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Friday, May 4, 2018

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Weekend

FUSION OF FLAVOURS Page 7

Carnival’s star power DJ Khaled and Machel Montano join forces page 2


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Friday, May 4, 2018

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OCA enthusiasts have been warming up for weeks now, attending fetes and preparing their costumes. But tonight is the night, and the main event, the Bahamas Carnival Experience, is finally here. It promises to be 72 hours of non-stop partying, with entertainment provided by top international acts like DJ Khaled, Machel Montano and Destra Garcia. This year’s Bahamas Carnival Experience (formerly Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival) is being presented by the private entity Polantra Media over three days. Bahamian favourites such as Dyson Knight, Wendi Lewis, D-Mac, Sketch and Rik Carey will also perform throughout the weekend. DJ Khaled (”I’m the One”) will host the event. At a special press conference at the Ocean Club yesterday, DJ Khaled declared his love for the Bahamas. “I love the Bahamas, especially Nassau. It’s like a home to me. So I am excited to be here for the Carnival show. I have a lot of surprises,” he said. Accompanied by his one-year old son Asahd to the press conference, DJ Khaled said he is excited to join Machel Montano and other soca stars on stage this weekend. “Saturday night is going to be incredible. I can’t wait to touch the stage. I am going to be in the crowd and on stage watching the show. I am going to be watching all of the Bahamian artists to be coming out,” he said. This will be soca king Machel Montano’s third time performing at the Bahamas Carnival. He said while he does not know exactly how he will deliver his performance tomorrow night, one thing he is certain of is that it will be full of energy. “It is good to be back in the Bahamas. This is my Carnival number three here and I am really fortunate to be here with my brother DJ Khaled. We had one of the best moments last year

to top that this year by adding Khaled. We want persons to come out and enjoy the full weekend of activities,” said Mr Davis. The addition of hit producer and media personality DJ Khaled to this year’s line-up was a calculated decision, as Polantra believes he will provide international appeal and guarantee international exposure. “We wanted someone who would keep the people engaged before the events, with interactive social posts and a broad appeal, as well as during the show, bringing the ‘vibez’, and Khaled delivers on all of the above,” said Mr Mackey. BTC will support Bahamas Carnival as this year’s title sponsor. There are three night of concerts that will feature a slew of artists. Here is the breakdown of the schedule: • Insomnia, Friday, May 4 This is the happy hour kick-off event starting at 7pm. It will be followed by tonight’s fete featuring performances by Destra Garcia (”Lucy”), Farmer Nappy, D-Mac, Ultimate Rejects, Sketch and more. All roads lead to Clifford Park for this mega party. • Road March, Saturday, May 5 The march’s route goes from the Thomas A Robinson Stadium, down

Destra Garcia

putting soca on display at the Barclay’s Centre. It was a good feel for all the people in the Caribbean to see a mainstream icon like Khaled who is a positive individual.” said Machel. Machel’s performance last year was rained out and some revellers who had been waiting to see the soca favourite left the concert, while others braved the downpour and stayed throughout Machel’s entire set. “Last year I came to Bahamas Carnival and it rained. But I stayed on stage and did it with the DJ,” he said. “This time around we are going to make it rain, but in a good way. We are going to celebrate hard this year.” As the demand for Bahamas Carnival has grown over the past three years, representatives of Polantra Media said they want to show locals and visitors alike that they are capable of the putting on a world-class event. After the government decided to privatise the festival, the Polantra conglomerate, made up of Trevor Davis, Kenny Mackey and Sebas Bastian, decided to step up to the plate. “It is our goal to organise a worldclass event with the focus of bringing the experience of the best live stage, the best performers, while also ensuring local businesses profit from this year’s event,” said Mr Mackey. “We want individuals to leave with a ‘ooo, ahh’ feeling. We stress the word experience because we want people to come out with high expectations and want them to be fully fulfilled as the fete continues.” Through his entertainment company, Alpha Sounds, Mr Davis has brought countless top musicians to the Bahamas and has pulled off a number of successful events for over a decade. “My role is to provide the experience, to bring the best artists, create that kind of excitement and thrill that can only be seen in the Bahamas,” he said. “Last year we saw Machel Montano and Beres Hammond on one stage. And many people wondered who was able to have them both perform on one ticket. Once again, we are attempting

Newlyweds Dyson Kn ight and Wendi Lewis

By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer jgibson@tribunemedia.net

Machel Montano

It’s Carnival time!

DJ Khaled

entertainment

Thompson Boulevard, towards West Bay Street and on to Clifford Park. It begins anytime between 10am and 11am depending on how long the bands take to line up, according to a representative from Bahamas Masqueraders. There is also no set ending time, but the march is expected to last a couple of hours. • Amnesia, Saturday, May 5 Tomorrow night’s concert-goers will get to see the soca king Machel Montano himself take the stage, in addition to Mr Vegas, Dyson Knight, Ricardo Drue, Wendi Lewis, Rik Carey and more. It all goes down at Clifford Park starting at 7pm. • Unleash, Sunday, May 6 The Bahamas Carnival Experience will culminate with ‘Unleash’, an ultimate cooler fete at Arawak Cay starting at 2pm. It will feature headliner Skinny Fabulous and friends. Tickets for the Bahamas Carnival Experience can be purchased at Airbrush Junkies, Outback Steakhouse, Quality Home Centre, Suncash, Club One Fitness Centre and Mario’s Bowling & Entertainment Palace. Day passes start at $25 and weekend passes at $60.


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Friday, May 4, 2018

Inside Weekend Interview 4-6 Cara Hunt talks to Paul King, who has lost both his wife and daughter to lupus, but continues the fight Food 7 An eclectic selection of flavours at Luca Fusion Art 8 - 11 The Sober House Art Museum offers an outlet for recovering addicts, plus ‘Women’s Tongue: A Social Commentary’ and Harry Wallace proves he has international appeal Theatre 12 Return to Sapodilla Street with ‘A Mother’s Inheritance’ Entertainment 13 ‘Lite Vibes’ offers new Sunday daytime party Fashion 14 - 15 Leading men suit up for autism awareness Books 17 CNN’s Jake Tapper and The X-Files’ David Duchovny explore their literary sides Film 18 ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ breaks more records, plus Charlize Theron’s ‘Tully’ reviewed Gardening 19 Jack Hardy on the planting in May Literary Lives 21 - 22 Sir Christopher Ondaatje on the fascinating language of birds

Forgotten Facts 23

Paul Aranha remembers the former Villa Doyle Puzzles 26 Animals 27 Kim Aranha on the challenges of ‘baby season’, plus the Pet of the Week Cover | Donovan McIntosh

My perfect Bahamian weekend Donna Maria Mortimer Image consultant

life. Feeling the sand through my toes, swimming in the clear blue waters and taking in the sunrise and sunsets are priceless.”

Q: What is the one thing that you can’t live without? “To quote Shakespeare, ‘If music be the food of love, play on.’ I cannot live without music. I lose myself in the rhythm and lyrics.”

Q: Saturday breakfast or Sunday brunch?

“Saturday breakfast for sure. After a productive week I enjoy my morning with home-made boiled fish and Johnny cake. It’s amazing the comfort the preparation brings.”

Q: Weekend away, where would you go? “I’d go to Bimini. This small island holds an idyllic appeal for me. I would visit the Fountain of Youth, go fishing on the dock, with a rod and bait, take in the marine life in all its tranquility and beauty, engaging conversation with the residents, enjoying local cuisine and visiting historic places and clandestine features of the island, especially where Ernest Hemingway once lived and wrote.”

Q: Wine, rum, cocktail or Kalik?

“I have a penchant for white wine. Sauvignon, Pinot Grigio, sparkling Gold Cuvée, just to name a few.”

Q: Beach or sofa?

“Most definitely the beach. It is therapeutic for me and brings a sense of relaxation and calm to my

Things 2 Do this weekend Friday

• Tequila and Tapas Time: 7pm Venue: Wild Thyme Restaurant Experience the pairing of incredible tasting tapas with Patron flavours. $65 per person. Limited seating available. RSVP at info@wildthymebahamas.com or call 393-4108. • ‘Jumanji’ Movie Night Time: 7pm Venue: The Sandbar Da Blue Hole Island Cuisine, in collaboration with KLC Entertainment, will show the box office hit ‘Jumanji’, starring The Rock and Kevin Hart. Food and bar will be available and guests are invited to bring their own blankets.

Saturday

• Recharge at Rose Time: 11am Venue: The boat departs from Bay Street Marina Shift The Culture will be sailing to Rose Island for a one-day getaway to recharge the creative batteries. Use the day to rest, relax or get back on track. The Bahamas Revisited crew will be spearheading activities for the day. Spots are available for up to 30 and it’s $25 a head for the trip. This covers

food, snorkelling, spearfishing and the whole day at Rose Island. • Cinco de Mayo at Outback Steakhouse Time: 11am to 11pm Venue: Outback Steakhouse, Mall at Marathon Come and party with Jose Cuervo. Enjoy welcome shots, authentic Mexican food and lots more. • Cinco de Mayo at The Bearded Clam Time: 11.30am Venue: The Bearded Clam, Woodes Rogers Walk It’s the sports bar and restaurant’s first ever Cinco de Mayo party. There will be all-you-can eat tacos and margarita specials, as well as prizes and surprises. • Cinco de Mayo at Green Parrot Time: 11.30 am until Venue: The Green Parrot, West Bay Street The restaurant is offering a specialty margarita bar, Mexican menu and live music. • Cinco de Mayo at Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville Time: 5pm -11pm Venue: Margaritaville, Paradise Island Shots and Margaritaville specials as well as authentic Mexican

cuisine will be on offer. • Car Boot Sale Time 12noon Venue: Old Fort Bay Town Centre Buy gently used items at bargain prices. Proceeds will be shared with local charities the FindU Foundation, the Bahamas Humane Society and Special Olympics Bahamas. The sale is being hosted by the Windsor and Meridian Schools.

Sunday

• Revive All Inclusive Breakfast Boat Ride Time: 10am - 2pm Venue: The President Taylor is docked at Potter’s Cay Dock The Revive All Inclusive Breakfast Fete features DJ Blueprint (100 Jamz), Sonic Boom (Team Soca) and DJ LJ (Kiss 96.1). Tickets are $60 and are available at Outback Steakhouse or call 242-809-3918 • Spirit of Beauty Luncheon & Awards Time: 11am Venue: The Balmoral Club Womanish’s Spirit of Beauty Awards Luncheon is a celebration of women who have demonstrated excellence through their achievements and contributions to the local community.


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Friday, May 4, 2018

interview He is determined not to let lupus win, despite the disease striking at the heart of his family. Paul King tells Cara Hunt how within one year and ten days he lost both his wife and daughter to the disease, but is now fighting on in their name.

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Paul King

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aul King’s wife Gwendolyn Eloise King and daughter Shanelle King-Brennen were both diagnosed at an early age with the autoimmune disease known as lupus which affects major organs in the body. During their lifetime, he said, they both displayed incredible strength and grace in their fight against it. They, along with Mr King’s younger daughter Shonalee King-Johnson, were also tireless in their efforts to bring awareness about the condition to the Bahamian community and provide a support system for those affected by

the disease through the Lupus 242 organisation. “We lost Shanelle on March 2 last year and we lost Gwen on March 12 this year, but Shonalee and I are left behind to carry on the work,” Mr King told Tribune Weekend. His late wife Gwendolyn was called the “matriarch of lupus” in the Bahamas, having fought the disease for more than four decades. Doctors would often ask her to speak with newly diagnosed patients and she was a constant support and inspiration for the members of Lupus 242.

The pair initially met in 1962 when Paul moved to Nassau from Cat Island to attend school. To get his future wife’s attention, he asked a neighbour to send messages to Gwendolyn at a cost of 25 cents per message. They were married on April 12, 1969. Shortly after giving birth to Shanelle, Gwendolyn started experiencing joint pains, which they initially attributed to the aftermath of childbirth. However, as her condition worsened and she also broke out in the butterfly skin rash associated with lupus, they realised that something

more serious was going on and sought further medical treatment. In 1974, at the age of 24, Gwendolyn was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Her case was one of the first lupus diagnoses in the country. And through her journey of painful flare-ups and extended hospital stays, Mr King remained by his wife’s side. “It was traumatic at times. We had a lot of lows, but we had a lot of highs,” he said. The lows began almost immediately after the diagnosis. In 1974, Gwendolyn was comatose for three days and had last rites administered as she was


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Friday, May 4, 2018

“I want people to understand the faith they had that never wavered and the strength and grace in how they fought.”

Paul King and his late wife Gwendolyn given a 50/50 chance of survival. However, it would be only the first of many times she would live up to the meaning of her name – Gwendolyn, the fair and blessed, and Eloise, a famous warrior – and defy the odds. In the late 1980s, she experienced another flare-up and was hospitalised for many weeks and could not walk. However, she once again managed to pull through, relearning to walk and drive, and returned to work. One of her biggest challenges came in 2009 when she had to have a continuous oxygen supply to assist her with her breathing. She also spent a lot of time in hospital in 2012 and 2017, before being admitted for the final time earlier this year. “Most nights the pain would be so severe that I would pray to God to let me share some of her pain, but then the next morning Gwen, being the fighter that she was, would be up and

bathed and dressed and ready to go before me. She never complained. She would say I may Paul King’s daughter Shanelle be down for a part of the day, but King-Brennen died from complications due to I won’t be down for the entire lupus at age 47. day,” said Mr King. His daughter, Shanelle, was in God. They both had tremendous diagnosed with lupus when she faith,” he said. was 19 and attending Acadia Univer“Through everything that she went sity in Canada. Mr King once again through, Gwen kept the family afloat, found himself in the role of caretaker attended every family function, and we and supporter. went on holidays and she made every “Originally, they didn’t tell me. I minute count. I remember we went didn’t know about it until after she had on a family vacation to Hawaii when her first child. And so for me I had to she had a flare-up. We had to leave divide my time caring for my wife and our young girls with strangers and my daughter. I spent seven weeks with drive 70 miles to the nearest clinic for Shanelle in Florida once when she was treatment. I asked her if she wanted to in hospital. It was rough seeing her skip the final leg of the trip where we suffer. Both of them always remained were supposed to stay in Los Angeles cheerful and they drew strength from for a few days and she said that she being able to know what the other was had not come all this way to go home. going through, but most of all they drew their strength from their faith When she was diagnosed we had been

told that she might not have made it to see 25 and her only wish was that she would live to see Shanelle become an adult. She lived long enough to see both Shanelle and Shonalee grow up get married and to see her four grandchildren, Sean Jr, Syann, Evan and Morgan.” However, despite their constant optimism and great courage, Mr King said that his daughter’s death was a huge blow for both of them. “There would be times when we would be sitting in our house not saying anything and then we would look at each other and break down and try to console each other,” he said. Mr King said that his wife and daughter’s legacy will be one of the faith and love. “I want people to understand the faith they had that never wavered and the strength and grace in how they fought. Gwen lived for 48 years with lupus, one year longer than Shanelle lived when she died at 47. It is by God’s grace that they both lived because many people went before them with lupus who only had it a shorter period. I am thankful to God for them. I couldn’t have asked for a better life.” May is Lupus Awareness Month and Lupus 242 will be hosting several events during the course of the month. “It will be hard to get through because we lost Shanelle last year and now Gwen, but we have to continue to do everything we can to try to help advance the goal of, if not the eradication of lupus, then raising awareness and the support of it.”

Lupus 242 events for Lupus Awareness Month

• POP Days (Putting on Purple for Lupus) are held on Fridays, May 4, 11, 18 and 25 • Church service – Sunday, May 6, at 10.30am, Southside Christian Church, Carmichael Road • World Lupus Day – Thursday, May 10 • Lupus242 website launch, the Hope Floats memory ceremony – Monday, May 21m, at 9am, Fort Charlotte • Lupus 242 Health Talk with Dr K Neil Parker – Saturday, May 26, at 12noon, University of the Bahamas; health screenings and refreshments will be available


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section


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Friday, May 4, 2018

food

A fusion of flavours By CARA HUNT cbrennen@tribunemedia.net

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hey may have owned the venue for the past two decades, but for Karen Dugary and her husband Jeff there is nothing dated about their new restaurant Luca Fusion. The small eatery, located on the corner of Christie Avenue and Shirley Street, serves up an eclectic breakfast and lunch menu that has already proven to be a hit with the many professionals working in the area “We have had this location for over 20 years and have had various businesses here over time, including my first business venture which was a natural hair salon called Good Hair,” Karen told Tribune Weekend. “I love this location, it has done us very well for every business that we have had here.” Karen said she initially considered turning the space into a restaurant about three to five years ago. “My husband wasn’t feeling it though, he thought it would be too much work,” she explained. However, Karen refused to give up on her vision and spent months researching restaurant trends, watching cooking shows and considering what her perfect menu would be. Last November, Luca Fusion finally opened its doors. “When we thought of the name we wanted, I wanted to incorporate my vision for the menu and my husband wanted to add Lucayan somehow, so we came up Luca Fusion. The restaurant theme is very natural and clean and we wanted to cater to both locals and still provide an island flair,” she said. “Honestly, with the menu I knew that I wanted something different and unique. I think that a lot of the food being offered is just way too boring. The possibilities for what you can offer in a menu are endless, you just have to be creative. I would describe our menu as eclectic; we don’t offer just one set style of food.” “In addition to our everyday menu, we also have themed days. For

PHOTOS/SHAWN HANNA

Salmon chipotle bowl with cilantro rice, seasoned black beans and grilled peppers

Chicken pasta salad

Wings come in several signature flavours.

Shrimp and grits with kielbasa sausage

example, we may have an international day, a chipotle bowl day or a pasta day, and we mix up the days to keep the menu fresh.” For menu staples patrons have a choice of seven signature flavours: teriyaki, sweet and sour, sweet chili, buffalo and jerk BBQ, sweet sriracha and honey mustard “You can have the flavour on our chicken wings, in a salad or a wrap,” said Karen. “And we have a lot vegan dishes. The vegan lovers are not limited to a simple menu, if we do it on the regular menu, we can do a similar style as a vegan option.” Another way Luca Fusion seeks to cater to their clientele is by offering a free delivery service. “I know that parking can be a challenge in this area and so we wanted to do what we could to accommodate our customers. We have delivered as far as Wulff Road, way past Bay Street and past Montagu to the Village Road area,” she said. Karen said she intends to apply the same basic entrepreneurial principles she has learned over the past 20 plus years in this new venture. “My passion is so deep that anything I do, I tend to put my entire focus on it, which I know may be a bit extreme, but that is how I am. I will work at it seven days a week. But if you want to be successful in business, you have to be willing to put in a lot of time and work, especially when you are first starting and building up that important client base,” she said. Luca Fusion is open Monday through Friday. Breakfast is served from 7am to 10am and lunch from noon to 4pm.


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Friday, May 4, 2018

art

‘Lay down the bottle, pick up the brush’ Sober House Art Museum hopes to give addicts new purpose By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Writer acadet@tribunemedia.net

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ocated just off Bernard Road and Cockburn Street Fox Hill, there is an eyecatching building that shines bright in shades of yellow, red and green. It is the new Sober House Art Museum which has a unique purpose: giving alcoholics and other addicts a creative outlet. Its owner, Rupert Missick Sr, a recovering alcoholic of 41 years, shared with Tribune Weekend his vision for the museum and his desire to do his part in bringing about change for individuals struggling with addiction. “Sober Bahamas was started as an organisation to assist persons who want to get off alcohol. As you may know, this community is infested with drinkers. They are not all alcoholics, but some are obviously out of control and having a challenge living and dealing with it. I am a recovering alcoholic and I have decided this should be my life’s work now. The enemy of sobriety is to be idle, so with being a recovering alcoholic you want to have things to do,” said Mr Missick. He illustrated his concern for excessive drinking and alcohol availability in the country by pointing out a funeral service that was taking place across the street from the museum at the time of this interview.

Rupert Missick, Sr, founder of the Sober House Art Museum

“As you may know, this community is infested with drinkers...We don’t take this thing seriously at all.” “Participants at the funeral have their car trunk open with an open bar,” he said. “We don’t take this thing seriously at all. If you have diabetes, cancer or any ailment in this community, you can get support and encouragement, but you don’t get no sympathy or understanding for alcohol.” Mr Missick believes when taking alcohol or drugs away from an addict, you have to replace them with something else. In this case, he hopes to replace harmful substances with art.


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PHOTOS/SHAWN HANNA

Friday, May 4, 2018

Artwork on display at the Sober House Art Museum

“I said to myself, you give up the bottle and pick up the brush. I have artists come together who will instruct, guide and help people to make sense of their scribblings, so that they can see what else is inside of them. This is my small effort of trying to say, ‘you don’t have to drink’. I know it isn’t something where persons are going to rush in and want to do, but every once in a while someone would stop here to inquire about the sign in the front of the building that reads ‘Sober Bahamas You Don’t Have To Drink’ The last fella who came, his wife had left him with their two children. He came to a few of the meetings in the afternoon, and then he dropped the meetings, and I

soon heard that he was on his way to prison for legal issues. The insanity in this community is overwhelming and the majority of persons who are creating havoc are on something like drugs or alcohol,” said Mr Missick. Barry Cartwright, a participating artist instructor, said when he first became involved with the Sober House Art Museum, the building looked nothing like it does today. He worked day in and day out, and painted the colourful pictures that are now on display on the exterior walls of the Sober House. “We wanted to get people to come in, get off alcohol and get into the artwork, because we saw it was better for everybody. So I came here and started

to paint all of the artworks that you see here. We had a few people come that really wanted to do some artwork, and we welcome them to come in and just away from the alcohol. We have people that come to the meetings and talk about the alcohol problems, but they are afraid to do the artwork because they feel as if they don’t know how to do it, and it all comes down to a teaching process, and that is OK. It can be done because I took time to get to where I am in the art world. Just about everything, I painted in here,” said Mr Cartwright. Dylan Miles, a 21-year-old participating artist, believes this initiative is an important one to be a part of. Neither

he or Mr Cartwright have ever been addicts, but they wholeheartedly support Mr Missick’s cause. “All of my artwork today here are pen and ink,” said Mr Miles. “One of them, I call ‘Stealth’, you will find different coloured inks. With all of my pieces I am trying to give off a surrealism feel. I am going for a cultural theme with the African masks, birds, and so forth. It’s appealing and hopefully relaxing,” said Mr Miles. For all interested persons, the Sober House is open and interested in volunteers. Operating hours and meetings are held Monday to Friday, 5pm to 6pm.


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Friday, May 4, 2018

art

Carla Campbell won’t hold her tongue Artist Carla Campbell By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer jgibson@tribunemedia.net

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T won’t be Carla Campbell’s tongue that shares her impassioned views on the state of the country and social ills that have plagued it for decades. Instead, her artwork will do most of the talking when her ‘Woman’s Tongue: A Social Commentary’ exhibition opens at the Doongalik Art Gallery & Studios next Friday. The exhibition highlights the artist’s view on issues that particularly concern women and children. And Carla has invited the general public to join her on May 11 for the unveiling of 15 pieces of art. It will begin at 6.30pm. To accompany the exhibition, there will be an Art Talk on May 17 at 6pm at Doongalik, where the artist will discuss key themes about some of her more controversial works with panel of guests such as playwright and professor Dr Ian Strachan, veteran counsellor of the Crisis Centre Donna Nicolls, and activist Terneille Burrows. This Art Talk will kick off a live streamed web series at ‘CarlaCampbellArt’ on Instagram and Facebook. “Like many Bahamians, I follow the news and feel the shocking, unbelievable and heart-wrenching issues deeply. When I started these pieces in 2015 I was feeling overwhelmed by the state of the nation and the weight of it festered within me. Then one day, seemingly out of the blue, the image that I needed to draw flashed in my mind. And this is my process. I have to be consumed with a topic through the news, conversations or an emotional experience, for example, and all of it must live with me for a while. Once, I had to sketch an image out on a napkin in a restaurant because I felt it might have disappeared from my mind’s eye. Everything has a season, and these images which speak to local and global issues are ready to reveal themselves at this time,” she said.

This particular series is an illustrative collection of drawings using mixed pencil media on watercolour paper and text to link visual and social commentary. The exhibition was greatly supported by the Charitable Arts Foundation. Colours play a major role in communicating the ideas in the Carla’s work. They have been reduced to blacks and brown of the skin, and a red stamp “represents a bureaucratic and almost industrial judgement of the subject matter.” “I love the process. It begins with simple lines on paper in a medium that is difficult to erase, so I don’t. I simply continue the work until the scribbles and lines turn into a figure or form. Any mistakes that I would have made I have to turn into the artwork. This is similar to life in that you cannot erase the lines of your past and history. You simply must weave them together to make something beautiful of your present and future. I chose to be representational because I wanted my

message to be clear. That message is: Art should comment on society and call it by its name. Art should be used as a vehicle for change to raise awareness about certain causes and speak to what is current,” she said. Apart from the artwork that highlights the current state of affairs from Carla’s perspective, she also draws inspiration for the show’s title, from a special tree found in the Bahamas called the Albizia lebbeck, or ‘Woman’s Tongue’. “Its nickname comes from the sound of the tree’s seed pods that rattle and purr whenever the winds blow. Whether the nickname was given to revere or mock the sound of a woman’s voice, the power of this tree cannot be denied as it turns the head of all when it makes its sound and for its known properties to heal,” she said. Viewers will see issues such as marital rape and sexual violence, accountability and transparency in government, as well as headlines stripped from the news tackled in the pieces.

“In order to promote healing one must first acknowledge what the problem is before conversations about fixing it can begin,” said Carla Carla holds a BFA in Painting from the University of Massachusetts, an MS in Organisational Learning and Leadership from Barry University, as well as PreTexts and Arts certifications from Harvard University and the University of Florida. She is a trained teacher of 16 years as well as a subject coordinator of Art & Design. She has written and taught a college-level art history course and her work has been exhibited in numerous group shows and featured in several journals. Art merchandise will be on sale and part of the proceeds will go to charities. Refreshments will be served and the entrance is free. For more information, visit www. carlacampbellart.com, and follow carlacampbellart on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.


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Friday, May 4, 2018

art

Local artist proves he has international appeal

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e may have only been creating art for a short time, but self-taught artist Harry Wallace is already making a name for himself, with top collectors from throughout the Caribbean and Canada acquiring his work. Just recently he opened his inaugural exhibition – a collection of pieces inspired by the Goombay influences of the Bahamas – at the CornérTrader off-shore bank which will allow local connoisseurs a chance to see his work up close and personal. Harry is a self-taught contemporary artist with the innate ability to create painted works and functional installation art. In 2015, he dedicated himself to creating art full-time and his signature style is his use of colour to capture the essence of the Bahamas with an international appeal. His primary focus is colourful contemporary art, which explores various mediums and styles to tell different stories. Harry has a talent of tying together Bahamian styles and international flare. This can be seen through his ‘Goombay’ and ‘Experiment’ collections, which are both on display at CornérTrader. There are a number of paintings that symbolise the Goombay history of the Bahamas. Some of the key pieces include famous local and international artists such as Peanuts Taylor and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His partnership with the CornérTrader is significant, he explained, because it directly connects the creative arts and private business. “It is a great opportunity that my first exhibit is endorsed by this multinational company. This signifies the appeal of my art. One of my goals is to create contemporary Bahamian art that attracts international attention. My work was designed to suit both home and office spaces,” he said. The opening of his art exhibition was a success, with strong attendance from real estate agents, government officials, bank executives, art enthusiasts, and business owners.

Harry also networked with individuals while he explained his inspirations behind each art piece. Vice President of CornérTrader Stefano Donati was present and said the bank is excited to partner with the artist on this event. “One year ago we opened our office here in the Old Fort Bay Plaza, Nassau, and this is where we began to use our office to accommodate different artist and their art pieces,” said Mr Donati. “The bank, in general, supports cultural events. The building was designed to display art and host art exhibitions.” The Head of Private Banking, Birgit Ludig-Dridi, was also in attendance to celebrate the event. This is the third exhibit hosted by CornérTrader. The first was an exclusive showcase of the legendary Amos Ferguson’s collection on loan from The D’Aguilar Foundation. “It is an honour to be shown in the same space as the iconic Bahamian artist, Amos Ferguson. Also, it is exciting to be the third artist to exhibit here. This invitation to showcase is an example of my reach as an emerging artist,” said Harry. The collection will be on display for the next four months.

Artist Harry Wallace stands in front of art from his exhibition on display at CornérTrader.


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Friday, May 4, 2018

theatre

‘A Mother’s Inheritance’ heightens feud on Sapodilla Street New play honours matriarchs By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Writer acadet@tribunemedia.net

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he effort to reunite a hurting and dysfunctional family is at the heart of the latest stage play by the company behind the popular ‘Sapodilla Street’ productions. Just ahead of Mother’s Day, the play “A Mother’s Inheritance” will be performed at Dundas Centre For Performing Arts this Saturday at 8pm and again on Sunday at 6pm. The plot centers around the Darling family during the last stage of “Mama Mo” Monique Darling’s illness. Upon a doctor’s request, the lead character Victoria Darling is forced to bring her feuding family together again. However, the family receives surprising news of an inheritance willed to Monique by her estranged father. Since Monique is now gravely ill, the inheritance may possibly go to her next of kin. This creates an even more intense feud, causing malicious gossip and greed to spread among the small fictional community of Sapodilla Street. Playwright Tamara Moncur of After Dark Productions said the title and motivation of the play came about as a result of listening to a sermon preached by Pastor Peter Joseph at a Family Life Crusade in October 2017. She said the pastor spoke of his mother and how the greatest gift any mother can leave behind for their children is “an inheritance of salvation which leads to eternal life.” “Preparing for this production can best be described as hilarious. The actors are actually funny off and on the stage, as we have had many laugh-until-you-cry moments,” she said.

“This is a great stress reliever after work, and for me it was important for me to write, produce and direct a show like this because it allows me to utilise my talent, seek and expose the talent of others, and present a family friendly comedy show to the public at large; using everyday situations, events and practices to create possible funny outcomes based on a general Bahamian mind set. It is a great way to embrace our very unique culture – the good, the bad and the ugly.” “A Mother’s Inheritance” cast of actors includes Tamara herself as the character of Josie, Franco Moncur as Hezi, Tiffany Aranha as Senator Lauren Whitehead, Fabia Johnson as Beulah, Dellarease Rolle as Pearl, Raquel Pinder as Tina, Alexia Tolas as Sarah, Kencil McPhee as Willie, Kevin McPhee as Joe, Archie Minnis as Dr Johnson, Jenson Rolle as Sam, Carla Sands as Dra’Quilla, Kenyatta Taylor as John, Holman

The cast of “A Mother’s Inheritance”

McDonald as Eli, Eddie Minnis as Officer Bodie, Brittany as Amber, Tamika Taylor as Ella, Andy Ferguson as David, and Isabella Taylor. Musicians appearing in the play are Travante Taylor, Calvin Parker, Dr Marvin Smith, Gia Smith, Aris Moxey-Flowers, Brittney Hanna, Nathan Boyd, Tamia Graham, Dezaria Mckenzie, Khya Farrington, Andrenique Rolle, Anwar Butterfield and Earnest Young “Our goal is to honour mothers because even in their imperfections we must love them unconditionally, learn from their mistakes and partake in her godly or moral inheritance. Hence, our ultimate goal is to mend broken relationships and to forgive. There are many broken and hurting people who have never got past issues or are constantly at war mentally, emotionally and spiritually because of their lack of forgiveness. Sadly, this is not only a family problem; this can be found on

our jobs, churches and community at large,” said Tamara. With big plans for the remainder of the year, Tamara said it is After Dark’s goal to go international and transition to the big screen. The team is already in talks with local filmmaker Lavardo “Conch Boy” Stubbs to produce a pilot episode for a series. “With this being such a major project we welcome corporate sponsors and donations as we try to tap into an international market in the form of a televised sitcom entitled ‘Welcome to Sapodilla Street’,” she said The next After Dark production will be “The School on Sapodilla Street” and will premiere in October. This particular show will be held in honour of school teachers, administrators and the work they do for the nation’s children. Then, in December, the group will host its annual “Christmas on Sapodilla Street” stage show, now in its fourth instalment.


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Friday, May 4, 2018

entertainment

Enjoy ‘Lite Vibes’ on Sunday Daytime party promotes Bahamas as ‘posh’ destination By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Writer acadet@tribunemedia.net

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fter an action-packed Friday and Saturday night, the organisers of “Lite Vibes” want their guests to unwind at a new and unique Sunday daytime party event. Held this and every Sunday on the grounds of the Hillside House Art Gallery starting at 12noon, “Lite Vibes” aims to provide young professionals, creatives, trendsetters and tourists with a fun day out, accompanied by the sounds of House music, Afrobeats, hip-hop, reggae and EDM by resident deejays Tristan “Trizz” Douglas and Todd Stylez. Also available are mixologists to whip up beverage favourites such as fresh coconut water straight from the coconut to tasty smoothies from the Gimme Gimme Bar. There are bottomless mimosas, games, mingling and photo opportunities. Models, artists, media personalities and socialites are in attendance. “We have set out to produce vibes each year and making it bigger and better each week. While there have been day parties of the past with some success, we are focused on tailoring ‘Lite Vibes’ to meet global standards,” said Tristan Douglas of Lite Vibes. “The most common guest review has been that Sundays are officially fun again and the atmosphere has been refreshing for a Downtown Nassau destination.” Reflecting on his childhood, Mr Douglas said Sundays were always a big deal when it came to daytime

Guests enjoy the ‘Lite Vibes’ at Hillside House

activities. As a matter of fact, he said Sundays were especially designated for the perfect “beach day outing”. This was, and still is, a day where persons go out to eat good food, turn on their favourite music and gather with friends and family after church. “That gathering could have taken place in your living room, your backyard, or at popular designated areas on your island like Grand Bahama’s West End, Nassau’s Gambier, or your favourite beach. Our experience and the way we execute our offerings of delicious bites, world-class deejay sets and fun activities are key to the success of ‘Lite Vibes’ thus far. It’s evolving each week and we have some

pretty cool elements we have set out to reveal in the coming weeks that we can’t share just yet, but can say it involves the coolest deejays from all over the world, and fusing unique Bahamian elements with world sounds for an even more ground-breaking experience for our guests,” said Mr Douglas. He believes the country is blessed with the ideal climate and natural beauty for year-round outdoor day parties. “Hillside House possesses an authentic environment in the heart of Nassau that locals and the island’s visitors have fallen in love with. Between myself, Todd Stylez, Theo McClain and

Keisha Oliver, we have been blessed with the opportunity to be involved with day parties in some of the posh markets such as Miami, Los Angeles, New York City and Toronto. Those experiences, and deejay sets played throughout North America, have instilled the culture within us and we see the Bahamas as a posh destination that should be at the top of the ranks,” said Mr Douglas. Expecting to attract many more guests as the Summer months approach, Mr Douglas said the ‘Lite Vibes’ team is gearing up for an unforgettable season leading up to an “epic” finale event on August 5.




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Friday, May 4, 2018

celebrity With Karin Herig and Cara Hunt

HIT

FAIL

SPLIT

SPLIT

Tiffany Haddish (”Girls Trip”)

Dakota Johnson (”Fifty Shades Freed”)

Gabrielle Union (”The Lion Guard”)

Anna Kendrick (”Pitch Perfect 3”)

Karin says: “I love a good, sparkly jumpsuit. This one looks comfy, stylish and sexy. With minimal fuss, you have a very chic red carpet ensemble. The length of the pants works especially well. And I also love the top knot and the long earrings.” Cara says: “This is the perfect choice for her. It is playful and bubbly just like her. I really think that this outfit is cool and something I could see myself wearing....in fact, I want it!”

Karin says: “Is this Big Bird’s bath robe? I don’t understand the cheap looking shiny velvet material or that particular shade of yellow. After the ‘Fifty Shades’ saga she maybe wanted to go in a different, drastically less sexy direction....well, she succeed big time!” Cara says: “This is fifty shades of unflattering. The colour looks like vomit and it is just so ugly and shapeless. It’s like she is wearing a yellow velvet sack.”

Karin says: “I think I like it. That satin will wrinkle as soon as you look at it, but it’s pretty in this photo. The baby pink really suits her and I like the double-breasted cut of the jacket and the over-long pants. Her hair is fab as well.” Cara says: “I am on the fence with this outfit. It reminds me a little bit of PJs and it’s really wrinkled. Also, I am not that crazy about the pink colour or the fit. I like her hair, but I could take or leave the suit.”

Karin says: “Anna, you should have saved this little black number for the club. It just seems a bit too short and saucy for an event of this nature. It’s a cool, cute little dress, not to mention sexy, but she kinda ruins it with those shoes. They don’t suit at all.” Cara says: “Oh, this is sexy, but not too much. It’s not a bad look and is young and fun. I think those shoes are really different and cute.”

PHOTOS BY CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/AP

The Weekend Fashion Report 2018 CinemaCon


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Friday, May 4, 2018

books

Review: Jake Tapper’s ‘Hellfire Club’ is insightful novel

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NN’s Jake Tapper dives into the world of historical fiction and produces “The Hellfire Club,” an insightful novel that echoes today’s political landscape. In January 1954, at the height of McCarthyism and when policies were decided behind closed doors, Charlie Marder receives a congressional appointment. It’s a temporary posting until the next election, and his colleagues treat him as naive and lacking in skills. Charlie’s ethics, his trust in others and his strong morality don’t fit into the world that he’s been thrust into, and in order to survive, he may have to go against his principles. His wife, Margaret, is a zoologist, and as she

struggles to maintain her credibility in a male-dominated field, she also finds herself slowly slipping away from her husband. Charlie has to fight to prove that his appointment was worthy and also has to do everything he can to keep his marriage intact. Tapper takes readers back to a Washington remembered for being a time of distrust and potential future conflicts. Key historical figures interact with Tapper’s fictional characters, and with his sources at the end of the novel showcasing his research, it almost feels like everything actually happened. It is fiction, however, well-written and worthwhile. JEFF AYERS Associated Press

CNN’s chief Washington correspondent Jake Tapper

Teatime with Jane Austen and Martha Stewart

‘Miss Subways’ is a quirky novel by David Duchovny THOUGH primarily known for his acting roles in TV series such as “The X-Files,” David Duchovny has the writing gene as well. “Miss Subways” is a quirky, wholly original — and at times baffling — novel that tackles an Irish myth and gives it a contemporary spin, mixing it with legends and stories from other worlds. What starts as a simple story of a woman in love turns into a battle with fate. Emer commutes every day on the New York subway to her job, and she daydreams of a better life. Her boyfriend, Con, lives with her and is a struggling writer. One night after a lecture, she waits for him to come home while he hangs out with a mysterious woman named Anansi. In the middle of the night, she gets a knock at the door expecting Con. But it’s a tiny doorman named Sid

Actor-turned-author David Duchovny

who tells her she must make a choice. Con is about to die, but she can save him by giving him up forever with no memory of them knowing each other. If she refuses, his life is over. Her answer and the ramifications of her decision spin the story to an endearing conclusion.

Duchovny masters dialogue and various monsters and mythologies to weave this tale that’s probably not for everyone. While rooting for Emer and Con to find happiness, readers will also question fate and reality. “Miss Subways” reads like a hybrid of the TV show “Twin Peaks” and the 1998 film “Sliding Doors” merged with a love letter to New York City. A wild and unpredictable journey from Duchovny’s bold imagination awaits readers. JEFF AYERS Associated Oress

NEW YORK (AP) — Two beloved novels are coming this fall in special culinary editions, as curated by Martha Stewart, among others. Penguin Young Readers is launching a cookbook/ literary series called “Puffin Plated,” the publisher told The Associated Press on Friday. The first two releases are Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice: The Classic Novel with Recipes for Modern

Teatime Treats by Martha Stewart” and Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol: The Classic Novel with Recipes for Your Holiday Menu by Giada de Laurentiis, Ina Garten, Martha Stewart, and Trisha Yearwood.” Both volumes will be released in October. They will be illustrated and in full colour, with a “themed menu of recipes” from well-known chefs.


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Friday, May 4, 2018

film

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ breaks records on way to $1 billion NEW YORK (AP) — “Avengers: Infinity War” was even bigger than previously estimated. Rey has handed over her lightsaber to Iron Man after the Lucasfilm team admitted defeat to Marvel Studios for breaking an opening weekend box office record set by “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” in 2015. The Associated Press reported that Walt Disney Co on Monday posted final weekend numbers for the superhero smash at $257.7 million in US and Canadian theatres, further boosting the film’s record-breaking opening weekend. The revised figure was due to unexpectedly strong Sunday ticket sales, Disney said. The Marvel blockbuster grossed $69.2 million on Sunday, besting the record held by “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” by more than $8 million.

review

In ‘Tully,’ a rare close-up of postnatal motherhood TULLY RUNNING TIME: 94 MINS

NEW YORK (AP) — The title character of Jason Reitman’s “Tully” descends not from the clouds, carried by an umbrella in the wind, but glides cheerfully through the front door on a black night. She arrives just as Marlo (Charlize Theron), the

A POST from Lucasfilm President Kathleen Kennedy on the official Star Wars Twitter account.

mother of two plus an unplannedfor newborn, is reaching the limits of exhaustion. “Tully,” directed by Jason Reitman and penned by Diablo Cody, isn’t a song-singing fantasy like “Mary Poppins.” It lives in the unglamorous and sleepless postpartum haze of breast pumps and swaddles. But like “Poppins,” ‘‘Tully” is a fantasy of parenthood — a homely fairy tale about a haggard mother who’s feeling her younger, former self slip away. It’s well into “Tully” before we meet Marlo’s saviour: a 26-year-old night nurse (Mackenzie Davis), for whom Marlo’s wealthier brother Craig (Mark Duplass) has paid. He promises night nurses, who arrive in the evening and stealthily depart before sunrise, are “like ninjas” capable of reordering Marlo’s sleepdeprived life. Marlo is less sure. “You can’t just outsource your life,” she says. But her life is punishing. Her tantrum-throwing son Jonah (Asher Miles Fallica) is labelled “quirky” by his school, but they mean worse and they want him transferred out. Her husband Drew

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH, Robert Downey Jr, Mark Ruffalo and Benedict Wong in the box office juggernaut “Avengers: Infinity War.” (Marvel Studios via AP) Disney had forecast a $250 milMarvel now holds six of the top lion US and Canada debut, which 10 opening weekends of all time, topped the $248 million record set with Disney accounting for nine by “The Force Awakens” in 2015. of the 10. “Infinity War” also set a However, accounting for inflation, new global opening weekend record “The Force Awakens” would still with ticket sales exceeding $725 milnarrowly edge “Infinity War” by a lion worldwide, and the film has yet few million. to open in China.

CHARLIZE Theron stars as Marlo in “Tully”.

(Ron Livingston) is little help, oblivious to Marlo’s hardship. When Tully arrives, she’s like a pixie apparition, both rescuer and a physical reminder to Marlo of her pre-kids life. Tully’s mission, she says, isn’t to take care of the baby; it’s to help mom. Their conversations steadily grow deeper and soon Tully isn’t just helping Marlo rest, she’s reinvigorating her life.

“Tully” is the third collaboration between Reitman and Cody, who have — in “Juno” and “Young Adult,” also with Theron — found an easy rapport that marries Cody’s whip-smart sarcasm with Reitman’s sincerity — both qualities shared by the other, too. Theron, who’s steadily making a career out of subverting her own glamour (”Monster,” ‘‘Mad Max: Fury Road”), is extraordinary as Marlo, a character for whom she reportedly gained 50 lbs. It’s surely one of the most authentic portrayals of young motherhood that we’ve had — and it’s not like that’s a much chronicled subject for Hollywood. Her Marlo is a frank missive into the myth of the “Super Mom.” That makes “Tully” a valuable antidote to a lot of the usual representations of early motherhood — and valuable especially to wouldbe fathers, who may have some Drew in them. But while “Tully” has a twist up its sleeve, it remains a minor exercise. JAKE COYLE AP Film Writer


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Friday, May 4, 2018

gardening

The darling buds of May A sure sign that summer is on the way, according to Jack Hardy, is the sight of royal poinciana in glorious bloom.

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lthough poincianas will be at their best in June it is during May we see the early bloomers put out their red and gold flowers branch by branch. No matter how old you grow and how used you are to the cycles of nature it is always a pleasure to see one of the world’s most beautiful trees bursting into bloom. Life is good, it seems to say. Enjoy yourself! I certainly will be enjoying myself in a few weeks because my grumichama tree is loaded with blossoms and they take only three to four weeks to produce ripe fruits. And what lovely fruits they are, very like the related jabotica fruits. Dark red to almost black, grumichama fruits have a corolla (crown) at the flowering end that must be picked off before eating the fruit, which is the size of a marble and has a central round seed. I do not see many gardens with grumichama and I encourage those of you with space to plant two or three. The trees take up little space because they grow upwards rather than outwards. You can keep the shrub-sized trees to about 10-12 feet for ease of harvesting. Grumichama is very readily propagated from seed but is a slow grower. It

prefers slightly acid soil but tolerates our limestone soil. It is one of the fruit trees that really appreciates water during the spring dry season. Grumichamas are deliciously juicy and sweet and I have told my grandchildren never to touch them, hinting that they may be poisonous. I love my grandchildren but darned if I am going to share my grumichamas with them. In the vegetable garden it is onion pulling time. Onions are five-month crops and when the bulbs are ready to pull the leaves die back. When the leaves (and the weather) are dry, pull up the bulbs, remove the roots with thumbnail, knife or scissors, and allow the bulbs to just lie in the sun for a few days or up to a week, turning now and then. This allows the skin on the lower parts of the bulb that were in the soil to begin curing and the better your onions are cured the longer they will last. Your onion harvest needs lots of ventilation and the ideal way to store them is by plaiting the leaves of a dozen or so onions and securing the ends with twine. The plaited onions can then be hung in a shaded area with good ventilation. If you cannot plait (mea culpa) then you can use several lengths of twine to tie the leaves together. An alternative method is to put your onions in an onion bag and hang the bag. Every few days you should massage the bag so those onions in the middle move to the outside. If you take some of your crop into the kitchen for a few days before using them be careful to cut the leaves off about 2 inches above the top of the bulb. It is the top of the bulb that cures last and if you trim the leaves too closely you may find your onions rotting at this point. How long your onions last once they are nicely cured depends entirely on the variety you planted. Most onions can last two months but some can be stored for six months or more. Our ever-present humidity encourages spoilage so check your onions regularly. May is a great time to sow seeds for summer vegetables. Snake beans, okra and corn can be established this month to provide a long growing season. Plant

Grumichamas, also known as Brazilian cherries more seeds in mid-June to ensure good harvests. Watermelons can be planted in sandy soil and will enjoy the summer rains. It is not only royal poinciana that begins flowering in May. Crepe myrtle usually puts out its first flowers in early May to begin a summer-long display of beauty. Crepe myrtle flowers come in a rainbow of colours and I particularly enjoy white. White flowers are also given by Bridal Bouquet frangipani, the one frangipani that keeps its leaves year round. The stems of Bridal Bouquet are brittle and are often broken by high winds. Sometimes a bouquet – a complete flowering mass – becomes dislodged. In this case, trim the stalk and plant the inflorescence in a container with potting mix. It will give several weeks of beauty and has a good chance of rooting and becoming an established plant. Summer flowers feature the same old crew that we depend on over and over. They include tithonia, vinca, cosmos, African daisy, gerbera daisy, marigolds, zinnias, gaillardia,

rudbeckia, cone flowers and sunflowers. Of these, gaillardia is a perennial but flowers in its first year just as if it was an annual. You only need to plant gaillardia once. I particularly like the variety with solid yellow flowers. The lovely rain we had in late April has caused the mowing season to begin in earnest. It would be good to start the season with fresh oil, air filter and spark plugs. Just a couple of years ago three men of my acquaintance died while using a lawn mower. If you are old or unfit, treat yourself gently. Heat and relatively heavy labour do not go together. It looks like a bumper mango season ahead here on Abaco. During March it seemed as though the trees were trying to make up their mind about conditions that were a little different from normal. Once the blooming started all the trees joined in and that April rain was a definite blessing. • For questions and comment, e-mail gardenerjack@coralwave.com


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Friday, May 4, 2018

literary lives – patricia vazquez

The language of birds Sir Christopher Ondaatje interviews the eminent resident Bahamian photographer Patricia Vazquez and investigates her technique photographing birds of the Bahamas.

would marauder the hive leaving something behind for them. In Norse mythology the ability to understand the language of birds was a sign of great wisdom. The god Odin was supposed to have had two ravens, Huginn and Muninn, who gave Odin information about mortal men. The legendary King of Sweden, Dag The Wise, is reputed to have gained his wisdom from understanding what birds said. In the Quran, Suleiman and David are said to have been taught the language of birds, and in Sufism the language of birds is known to be a divine language. In the Jerusalem Talmud, Solomon’s proverbial wisdom is said to have been attained by his being granted understanding of the language of birds by God. The gift of understanding the language of birds is also described in Welsh, Russian,

German, Estonian, Greek, and Roman folklore. Understanding the language of birds, their voices, their movements and their habits, is a gift – and I have spent the last few days interviewing a photographic artist of considerable talent, questioning her about why she has used birds as the symbols, images and metaphors of her photographic literature and poetry. It was an enlightening experience. Patricia Ann Van den Berg de Vazquez was born in Holland on March 4, 1962 – the youngest of seven children – in the town of Weesp, half an hour south of Amsterdam, on a farm where her family took care of animals and birds. When she was 19 years old she left Holland for the United States where she worked as an au pair for an American family in New York, looking after a one-year-old baby girl. It was a

huge cultural difference, particularly difficult in the first three months, a testing and uncomfortable time, completely different from anything she had experienced before, and she missed her family and roots. Enduring a troubled existence in North America for the next three years, Patricia met her husband Leandro Vasquez in 1987, and spent the next year travelling with him to the Far East, the Caribbean, Europe and Australia. They married in 1988 and settled in San Sebastian in Northern Spain. Their son, Eduardo, is now a hotelier in Hong Kong, and their daughter Natascha is curator of the Current Art Gallery in Baha Mar in the Bahamas. The couple also bought an island, Little Pipe Cay in the Exumas, where they lived on an off for three years before buying their house in Lyford Cay. They have been happily married for 30 years.

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irds have long captivated us with their unmatched beauty, their language, and their ability to fly. In Proto-Indo-European religion, bird behaviour was used for the purposes of divination by visionaries. This behaviour may have its roots in the Paleolithic era when, during the Ice Age, humans looked for carrion by observing scavenging birds. In North America ravens have been known to lead both wolves and native hunters to prey they were not able to consume. The Greater Honeyguide in Africa has been observed leading humans to beehives hoping that they

Photographer Patricia Vazquez and a yellow-crowned night heron regard one another


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Friday, May 4, 2018

They sold their island in the Exumas and instead bought a ten-acre farm on South Ocean Boulevard, which they have turned into an animal and bird sanctuary. Patricia Vazquez started taking photographs seriously in 2006. It wasn’t easy. There was a lot to learn. Using a Canon EOS 5 D camera with a 100-400 (mm) lens, a 70-300 (mm) lens, and a wide-angle and Macro lens for close-ups, Patricia set out to learn the lessons of wildlife photography, using only natural light and never using a flash. She learned quickly that there are some basic rules that one must follow. Birds are unpredictable wildlife subjects and it is important that you choose the correct shutter speed settings before you track down your quarry. Birds and animals react very quickly and the photographer has only about five or six seconds to focus and capture the shot. If you don’t act quickly your opportunity will be lost. You must know the minimum shutter speed you can use to still capture a sharp image. It is a good idea to practise switching between focus modes. It is also terribly important to know your subject before setting out on photographic safaris. No matter how well you might think you know your bird, the unexpected always happens. Wildlife subjects react nervously around humans and the better you know your subject and your subject’s territory, the easier it will be to get a successful picture. For example, photographing flamingos on Great Inagua Island requires patience and determination. “Although there are over 60,000 flamingos on Great Inagua Island, one must walk miles through shallow salt pans to get anywhere near the nervous birds. The slightest sound or movement will cause the birds to fly away, and you will not get another chance for another two or three hours. Using a kayak is silent and allows you to keep a lower profile. Also, using a knowledgeable guide is imperative. Otherwise you will spend hours in a futile search for the colourful birds.” Composition and lighting are important considerations. Although the early morning and evening light gives a softer more pleasing photographic result, it is no use going out to photograph if it is too dark and your fast shutter speed will only render you an indistinct image.

A flamingo in flight with cormorant

Bahama Parrots conversing “I always have to remember that I am trying to photograph unpredictable and impulsive bird subjects. Getting a good photograph requires instant reaction and several shots before I get what I am looking for. Photographing birds in flight requires not only attention to composition and light – but stamina and perseverance. I always look for contrast and background but never forget that focus and facial expression reveal the character of the bird. As there is so little time I generally set my camera on auto and let the camera do the work for me. It takes ages to get what I am looking for.” It is the elusive pursuit of beauty and character that makes wildlife photography so challenging and rewarding.

Good wildlife subjects are rare and fleeting. There is little room for error. In addition to determination and persistence there is also the element of luck. The harder you work the luckier you will get. One must try to be at the right place at the right time. Aperture and shutter speed are vital, but behavioural understanding is just as important. It will increase your chances of success. “To photograph is to hold one’s breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It’s at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy.” – Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004) Birds do not wait for anyone. Expect the unexpected. A wildlife

photographer must always have his or her camera prepared for any eventuality. It is no use having your camera ready and around your neck if the lens cap is still on. You will not have time to remove it, focus, and then take the shot you have been waiting for. Set your aperture and shutter speed and be prepared for anything. Do not worry about your camera battery running out of power. Always, always have one, or even two, spare fully charged batteries in your camera bag. Getting enough light into your camera when you are out photographing is all-important. You will need a lot of light to freeze a 1/1000 second shot. More normally you will have to use speeds of 1/500 of a second – particularly if you are using a telephoto lens. Thus your aperture will have to be f/5.6 or f/8. Set your aperture first and then your shutter speed. Be prepared. There is no point taking a dramatic bird photograph – and then having a blurry image. You will be extremely disappointed. Henri Cartier-Bresson has said in “The Decisive Moment”: “To photograph: it is to put on the same line of sight the head, the eye and the heart.” He is right. Look through your lens and study the bird’s behaviour before taking your photograph. A motionless bird is far less dramatic than an active or moving subject. Move slowly and take several shots before moving on. You will be rewarded. Sometimes you may have to take as many as ten or twelve quick shots to capture the movement and expression you have been hunting for. “Of all the Bahamian birds I have photographed the rose-throated or Bahama Parrot is my favourite. They are so expressive. These noisy birds, especially when perched in a flock, are native only to the Bahamas, Cuba, and the Cayman Islands. They are found only on Abaco and Great Inagua, although a few pairs have been spotted on New Providence Island,” said Patricia. “The other bird I love photographing is the gorgeous Yellow Crowned Night Heron which is a common year-round resident of the Bahamas – solitary and mostly nocturnal – and feeds on hard-shelled crustaceans. It is not often seen in bright daylight.” Different perspectives can produce different images – but be careful when photographing birds not to show too

Continued on page 22


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Friday, May 4, 2018

Flamingos over Great Inagua Continued from page 21 many distracting elements in your background. It will draw attention away from your subject and dilute the importance of your photograph. Photographing a beautiful sunset or seascape may produce a dramatic scene, but this needs a very different technique to that of wildlife photography. “Photography is not, to begin with, an art form at all. Like language, it is a medium in which works of art are made. Out of language, one can make scientific discourse.” – Susan Sontag (1933-2004) To interview Patricia Vazquez about bird photography is to find a whole world of sympathy for the wild and the free. She is someone who is clearly dedicated to her craft. She knows that the Bahamas is a birder’s paradise. As the late Anthony W White explained to me when he was putting together his peerless book “A Birder’s Guide To The Bahama Islands”, when most people think about the Bahamas, they think of sun, sand, and sea, and rightfully so, because the Bahamas have these in abundance. They have, however, a great deal more to offer those who want to visit and enjoy tropical forests, coral reefs, colourful fishes, and, of course, birds! Most oceanic islands are formed by volcanism and plate tectonics but

A burrowing owl resting on one leg

the Bahamas were not. They consist of thousands of feet of limestone, which, in the most recent ice age when the sea was many feet lower, formed three very large islands. These islands were rather flat, but wind-blown sand formed low hills around their shores. With the rise of sea level to current levels, these hills and dunes constitute the present Bahama Islands. The modern Bahamas are made up of 35 islands, almost 700 cays, and 2,400 outcroppings of rocks. Most of the seabird population is on the cays and rocks. The islands and cays are spread over a wide expanse of water both shallow and deep. The climate is tropical, with temperatures seldom lower than 60 or above 90 degrees Fahrenheit. The northern islands receive from 55 to 60 inches of rain per year, while the southern islands get only 30, which leads to differences in the vegetation, with the most extensive forests occurring in the north. It has, however, been only during the latter half of the 20th century that active birding and serious ornithological studies have taken place. Even today knowledge of Bahamian birds is far from complete. From the tropical forests on Abaco to the salt flats of Great Inagua, opportunities abound to see new birds and to add to the knowledge of the bird life of the Bahamas. Patricia Vazquez knows this, and thus she also knows that her photography is a “work in progress”. She is

a very talented artist and her brilliant portraits of flamingos, Bahama Parrots, burrowing owls, nesting kestrels, yellow-crowned night herons, brown pelicans, and even the tiny blue-grey gnat catchers, are only a beginning to her art which will I am sure in time extend to the rare nesting colonies of magnificent frigate birds, brown boobies, white-tailed tropicbirds, laughing gulls, and many other endemic and migratory subjects. She has already written two children’s books: “Maya Moon” (2012) and “Fabulous Faces” (2016), and held exhibitions at the former Van Breugel Restaurant, a resident studio at the Lyford Cay Club, the Central Bank of the Bahamas and Baha Mar. What’s past is prologue. All of us wish her well and look forward to the next showing of her poignantly exceptional photographs. • Sir Christopher Ondaatje is the author of “The Last Colonial”. He acknowledges that he has quoted liberally from “A Birder’s Guide to the Bahama Islands” (1998) by Anthony W White and “Birds of the West Indies” (1998) published by Christopher Helm (Publishers) Limited. NEXT WEEK: The traumatic life of an American poet considered to be one of the most influential voices of our time.


The Tribune | Weekend | 23

Friday, May 4, 2018

history

The Villa Doyle Forgotten facts Paul C Aranha

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ast night (April 6), I spent several magical hours as a guest of the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas for the grand opening of their new Fiona’s Theatre. “Where words leave off, music begins.” How right was the poet Heinrich Heine when he wrote those words. My wife and I sat there, in the shadow of an historic monument to colonial days, overlooking other monuments of this age gone by – St Francis Church, the first Roman Catholic church in the Bahamas, buildings on West Hill Street, some in desperate need of lots of TLC, and listening to Schubert, Beethoven and Mozart. To round it off, we were treated to a Junkanoo parade, which brought the audience to their feet, rocking to the rhythm. I imagined the earlier occupiers of Villa Doyle, entertaining their friends with champagne, music and dancing, never thinking of its becoming an art gallery, but I’m sure they would be happy with what has been accomplished. We should all thank the Albek family (in the Bahamas by choice) for the amphitheatre they have given us. In the Arts and Culture section of this morning’s newspaper, I was

Villa Doyle before it was the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas disappointed to read “. . . some people may have reservations about the NAGB inhabiting this building . . . “, but I was not surprised, because this Arts & Culture section can be depended upon to laud the destruction and disappearance of colonial-era buildings, forgetting that it is easy to re-write history, but impossible to unlive it.

The Loyalists transformed Nassau, leaving us architectural treasures that stem from that era and later. The Royal Victoria Hotel was the prime example. It bore no comparison to the soon-to-be imploded ‘new’ Post Office. The old Post Office was in the centre of the three public buildings. Fortunately, it and the other two public buildings still stand, testaments to the way we were.

Christ Church Cathedral, St Matthew’s Church and the pearl of Bay Street, the Masonic Temple, remind us of days when the Treasury earned just a few thousand pounds (who remembers pounds, shillings and pence?) and the Bahamas was not facing bankruptcy. Tourists came here to enjoy buildings such as these and Villa Doyle; tourists who could afford it to buy fine china, furs (believe it or not), English linen and other luxury items that filled the public coffers; tourists who did not parade through Bay Street in bikinis. They would have been arrested if they had. “Those were the days my friend. I thought they’d never end,” but even traditional Bahamian calypso (goombay?) has gone. Remember, “Mama, Bahama Mama, you tropical charmer, from the Isles of June”? George Symonette and Blind Blake were household names, as was Sweet Richard, who was “on stage” 24 hours a day. Nightclubs were synonymous with Over-the-Hill – Freddie Munnings, Paul Meeres and many other fine establishments. Our streets were safe. “Gone” is inevitable. “Forgotten” should be avoidable. • For questions and comments , e-mail islandairman@gmail.com

This weekend in world history May 4 • 1959 – The first Grammy Awards are held. Perry Como and Ella Fitzgerald win. • 1979 – Margaret Thatcher, leader of the UK’s Conservative Party, is sworn in as Britain’s first female prime minister.

May 5

• 1821 – Napoleon Bonaparte, the former French military leader who once ruled an empire that stretched across Europe, dies as a British

prisoner on the remote island of Saint Helena. • 1961 – Navy Commander Alan Shepard Jr becomes first American in space (aboard Freedom 7 space capsule)

May 6 • 1937 – The German passenger airship Hindenburg explodes as it arrives at the Naval Air Station Lakehurst, New Jersey. Thirty-six people die in the fiery accident. • 1941 – Revolutionary Joseph Stalin becomes Premier of the Soviet Union.

The Hindenburg, carrying 97 people, goes up in flames.


24 | The Tribune | Weekend

Friday, May 4, 2018

travel

Could you do it? Trips that ban cellphones, even for photos

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ould you take a trip if you couldn’t use your cellphone? A new tour company called Off the Grid is asking travellers to put their cellphones away and not even use them for photos. “When you’re somewhere new, there’s a lot to soak up, a lot to see, a lot of cool, interesting people to meet. Your phone can distract you,” said Off the Grid founder Zach Beattie. Off the Grid trips, he says, are designed to be “fully unplugged and very social.” The first trip is to Lisbon, Portugal, in July, with others planned to Prague; the Croatian coast; Barcelona, Spain; Lima, Peru; and Tulum, Mexico. “People have signed up for every trip we’ve launched so far,” Beattie said. Tours are seven to 10 days, with small groups of up to 16 people. Prices range from $1,500 to $1,650, including accommodations in hostels, some meals and ground transportation (but not airfare). Itineraries include at least three excursions and two social events, with an emphasis on unique experiences over bucket-list sightseeing. The Lisbon tour includes surfing lessons, yoga on the beach, a day of sailing and dinner with a family to learn about local cuisine and wines.

Tour operators equip travellers with everything they need, including a burner phone pre-loaded with emergency numbers. “We are under-scheduling,” Beattie said. “The entire focus of the trip is mindful travel and not cramming every single site into your trip.” The phone ban won’t be enforced quite as strictly as it seems at first glance. “We want it to be volunteer,” he said. “We’re not collecting phones and throwing them in a locked trunk. It’s held by you, but put in a pouch, and you state your intentions for the week,” whether that’s checking your social media once or twice a day or a total blackout.

Tour-goers also get a “dumb phone” without internet access that’s loaded with numbers for group leaders and other participants, both for emergencies and to promote socialising. Participants may bring regular cameras, but Beattie is hiring a photographer for each tour so there will be plenty of images to remember the trip by. Once the trip is over, participants will have access to those images for use in social media posts. “I think it’s interesting and challenging to say, ‘Can I enjoy this moment

without a camera? Can I soak up this memory and have it be part of me without instantly sharing with someone else in order for the moment to be real?’” he said. Those signing up range from kids graduating high school to folks in their 60s, but most participants are professionals ages 24 to 35, “people who’ve worked for a couple of years who really need a real vacation,” said Beattie, who’s “bootstrapping” the business using money he saved from a tech job at a mapping company. He’s hired guides for every trip but will help lead the first few himself. Kensey Neely, 30, a speech pathologist from St Joseph, Missouri, signed up for the Lisbon trip. “I’m so excited to go,” she said. “I had been trying to find a way to step out of my comfort zone.” Giving up her phone will be hard, she says, but “I’m hoping once I do it during the trip, I won’t be as tied to it when I get back.” She is taking a digital camera, but hopes to use it sparingly: “I want to enjoy the experience and not take pictures of every little thing.” • Online: https://www. traveloffthegrid.com/ BETH J HARPAZ AP Travel Editor


The Tribune | Weekend | 25

Friday, May 4, 2018

weddings

Etiquette and protocol highlights for royal wedding guests NEW YORK (AP) — Grab those nude stockings, ladies. You’ll be at a royal wedding, after all. While the May 19 nuptials of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will be a lower key affair than those of Will and Kate, guests at St George’s Chapel will still be expected to follow church and royal protocol, or at the very least basic British tradition, etiquette pros said. The invitations to 600 guests described the high church dress code thusly: For men, military uniforms, morning coats or lounge suits, otherwise known as business suits in not-wacky colours. For women, “day dress with hat.” The edicts leave plenty of room for faux pas. They also leave room for honouring age-old but not widely known customs, such as choosing straw as the material for hats after Easter. Some fashion and style etiquette fit for a queen: (l-r) Carole Middleton, Queen Elizabeth II and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, at the royal wedding in 2011. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner) DAYWEAR HEMS AND SHOULDERS International guests clearly are dressing Americans for European Etiquette expert Myka Meier, who formal events for more than 30 years. welcome to wear their country’s trained in London under a former Meier said women often start with equivalents. member of the royal household, said the hat when planning their outfits. “At the end of the day you just want dressing for such an occasion in Britain A rule of thumb from Lloyde Roth: and elsewhere can be very different to match the formality of the event “Make sure your hat and your outfit things. you’re attending,” Meier said. are going to the same event.” Women’s shoulders should be The huge hat worn by Princess Beacovered. It’s the Church of England, HATS: BIGGER ISN’T ALWAYS trice to the wedding of Harry’s brother, and the groom’s grandmother is the BETTER Prince William, and Kate Middleton head of that institution, FYI. Hemlines Royal weddings can seem like a hat lives on as a cautionary tale. Royal shouldn’t be shorter than the longest free-for-all. watcher Anne Chertoff called the high finger when arms are held at the side, “Hats are a sign of festivity for a bow on Beatrice’s fascinator “ridicuand no longer than mid-calf, Meier British wedding. They are kept on lous in so many ways, but at least you said. inside the church, but people should could see through it.” “You won’t see cleavage. You won’t be careful of the people sitting behind see a lot of skin,” she said. “At least them,” said Meier, who specializes SHOES MATTER you shouldn’t. It would be seen as in international social and business The wedding is a formal church disrespectful.” etiquette and protocol. affair but also a day event. That doesn’t Dresses that are mostly black or “It’s not the Kentucky Derby. No mean anything goes on the feet. This mostly white are no-nos. White is huge brims. Nothing too high,” she isn’t a garden party. reserved for the bride, and perhaps the said. Forget open toes and wedges. Slingbridal party. Black remains a colour of Fascinators — headpieces decorated backs are also considered too informal, mourning. Accents, patterns or smaller with bows, flowers and more — are Meier said. pops of those colours are fine. popular and perfectly acceptable, lend“You want something that is about Light prints and patterns are likely, ing an air of whimsy. four inches maximum,” she said. but big and blocky prints are unaccep“Whimsy as opposed to crazy is “The walk in is not going to be easy. table, Meier said. It’s a spring wedding fine,” said celebrity and society stylist There are lots of cobblestones even so expect plenty of pastels and traditional seasonal prints such as florals. Diane Lloyde Roth, who has been though there will be different types of

carpeting.” And stilettos? Forget about it. HANDBAGS They should be small. “There are about 800 seats in St George’s Chapel but it’s very tight seating. There isn’t any place to put large bags,” Meier said. Clutches or other handbags that fit easily on laps or just slightly to the side will rule the day. Kate Middleton rolls that way routinely. The queen also doesn’t tote around a tote. DON’T OVERDO “Americans forget that sometimes,” said Lloyde Roth, based in New Canaan, Connecticut. “You’re not the princess.” Makeup should be minimal, along with accessories. Savvy guests will let the hat do the talking, she said. “Do a great bold lip with the hat. That balances everything,” Lloyde Roth suggested. In terms of accessorising, she offered the wise words of Coco Chanel: “Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take one thing off.” THE HOLLYWOOD FACTOR “The only way there will be a culture clash would be if the Hollywood contingent tried to out-royal the royals,” Lloyde Roth said. “They should remember, this is the upper crust. They own their jewels and the clothing they’re wearing. They don’t turn back into mice at the stroke of midnight.” It is said the queen is not fond of skinny straps on dresses or revealing attire. Guests won’t change for a castle reception immediately following the wedding, but there is a private evening party at Frogmore House just south of Windsor Castle. If it’s black tie, as was the night party for Will and Kate, floorlength gowns are called for. “They can be strapless or sleeveless or long sleeves, based on the personal style preference of the woman,” Meier said. LEANNE ITALIE Associated Press


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26 | The Tribune | Weekend

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SmALL CRoSSwoRd

Lisa Wild

SmALL CRoSSwoRd

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

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EASY PUZZLE

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The Tribune | Weekend | 27

Friday, May 4, 2018

Animal matters Kim Aranha

The busy ‘baby season’

S

pring is in the air, though the weather on Wednesday afternoon felt more like a wintery, blustery cold front in January... I was delighted to see the first Poinciana blossoms on the trees shading the road between Lyford Cay and the Old Fort roundabout. Ahhh, Spring, much sung about, written about, dreamt about, and long awaited during those miserable winter months… Spring when the little buds pop out and the brightly coloured flowers peek through the earth, or snow or sand. A period of re-creation and starting over; a period of baby birds, baby dogs, baby cats…baby everything…and therein lies the problem! At least, a very big problem for us at the Bahamas Humane Society. Pregnant mother dogs and cats abound. Newborn puppies and kittens whose eyes are barely open are found under a car somewhere and no mother to be seen...did she get hit by a car? What to do? How to save them? How to home them? Blissful Spring, full of hope and beauty, is a period of intense stress, expense, work and challenges for a shelter, especially when you are the only shelter on the island. We do not kill animals because they are an inconvenience; we believe that they have a right to live a happy and fruitful life. These beliefs make it more difficult, but they are the right thing to do. Momma dogs and cats brought in are allowed the time to feed their babies, we try and get them out to foster homes once the babes have grown enough to eat on their own. The mother dog/cat is spayed before going to a new home or at least being put up for adoption. The babies are given their shots and they too are “fixed” before they go to their homes. No unwanted babies for the class of the BHS, only responsible ownership! One thing to try and remember if you find a group of tiny pups or kittens without a mother is that she

A dog for every occasion By The Bahamas Humane Society

PATRICIA VAZQUEZ

animals PET OF THE WEEK

W

ith 105 adult dogs in the Bahamas Humane Society shelter, how do you choose just the right one for you? Do you want a yard dog, an inside dog, a guard dog? China would be perfect if you are looking for a yard dog. Do you want an older puppy, a young adult, a senior? China is about two years old so has grown past her puppy stages but still has many years to look forward to. Do you want a male or a female? All adoption dogs are spayed or neutered; China here is female! She’s not a leash walker but she’ll happily protect her yard from any nefarious doings. She’s welcome to stay at the BHS for as long as need be, as the BHS is a no-kill shelter, but having been here since November, China is eagerly looking forward to a home of her own. Are you the person who’s just right for China? If so come in to the shelter to meet her, or call 3235138 for more information. Adoption hours are 11am to 4pm, Monday to

Friday, and 10am to 4pm on Saturday. China looks forward to meeting her perfect fit! • Join us as we ‘Party for the Animals’ on Friday, May 11, at 7pm at Montagu Gardens. Tickets are $60 and are available at the BHS. There will be a cash bar, door prize, and adult hoop-la, and the B-Humane Awards will be presented. Come and help support the BHS.

may have gone looking for food and water, so do not move them right away. Check on them to see if she comes back, or if the babies are suddenly gone, she probably came and moved them herself to where she felt was a safer place. These tiny puppies and kittens are better off with their mummy than with anybody else. Though we can bottle-feed them, there is no substitute for a mother, her milk, her warmth and the teachings she provides her offspring from the moment they enter this world. Baby birds are a different problem. The shelter does not adopt out birds, and the ones you may find will be wild anyway. Again, if you find a baby on the ground, look for the nest he fell out of and put him back. It is an old wives’ tale that the mother bird will abandon her child if she smells that a human has touched the baby. If you can’t find a nest, try a attach something to the tree nearest to where you found the baby bird, place the baby in the container and watch. Obviously, if the mother does not return then the baby needs to be cared for and fed until it is old enough to be freed to fly off on its own. We are blessed, in this town, to have two wonderful “bird ladies” – Melissa Maura and Maggie Crowch – who are simply amazing in how they can rescue baby birds, feed them and teach them to fly away once all grown up. I live in admiration of these two ladies because I have never had any success trying to save and feed baby birds and I always end up crying my heart out. Ardastra Gardens are also very helpful at saving and treating baby birds. If you find one, phone the Bahamas Humane Society and we will be able to advise you and put you in touch with the “bird squad”. During this lovely season of rebirth and creation I would like to remind you that we have many, many, cats and dogs, kittens and puppies looking for homes. We also have adult dogs and cats. We are proud to be a no kill shelter, but it’s a huge burden to find homes for all the animals who come through our gates. Every heart beat is an animal created by God to be loved and cared for. Won’t you open up your hearts and celebrate Spring by giving one of these animals a well-deserved and needed home? Adoption is quick and easy, frequently prices are discounted or even waived. Please visit the shelter and get a best friend.


28 | The Tribune | Weekend

Friday, May 4, 2018


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