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Friday, October 11, 2019

art books film fashion music food history puzzles nature animals

Weekend

BORN TO TEACH Pages 4 & 5

Coral Farmers Diving deep to save the Caribbean’s damaged reefs pages 14 & 15


02 | The Tribune | Weekend

Friday, October 11, 2019

music

Kamilah's Dangerous debut keeps the midnight oil burning By JEFFARAH GIBSON | Tribune Features Writer | jgibson@tribunemedia.net

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S the year 2019 begins its culmination, sultry Bahamian musician Kamilah is finding her plate full. The artist who currently resides in Brooklyn, New York is promoting her latest single “Dangerous” with special shows, is in the process of completing the accompanying music video Kamilah’s  and recording the final songs to be featured on her debut musical project. The vocalist, guitarist and songwriter said she is hoping to release her album “Learning Curve”, next month leaving Kamilah with very little down time. The project is a blend of genres and influences ranging from jazz and R&B to pop/rock. It is also a recollection of and reflection on life experiences, exploring thought-provoking topics like black-on-black racism. Having no free time right now, matters little to Kamilah. She is on a journey to solidify her position on the international music scene, fully accepting the road to success

involves burning the midnight oil at times. “Keep your eyes and ears open for something fun in early October,” she said is all the sneak peak fans are going to get concerning visuals for the “Dangerous” music video. Written by Kamilah, produced by New York- based producer/engineer Torna and co-produced with Tariq AlSabir, the song was released late last month. In “Dangerous” Kamilah reflects on contradictory feelings of being love but intuition, and just about everyone you trust, says it’s a bad idea that will likely end in heartbreak. “‘Dangerous’ is about being in love but knowing, almost intuitively, that it won’t end well. The song almost anticipates how the relationship will end but the lyrics and overall tone suggest a slight helplessness; like ‘I know I should go, but it’s just as hard to leave as it would be to stay.” The song’s honesty, gives it the relatable characteristic for listeners, she said. “It feels like the kind of lonely experience a lot of people have. I like that the

Artist Kamilah song can help people going through that moment in their relationship can feel a little less alone in what they’re going through. “So far people have said that the song puts them “in their feelings”. It definitely

inspires some reflection. Whether you’re going through that circumstance now or you’ve come out the other side and are reflecting on the relationship in hindsight, I think the song has a way of

helping you process- it has for me,” she said. Kamilah recently celebrated the launch of “Dangerous” at the Rockwood Music Hall in Manhattan. She also Kamilah used it as an opportunity to bring attention to the needs of Abaco and Grand Bahama. The show at the Rockwood Music Hall has a capacity of 200 audience members and therefore presented the perfect setting for Kamilah. During the showcase Kamilah performed with a live band: Torna (electric guitar), Tariq Al Sabir (Grand Piano), Lex Sadler (bass), David Frazier (drums), Taj Sapp (background vocals), Kola Rai (background vocals), Rachel Winder (saxaphone and flute). She performed seven original songs – some from the forthcoming project – and the new single “Dangerous”. The song is available on all major platforms including Apple Music, Spotify and Tidal among others.


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Friday, October 11, 2019

Inside Weekend

My perfect Bahamian weekend Regina Whylly Founder of the Whole Woman

Interview 4-5

Q

. Beach or Sofa? Beach every day and twice on Sunday. Anyone that knows me, knows that every Saturday - barring sickness - I am at the beach swimming or just hanging out watching the waves. Learned a lot of life lessons at the beach.

Q

. Saturday lunch or Sunday Brunch? Absolutely Saturday lunch because they always turn into evening fun, especially with my girlfriends. There ought to be a law for when we get together, all the laughing and girlfriend love that happens is amazing. Love it!

Q

. Rum, Wine, Cocktail or Kalik? I enjoy a glass of wine from time to time but only when I am with my significant other, it makes that time special, especially if you are celebrating something.

Fashion 7 The winners and losers of the star couples on the red carpet this week.

Q

. One thing you cannot live without. Lol, now that question can go a lot of ways but these days it’s the love of my grandson. He makes my world go round. I say to him in front of his mummy and his uncle, ‘Nana love you more than your mummy and your uncle.’ So they know lol.

Food 9-11 Atlantis two-week culinary festival swings into action as Weekend also looks ahead to the upcoming annual International Food and Drink Festival.

Music 12

Q

. Weekend away, where would you go and why? A weekend away for me would be South Andros, I love it there, it is so peaceful and beautiful. I lay out under a coconut tree and just chill or get some nice fella to get some coconut out the tree and drink coconut water and eat jelly. I spent many a summer there when I was young.

Wham! were one of the biggest bands of their time. Founding member Andrew Ridgeley looks back on the days when he and singer George Michael ruled the world.

Beauty 13 Teenager Davinia Capron has her sights set on being a star in the world of beauty fashion.

Nature 14-15 In the waters off Jamaica divers are engaged in a battle to help bring life back to devastated coral reefs. What lessons are there for us in the Bahamas as our our marine live deals with the exact same dangers.

Health 16-17 Cancer survivors celebrate their stories with a fitness party.

Cinema 18 Will Smith’s latest screen outing struggles to make the grade.

Books 19 Red hot reviews of some of the latest offerings in the world of literature

Literary Lives 20-21 Sir Christopher Ondaatje recounts the story of the turbulent life of Hollywood star Dorothy Dandridge.

Gardening 22 Jack Hardy with his latest tips for what to do this holiday weekend.

Calendar 23 Our guide on what to do and where to go.

Puzzles 23 Animals 27 Kim Aranha remembers some worrying days with her beloved potcake, Chief.

Drink 28 It’s golden days for Watlings Distillery as they take on the best in the world of rum.

This weekend in history October 11 • In 1991, testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Anita Hill accused Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of sexually harassing her; Thomas re-appeared before the panel to denounce the proceedings as a “high-tech lynching”. • In 1809, just over three years after the famous Lewis and Clark expedition ended, Meriwether Lewis was found dead in a Tennessee inn, an apparent suicide; he was 35. • In 1884, American first lady Eleanor Roosevelt was born in New York City. • In 1910, Theodore Roosevelt became the first former US president to fly in an airplane during a visit to St. Louis. • In 1968, Apollo 7, the first manned Apollo mission, was launched with astronauts Wally Schirra (shih-RAH’), Donn Fulton Eisele and R Walter Cunningham aboard. The government of Panama was overthrown in a military coup. • In 2017, The Boy Scouts of America announced that it would admit girls into the Cub Scouts starting in 2018 and establish a new program for older

girls based on the Boy Scout curriculum, allowing them to aspire to the Eagle Scout rank. Today’s birthdays: Singer Daryl Hall of Hall and Oates is 73. Actress Joan Cusak is 57. Actor Jane Krakowski is 51. Rapper U-God of Wu-Tang Clan is 49. Rapper MC Lyte is 48. Actress Emily Deschanel (”Bones”) is 43. Actress Michelle Trachtenberg (”Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” ‘’Inspector Gadget”) is 34.

October 12 • I 1973, President Richard Nixon nominated House minority leader Gerald R. Ford of Michigan to succeed Spiro T Agnew as vice president. • In 1492 (according to the Old Style calendar), Christopher Columbus’ expedition arrived in the present-day Bahamas. • In 1792, the first recorded US celebration of Columbus Day was held to mark the tricentennial of Christopher Columbus’ landing. • In 1984, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher escaped an attempt on her life when an Irish Republican Army bomb exploded at a hotel in Brighton, England, killing five people. • In 1997, singer John Denver was killed in the crash of his privately built aircraft in Monterey Bay, California; he was 53. • In 2017, President Donald Trump lashed out at hurricanedevastated Puerto Rico, saying the federal government can’t

keep sending help “forever” and suggesting that the US territory was to blame for its financial struggles. Today’s birthdays: Singer Sam Moore of Sam and Dave is 84. “Fox News Sunday” host Chris Wallace is 72. Actor Hugh Jackman (“The X-Men”) is 51. Fiddler Martie Maguire of the Dixie Chicks and of Courtyard Hounds is 50. Actor Josh Hutcherson (“The Hunger Games”) is 27.

October 13 • In 1775, the United States Navy had its origins as the Continental Congress ordered the construction of a naval fleet. • In 1792, the cornerstone of the executive mansion, later known as the White House, was laid by President George Washington during a ceremony in the District of Columbia. • In 1943, Italy declared war on Germany, its onetime Axis partner. • In 1972, a Uruguayan chartered flight carrying 45 people crashed in the Andes; survivors resorted to feeding off the remains of some of the dead in order to stay alive until they were rescued more than two months later. • In 2010, rescuers in Chile using a missile-like escape capsule pulled 33 men one by one to fresh air and freedom 69 days after they were trapped in a collapsed mine a half-mile underground.


04 | The Tribune | Weekend

Friday, October 11, 2019

interview

Patrice Perpall: Born to be a teacher By CARA HUNT | Tribune Features Writer cbrennen@tribunemedia.net

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ike many parents Patrice Perpall’s dad was less than thrilled when she suggested she might want to be a teacher. “He was of the notion that teachers didn’t make enough money and he encouraged me to consider a science/medical degree instead,” she told Tribune Weekend. Listening to her father’s advice Patrice decided to pursue a career in dentistry and attended the University of York in Toronto, Canada. After returning home, she became very involved in her Holy Spirit Anglican Church’s youth programmes, such as Girl Brigade and Sunday School. “I just realised that I had a passion for being around young people, I couldn’t wait to be around them,” she said. Patrice realised she really did want to pursue an education career after all. “I have to give my parents credit, because when I told them they allowed me to return to school to get my teachers diploma.” Patrice returned to Canada and enrolled in the George Brown College at Reyerson University and received her diploma in early childhood education in 2007. She says that from the very first day she

“The food was the biggest adjustment. I taught at an international school there which was different from the traditional/ local schools. They were more rigorous. Students went to school for longer days and six days a week, including Saturday. We followed the five day schedule.”

entered the programme she knew that it was the right decision for her. “It was a two year programme and I loved it, I got every award possible,” she said. After completing her degree, Patrice had the opportunity to teach in China – it was an experience that would open her eyes to the vast possibilities of a teaching career as well and also fuelled a love of international travel. “China has preserved over 5000 years of history. My experience was an educational one. I wanted to learn more about

the history, the culture and the people,” said Patrice. “The food was the biggest adjustment. I taught at an international school there which was different from the traditional/ local schools. They were more rigorous. Students went to school for longer days and six days a week, including Saturday. We followed the five day schedule.” While her year teaching in China was amazing, Patrice decided to return home at end of the academic year. “My mom was ill and it had been very hard to be so far

away from her and not be able to see her,” she explained. Once in Nassau, she began teaching at St Andrews a position she held for eight years. “The eight years I spent at St Andrews were awesome it was great exposure,” she said. A few years ago, an opportunity to once again teach overseas presented itself – this time in Muscat, Oman. “One of my former principals was at the school I am at now and he recruited me to come over.” She admitted that initially she was hesitant particularly as a Christian going to live


Friday, October 11, 2019

and work in a Muslim country. After a 26 hour flight, she touched down in Muscat. The school she teaches at has 1300 students from kindergarten to Year 12. Patrice’s colleagues are from all over the world and she teaches English, Science and Mathematics. “I have thoroughly enjoyed the experience. It is a safe country with so much to do; camping in the desert, visiting the Opera House, sitting on the beach watching the most beautiful sunsets or sand dune bashing in the desert to name a few.” She added that while she has to wear traditional dress and remain appropriately covered, she has found Oman to be quite modern and her religious concerns did not turn out to be an issue at all. “The Sultan here has given land to Christians to build churches and worship,” she said. “I attend a church with other churches in the same yard and a bible study group on campus. Amazingly, my faith has grown.”

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Patrice has just started her fourth year and says the decision to move to Oman has been one of the best of her life. Living abroad has been a unique experience and she says she would encourage everyone to take advantage of travel opportunities. “As a child I read a lot, often nonfiction books about different countries and places. I never imagined that I would travel to some of those same places I read about some years ago. By living abroad I have gained a great appreciation for life, people, culture and history. In saying that, there is no place like home. I appreciate more of what we have right at home since travelling. “There is no beach like the turquoise beaches at home. I am a proud Bahamian, cooking Bahamian dishes on international nights and socials and sharing about my Bahamaland to my students and friends. I take my Bahamas with me.” Patrice also highly recommends teaching as a profession. She said there are amazing opportunities for teachers around the world. “I do encourage others to teach abroad. It has been an amazing opportunity. Know that the ceiling in education has risen. You are no longer limited to one country. There is a lot of opportunity out there to teach abroad. In doing so you learn different educational systems, meet and work with people from different backgrounds and grasp new and innovative concepts.” However, she stresses that education is a career one must be passionate about. “You don’t have to like children, you have to love them,” she said. And like in any profession there are lows and highs. She said that the lows are that education is often test-driven. Since everyone learns differently she says this may not be the best measurement of achievement which she says means that teachers sometimes are not able to reach all of their students. However, she said that highs of education is that “lightbulb moment when you know that a student has ‘got it’. That is such a powerful moment.” Additionally, she said: “ When children that I have taught throughout the year have shown steady progress, not just academically but are more caring and empathetic towards others and their environment then you know that you have done well. That is a great feeling.”


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Friday, October 11, 2019


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Friday, October 11, 2019

celebrity Grand Opening of Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta

With Cara Hunt and Jeffarah Gibson

HIT

SPLIT

SPLIT

HIT

SPLIT

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif. and Sid Williams

Oprah Winfrey and Stedman Graham

Terrence Howard and Miranda Pak

Ludacris and Eudoxie Bridges

Colin Kaepernick and Nessa

Cara says: “Oprah looks nice - I wouldn’t say I was blown away, but the dress is ok. I do like the sheer hemline. And I like that she is wearing some serious bling. Stedman’s suit is just another suit, he just blends in the background.” Jeffarah says: “For the grandness of the event, Oprah and Stedman just seem to fall very flat. Stedman sported a regular and uninteresting church suit. Oprah’s gown fits perfectly but it ran out of gas on the glamour.”

Cara says: “Let’s start with Terrence, he is giving off serious Lord of the Manor vibes, I love all the detail in his jacket and vest. You just know he came to party in an outfit like that. As for Ms Miranda, I think the dress is a bit mixed up. I like the skirt but not with the top and I don’t like the band at the top. I don’t know, not feeling it that much.” Jeffarah says: “This couple have created one of the worst fashion collisions I have seen on any red carpet in recent times. Individually their ensembles are a mess; Terrence’s coat is too busy and Miranda’s gown is just awful. Matching chiffon fabric with a leather corset just did not work in this instance. Collectively they are a wreck.”

Cara says: “We are seeing a lot of velvet dresses this season, this one seems really nice, sexy but in a subtle way. And the touch of orange with the earrings is very fall appropriate. I am also really feeling Ludacris’s tux, like the colour the texture and the detailing – love when guys go the extra distance and spice up their red carpet look.” Jeffarah says:  “They both look dapper! Love that their fabric of choice was velvet because its definitely in season. Eudoxie’s dress is a bit ordinary, however it compliments Ludacris’ blue suit perfectly.”

Cara says: “Nessa’s dress has that bedspread vibe going on, its a lot of print.I also think that the length is weird - it almost feels like it should be floor or knee length rather than how it cuts her mid calf. I like that she kept the hair pulled back and simple. Colin’s suit is an awesome green and surely stood out on the red carpet. Its giving me Royal African vibes with the sash.” Jeffarah says: “Love the look this duo rocked on the carpet. Love the deep green colour of Colin’s suit and the patterned sash. It is a different look, not one usually sported by men on the carpet. As for Nessa, her jumpsuit complements Colin’s attire. He was the star, she is just the supporting cast.”

Cara says: “What a lovely couple, Ms Maxine looks regal in her black sheath gown. And I love the drama of the cutout at the bodice and the long gloves. She is certainly showing the younger girls how it’s done and Mr Williams is her perfect arm candy. Very elegant.” Jeffarah says: “Ms Waters’ gown is very age appropriate and elegant. Love the cutout top as it adds that extra flare. Like Cara said, Mr Williams looks nice on her arm.\ Oprah Winfrey and Stedman Graham

PHOTOS/AP PHOTOS

The Weekend Fashion Report


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Friday, October 11, 2019

celebrity

Perry honours the black Hollywood trailblazers By JEFFARAH GIBSON | Tribune Features Writer | jgibson@tribunemedia.net

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N CELEBRATING one of the most historic moments in his career and black entertainment, filmmaker Tyler Perry dedicated sound stages during a star studded ceremony at his Atlanta studios to those who paved the way. The Bahamas’ Sir Sidney Poitier was among the cadre of veteran actors honoured. The ceremony drew a VIP crowd last Saturday including other Hollywood heavyweights such as Denzel Washington, Whoopi Goldberg, Oprah Winfrey, Will Smith and Spike Lee. The 330-acre studios at Fort McPherson is the only black-owned major film studio in the US. Perry purchased the land in June 2015, which now holds 12 sound stages for movie productions. He has dedicated each soundstage to a black person who’s made strides in Hollywood, including the late Diahann Carroll. Carroll’s dedication was a particular highlight as the actress passed away a day prior to being honoured at the gala night. During her lengthy life she made TV history as the first black actress to star in a prime time series as a career woman rather than a domestic worker in “Julia”. She died at age 84 following a long bout with cancer. Despite this somber moment at the gala, the stars boasted on their social media of what an inspiration the event had been especially given Tyler Perry’s rags to riches story of overcoming abuse, poverty and homelessness. Tyler kicked off the reception by sharing the story of what inspired him to move to Atlanta in 1992. “I saw black people doing well for the first time in my life. I saw black doctors, lawyers and other professionals and thought, ‘This is the promised land. I can make it here’,” he said. He also reflected on the influence of his mother and God in his life: “It was my mother who taught me about faith. No matter what hell was going on in the house, she taught me about faith and God,” he said. “Nobody is teaching kids enough about faith [today]. About how to pray

Tyler Perry poses for a photo on the red carpet at the grand opening of Tyler Perry Studios at Tyler Perry Studios on Saturday in Atlanta. Photos by Elijah Nouvelage/ Invision/AP

Iyanla Vanzant, left, and Cicely Tyson.

Michael Ealy and Khatira Rafiqzada.

Usher.

Kesha Ward and 2 Chainz.

your way through a situation rather than turning to drugs or some other alternative. If my mother hadn’t given me that, I don’t know where I would be.” He then highlighted one special person in attendance who influenced him: “In 2005, Oprah invited me to her Legends Ball,” he revealed. “I saw Diana Ross, Smokey Robinson, Tom Cruise and Sidney Poitier, and I said, ‘What am I doing here?’ I didn’t know I said it out loud, but Yolanda Adams was sitting next to me and she said, ‘You belong here’. By the end of the party I said, ‘I’m going to dream bigger.’ It was something about being in Oprah’s house, being in her presence, seeing what a black person had accomplished — it really, really spoke to me.” The day after the event Tyler reflected on the night. “I’m a writer with no words for Saturday night,” Mr Perry said in a Facebook post on Monday. “So if a picture is worth a thousand words then let them speak for me while I gather my emotions and try to process what happened on Saturday!!”


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Friday, October 11, 2019

food

Fire up the ovens for fantastic 'Food Fest' By ALESHA CADET | Tribune Features writer | acadet@tribunemedia.net

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estival season is set to kick off next weekend with one of the country’s biggest events - The International Culture, Wine and Food Festival. This year’s festival will once again take place at the Botanical Gardens next Saturday, beginning 10am - 7 pm and on Sunday at 10 am - 6 pm. The annual festival has attracted tens of thousands of visitors who enjoy a variety of dishes from a collection of national food booths; whether it is crab and dough from the Bahamian section, ackee and codfish from Jamaican, adobo from the Philippines, or some griot from Haiti - there is something for all to enjoy. “They also enjoy sampling beers from different countries, places where they may have gone on vacation and tried the native brew and now they can enjoy it on home turf in the Bahamas,” said Sheila Bethel, Marketing Director of the International Culture Wine and Food Festival. “Every year we try to add something so it doesn’t get stale. While Bahamians call it the “Food Festival” it is much more than that and provides a window/snapshot into the cultural heritage of countries with foreign nationals domiciled here in the Bahamas either through work or marriage.” The highly festival was inaugurated 24 years ago to celebrate the anniversary of the United Nations and to also celebrate the diversity of cultures that have come together to make up the Bahamas. “We have the booths judged by a team under the guidance of artist John Cox, who select

the Best Booth in each region and then an overall winner. For several years, the Philippines and Cuba have battled it out – wonder who it will be this year?” asked Sheila. Highlights will also include an introduction of a Saturday Night Movie. Throughout the evening there will also be various media clips shown to display Hurricane Dorian Relief Efforts such as scenes from the Queen’s College students who loaded up a helicopter and offered supplies to affected areas; as well as media clips of children from other nations like The Gambia and Austria who sent their best wishes. “ICWFF attracts several organisations which, in addition to creating awareness of their organisation, use the event as a major fundraiser for their non-profit organisations. With the outpouring of love for the Bahamas from around the world, this is also a way to say thank you to these different groups and to say we’re

glad you’re here. We found after Hurricane Matthew in 2016, people were thankful to be able to ‘let off steam’ and relax at an event they have known and loved for several years. We hope the fun and joyous atmosphere of ICWFF will do the same for everyone this year,” said Sheila. How does it feel to have come this far to actually hosting for a 24th annual time? For the entire team, Sheila said it is very rewarding, as the team took steps to make it sustainable from the outset. “The event is not just one person, I am part of a team, spearheaded by our Chairman Janet Johnson. From the Advisory Council to the vendors, sponsors and even the attendees. It’s a lot of work, we start planning in February each year but every year when we walk the event and see all the happy, excited people, we know that we’ve done a good job. This is the only Festival where the vendors are an integral partner,

they have a vested interest in the success of the Festival and their contribution helps defray operational expenses. We celebrate the 25th anniversary next year and with this milestone we plan a big splash and new features, for example, Fintech and going “green”, which we have begun this year. We had a lot of special pre-festival events when we celebrated our 20th, so look for even more next year,” said Sheila. Tribune Weekend asked, what advice would she give to persons experiencing the festival for the first time. Sheila suggested to go and get your admission bands early on from locations such as Cash ‘N Go’s Palmdale, Carmichael and Downtown stores.

“Buy enough Festival Dollars so you don’t have to queue again; ask for sample portions so you can try a variety of cuisine; and drink responsibly. Review our website which lists the booths and find them on the maps placed on the North Lawn (Bahamas) and Main Lawn (International). Go to our Facebook page after the event and vote for your favourite booth – this is another exciting battle and was won by a Mexico booth last year. Several thousand people vote online,” said Sheila. ALIV will serve as the festival’s presenting sponsor this year. Sponsors also include Doctors Hospital, The Qs, Girl Guides and the Rotary Clubs of The Bahamas which operates the festival ‘banks’.


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Friday, October 11, 2019

food

Let's get this party started By ALESHA CADET | Tribune Features writer | acadet@tribunemedia.net

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T WAS the ultimate “Party in the Village” at the picturesque Marina Village, as Atlantis transformed the space into an extravaganza of food, beer, wine and spirits coupled with Junkanoo, live music, local artists and artisans. As part of its “ Extraordinary Taste at Atlantis” (EAT) two-week culinary festival now in its second year of featuring specially chef-curated menus offered at fixed rates across 14 restaurants at the Paradise Island property - the Party In The Village served as the kick off to the foodie adventure to come. “This year we have made the ‘Party In the Village’ bigger. We have expanded all over Marina Village – in front of Murray’s, the Pizzeria, and then all the way down to Carmine’s. We added more booths, entertainment and more food stalls so you can come in and either purchase just the beverage package for one price at $35, or you can get beverage and food for $55. You will get a nice coloured wrist

band that tells you what it is, which makes it nice and simple. You can participate in the festival, enjoy the live bands and Junkanoo, or go into one of the restaurants and enjoy a prix fixe menu. It is totally up to you,” said Sean O’Connell, general manager and vice president of Culinary Operations at Atlantis, Paradise Island. Things are being done a little bit different this year, as patrons are given a food map to each of the grab-and-go offerings. For example, the participating booths such as Pirates Republic, McKenzie’s Conch Shack, The Village Burger Shack, and Marina Pizza invited diners to get a taste of some of their most popular selections. As you travel to each of the stops, the destination on the map is torn from the bunch when completed. At Pirate’s Republic - known for its light bites ranging from fresh jerk chicken to ahi tuna and a specialty sausage menu - attendees got the chance to get a taste of the restaurant’s


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Friday, October 11, 2019

PHOTO/TERREL W. CAREY SR

pork sausage roll. The pub’s Chef Maxine Smith told Tribune Weekend, the sausage roll is offered on a pretzel bread and served with pickled peppers, dijon mustard, bacon bits and onions which brings an awesome balance to the flavour. “We wanted to showcase the sausage roll because it is different. People are used to the original hot dogs but we are trying to switch it around and offer something new, almost like a gourmet hot dog. I’ve been watching from the side lines as people stop by to try, and I must say it is going smooth so far. I hope we garner a lot more business even after this,” said Chef Smith. Not too far from the Pirate’s Republic, is Mckenzie’s Conch Stand most famous for having some of the best conch salad in Nassau. With fresh local fruits, vegetables, and conch, Mr Mckenzie himself served up bowls of the product to partygoers. “I am glad to be here, as this is helping to promote my business and what it is about. People are enjoying it,” he said. One patron in line, Celina Adams, noted: “I think the inclusion of Mckenzie’s is a nice addition here at Marina Village because it give you a real taste of the Bahamas while over here on Paradise Island. I mean you can come here and get fresh conch salad and you cant really beat that. Other than that, the atmosphere is nice, which makes for a good night out.” For those not quite full as yet - there was the option of trying the gourmet Beef or Veggie burger at The Village Burger Shack, and slice of a traditional pizza with your favourite toppings at Marina Pizzeria. Manager, Alphonso Rolle at the The Village Burger Shack said the festival was an awesome way to showcase what the restaurant is all about. He was sure that no where else, persons would have found a burger infused with Bahamian seasonings with an American twist. “Here tonight we are actually showing people what makes our burgers different from any

others burger joints out there in this country. Our beef is prepared here on the property, you get a juicy size burger in your mouth and the service is awesome. Our quality is rich and this is the place to come. We are trying to draw our Bahamian crowd over and give them the opportunity to enjoy that we have going on here,” said Mr Rolle. Moreover throughout the event were beverage vendors such as: Chateau Ste Michelle Wine Estates, Jackson Family Wines, Caribbean Bottling Company, Webb Banks, John Watlings, Commonwealth Brewery Ltd, Southern Glazer’s Wine + Spirits, Young’s Fine Wine, Graycliff, Bacardi, Sysco and Barcelo. The EAT Culinary experience will continue until October 13th to feature additional restaurants such as Mosaic, Poseidon’s Table, Frankie Gone Bananas at Bimini Road, Virgil’s Real BBQ, Seafire Steakhouse, Todd English’s Olives, Casa D’Angelo, Bahamian Club, Nobu, Café Martinique, and Fish by José Andrés. “Based on the experience from last year’s first annual EAT, we have had a lot of Bahamian participation, especially in our signature restaurants at a better price point. What we found was that it was a much easier way for them to come back into Atlantis. Atlantis was really previously, before EAT, not their chosen destination. However, during the EAT programming we made (the resort’s restaurants) available to a lot more people,” said Mr O’Connell. He believes EAT is a great way to experience the evolution that has been going on at Atlantis over the last few years. A portion of the proceeds from each beverage and meal purchased at this year’s Party In The Village will be donated to Hands For Hunger, earmarked specifically for Hurricane Dorian relief efforts.


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music

Memories of Michael

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ong before he was a music icon in skintight jeans, leather jacket and designer stubble, George Michael was something else — awkward, chubby and insecure. He even went by the very unhip nickname Yog. A loving portrait of a young, striving Michael is offered in a new book by his closest friend and former bandmate, Andrew Ridgeley. His “Wham! George Michael & Me” is part memoir and part monument to one of the biggest pop stars of the 1980s. “The point of the book was really to illustrate our friendship and how it really formed,” said Ridgeley. “It’s very difficult to put it into words or really put your finger on exactly what it was that people found so attractive about Wham! But it was a lot to do with George and me and our friendship.” In the book, Ridgeley traces the rise of Wham! and key moments in the band’s career, like the creation of hits like “Careless Whisper” and “Everything She Wants,” their appearances at Live Aid and the time in 1985 when the band became the first Western pop group to visit China. But while this may be Ridgely’s memoir, Michael looms large and the book peters out after Wham! broke up in 1986 as Michael’s star soared, almost as if the most interesting thing Ridgeley has to write about is his friend, who died on Christmas Day 2016. There are fun anecdotes, such as the drunken hijinks that accompanied the video shoot for “Last Christmas,” the reason why Ridgeley wasn’t part of Band Aid and the note he drunkenly wrote on his parents’ fridge that became the title of a Wham! hit: “Mum, wake me up up before you go go.” The book also deals with more weighty subjects, like how their lives changed as tabloids stalked the pair and that during the band’s life Michael realized he was gay but remained closeted. It was a business decision to stay there. “He felt it would undermine us and our chances of success. And it was very

important to both of us that Wham! was a success that we wished for,” said Ridgeley. “It was tough for him. There’s no doubt about that. And it caused him a great deal of discomfort.” Ridgeley met a 13-year-old Michael — born Georgios Panayiotou to a Cypriot family — in 1975, at school in Hertfordshire, England. They quickly bonded over a shared sense of humour and music, both loving Queen, Elton John and David Bowie. The pair formed a ska-influenced quintet called The Executive and then in 1981 re-emerged as a duo, taking the name Wham! from their first completed song, “Wham Rap.” Ridgeley, 56, writes that Wham! was never meant to last very long, saying the youth-driven duo was intended to “burn brightly, but briefly.” Ridgeley just wanted to form a band, write music and perform. Michael soon outgrew his bandmate and their break-up was amicable. “I achieved my ambition early in life,” Ridgeley said. The book charts the evolution of Michael from a frumpy, uncool kid who collected Spider-Man comics into a superstar, with detours into very tight Fila shorts and plenty of hours of hair teasing. Ridgely has a few well-intentioned cracks at Michael’s early fashion mistakes and his later endless obsession with his appearance. “He struggled with his looks and his weight as an adolescent,” Ridgely said. “His transformation, in every sense, is quite amazing. Music and the career that he chose, allowed him to become, in some ways, the man in his mind’s eye.” Ridgeley said he didn’t always handle the tabloid press very well, unable to shake the “Animal Andy” or “Randy Andy” labels as a hard-partying pop star. In many ways, the book is a lesson for any wannabe pop stars out there about the pitfalls ahead. “If I was advising the 20-year-old Andrew Ridgeley from this perspective, I’d be telling him to do things very differently,” Ridgeley said.

Andrew Ridgeley, author of “Wham! George Michael & Me.” Photo /Urszula Sołtys/Dutton via AP

Wham! George Michael & Me,” a memoir by Andrew Ridgeley. Photo/Dutton via AP “Perhaps the biggest lesson that I would say is the one to learn is not to let fame and fortune get inside your head,” he added. “Give yourself a healthy bit of distance between your

fame and reality because they are two different things.” Among the book’s highlights are the dozens of photos included, complete with witty captions from Ridgeley. One of the duo wearing swimsuits is labeled “poseurs,” another of them dancing onstage is given “prancers” and a third of them joking around gets “prats”. “I had great fun doing that. I could just imagine George next to me going through those,” Ridgely said. “It was important that whilst the music and the making of the music was serious business, we weren’t a serious business.” MARK KENNEDY AP Entertainment Writer


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Friday, October 11, 2019

beauty

Teen's lip gloss line is poppin' By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features writer acadet@tribunemedia.net

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ylie Jenner, Rihanna, Lady Gaga, YouTube beauty guru James Charles – these are just some of the celebs that have gotten into the cosmetics industry in recent years. And with an estimated market value of over $500 billion, it is safe to say that the rapidly growing makeup industry is poppin’ right now. Here in the Bahamas, although access and resources are limited, a teenage girl has decided to carve out her own niche in this ever-expanding market. Two months ago, 14-yearold Davinia Capron launched her very own line of lip products called TariGloss. She told Tribune Weekend she initially feared that no one would take her seriously as a business owner due to her age, but the opposite has proven to be true. She already has a client base which is raving about her products. While other teens were whiling away their time at the beach, at the movies or on vacation, Davinia’s Summer was dedicated to putting together her lip glosses, balms and scrubs, as well as coming up with her company logo. And she has been very creative in coming up with unique flavours for her lip products. Her absolute favourites are ‘Switcha Cooler’ – inspired by the limeade’s smell, colour and taste; the Bahama Ocean Breeze – inspired by

Bahamian waters; and the Bahama Beauty – inspired by the Bahamian flag, the beauty of the islands, and most importantly, the unity of her people she has witnessed in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian. “I love getting customer feedback and engaging customers in things such as naming a new lip gloss, or what other lip care products I should make next. The experience of creating and using your own products is extremely important because this way you can know how effective they really are,” said the 10th-grade Charles W Saunders student. Thanks to the help of friends and family sharing, and posting her TariGloss promotion video on social media platforms, Davinia said her clientele is steadily growing. She is inspired by people like her mother, Demetria, as well as her aunts, Anthonique, Toya, and Boo, who are all successful business owners in addition to holding down full-time jobs. “They have shown me that you can start a business regardless of age, gender or product. My overall goal for TariGloss is to expand on the amount of products I have to offer in order to appeal to a larger audience. As long as TariGloss keeps growing, updating and evolving as a business, I think that the future will be bright,” she said. Davinia was happy to note that the feedback she has received so far has all been positive.

Teen entrepreneur Davinia Capron

“(Customers) always say that they love the texture and quality of the glosses, especially the taste. I remember out of all the customers I’ve had so far, I must say that a young lady named Annisa was my most memorable one. She bought about 14 orders of the three for $10 packages for each of her friends. I deeply appreciated that,” she said. For the month of October, the teen entrepreneur plans to spread breast cancer awareness amongst her peers through the sale of her glosses. “With every purchase that is made during the month of October TariGloss is going to donate $1 to the Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group to help in whatever way we can,” said Davinia. Those interested in TariGloss, can contact 4285639 and 815-0820 or visit the company’s Facebook and Instagram pages @Tarigloss.


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Friday, October 11, 2019

community

Cancer survivors sweat & fete By JEFFARAH GIBSON | Tribune Features Writer jgibson@tribunemedia.net

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WEAT fete culminated over the weekend fulfilling its three-fold purpose of celebrating Anita Rolle, the founder’s survivor journey, raising proceeds for the Gennie Dean cancer support group and reinforcing a message of hope even after cancer diagnosis. Ms Rolle who has been cancer-free for eight years was inspired to host the event, now in its second year, as a way of helping survivors in need of financial assistance while also giving them moral support. The event at Goodman’s Bay on Saturday featured two interactive aerobic demonstrations, health screenings and health information. There were also live performances by Bahamian artists including Shine, Patrice Murrell, Karrington McKenzie, and Alia Coley. There were more than 50 vendors – more than double the size of the first Sweat Fete. Ms Rolle said there was something for every taste, including a booth manned by Rotaract, and Nassau Sunset club members accepting donations for persons affected by Hurricane Dorian. Having walked her own journey after discovering a

lump in her breast, Ms Rolle said keeping herself surrounded with positivity was what kept her going. She hoped to spread the same energy to survivors who attended Sweat Fete. “I discovered a lump in my breast and was diagnosed with stage two cancer,” she told Tribune Woman. “It did not spread to any other areas. I did a lumpectomy and also had to do chemotherapy and radiation. And that journey of course is not easy and you would have to remain positive,” she said. One of the main things that got her through what she has described as one of the toughest ordeals in her life was having the right mindset. Without it, she may not have survived to bring hope to others currently fighting the battle. “God is the only person at that point in your life that can help you. That is how it was for me,” she said. “In any situation, I tend to grasp the positive and not the negative. As a survivor that is what actually assists you with getting through it because the actual medication and treatments are not easy. It’s just


Friday, October 11, 2019

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about remaining focused, optimistic and seeing the best that you can in every situation. “If you have been diagnosed with cancer you cannot think ‘I am going to die’, you have to think you will live. That was my first thought. I said I will do what I have to do but this didn’t come to take me out.” Throughout the event, attendees were encouraged to consider their eating habits and make adjustments to create a much healthier lifestyle. “I think my diet helped me a great deal. Breast cancer can be triggered by so many things including the food that you eat. But for me it wasn’t due to my diet. I was always a person who would try to eat as healthy as possible. And I think that helped me with my recovery. So I encourage people to eat healthy because your body reacts to what you put in it,” she said. Ms Rolle’s mission is to help those affected by breast cancer through early detection, education and support services. She said her annual physical earlier this year, and her mammogram, also shows Ms Rolle remains cancer-free.


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Friday, October 11, 2019

film

Left, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Will Smith and Benedict Wong in a scene from the Ang Lee film “Gemini Man.”

Will Smith, portraying Junior, foreground, and Henry Brogan.

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ill Smith is usually an asset for a movie. He’s the kind of true movie star whose charisma can elevate even the most mediocre material. You’d think then that it would be a good thing to have not just one but two Will Smiths in a movie if you can. That was at least part of the idea behind “Gemini Man .” The action film from Ang Lee also uses state of the art de-ageing technology to create a basically believable 20-something version of Smith and has billed itself as a “true event film” that “redefines action cinema”. Those are some lofty claims, but unfortunately its biggest accomplishment seems to be in sapping all the charm out of Smith (twice!). For all the hype about the modern technology, the story is curiously stale and at times feels like a mashup of other, better movies. It makes more sense when you learn that “Gemini Man” was written over 20 years ago and has

Advanced tech but even two Will Smiths can't bring this to life gemini man | 117 minutes

gone through enough possible directors and stars to fill out a baseball team. Certainly it’s been updated since whatever version was making the rounds in 1997 — “Game of Thrones” showrunner David Benioff shares a story and screenplay credit with Darren Lemke and Billy Ray — but it still has a dated core, and not in a good, self-consciously retro way. Smith, at his current age, plays Henry Brogan, a

talented assassin employed by the U.S government who just wants to retire. The film begins with his last job: He has to assassinate someone on a full speed bullet train while perched on a hill outside. Brogan is a one-in-a-million sniper, you see, and a bunch of other guys failed where he succeeded. But of course hanging up his hat afterward for a quiet life of fishing isn’t as simple as he

Clive Owen in a scene from the Ang Lee film “Gemini Man.” Photos Ben Rothstein/Paramount Pictures via AP hoped. He soon finds out that he’s being monitored, and then hunted by his former employers including a bureaucrat played by Linda Emond and a private contractor named Clay Varris (Clive Owen), who is one of the most one-dimensional “bad guys” we’ve had the privilege of spending time with in a while. Henry has no choice but to go on the run, bringing the young agent who was assigned to surveil him, Danny (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), along because, well, there has to a potential love interest in a movie like this, so why not? This won’t come as a surprise to anyone who has seen any sort of “Gemini Man” marketing, although the movie seems to think it is a surprise, but they soon discover that the person Henry’s being hunted by is a much younger version of himself. “Junior” (a de-aged Smith) is part of a shadowy programme run by Varris called Gemini. The construct of “he knows every move I’m going to make” is

an interesting one, but this film barely does anything with it. It’s too busy inexplicably continent hopping and giving Winstead, Smith and Benedict Wong one-liners even they can’t sell. Lee once again is using the high frame rate he deployed in “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” (which I liked more than most) but it’s even more distracting this time around. The hyper reality makes everything look somehow cheaper and less cinematic and it detracts from some of the genuinely well-choreographed action set pieces. And while “Junior” does look pretty good for a computergenerated approximation of a 23-year-old Smith, it’s hard not to wish that all the time and money spent on this gimmick might have been put toward making sure the script and story were at least engaging and entertaining. As it stands, “Gemini Man” is a lot of show, LINDSEY BAHR AP Film Writer


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Friday, October 11, 2019

books

Back to the glory days of film noir “Blues in the Dark: a Thriller,” Arcade Books, by Raymond Benson A movie producer who moves to Los Angeles and stumbles upon a story sparks Raymond Benson’s look at a turbulent Hollywood of the 1940s with ramifications in the present in “Blues in the Dark”. Karissa Glover has just arrived in Los Angeles when she learns of a can’t-miss deal on an old mansion that hasn’t been lived in since the murder of

movie starlet Blair Kendrick in the late 1940s. She barely moves in when she realizes that Kendrick’s story needs to be told, so she works with her producing partner to create a film telling the world about this femme fatale who has largely been forgotten. The chapters alternate between Glover following the path of Kendrick’s life when she arrived in Hollywood and the finished film taking the reader into the 1940s. Benson

outlines a world of prejudice where women who wanted to become stars were expected to sleep with producers and movie studio executives. Kendrick wanted to see her name in lights, and when she’s offered a lucrative contract, she thinks she’s made it. When she falls in love with jazz musician Hank Marley, she quickly learns that interracial relationships aren’t met by others with fondness. The shifting perspective that contrasts Glover’s quest and the resistance she meets to find out what happened to Kendrick with Kendrick’s desire to make films and love the man she wants is compelling and heartbreaking. Benson has crafted a noir film inside the pages of a book and the cast of characters in the present and past come vividly to life. He also makes the reader question what is morally just in the midst of a well-written crime drama. JEFF AYERS Associated Press

A story of the Great Depression ringing true today

“The Giver of Stars: a Novel” (Pamela Dorman Books), by Jojo Moyes At the outset of Jojo Moyes’ “The Giver of Stars,” Alice Van Cleve has gone from the frying pan into the fire. An outspoken young woman who

doesn’t quite fit in with polite English society, Alice jumps at the chance to leave her native England when a handsome American proposes. Imagining a different sort of life altogether, she ends up with Bennett Van Cleve and his overbearing father in a rural town in Depressionera Kentucky. She’s friendless, miserable and trapped. Until, that is, the Pack Horse Library initiative comes to her town, offering her an escape from the lonely monotony of her days. Saddling up to bring books to remote families hungry for reading material, Alice and a cluster of local women join the initiative. According to an article in Smithsonian magazine — which inspired Moyes to set her historical novel in eastern Kentucky — the Pack Horse Librarians were the bookmobiles of the Great Depression. Overcoming

danger and discomfort, they traversed seasons, mountains and miles to bring books to homes and schools that would otherwise go without. While her novel is set in the midst of the Great Depression, Moyes crafts a tale that’s remarkably contemporary. One timely theme that runs throughout the book is the importance of facts. The librarians represent knowledge — knowledge they wish to share not just to open people to new worlds and ideas but also to arm them with the facts they need to counter the disinformation campaigns promoted by the wealthy and powerful. “Knowledge is so important, don’t you think? We all say at the library, without facts we really do have nothing,” Alice says. And when her father-in-law attacks Alice for reading a “filthy book,” he smugly informs her that the book has been banned. Her response? “Yes, and I know that a federal judge overturned that same ban. I

know just as much as you do, Mr. Van Cleve. I read the facts.” Environmental degradation is another recurring theme. And while Moyes never labels her character Margery O’Hare as an environmentalist, her love and respect for the mountains that she calls home fuels her efforts to protect it from the degradation inflicted by the coal mines. “A certain kind of man looked at God’s own land,” Margery thinks as she discovers newly desecrated forest, “and instead of beauty and wonder, all he saw was dollar signs.” The fiercely independent Margery, “who would be owned by nobody, and told by nobody,” is the ringleader of the librarians and in many ways is Alice’s saviour. “You’re like a prisoner sprung from jail most mornings,” she says to Alice, and allows her to see that she isn’t as trapped as she thinks she is. Inspired by the history of the actual Pack Horse Librarians, Moyes depicts the courage and resourcefulness of these women in loving detail. “The Giver of Stars” is a tribute not just to the brave women who brought the light of knowledge in dark times, but also to the rejuvenating bond of women’s friendship. GENINE BABAKIAN Associated Press


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Friday, October 11, 2019

literary lives – dorothy dandridge

A Hollywood trailblazer with a tragic end Sir Christopher Ondaatje writes about the glamorous but turbulent life of the actress, singer and dancer who was the first black performer to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress. She died under mysterious circumstances when she was 42 years old.

“I

f I were white I could capture the world.” – Dorothy Dandridge Dorothy Dandridge was born on November 9, 1922 in Cleveland, Ohio to aspiring entertainer Ruby Dandridge and Cyril Dandridge, a Baptist minister. Her parents separated before she was born. Her mother taught her two daughters, Vivian and Dorothy, to sing and dance and they toured the Southern United States under the name of “The Wonder Children” for five years while their mother performed in Cleveland. It was difficult to find work during the Great Depression and Ruby and her two children moved to Hollywood where she survived on small domesticservant roles. Her daughters were renamed The Dandridge Sisters and were booked in several nightclubs including the Cotton Club and the Apollo Theatre. They also appeared briefly in “Teacher’s Beau” (1935), “The Big Broadcast” (1936), “A Day at the Races” (with the Marx Brothers) in 1937, and “It Can’t Last Forever” (1937). Dorothy Dandridge broke away from her sister and won her first film role as a murderer in “Four Shall Die” (1940). She also had bit parts in “Lady from Louisiana”, “Sundown”, and “Sun Valley Serenade” in 1941. She performed as a band singer with Count Basie in “Hit Parade” of 1943, and with Louis Armstrong in “Atlantic City” (1944) and “Pillow to Post” in 1945. She also appeared in “Tarzan’s Peril” (1951), starring Lex Barker and Virginia Houston, and received questionable publicity about her scanty and revealing clothing – but this led to her

Dorothy Dandridge (1922 - 1965)

Dandridge in her iconic ‘Carmen Jones’ outfit, the movie which earned her the ‘Best Actress’ Oscar nomination in 1954.

being featured on the cover of Ebony magazine. She also got a supporting role in The Harlem Globetrotters (1951). In 1951, she opened in the Mocambo nightclub in West Hollywood to rave reviews, which led to other engagements in New York and London and a return booking at the Mocambo. She was seen by a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio scout who recommended that Production Chief Dore Schary cast her in a starring role in “Remains to Be Seen” (1953) opposite Harry Belafonte – his first feature film performance. She continued her successful nightclub acts. “ ‘Carmen Jones’ was the best break I ever had. But no producer ever knocked on my door. There just aren’t that many parts for a black actress.”   In 1953, 20th Century Fox began casting the all-black musical film “Carmen Jones” – Oscar Hammerstein’s adaptation of Georges Bizet’s opera “Carmen”. Director Otto


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Friday, October 11, 2019

Preminger, however, chose her for the smaller role of Cindy Lou. Dandridge, on hearing this, confronted Preminger in his office fully made up in the character of the more earthy seductress Carmen. Preminger changed his mind and gave her the leading role together with Harry Belafonte, Pearl Bailey, Brock Peters and Diahann Carroll. A disappointed Dandridge had her voice dubbed by the more operatic Marilyn Horne – but the film went on to achieve worldwide rave reviews – eventually earning over $10 million at the box office, and making Dandridge one of the first African-American sex symbols. On November 1, 1954 she became the first black woman featured on the cover of Life magazine. Variety magazine stated that: “Her performance maintains the right hedonistic note throughout.” Walter Winchell called her “bewitching”. “Carmen Jones” became one of 1954’s highest-earning films, and she earned an Oscar nomination for Best Actress, along with Grace Kelly, Audrey Hepburn, Judy Garland and Jane Wyman. Grace Kelly dubiously won the award for her performance in “The Country Girl”. On February 15, 1955 Dandridge signed a three-movie deal with Darryl F Zanuck at 20th Century Fox at $75,000 a film. Zanuck intended Dandridge to play parts in “The Blue Angel”, “Under Two Flags”, “The King and I”, and the “Lieutenant Wore Skirts”. However, her former director Otto Preminger, now her lover, advised her to only take on leading roles. Thus Dandridge rejected the lesser roles which were given to Rita Moreno. In 1957, Dorothy Dandridge sued Confidential magazine who revealed that a scandalous sexual incident had taken place in the woods behind Lake Tahoe with a white band leader. She accepted an out-of-court settlement of $10,000. She then testified at a similar 1957 criminal libel case where Confidential and other tabloid magazines had published false information about incidents concerning casual sex. Visiting Grauman’s Chinese Theatre the jury determined that Maureen O’Hara could not possibly have performed various sexual acts while seated in the balcony as claimed by the magazine. Dandridge was photographed shaking hands with Maureen O’Hara outside the Los Angeles Courtroom.  

Dandridge (right) sips champagne with her director and lover Otto Preminger, and her sister Vivian at a Hollywood party. “Prejudice is such a waste. It makes you lazy and half-alive. It gives you nothing. It takes away.” n 1957, after a three-year absence from film acting, Dandridge agreed to appear in “Island in the Sun” opposite James Mason, Harry Belafonte, Joan Fontaine, Joan Collins and Stephen Boyd. The film was intensely controversial and the script had to be changed several times to conform with the Motion Picture Production Code which disallowed interracial relationships. Dandridge, who plays an Indian shop clerk, is shown in an intimate love-embrace with the white John Justin. The scene was not cut from the film and, despite the controversy, the film received favourable reviews and good box office receipts. Dandridge next agreed to film “Tamango” (1958) opposite the German actor Curd Jürgens. When the original script called for Dandridge to swim in the nude and spend a greater part of the film in a threadbare rag swimsuit, she threatened to leave the film. Eventually the script was changed, but the passionate kiss between Dandridge and Jürgens avoided Motion Picture Production Code censure as it was an Italian film production. Nevertheless, “Tamango” was not released in the United States until the latter part of 1959. It remained her first and only screen kiss with a white actor.

I

Dandridge, in 1958, was offered the starring female role in “Porgy and Bess” by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, but the film was plagued with criticism from the African-American community who thought the stereotyping of black people was negative and degrading. The director Rouben Mamoulian was replaced by Otto Preminger, but a fire on the set and a costly long production resulted in bad reviews and a $2 million loss. “Malaga” (1959) was Dandridge’s last film appearance. She played a European woman for the first time opposite Trevor Howard and Edmund Purdom. The film was a low-budget British jewel robbery thriller that created some notable sexual tension between Dandridge and Howard, causing it to be withheld from international release until the next year, and in the United States for three years.

“Have you ever caught sight of yourself by accident and you see yourself from the outside? That’s who you really are.” Dorothy Dandridge had a wayward and stormy personal life. She married the dancer and entertainer Harold Nicholas on September 6, 1942 and their only child, Harolyn Suzanne Nicholas, was born with brain damage, requiring constant care. Nicholas abandoned the family in 1948 and they divorced in 1951. She began an affair with director Otto Preminger while filming “Carmen Jones” in 1954 – an affair that lasted four years. He took control of her acting career – a mistake which she later regretted. She became pregnant by him in 1955 but was forced to have an abortion by the studio, 20th Century Fox. The affair ended when she realised that Preminger had no intention of leaving his wife. Dandridge married Jack Denison on June 25, 1959, but divorced in 1962 amid financial setbacks and accusations of domestic violence. She discovered that her financial managers had swindled her out of all her savings and that she owed $139,000 in back taxes. She had to sell her Hollywood home, place her daughter in a state medical institution, and move to a small apartment in West Hollywood. On September 8, 1965 she was found naked and dead by her manager Earl Mills. She had been scheduled to fly to New York the next day to prepare for her nightclub engagement at Basin Street East. A Los Angeles pathology institute determined that her death was caused by an accidental overdose of imipramine – a tricyclic antidepressant. However, the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office concluded that she died of a fat embolism resulting from a foot fracture sustained five days earlier. Dorothy Dandridge is rightfully recognised as being a major contributor to the image of the black American in American motion pictures. A private funeral service was held on September 12, 1965. She was cremated and her ashes interred in the Freedom Mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles.   NEXT WEEK: Delve into the life of the British novelist, author and illustrator known for his satirical works.  • Sir Christopher Ondaatje is the author of The Last Colonial. He acknowledges that he has quoted liberally from Wikipedia; and from Dorothy Dandridge by Donald Bogle (2012). 


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Friday, October 11, 2019

gardening

Carrots and root crops Jack Hardy gives tips on an easy crop to grow

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hen most people think of root crops they probably think carrots first. I guess I am in the mainstream in my attitude towards carrots: they are for adding to preparation of main meals. I have become quite skilled in holding carrots at an angle, cutting and quarter-turning, to provide morsels for Chinese stir fries. I add slices to chicken souse and beef stew. If there is a long cooking period ahead I cut them thick; if I am running out of time I cut them thin. Carrots always seem to be a minor component of any meal but my attitude changed when a friend served me carrots as the main ingredient. She is mainly vegetarian but also eats fish and dairy products, in other words she adapts her meals for health rather than moral reasons. The carrots came from a packet that claimed organic origins and they were all juvenile, about four inches long. The most interesting aspect of the carrots was they were strangely coloured – pink, white, purple, red – and not one of them was orange. Their leaf stalks were trimmed to half an inch and they were delicately steamed. They were served with a drizzle of melted Normandy butter alongside a green salad. I was impressed. The carrots were sweet but also had a deep

earthy umami flavour. They were absolutely delicious and I had to ask for seconds. At the other end of the gustatory scale from these little organic jewels is a product called baby carrots. These are also sold in plastic packages but are all orange. It is impossible to tell which end is up and the reason for that is the ‘baby carrots’ have been sculpted from larger ones. Very impressive but virtually tasteless. Virtually all carrots these days are orange but that trend only started in the 1700s when the Dutch celebrated their flag by producing orange carrots that proved enormously popular. There are four varieties of carrot grown these days: Nantes, Danvers, Chantenay and Imperator. Nantes are sweet, with a darker coloured core and a rounded tip. Danvers have broad shoulders and a conical shape that ends in a point. This is the carrot to use in heavy soil. Chantenay is also sweet and has a blunt tip. Imperator is by far the largest of the four and is the one grown most by farmers. It grows so big that very few gardens in The Bahamas have the depth of soil to accommodate them. They can, however, be grown in deep bins with drainage holes. Carrots are an easy crop to grow and I would suggest that the most important aspect of cultivation is spacing them out properly at sowing time. Here we can be helped by the ubiquitous plastic milk crate. Press the bottom of the crate into the soil and you will have lines to guide you. You may sow your carrots in rows or blocks. The rows are actually multiple rows that have been raised slightly to help with drainage.

Three or four rows can be planted so the seeds are at least 2 inches apart. I prefer sowing in blocks. I press the milk crate into the ground four times to create a large square. The seeds are sown – again – 2 inches apart for Nantes and Chantenay, 3 inches for Danvers, and at least 6 inches apart for Imperator. The carrot rows and blocks should be watered daily until the seedlings are up and have developed a healthy root system. Imperator takes about four months to mature but the others are usually ready to pull after three months, or earlier. I tend to use Osmocote timerelease fertilizer solely for my potted plants but with carrots I make an exception and make one application when the

seedlings are about four inches high. Osmocote will look after the needs of the carrots with a single application. If you use a fertilizer that is high in nitrogen you may find many roots growing from the main tap root. This is undesirable and carrot fertilizer should be low in the nitrogen that encourages side root growth. Beets are a very important crop in Bahamian gardens. Almost every garden has a row or two. Over the years the main variety has been Detroit Red and this remains the standard to this day. Like carrots, beets come in several colours and yellow beets seem to be popular. Beets can be grown as for carrots, in rows or blocks, but the spacing between plants should be 4

inches. The seeds in a packet are in fact seed capsules and contain more than one seed, but it is not necessary to thin the seedlings. Always pick beets the moment (or slightly before) they reach advertised size. Beets left in the ground can become corky and no amount of boiling will make them tender. When beets are harvested the leaves should be cut away about an inch above the bulb. Do not cut the thin extension of the root at the bottom of the beet. This can be done after cooking. Serviceable beets can be bought in cans and jars but the taste of home grown is far superior. You can use the traditional method of boiling the beets, or roasting them in the oven. It’s when the beets are cooked that you peel them, usually by merely rubbing the skin or outer layer away. Beets can be cubed or sliced for serving. The addition of sugar and vinegar gives a tang to beets while preserving their innate sweetness. And let us not forget about those greens we cut away. Some claim that beet greens are the finest of all, a great bonus to a tasty crop. Parsnips look like long ivory Danvers carrots and the two are related. Unfortunately they enjoy much cooler growing conditions than are provided in The Bahamas and I cannot recommend growing them. They will grow, but their taste will be insipid. Turnips are popular in other parts of the world but have little following locally. They should be grown 4 inches apart and raised as for beets. If you want to add turnips to a stew, try throwing in a few radishes. The cooking eradicates the pepperiness of radishes and makes then taste remarkably like turnips. I will deal with rutabagas Irish potatoes and sweet potatoes in future articles. • For queries and comments e-mail jacktribune242@ gmail.com


The Tribune | Weekend |23

Friday, October 11, 2019

Call Michelle Gibson on 557-8181 for tickets. Tickets are $85. Group discounts available.

Featured

Slimey Fridays with Poley Time: 3pm Venue: Poley’s Playhouse

FRI 10/11

Arts and Crafts Camp at Earth and Fire Pottery Studio, Atlantis. Time: 9am Venue: Atlantis A fun-filled day of straw crafting, canvas painting, pottery painting and tours. Snacks and lunch provided. For more information, call 363-2000 ext 64470.

Live2lead 2019 Conference - A Transformational Experience Time: 9am Venue: National Training Agency, Gladstone Road, Nassau.

Live2Live 2019 is a live simulcast conference with John C Maxwell and four of his friends, aiming to encourage leadership leadership and personal development to grow to another level.

The Tribune Established 1903

Let the kids enjoy slime making day with Poley! For a fee of just $25 you can receive your own slime kit to make your slime with Poley, a slice of pizza, and a drink.

SAT 10/12 Featured

Featured

Editior’s Voice

Street Smash at Pompey Square Time: 8pm Join the Bahamas National Esports League in this collaborative event to bring some of the best gamers from around

|100 Jamz | Y98

weekend

Bahamas Automotive Festival - Hurricane Relief 2019 Venue: The Tracks, Nassau Time: 12pm

If you’re looking for a family friendly way to support the hurricane relief efforts, come out to the Bahamas Automotive Festival! Have the opportunity to see the antique show cars, and hot rod racing! There will also be live entertainment by local Bahamian artists, food and drinks available, bouncy castles for the kids and more. It’s a whole day’s fun for a good cause. A family-friendly event. Entry $10, children $2.

Latin Fiesta Venue: Nassau Night Market, Downtown Nassau

Saturday

The Wild and Ancient Botanic: Apothecaries for Healing Time: 10am Venue: NAGB Sculpture Garden and Primeval Forest National Park Join the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas to explore the NAGB’s sculpture garden blooming plants therein which includes mahogany, sage, bay leaf, Black Poui/Jacaranda, seagrape, moringa, and more. Attendees are invited to bring their smartphones upon which they will be invited to download a ‘plant identification application’ which will be the principal guide along with Bynoe through the Sculpture Garden. Chosen for its importance as the site for the first African hospital in The Bahamas, the NAGB Sculpture Garden is a sacred space where the ancestors will be honoured and indigenous knowledge of plant medicine will be acknowledged. Two blooms will be chosen through a process of ethical wildcrafting which is also known as foraging and is the practice of harvesting plants from their natural, or ‘wild’ habitat, primarily for food or medicinal purposes. Participants will meditate with the plant and ask permissions for its healing properties to be set into the medicine. The process of the infusion and solarization can take anywhere from 3-6 hours. Attendees will carpool from the NAGB to the Primeval Forest National Park where we will have a guided tour of the 7.5-acre property by a trusted guide. It is also advisable to pack a light lunch and snacks as the workshop will run for 6 hours. Open to children 10+. For those who are sensitive to alcohol, medicine will be made and set with apple cider vinegar. Price: $75. Phone: 565-9827 or Whatsapp: 828-4310.

Time: 2pm

What's going on this Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master

New Providence to show their skills at this ranked event. This is a Team Event for the first time in The Bahamas introducing the Street Fighter 3v3 competition to get our gamers in gear for the Olympic Level. There is a SSBU 2v2 (Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Doubles) tournament as well. Team entry is $5 per person - $15 total for SFV 3v3 and $10 total for SSBU 2v2. Online registration is free, entry fee payable at check in. Food and drinks will be available for purchase and a free movie will be provided by Pupstar Entertainment. More information at www.cultgaming.net.

Join the Latin Fiesta at the Nassau Night Market for awesome Cuban food, Latin music and Spanish speakers! Hosted by Nassau Night Market and Hello Culture. Phone: 828-4085.

Time: 5.30pm

Come and join Camperdown Equestrian Centre for pony rides and the last movie night before time changes. The movie will begin at 7:00 and is $10 per person. Don’t forget to bring a blanket, cushion or chair. $10.

Featured Movies in the Square Venue: Pompey Square A free outdoor movie experience! Join Pup star Entertainment to watch Ghostbusters. Concessions open from 7.30pm, showtime at 8pm. Movies are free.

Pony Rides and Movie Night (The Lion King) Venue: Camperdown Equestrian Centre

Short Tales 2019 Venue: Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts Time: 8pm

Ten short new plays. Ten local authors. Nine directors. We’ve

done it again! You’ll laugh, you’ll be shocked, you might even sing. Revenge, death, bigotry, forgiveness ... and pigs. This year’s Short Tales is not to be missed! Tickets $30.

SUN 10/13 Community Movie Nights Venue: Black Food Bookstore and Culture Shop Time: 3pm

Monthly community movie night series showing movies featuring Africans on the continent and throughout the diaspora. Visit www. blackfoodshop.com for movie titles for each screeing. Seats are limited so be sure to RSVP. Admission is FREE.


24 | The Tribune | Weekend

Friday, October 11, 2019

history

The bygone days of 'knowing' your client Forgotten facts | Paul C Aranha

“K

now your customer, alternatively known as know your client, or simply KYC, is the process of a business verifying the identity of its clients and assessing their suitability, along with the potential risks of illegal intentions towards the business relationship.” – Wikipedia   Recently, I’ve heard a lot of talk about “knowing your client”, but it appears to be an initiative of zero benefit to the “known” customer, who is never recognised by the firms who know just about everything about the client, but do not/cannot recognise him/her. I grew up in a world where merchants knew their customers and the customers knew them. If my father took me into John S George’s store on Bay Street the clerk would ask,“What can I do for you, Mr Aranha?” The proprietor, and each and every one of the employees, knew Mr Aranha. What was even more impressive was that when William

Moseley’s Book Store on Bank Lane Aranha drove by a policeman, the cop would stand at attention and salute the Crown Lands Officer. Our neighbourhood store, on East Shirley Street opposite Church Street, was owned by Mr Farrington, but run by Miss Dyntie Thompson. If Rosa, our maid, sent me there to buy tobacco, I was always greeted with “Hello, Paul”. The personnel at the main branch of the Royal Bank of Canada would say, “Good morning, young Aranha” and, later, when I started work and opened an account at the Bay and Victoria Branch I would be greeted with “Hi, Paul” and I would greet each one of them by name. I was earning a measly £53 a month, but the bank knew me – knew their customer. The people in Black’s Candy Kitchen, Milo Butler’s Store, Cole’s Pharmacy, Malcolm’s Eastern Station, Malcolm’s Grocery, the McKinney and Deveaux Bicycle Shop, the Park Store, the Stop-n-Shop, Thompson’s Pharmacy, and Willie Weeks Bicycle Shop knew my parents, my siblings and me. So did Mr and Mrs A

F Adderley, Nurse Zenobia Neeley, Dr and Mrs K V A Rodgers, Mr and Mrs T A Toote – and we knew them. When I was preparing to go away to boarding school, Stanley Lowe, editor of The Nassau Herald (long before it became a political tool) stopped me in front of his office on Bay Street and promised to mail his newspaper to me each week – a promise he

kept for all the five years I spent in England. At Esso Standard Oil we encouraged our gas station operators to know their customers and to call them by their names: “Hello, Mrs Worrell. May I fill your tank?” No mention of ID. My only ID was my face. Driver’s licences did not have photographs and the National Insurance Board had not yet

been invented. If you were one of the few who had a passport you did not carry it around with you. I hadn’t noticed just how much that way of life had changed until I went to Batelco (before they became BTC) about upgrading my phone service. When signing up for that service I had to produce various forms of photo ID, each of which they


The Tribune | Weekend | 25

Friday, October 11, 2019

This building on Ernest Street, the former home of Sir Milo Butler, was destroyed by fire in March 2014.

Jimmy Glico’s air-conditioned Grand Central Restaurant on Bay Street. (1948; photo by Martin Linsey)

RBC’s now closed branch on the corner of Victoria Avenue and Bay Street carefully photocopied and filed away, presumably for future reference. It appeared that they wanted to know me, their customer. When the time came for upgrading I was ushered into an impersonal room, filled with “customer service” staff. Nobody knew me and, in order to negotiate the desired upgrades, I had to produce photo ID, which I hadn’t thought to bring. Undaunted, I pointed out that they already had my photo IDs in their files, but this was a total waste of time.

The thoroughness in demanding multiple photo IDs has nothing to do with “knowing” me as an individual, but is just a matter of assessing my suitability and potential risks of illegal intentions towards the business. No mention is made about the merchant’s suitability and/or illegal intentions towards me. A prominent Bahamian businessman went to pick up his new passport and was asked for photo ID, to which he replied, “You have it in your hand”. He had not thought of taking some other

form of photo ID, so he pointed out that the clerk was holding his best form of photo ID and all she had to do was open the passport and compare the picture with the man standing in front of her. Ultimately, the supervisor was called in and he conceded the point. In August, I went to my bank, showed an employee my about-toexpire debit card and asked for a new card. I was not asked for a photo ID, but was handed an envelope, said to contain my new card, which could not be “pinned” because the system was down. A few hours later I went back to the bank, hoping to pin my new card, but noticed the name on the envelope was that of my son. The bank had given me someone else’s debit card. So much for KYC! I went back a few days later, hoping to get my new debit card. This time I was asked for ID (obviously the bank

still did not KNOW me, their customer) and the employee came back with the same envelope, addressed to my son. After several weeks of travel, without the expected help of a debit card, I went back to the bank, showed my expired card and asked for a new one. It was a one-way conversation, except for the words “Do you have ID?” For the third time, by three different bank employees (once without ID), I was once again handed my son’s envelope. But all’s well that ends well and ultimately I left with my new debit card. I wonder what people like Sir Milo and Lady Butler, Sammy Cartwright, Jimmy Glico, Stanley T Kemp, Seighbert Russell, Bo Sands or Willie White would think about all this. • For questions and comments, e-mail islandairman@gmail.com


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26 | The Tribune | Weekend

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday

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TARGET

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K 3 Good 27; very 41; excellent 54 3 A 40good 6 32 34 40 35 39 20 (or more). L B Solution tomorrow.

HOW many words of four letters or C 20 18 12 14 31 more can you make from the letters call 0907 181 2585 D shown here? solution E 39 target 7 22 22 11 in making a word, each letter may befor today’s *Calls cost 80p F per minute plus your telephone used once only. Each must contain company’s network access charge. Yesterday’s G 35 3 Yesterday’s the centre letter and there must be at 33 4 26 Answer Kakuro Answer least one Sudoku nine-letter word. no plurals H or verb forms ending in “s”. I 36 11 22 4 10

BATTLESHIPS

M 1910 2 40 17 8 31 23

J TODAY’S TARGET K 3 Good 27; very good 41; excellent 54 33 34 35 24 12 FIND where the (or more). Solution tomorrow. L fleet of ships shown is hidden

CRYPTIC PUZZLE Across 1 Extensive property (10) 6 Feathered, they skim the water (4) 10 I held out for foreign capital (5) 11 Promote a murderer and cause uproar (5,4) 12 Paper that’s bought to be thrown away (8) 13 Lad that is treated right may become perfect (5) 15 More than one player is in new boots (7) 17 Old woman, maybe a grandma (7) 19 Change gears, points and lubricants (7) 21 Aviation spirit (7) 22 I complain when she returns (5) 24 One is not expected to live on them (4,4) 27 Insulting attack (9) 28 It’s said in France to be the same (5) 29 Port area (4) 30 Just now - or just Christmas? (7,3)

1

2

3

4

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Yesterday’s Easy Solution Across: 1 Voyager, 5 Aegis, 8 Intrinsic, 9 Asp, 10 Else, 12 Adelaide, 14 Voodoo, 15 Endure, 17 Cape Town, 18 Zeus, 21 Ode, 22 Extricate, 24 Spell, 25 High-hat. Down: 1 Voice, 2 Yet, 3 Grip, 4 Reside, 5 Auckland, 6 Gratitude, 7 Supreme, 11 Showpiece, 13 Montreal, 14 Vacuous, 16 Switch, 19 Spent, 20 Ring, 23 Ash.

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across: 1 Reserve, 5 Regal, 8 Tailoring, 9 Fan, 10 Rare, 12 Smash hit, 14 Drawer, 15 Metric, 17 Sets free, 18 Beta, 21 Rue, 22 Aftermath, 24 Defoe, 25 Legends. Down: 1 Rotor, 2 Ski, 3 Room, 4 Enigma, 5 Register, 6 Gift horse, 7 Lunatic, 11 Roast beef, 13 Selfsame, 14 Desired, 16 Mental, 19 Ashes, 20 Drag, 23 Ann.

in the grid. The numbers the right M 19 26 to13 6 of 34and25 N indicate how many of the call 0907 181 2585below the grid squares in that O row for today’s target solution 1 are 22filled 6 in with 37 ships 8 or 20 parts of ships. The ships do not touch each *Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone P company’s network access charge.other, even diagonally. Some squares have Q 21in to 15start 34you19 4 been filled off. 5 R Solution tomorrow S 38 4 25 16 17 15 1 2 3T 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 U 26 38 8 24 1 229 FIND where the fleet of ships shown A is hidden V in the grid. The numbers to the right of and W 1 17 18 2 7 227 below the grid indicate how manyBof the X squares in that row are filled in withCships or 4 parts of ships. The ships do not touch each Y 3 22 26 37 30 31 0 D have other, even diagonally. Some squares Z been filled in to start you off.E 2 10 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9

BATTLESHIPS

Solution tomorrow

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Down 1 Source of inspiration (4) 2 Magnificence (9) 3 Open to view (5) 4 Turn aside (7) 5 To yield (7) 7 Wanderer (5) 8 Sound practical judgment (5,5) 9 Express discontent (8) 14 Referendum (10) 16 Only a little (8) 18 Course of action (9) 20 Noisy disturbance (7) 21 Shrill cry (7) 23 A tree-borne fruit (5) 25 Accidental success (5) 26 Small amount (4)

22

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The Tribune | Weekend | 27

Friday, October 11, 2019

PET OF THE WEEK

SOPHIE

Photo/Patricia Vazquez

Hail to the Chief and the vets who saved him

By The Bahamas Humane Society

N

ow that so many dogs have been airlifted to the US to make room for the Hurricane Dorian refugees, the Bahamas Humane Society has a slightly smaller pool of adoption dogs to choose from. That doesn’t make them any less special! Sophie is one of those who will be forever grateful if you can provide her a forever home. Sophie is about two years old. She’s friendly with other dogs but would be okay on her own as well. She’s not too familiar with cats. Kids or adults are fine and she’ll be happy to be a yard dog, enjoying a space of her own. Sophie will need some medical attention in the next few months but once that’s done, we expect she’ll live a long healthy potcake life. For more information about Sophie, please call 323-5138 or come in during adoption hours: Mon - Fri 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sophie looks forward to meeting you! Speaking of the Dorian rescues, if you’d like to make a financial donation towards hurricane relief, please email b_humane@hotmail.com; if you’d like to donate supplies or volunteer your time, please contact doriananimalrelief@gmail. com. Recovery for those islands is going to be a long process and we will need all the help we can get! (And if you’re house cleaning, don’t forget our Thrift Shop - they take donations of all gently used items, including furniture!) Thank you so much!

L

ast year in September my beloved Potcake Chief had surgery to remove a very fast growing lump on the back of his hind leg. Dr. Grant was able to remove the entire lump, but what was of immediate concern was how quickly the lump had grown. A couple of weeks before it had not been there and by the time surgery was performed it was the size of an orange. After surgery the lump was sent off to the United States for analysis. The results were exactly what I dreaded, Stage 3 cancer and extending all the way out to the edges of the removed mass. That is never good news because it indicates there may possibly be cells floating around in his leg because of the wealth of cells in the lump all the way out. I felt a chill going through my body while I was getting this information on the phone, all the time a very healthy looking, happy Chief is lolling on the sofa watching me and probably

Animal matters | KIM ARANHA

animals

wondering why I was getting a bit misty eyed and swallowing back tears! The experts in the States recommended radiation for this kind of situation, chemo won’t work. “Oh, and we need to act fast because if there are cells remaining in his leg they will develop fast and he could need to have his leg amputated in a matter of a few weeks.” I felt cross-eyed and panicked. But there was a way out, radiation. “Okay, we will do the radiation,” I said. “Do we do it here in your office?” “No we don’t have the facilities to administer radiation to animals in the Bahamas. We have to go over to Florida. “Fine we’ll fly over for the treatments and then come home”, easily achieved. But, no. Because he has to have it done every week-day for 21 sessions consecutively. We could take him over and check him in to the Cancer Care Clinic and leave him there….alone, in a cage? My big boy who sleeps on our bed most nights, or in his special, bed besides me? My boy who lies on the sofa in my den and watches me whilst I write my articles? My boy who was watching as this conversation was taking place? No I don’t think so.

It was a snap decision, no time to wobble. We’ll go with him. I have family in Orlando, we can go there and it will be perfect, yes? No, there are only three radiation locations in Florida for animals, and Orlando is not one of them, really? You’re kidding me! So it appeared that the best location to choose was Fort Lauderdale, where we have no family, but we do have people we know and friends we can see during our proposed exile. Chief’s surgery site had to heal before we could leave. The earliest day we cold start the therapy was October 9. We flew out on October 8 to Fort Lauderdale Executive on one of my son’s Trans Island Airways planes. Chief was as good as gold on the plane, but I am getting ahead of myself. We needed a place to stay where Chiefie would be welcome, with a suitable garden and not too far away from Fort Lauderdale. With the help of my daughter-in-law, Bianca, we settled on a cottage in Delray Beach near the strip with all the restaurants and little shops. Only a 45-minute drive to the cancer hospital, and thus, we commenced our five weeks in Florida. It was actually a very positive experience. Some of you may have read my articles from there last year. Chief’s treatment went fast and he learned how to be a good boy in a restaurant and allow total strangers to come up to him and stroke him! Not his usual Nassau persona, and one he forgot within minutes of being back on Bahamian soil. Many friends tried to persuade me not to put him through it, and to put him to sleep “while he was doing well”. I am glad I didn’t listen; it really wasn’t that big of an ordeal. The two weeks after were not pleasant because the site became crusty and itchy. But it didn’t last long. One year ago we were in Florida praying the treatment would work and he could keep his leg. Today as I write this my beautiful happy four-legged dog is on my sofa in my study watching me write this article. I am so full of gratitude to modern medicine, to the veterinarians who have dedicated themselves to the care of animals, and to my supportive Nassau vet Dr. Val Grant who was there every step of the way. Here’s to many more happy years together Chiefie!


28 | The Tribune | Weekend

Friday, October 11, 2019

drinks

John Watling's Distillery at the Buena Vista Estate

There's gold in them there bottles By JEFFARAH GIBSON | Tribune Features Writer | jgibson@tribunemedia.net

T

HE rumoured treasure of English buccaneer John Watling who landed on San Salvador in the 1960’s may or may not exist. However, gold and silver medals the Nassau distillery captured during the recent International Rum Conference are certainly tangible. John Watling’s single barrel rum is a 2019 double gold medal winner while its Pale rum won the 2019 silver medal award during the conference in Coral Gables, Florida. The conference was held from September 25-28 at the Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables, Florida. It featured a rum competition, two days of industry seminars and two days of grand tasting. At the conference, the distillery, partnered with The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism, which continues to tell consumers that despite Hurricane Dorian’s impact on Grand Bahama and Abaco, The

Bahamas is open for business throughout its many islands. The rum conference also provided the National Association of The Bahamas (NAB) with a booth for Hurricane Dorian relief. NAB is a voluntary organization working for a better Bahamas. This was the first year since 2015 the distillery participated in the conference, said Pepin Argamasilla, managing partner. “We wanted to get back into the awards competition and see how our rum performed against other rums in its competitive set,” he told Tribune Weekend. A five-judge panel conducted blind tastings and evaluated each of the rums for visual, olfactory, taste and general impressions. Both John Watling’s single barrel rum and pale rum competed in the molasses or cane derivatives classification. A win for the distillery is also a win for the country, Mr Argamasilla said. “The win is significant in the sense that it is showing The

Head Mixologist of John Watling’s Distiller Wilfred Sands Bahamas is able or produce, manufacture and sell super premium rums. Our single barrel which competed in the single category beat every other rum in that category so gain it shows that The Bahamas has perineum products that it is able to sell and hopefully that translates over to premium destination,” he said. All rums by the distillery are crafted from hand-cut, choice sugarcane molasses sourced

from different British Caribbean islands. The single barrel rum was awarded the highest prize or in the special harvest/single cask category. Single Barrel is exceptionally smooth rum with full-bodied pot still character. Aged for six years in once-used bourbon barrels, it is bottled directly from the barrel at a cask strength of 66.2% or 132.4° proof. Pale rum is a light-bodied pot still character aged for two years in once-used Bourbon barrels at the Buena Vista Estate in Downtown Nassau. It is hand-blended in small batches using more than 175 years of Spanish, French and English rum-making know-how. John Watling’s participation in the rum conference this time around was a reaffirming experience this is expected to churn out several new products before the start of the Yuletide season.

“People are looking for local products and hopefully they see the Bahamas has quality uber premium products that it is able to compete with the big boys out there and actually win. So again the premium section of the category is increasing in the present and in the future.” The medals have been added to a list of accolades for the distillery as its rums are the only Bahamian spirits listed as recommended by the Beverage Testing Institute in Chicago, Illinois. They have been recognized and awarded by “The Fifty Best” in New York City, New York; BarLife Magazine from the Czech Republic; Rum Bahamas in Nassau, Bahamas; Taste of the Caribbean Competition in Miami, Florida, Beverage Testing Institute in Chicago, Illinois; and the Concurso de Ron in Madrid, Spain.

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