-going, a self-guided adventure

Menemsha Hills Quest MENEMSHA HILLS RESERVATION, CHILMARK 508.693.7662

This self-guided educational treasure hunt leads to a “treasure” box hidden on the property. Wear sturdy shoes and bring water; adventure takes 3-4 hours. Compass and Quest booklet are available at the property.


On-going, a self-guided adventure (Through November)

GREATER BOSTON

Thursday, September 22 | 9:30AM–3:30PM

CAPE POGE WILDLIFE REFUGE, CHAPPAQUIDDICK

Conservation Restrictions: The Fundamentals of Stewardship and Administration

508.627.3599

DOYLE CONSERVATION CENTER, LEOMINSTER,

This self-guided educational treasure hunt leads to a “treasure” box hidden on the property. 4-wheel drive vehicle and current OSV permit are required. Wear sturdy shoes and bring water; adventure takes 2-3 hours. Compass and Quest booklet are available at the property.

978.840.4446 X1923; JALLAIN@TTOR.ORG

Cape Poge Quest

Now through October 31 Monday through Saturday (except holidays) 10AM–5PM Sunday and holidays | 12NOON–5PM

Conservation restrictions are a fundamental tool for land conservation but without regular attention, their effectiveness is limited.This workshop is for land trusts and conservation commissions with few or no staff. Space is limited, pre-registration required. $35, BYO lunch.

The Old Manse in History THE OLD MANSE, CONCORD 978.369.3909

Guided house tours of this National Historic Landmark, built in 1770 and home to Emerson and Hawthorne, are offered throughout the day.The Old Manse contains over 200 years of family furnishings. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: Adult $8, Child $5.

Sunday, November 20 | 1–3PM

Special Places Conservation Restriction Walks: Menemsha Hills Brickyard Hike

Saturday, October 1 | 10AM–4PM

MENEMSHA HILLS BRICKYARD CONSERVATION

Come learn about our “green” building technology and take a tour of the building and grounds at the beautiful Doyle Conservation Center.

Green Buildings Open House Tour DOYLE CONSERVATION CENTER, LEOMINSTER,

RESTRICTION, CHILMARK 508.693.7662

Explore the Menemsha Hills Brickyard ruins, the last remnants of a once prosperous Vineyard industry. Call for meeting location. Members only. Pre-registration required, space is limited.

Sunday, September 4 | 2– 4PM

Summer Concert Series: PANdemonium THE OLD MANSE, CONCORD 978.369.3909

Our final concert of the season on the beautifully preserved grounds of The Old Manse by PANdemonium and friends. Bring a seat, a picnic, and a friend! FREE to all.

Saturday, October 15 | 9AM –1PM

Landscape Tales: If these woods could talk

CENTRAL REGION

SWIFT RIVER RESERVATION, NICHEWAUG TRACT

Saturdays, September 17 & October 15 10AM –12:30PM

978.248.9455

Weekends Through Columbus Day

A Rustic Retreat TULLY LAKE CAMPGROUND, ROYALSTON 978.249.4957

Enjoy one last weekend of cool nights and comfortable days, perfect for camping under the stars, fantastic for hiking and paddling. Call for reservations.

Walk with naturalist Bob Clark and learn how the Nichewaug Tract has been shaped by agriculture, forestry and the 1938 hurricane. Bring a lunch. FREE.

Paddling Back in Time THE OLD MANSE, CONCORD 978.369.3909

Bring your own or rent canoe or kayak for a guided trip down the Concord River, ending at

Saturday, October 22 | 10AM –2PM

Drumlin Day DEXTER DRUMLIN, LANCASTER

Join us as we experience the timeless beauty of the autumn landscape. Bring a picnic lunch and your favorite kite.

Thursday, September 8 | 9AM–12:30PM

Identifying Massachusetts’ Natural Communities DOYLE CONSERVATION CENTER, LEOMINSTER,

The closer you look, the more you will see. Learn to identify the natural communities of Massachusetts according to the state’s standard classification system. Workshop includes time in the classroom and in the field. Space is limited, pre-registration required. FREE.

Peaked Mountain Birthday Run

Saturday, September 17 | 9AM–2PM

Thursday, November 3 | 8:30AM– 6PM

Water-bar Hoppin’ PEAKED MOUNTAIN 978.248.9455

v

Roslyn’s Turnpike was created to help firefighters access the mountain. Poor drainage, however, has the trail washed out. Leave your mark by helping us wipe away the problem. FREE.

v

Volunteers needed!

PEAKED MOUNTAIN 978.248.9455

Celebrate Peaked Mountain and the generosity of those who made it possible with this fantastic fall four-miler. Birthday cake and medal ceremony after the race. Call for registration.

Managing Land & Visitors: Stewardship Challenges of Natural and Historic Places DOYLE CONSERVATION CENTER, LEOMINSTER, 978.840.4446 X1923; JALLAIN@TTOR.ORG

If you are involved in managing natural or historic places that are open to the public, this day-long conference will be of great interest to you. Space is limited, pre-registration required. $35, BYO lunch.

©D.SYLVESTER

Sunday, October 23 | 9:30AM

978.840.4446 X1923; JALLAIN@TTOR.ORG

Saturday, October 29 | 5:30–7:30PM

2nd Annual Pumpkins in the Park FRANCIS WILLIAM BIRD PARK, EAST WALPOLE 508.668.6136

Join this community celebration of Halloween! Bring a carved pumpkin and small candle to illuminate the pathways and ponds. Enjoy ghoulish games, ghost stories, and treats. Costumes are welcome! Pre-registration not required, but helpful. FREE to all.

SpecialPLACES | FALL 2005

17


The Old Manse. See what inspired Emerson, Thoreau, and Hawthorne, and learn about the history of The Trustees. Reservations and prepayment required. Members: Adult $8, Child $5. Nonmembers: Adult $16, Child $10. Saturday September 24 | 1PM & 3PM

Femmes Celestes: Women of The Old Manse THE OLD MANSE, CONCORD 978.369.3909

Learn about the 19th century tradition of the femme celeste—the all-knowledgeable inspirational woman. Discover the “Great Women” behind the “Great Men” who have lived at The Manse. Not recommended for children. Please pre-register. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: Adult $8.

Sunday, December 11 | 2–4PM

Tuesday, September 13 | 10AM

Parlor Songs and Holiday Music at The Old Manse

Autumn Splendor in the Garden

THE OLD MANSE, CONCORD 978.369.3909

The gardening season in New England does not end on Labor Day.There is a special quality of light in September and October by which the colors in the garden glow more richly than ever. In this slide lecture, Kathy Tracey will share thoughts and images of the best fall annuals, perennials, trees and shrubs. Please pre-register. Members: $20. Nonmembers: $30.

Celebrate the holidays with “Parlor Songs and Holiday Music,” an intimate concert and singalong led by local music teacher and composer Katherine Stevens in the historic parlor of The Old Manse. Limited Seating: Reservations and pre-payment required. Members: Adults $7. Nonmembers: Adult $14.

NORTHEAST REGION

Saturday, October 15 | 9:30–11AM

Saturday, September 3, October 1, or November 5 | 2–4PM

As Leaves Fall…

Landscape Discovery Stroll

FRANCIS WILLIAM BIRD PARK, EAST WALPOLE

APPLETON FARMS, IPSWICH/HAMILTON

508.668.6136

978.356.5728

What causes the beautiful colors of autumn? Why do trees drop their leaves? Unlock these mysteries as we stroll through the park’s everchanging landscape of native and ornamental trees. Pre-registration required. Free to all.

Discover landscapes created by the Appleton family and completed in the early 1900s. Stroll through the Grass Ride trails, along the Great Pasture, and visit the four family memorials that formerly adorned Harvard’s Gore Hall Library. Meet at Highland Street parking area. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: Adult $5.

Saturday, October 29 | 6–8PM (tours begin at 6, 6:30, 7, 7:30)

All-Hallows Eve

Saturday, September 10 | 10AM–2PM

THE OLD MANSE, CONCORD 978.369.3909

Choate Island Day

Come to The Old Manse for an evening of spooky stories from America’s past. Guides in period costume will enthrall listeners with mysterious tales. Appropriate for school-age children and up. Please pre-register. Members: Adult $4, Child $3. Nonmembers: Adult $8, Child $5. Saturday, December 3 | 2–4PM

Tales from Holidays Past

Saturday, December 10 | 1–4PM

Deck The Halls: Holiday Crafts at The Old Manse THE OLD MANSE, CONCORD 978.369.3909

Create holiday crafts in the historic setting of The Old Manse. Call for more information, for a materials list, and to pre-register. Not recommended for children. Members: Adult $6. Nonmembers: Adult $12.

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THE TRUSTEES OF RESERVATIONS

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Saturday September 17 | 10 –11:30AM

Family Roots THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Have you ever asked your parents about their grandparents? Researcher Daniel Duncan, from New England Historical & Genealogical Society will lead an informative workshop on discovering your past. Member family: $10. Nonmember family: $15. Saturday, September 17 | 6PM

Appleton Farms Farm Formal APPLETON FARMS, IPSWICH/HAMILTON 978.356.5728

Cocktails, dinner, dancing and a live auction to benefit the farm. Auction items include: Scotland trip; catered dinner with Appleton produce; and camping in the Great Pasture. Call for tickets: $175 per person. Seats are limited.

CRANE WILDLIFE REFUGE,THE CRANE ESTATE, ESSEX 978.356.4351

Tuesday, September 20 | 10AM –12NOON

Originally a wildlife haven, our preservation of old fields and farm buildings reveals centuries of agricultural life on Choate Island. Come explore! Bring a picnic lunch. Shuttle boat provided (last boat returns at 3PM). Recommended for families. Meet at Beach gate. Members: Adult $10, Child $5. Nonmembers: Adult $15, Child $8.

Planting and Transplanting: Trees, Shrubs, & Perennials

THE OLD MANSE, CONCORD 978.369.3909

Children young and old will enjoy holiday stories as told by costumed interpreters, including St. Nicholas reading The Night Before Christmas. Please pre-register. Members: Adult $4, Child $3. Nonmembers: Adult $8, Child $5.

LONG HILL, BEVERLY 978.921.1944

Sunday, September 11, October 9, or November 13 | 3–5PM

Farmstead Tour

LONG HILL, BEVERLY 978.921.1944

Whether you purchase your plant in a container or balled in burlap, it needs to get off to a good start to prosper for years to come.Transplanting an existing plant also takes know-how, the correct tools, and proper techniques. After a demonstration you will get hands-on practice in the Sedgwick Gardens. Please pre-register. Members: $25. Nonmembers: $35.

APPLETON FARMS, IPSWICH/HAMILTON 978.356.5728

Sunday, September 25 | 8–10AM

Witness the rhythms and relics of Appleton Farms, a vibrant working farm since 1636. Walk along bucolic meadows and pastures of grazing cattle.Then visit historic buildings and the dairy during milking (ordinarily closed to the public). Meet at Waldingfield Road parking area. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: Adult $5.

ENHC Trails & Sails: Crane Marsh Meander

www.thetrustees.org

CASTLE HILL,THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

In conjunction with the Essex Natural Heritage Commission’s Trails and Sails weekend, enjoy expansive scenic salt marsh views and discover historic uses of the marsh before reaching Cedar Point, where Ipswich River meets the sea. Moderate 2-3 mile walk. Meet at Inn gate. Members: FREE or with ENHC.


Sunday, September 25 | 3–5PM

ENHC Trails & Sails: A Working Farm

sculpture, ceramics, furniture, water features and containers. Please pre-register. Members: $20. Nonmembers: $30.

APPLETON FARMS, IPSWICH/HAMILTON 978.356.5728

October through April

Witness the rhythms and relics of New England’s oldest, continuous working farm. Visit historic buildings and dairy during milking (ordinarily closed to the public). Meet at Waldingfield Road parking area. Members: FREE and with ENHC.

Slow Food Dinner Series

Tuesday, September 27 | 7:30PM

Choosing Distinctive Ornaments for your Garden

THE INN AT CASTLE HILL, IPSWICH 978.412.2555

For chefs, dates and times visit WWW. CRANEESTATE . ORG The Inn at Castle Hill and Slow Food Boston have partnered to bring you monthly dinners prepared by the areas most “Slow” chefs. Fourcourse prix fixe dinners will feature predominantly local and seasonal ingredients. For more information visit WWW. SLOWFOOD. COM .

LONG HILL, BEVERLY 978.921.1944

Acquire a wealth of ideas applicable to using historic artifacts in your garden. Marie Stella Brynes will discuss handmade garden ornaments ––from carved stone to iron gates––crafted by artists trained in the traditional arts. She will stress the selection, role and placement of

Sunday, October 2 | 9AM–12NOON

Sand Tracking CRANE BEACH,THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH

interpret their behavioral traits. Co-sponsored with Mass Audubon’s Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary. Recommended for families. Space is limited. Pre-registration required. Meet at Beach gate. Members: Adult $18. Nonmembers: Adult $22. Sunday, October 2, November 6, or December 4 | 1–3PM

Wildlife Walks CASTLE HILL,THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Explore the varied habitats and wildlife at Castle Hill, including salt marsh, sandy beach, dunes and forested upland. Lead by local naturalist John Nove these walks are moderate 2-3 miles. Recommended for adults and children over 12. Bring binoculars. Meet at Barn parking area through the Inn gate. Members FREE. Nonmembers $5 (for parking).

978.356.4351

Join naturalist and Maine guide Bob Metcalfe for this morning beach and dune exploration. Learn to read animal tracks and signs then begin to

Saturday, October 8 | 8–10AM

Marsh Meander CASTLE HILL,THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Castles & Cottages 2005 ARCHITECTURAL LECTURE SERIES

Thursday, September 22

North Shore Boston: Houses of Essex County, 1865-1930 Author and preservation consultant Pamela Fox will present a lecture highlighting her new book, North Shore Boston: Houses of Essex County, 1865-1930, including Castle Hill. Book available for purchase and signing. Thursday, October 27

Royal Barry Wills and the Colonial Revival Cottage

©R.HEATH

Leading architectural historian and author Richard Guy Wilson will share his insights into the Boston architect Royal Barry Wills and the Colonial Revival era.The Royal Barry Wills firm designed Cornelius Crane’s “White Cottage” on Choate Island in 1941 and their designs remain popular to this day. Prof. Wilson’s latest book, The Colonial Revival House, will also be available for purchase.

Thursday, November 10

Royal Barry Wills and the Wills Firm Today Meet architect Richard Wills who will speak about his father, Royal Barry Wills, and share stories about this famous firm both then and now. Learn about the origin of their architectural designs and how the market today reflects their continued popularity. THE GREAT HOUSE ON THE CRANE ESTATE 978.356.4351 Arrive at 5:30 PM for a self-guided house tour. Lectures begin at 6:30PM. Advance ticket purchase is strongly suggested. Members: $15. Nonmembers: $25. All 3 Lectures in Series: Members: $40. Nonmembers: $60.

The fortune of the Great Marsh, now a coastal treasure, has ebbed and flowed over the centuries. Moderate 2-3 mile walk. Meet at Inn gate. Please pre-register. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: Adult $5. Sundays through October 9 | 1–5PM

Paine House Guided Tours GREENWOOD FARM, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Discover this unique 1694 house on its original saltwater farm location.Tours focus on firstperiod architecture, construction, archaeology, and the Colonial Revival. Special architectural tours that discuss our dendrochronology project are offered at 3PM. Group tours available on other dates and times by appointment. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: Adult $8, Child (6-12) $5. Grounds FREE to all. Sundays through October 9 | 1–5PM

The Stevens-Coolidge House Guided Tours THE STEVENS-COOLIDGE PLACE, NORTH ANDOVER 978.682.3580

Step back in time and tour this Colonial Revival estate featuring architectural and garden designs by Joseph Everett Chandler, and the Coolidge’s original collection of fine and decorative art. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: Adult $8, Children (6-12) $5. Group tours by appointment. Grounds FREE to all, 8AM–sunset.

SpecialPLACES | FALL 2005

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Monday, October 10 |

TIME TBD

Equestrian History APPLETON FARMS, IPSWICH/HAMILTON 978.356.5728

AFTER SCHOOL SERIES

Saturday, October 22 | 10AM –12NOON

Fridays, October 14, 21, 28 | 4–5:30PM

Junior Farmer

©R.CHEEK

Learn about the rich equine history of the farm, from working the land to pleasure rides. Witness history come alive as the Myopia Hunt rides to the hounds during a simulated fall foxhunting meet. Directions sent to registrants. Pre-registration required. Members: Adult $5. Nonmembers: Adult $8.

Appleton Farms Foliage

(4-6 GRADERS)

APPLETON FARMS, IPSWICH/HAMILTON

APPLETON FARMS, IPSWICH/HAMILTON 978.356.5728

978.356.5728

Our landscape is always changing at the farm. Bring your eyes up from our working fields and view tree tops during their seasonal display as we walk to vibrant foliage areas. Meet at Waldingfield parking area. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: Adult $5.

Your 4th-6th grade child, accompanied by a favorite adult, will discover that soil is not dirt, help with fall harvesting and help care for cows. A first-hand farm experience! Directions sent to registrants. Space is limited to 12 students. Pre-registration and pre-payment required. Members: $36. Nonmembers: $50. Saturday, October 15 | 12NOON –2PM

Pigeon Hill Picnic APPLETON FARMS, IPSWICH/HAMILTON 978.356.5728

Bring a picnic and come enjoy the expansive views from Pigeon Hill, the highest point in the Great Pasture. Activities for all. Park at Highland Street parking area. FREE for all.

Tuesday, October 18 | 10AM –12NOON

Saturday, October 29 | 3:30–5PM

Bulb Forcing

Dune Discovery

LONG HILL, BEVERLY 978.921.1944

CRANE BEACH,THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH

Prepare now for dull winter days. Liven them with pots of forced bulbs. Accomplished gardener and flower show judge, Mary Ann Streeter, knows all the tricks and will share them with you. Please pre-register. Members: $25; Nonmembers: $35.

978.356.4351

Tuesday, October 18 | 10AM –12NOON

Native Plant Communities

Starting at the ocean’s edge, follow the dune building process where the wrack line begins a maritime dune community. As you continue farther from the shoreline you’ll discover a variety of habitats that develop. Meet at Beach gate. Limited to 15. Please pre-register. Members FREE. Nonmembers $5.

LONG HILL, BEVERLY 978.921.1944

October 15, 22 & 29 | 10–11:30AM (series of three Saturday mornings)

Autumn Light THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Incorporate autumn leaves into a luminary made from your own handmade paper. SESSION ONE : Collect fallen foliage during a tree walk with a Trustees naturalist. Learn the difference between conifers and deciduous trees and why some leaves turn orange while others turn brown. SESSION TWO : Make handmade paper with local artist Laurie Miles. We'll work with natural fibers and organics: abaca, cotton, and our own homemade pulp. SESSION THREE : Design a shade for a take-home luminary that highlights the leaves we collected during our first meeting. Members $35 + $5 materials fee. Nonmembers $40 + $5 materials fee.

Discover Long Hill’s appealing woodland trails and native plant communities.This guided walk will focus on plant identification, various habitats, and natural history. Limit to 18 participants; please call ahead for reservations. Members: FREE; Nonmembers: $5 per person. Saturday, October 22 | 5:30PM–7PM

Sunset, Sand & Botany

Friday, November 4 | 7–9PM

Starry Nights THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Learn how to locate Mars, the myths behind the stars, and all you ever wanted to know about deep-sky objects. Star gaze through telescopes on the Grand Allee led by The North Shore Amateur Astronomy Club. Member family $10. Nonmember family $15.

CRANE BEACH,THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Saturday, November 5 | 10–11:30AM

Experience the beauty of Crane Beach at sunset as you criss-cross the sandy dune trails. Our naturalist helps you identify plants that have adapted to this unique environment. Bring binoculars. Meet at Beach gate. Recommended for adults and children over 12. Limited to 15. Please pre-register. Members FREE. Nonmembers $5.

Composting for Home APPLETON FARMS, IPSWICH/HAMILTON 978.356.5728

Save your leaves! Join composting experts for tips on easily setting up a home compost unit. Please pre-register. Directions sent to registrants. Members: Adult $5. Nonmembers: Adult $8. Saturday, November 19 | 9AM –12NOON

Brisk Beach Hike CRANE BEACH,THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Briskly hike four miles of sand—a gift of spacious conservation land. Recommended for adults and children over 12. Meet at Beach gate.

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Limited to 15. Please pre-register. Members FREE. Nonmembers $5.

Wednesday, December 13 | 3:30–5PM Thursday, December 14 | 3:30–5PM

relates to the ecology of Red Brook. Space limited. Please pre-register. FREE to all.

Children Holiday Parties Friday, December 2 | 7–9:30PM

(Recommended for children ages 2 to 6)

Saturday, September 17 | 1– 4PM

Castle Hill Holiday Party

THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Coastsweep 2005 at World’s End

Have some holiday fun with your little one! “Benjamin of Moscow Circus” will perform a magic and juggling act for the kids. After the show, children can meet Santa (a perfect photo opportunity for parents with camera in hand) and each child will receive a special little gift and refreshments. Members: Parent Accompanying Child FREE, Child $18. Nonmember: Parent Accompanying Child FREE, Child $22.

THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Kick off the holiday season in the splendor of the Great House. Enjoy the dazzling decorations while catching up with old friends and new.The evening will include music, champagne, hors d’oeuvres and festive desserts. Cast a vote for your favorite wreath designed by talented local florists, and enter the raffle to take one home! Members: $45. Nonmembers: $55.

Sunday, December 11 | 3–5PM

Holiday Choral Concert: Mother and Child

©M.BACKUNAS

THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Holiday spirit will fill the air when Cantemus, the North Shore's virtuoso chorus, joins us again for a rousing celebration.The 40-singer classical group will perform music from around the world and across the centuries, from quiet, reflective carols to rousing holiday favorites. Members: $20. Nonmembers: $25.

SE MASSACHUSETTS BIORESERVE, FALL RIVER 508.679.2115

A fall walk in the woods is made all the more enjoyable by the great variety of mushrooms that can spring up, seemingly overnight. Learn to appreciate the delicate beauty of this often overlooked kingdom of forest life with mycologist Roger Goos. Please pre-register. FREE to all.

The Trustees team up with Coastal Zone Management and The Ocean Conservancy for this annual beach cleanup.Take an active role in preserving the beauty of World’s End. All materials provided. FREE to all.

Ecosplorations After School Program* SESSION I

(ages 5-7) Tuesdays, September 20– October 25 | 3:30–5PM (ages 8-10) Wednesdays, September 21– October 26 | 3:30–5PM SESSION II

(ages 5-7) Wednesdays, November 8– December 13 | 3:30–5PM (ages 8-10) Tuesdays, November 9– December 14 | 3:30–5PM WORLD’S END, HINGHAM,WEIR RIVER FARM, WHITNEY/THAYER WOODS 781.740.4796

SOUTHEAST REGION

Saturday, October 8 | 1–3PM

Fungus Foray

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WORLD’S END, HINGHAM 781.740.7233

FOR EVENTS BELOW WITH *

Registration and Information Evening at Hingham Public Library on Wednesday, September 7 from 6–8PM. For more information call 781.740.4796.

Saturdays until November 5 | 12NOON–3PM

Open Barnyard at Weir River Farm WEIR RIVER FARM, HINGHAM 781.740.7233

One hundred years ago, family farms were a common sight in Hingham. Come see The Trustees’ efforts to preserve one of the last examples in town. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: $3 per person.

Attention young explorers! Join us for a unique afterschool experience where we sharpen our observation skills in order to uncover the history and ecology of our properties. Please pre-register. Members: $36. Nonmembers: $54.

Autumn Outings* SESSION I

(ages 2&3) Tuesdays, September 20– October 18 | 10–11:30AM (ages 4&5) Wednesdays, September 21– October 18 | 10–11:30AM SESSION II

(ages 4&5) Tuesdays in November | 10–11:30AM (ages 2&3) Wednesdays in November 10–11:30AM WORLD’S END, HINGHAM, NORRIS RESERVATION, NORWELL AND WHITNEY/THAYER WOODS,

Saturday, December 3 | 10AM–5PM Sunday, December 4 | 10AM–4PM

Holiday Open House THE CRANE ESTATE, IPSWICH 978.356.4351

Enjoy self-guided tours of the festively decorated Great House.This year don't miss the beautiful wreaths adorning the historic rooms on the second floor designed by talented local florists ––a raffle will allow the lucky winners to take one home! The open house will include a gift boutique, café, and a capella singing groups. Members: Adults $8, Child /Senior: $5. Nonmembers: Adults $12, Child /Senior: $8.

Every Friday through Fall | 9:30–10:30AM

HINGHAM/COHASSET 781.740.4796

Senior Walking Club

Connect with your child while he or she connects to these “special” places. Be surprised at the natural wonders waiting at a variety of our local properties. Please pre-register. Members: $30. Nonmembers: $45.

WORLD’S END, HINGHAM 781.740.6665

Join other seniors for a stroll through beautiful World’s End every Friday. All ages and abilities welcome. Walks take place rain or shine. FREE to all. Saturday, September 3 | 1–3PM

Fly Fishing Seminar LYMAN RESERVE, BOURNE 508.679.2115

Join members of Trout Unlimited at the Lyman Reserve for an afternoon spent learning the basics of fly fishing. Discover how fly fishing

Saturday, September 24 (ages 3-5) | 1–1:45PM (ages 6-9) | 2–3:30PM

Beatrix Potter – Tale of Peter Rabbit and More* WEIR RIVER FARM, HINGHAM

Suzanne Terry of The Boston Athenaeum, shares | SpecialPLACES | FALL 2005 2005 SpecialPLACESSUMMER

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the magical stories of the artist, farmer and author Beatrix Potter.This program will include a story, craft and snack plus chance for older children to try their hand at natural drawing. Please pre-register. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: $3 admission to barnyard. Sunday, September 25 | 1–4PM

Happy Birthday Copicut Woods! SE MASSACHUSETTS BIORESERVE, FALL RIVER 508.679.2115

Visit us for a day of food, fun and frolic in the Bioreserve to celebrate two years of permanent protection for Copicut Woods. Bring the whole family and join us for this special celebration! Please pre-register. Members: FREE Saturday, October 1 | 12NOON–3PM

Weir River Farm Festival WEIR RIVER FARM, HINGHAM 781.740.7233

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Reap and share the joy of Harvest on the Farm! Bring your family and join your community for festivities including games, pony rides, music, and more. Members: $3. Nonmembers: $5.

Saturday, November 5 | 9AM –12NOON

Heritage Landscape Volunteer Day

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SE MASSACHUSETTS BIORESERVE, FALL RIVER 508.679.2115

Abandoned fields, stonewalls, and cellar holes all tell the story of Copicut Woods’ past. Join The Trustees’ efforts to protect and restore the cultural features that connect us to the land’s history and our own. Please pre-register. FREE to all.

The Story of the Wilson Farm: From Mariner to Yeoman

Sundays, September 25–October 2 9:30AM–12NOON Saturday, October 8 | 9:30AM –12NOON COLUMBUS DAY, Monday, October 10 9:30AM –12NOON Sundays, October 16–30 | 9:30AM –12NOON

Natural History Canoe Trip on the Housatonic River

Saturday, November 5 | 12NOON–3PM

BARTHOLOMEW’S COBBLE, SHEFFIELD 413.229.8600

Meet the Veterinarian

Paddle the winding Housatonic River with a naturalist/guide. Look for wildlife and learn about river ecology. Binoculars helpful. Please pre-register. Members:Adult $20, Child (ages 10-16) $10. Nonmembers:Adult $30, Child (ages 10-16) $15.

WEIR RIVER FARM, HINGHAM 781.740.7233

We close out the 2005 tour season with this special visitor. Bring your family to see what it really takes to care for our animals. Members: FREE. Nonmembers: $3.

Saturday, September 10 | 1–3PM Friday, December 16 | 6–8PM

A Homestead Ramble

Full Moon Night Hike

BRYANT HOMESTEAD, CUMMINGTON

SE MASSACHUSETTS BIORESERVE, FALL RIVER

413.634.2244

508.679.2115

Interpret the historic landscape by walking the Homestead property and observing changes to the rural Hilltown environment, caused by generations of human habitation. Members: $2; Nonmembers: $5.

As the solstice approaches, get out and enjoy a moonlight walk to experience the changes that wintertime brings on the landscape at Copicut Woods. Please pre-register. FREE to all.

Tuesday, October 4 | 11AM–1PM (Rain Date: October 11)

them into your own cuisine. Please pre-register. Members: Adult $5, Child (6-16) FREE. Nonmembers: Adult $8, Child FREE.

WESTERN REGION

SE MASSACHUSETTS BIORESERVE, FALL RIVER 508.679.2115

In 1768 David Wilson gave up the seafaring life for farming and, over the next two centuries, four generations of his family left their mark on the land.Their story is now preserved forever in the landscape of Copicut Woods. Please pre-register. FREE to all.

Thursdays through October | 9–11:30AM

Volunteer Work Party BARTHOLOMEW’S COBBLE, SHEFFIELD 413.229.8600

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Help with all sorts of fall projects. Call for specifics each week. Fun for all. Please call in advance. FREE to all.

Saturday, October 22 | 10AM–12NOON

Pumpkin Patch Walk

Saturday, September 10 | 5PM concert

EASTOVER FARM, ROCHESTER 508.679.2115

(please arrive by 4PM)

There’s something special about a farm during the autumn harvest.Take a Hiller family hayride or a stroll through the pumpkin patch and you’ll see why The Trustees’ have made protecting this family farm a top priority. Please pre-register. Members: discount on pumpkins.

Native American Flute Concert with Joseph Fire Crow

Sunday, October 23 | 1–4PM

Norris Reservation Clean Up NORRIS RESERVATION, NORWELL

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781.740.7233

Join us to meet the new trail volunteers, share some light refreshments and the chance to do some volunteer work of your own. FREE to all.

Northern Cheyenne fluteman and Grammy Award nominee, Joseph Fire Crow, returns to Hurlburt’s Hill with the clear, bright, soul-stirring sounds of his handmade wooden flutes. Please arrive no later than 4PM for travel to the concert site. Bring a blanket or lawn chair and a picnic, if desired. Sunset: 7:12PM. Please call for reservations. Members: Adult $12, Child (ages 616) $6. Nonmembers: Adult $15, Child $8. Sunday, September 11 | 12:30–2:30 PM

Delicious, Nutritious Wild Edibles BARTHOLOMEW’S COBBLE, SHEFFIELD 413.229.8600

Learn to identify dozens of wild edibles, how to collect them ethically, and how to incorporate

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©TTOR

BARTHOLOMEW’S COBBLE, SHEFFIELD 413.229.8600

Saturday, September 17 | 1PM

Mumbet’s World: Life in 18th century western Massachusetts COL. JOHN ASHLEY HOUSE, ASHLEY FALLS 413.298.3239

Join Ann-Elizabeth Barnes for a thoughtprovoking program about Elizabeth (Mumbet) Freeman, an enslaved AfricanAmerican woman who successfully sued Col. Ashley for her freedom in 1781. FREE with admission.


Saturday, September 17 | 9AM –3PM

The Highland Communities Initiative’s Third Regional Conference The Future of the Highlands: Lessons From Our Neighbors will feature ideas and inspiration from keynote speakers Jean Richardson of Vermont and Tom Bailey of Michigan, two national experts on rural community development and conservation. Pre-registration required. For more information call 413.268.8219 or email highlands@ttor.org. $25, includes lunch.

©R.CHEEK

GATEWAY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL, HUNTINGTON

Sunday, September 18 | 1PM

Behind the Scenes - Farm and Barn Tour at Naumkeag

Saturday, September 17 | 6:30–8:30PM

Nightlife on the Housatonic River

NAUMKEAG, STOCKBRIDGE 413.298.3239

Historic Resources Manager Will Garrison will lead a guided hike through the barn, potting shed, and kitchen at Naumkeag. Moderate hiking over uneven surfaces. FREE with admission.

BARTHOLOMEW’S COBBLE, SHEFFIELD 413.229.8600

Nighttime is the right time for wildlife on the river. As the sun sets at 7PM, a full moon will rise. Enjoy a moonlit paddle with a naturalist /guide and look for otter, muskrat, beaver and other wildlife. Please pre-register. Members: Adult $20, Child (10-16) $10. Nonmembers: Adult $30, Child (10-16) $15.

Saturday, September 24 | 9AM–12NOON

Volunteer Workday at Dinosaur Footprints

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DINOSAUR FOOTPRINTS, HOLYOKE

Saturday, October 8 | 9AM –12NOON

413.532.1631 X13

Trailblazing at Little Tom

Help clear Dinosaur Footprints of invasive honeysuckle and learn to identify the native plants along the Connecticut River shoreline. Bring gloves. Please pre-register. Saturday, September 24 | 9 AM–12NOON

Bear Swamp Invasive Control Workday

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BEAR SWAMP, ASHFIELD 413.684.0148

Bear Swamp is known for its ecologically diverse forests. Join the Local Committee to attack some minor invasive plant problems and keep the property pristine. Please pre-register. Saturday, October 1 | 9–11AM

LITTLE TOM RESERVATION, HOYOKE

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Saturday, November 12 | 9AM–2PM

6th Annual NW Connecticut Waterfowl Census

413.532.1631 X13

BARTHOLOMEW’S COBBLE, SHEFFIELD 413.229.8600

Join us as we begin construction of a new trail that will ultimately lead visitors through Little Tom's diverse landscape. Bring gloves and wear sturdy footwear. Please pre-register.

Learn to identify waterfowl on a field trip to several lakes in NW Connecticut with experienced birders. Dress warmly. Please call in advance. FREE to all.

Sunday, October 9 | 1–3PM

Saturday, December 3 | 8AM–4:30PM

Fall Foliage at Petticoat Hill Reservation and Mill River

Ski Season Starts at Notchview

PETTICOAT HILL, WILLIAMSBURG 413.684.0148

413.684.0148

We will hike and explore the history of both Petticoat Hill and the Skinner Dam site. Meet at Petticoat Hill Reservation. Moderately strenuous; bring lunch. FREE to all.

Notchview opens for early season skiing on 30 km. of trails with 22 km. groomed for classical and skating. Call for conditions or visit WWW. XCSKIMASS . COM . Members FREE. Nonmember: Adults $10, Child $3.

Nordic Training at Notchview

NOTCHVIEW RESERVATION, WINDSOR

NOTCHVIEW, WINDSOR 413.684.0148

Saturdays, October 15 & 22 | 7–9PM

Join USSIA certified coach Ed Hamel for dry land ski training and technique. Geared toward classical skiing with some skating information. Bring ski poles and water. Please pre-register. FREE to all.

Owl Prowl – In Search of the Silent Flyers

Saturday, December 10 | 12NOON–4PM

BARTHOLOMEW’S COBBLE, SHEFFIELD 413.229.8600

NOTCHVIEW RESERVATION, WINDSOR

Owls have an amazing ability to hunt swiftly, accurately and silently in the dead of night. We’ll learn how certain physiological traits support these capabilities; we’ll listen to the calls of great-horned, barred, saw-whet and screech owls and try to draw them in. With luck, we may see one of these silent flyers. Please pre-register. Members: Adult $4, Child FREE. Nonmembers: Adult $6, Child $2.

413.684.0148

Sunday, September 25 | 1–4PM

6th Annual Autumn Antique Appraisal BRYANT HOMESTEAD, CUMMINGTON 413.634.2244

Kimball’s Auction and Estate Services appraises art, furniture or other collectibles for an instant assessment of your valuables in the red barn. Refreshments available. Appraisals cost $5 for one to two items or $7 for up to a limit of three items.

Notchview Christmas Tree Sale

We have a good selection of 5’ to 7’ organically grown trees. If you can’t make it on that day give us a call. $20.

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FIND YOUR PLACE Chapelbrook, Ashfield

©MARY ARDUSER


OUR PLACE IN

ŠF.SITEMAN / DEXTER DRUMLIN. LANCASTER

YOUR WORLD

FIND YOUR PLACE Together with our neighbors, we protect the distinct character of our communities and inspire a commitment to our special places. Our passion is to share with everyone the irreplaceable natural and cultural treasures we care for.

Special PLACES THE TRUSTEES OF RESERVATIONS

572 Essex Street Beverly, MA 01915-1530

N O N-PROFIT O R G. U .S .P O S TA G E

P A I D N .READING,M A PERMIT N O.140


Special places fall 2005