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Towson’s campus and community news source

TheTowerlight.com

November 13, 2018

TU senior Mariela Pepin was crowned Miss Maryland USA for 2019, pg.10

Photo by Brendan Felch, Photo Illustration by Victoria Nicholson/The Towerlight

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November 13, 2018

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Social

November 13, 2018

Editor-in-Chief Karuga Koinange Senior Editor Bailey Hendricks News Editor Mary-Ellen Davis Asst. News Editor Keri Luise Arts & Life Editor Kerry Ingram Asst. Arts & Life Editor Alex Helms Sports Editor Asst. Sports Editors Muhammad Waheed Jordan Kendall Staff Writers Jessica Ricks Meg Hudson Sophia Bates

NOVEMBER

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Timothy Klapac Cyan Thomas Suzanne Stuller John Davis Aaron Thomas

Lacey Wall Brittany Whitham Isaiah Freeman Lexi Thompson Nikki Hewins Owen DiDonna Tiffany Deboer Proofreaders

General Manager Mike Raymond Art Director Victoria Nicholson Webmaster Circulation Staff Scott Halerz Dom Capparuccini Elssa Kenfack

As part of Hunger & Homelessness Awareness Week, TU is collecting food and hygiene items for the campus FoodShare. Donation bins are located in the University Union 2nd floor lobby and the Administration Building 2nd floor.

PAWS AGAINST HUNGER

University Union, 2nd floor lobby and Administration Building, 2nd floor

Glenn Kaplan John Hack

Staff Photographers Simon Enagonio

WEEKLY

13-17 CALENDAR.

Anthony Petro Albert Ivory

Photo Editor Brendan Felch

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TEDXTOWSONU In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local,

West Village Ballrooms, 5:30 p.m.

self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

LECTURE | PIERRE BOWINS: A SIN OF OMISSION

Pierre’s journey as a practicing graphic designer for 20 years has put him on the path of exploring the missing Black American diaspora in the field of graphic design.

Art Lecture Hall, Center for the Arts, Room 2032, 6:30 p.m.

16

17

LIFE, THE UNIVERSE, AND EVERYTHING PLANETARIUM

Smith Hall, Room 521, 8 p.m.

BREATHE EASY (FREE) 5K

Join us as we emulate the infinite improbability drive and join the real hitchhikers as we explore what is known about our universe, all in 40 minutes or so. Bring your peril sensitive sunglasses in case we go too close to a black hole!

Come run/walk and learn some quick facts at our free Breathe Easy 5K! Register here! Free bandanas and a raffle for a chance to win a basket of UStore merchandise.

MORE EVENTS CAN BE FOUND AT

Tiger Plaza, 8:15 a.m.

TOWSON

TRENDING.

8000 York Road University Union Room 309 Towson, MD 21252 (410) 704-5153 editor@thetowerlight.com thetowerlight.com The Towerlight print edition is published by students of Towson University on Tuesdays. The Towerlight is owned by nonprofit Baltimore Student Media Inc., BaltimoreStudentMedia.com. The Towerlight’s advertising deadlines are firm:  Wednesday noon for space; Friday noon for art. Classifieds appear online and in print and are self-service at TheTowerlight.com/classifieds. We encourage letters to the editor and online feedback. Commentaries, letters to the editor, editorial cartoons and other editorials express the opinions of their authors and not necessarily the views of the newspaper. The Towerlight does not discriminate based on age, color, condition of handicap, marital status, national origin, race, religion, gender or sexual orientation. ©2018 by The Towerlight, 8000 York Rd, Towson, MD 21252. All rights reserved.

Please Recycle!

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@kimschatzel We can only imagine the suffering. We can remember these soldiers, all soldiers for their sacrifice and bravery. 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. #NeverForget #Armistice100 @TowsonCR Happy Veterans Day to all of the impeccably brave men and women of the United States military. Thank you for your service and sacrifice

#

EVENTS.TOWSON.EDU

VETERANS DAY

@david_s_marks

It was an honor to attend #VeteransDay ceremonies in Towson and Carney today. @PretzelloBands So excited to be in NYC with @ TowsonBand to honor our nation’s veterans. It’s going to be a beautiful day!


4

OpinionOpinion

November 13, 2018

November 13, 2018

www.redbrickstation.com

Climate action Blue Wave hits the nation after the election Democratic victories gained RYAN KIRBY Columnist @RyanHKirby

On Election Day, voters went to the polls to cast their ballot. Voters turned out in record numbers with the highest midterm turnout in over half a century. Just over 47 percent of eligible voters cast a ballot. With Republicans in control of every branch of government, there was much media coverage over whether or not Democrats would be able to create a wave election to take back much of they had lost in the past decade. As the results have continued to trickle in, it is clear the blue wave made landfall this year. Democrats sent a clear message to the Republican Party by picking up approximately 38-39 seats in the House of Representatives, seven governorships and over 300 state legislative seats. Some will try to point to the losses Democrats took in the Senate, but that argument lacks a basic understanding of the context surrounding those races. Republicans were handed the most favorable map possible with 24 Democrats, and two independents who caucus with the Democrats, up for

re-election and only nine Republicans. Ten of those Democrats up for re-election were running in states that President Donald Trump had won. The simple fact that Republicans were only able to take two seats when they were handed their best-case scenario shows that many Senate Democrats were protected by a Blue Wave during a strong campaign. In Maryland, we were unsuccessful in our attempt to elect Ben Jealous as our next governor, and we will have four more years of Governor Larry Hogan. Maryland Democrats were successful in re-electing Senator Ben Cardin, Attorney General Brian Frosh and Comptroller Peter Franchot. District 6 will have David Trone as its new representative in Congress, but overall there was no partisan difference in our congressional delegation. Hogan initiated his “Drive for Five” with the intention of winning five seats in the State Senate to break the Democratic supermajority. With some amazing campaign work across the state, Democrats were able to hold supermajority and will be able to override Governor Hogan’s vetoes if necessary. Democrats also picked up three county executive seats in Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties. There were countless wins up and

down the ballot across the country that could be written about and analyzed in thousands of words as to why they won, but I would rather focus a discussion on how this year’s elections shaped the two parties. When it comes to the Republican Party, was Trump more beneficial or harmful to his party? Has Trump altered the major policy issues of the Republican Party? Did the 2018 elections provide evidence as to whether Trumpism is only temporary, or will it have a long-lasting impact on the future of the Republican Party? When it comes to the Democratic Party, are there any meaningful lessons that can be draw from the election results? Democrats ran progressives and moderates in tough elections and in some cases came up defeated. Does the party focus on the lessons we can learn from losses and victories of progressives or does the focus get placed on the moderates? I don’t claim to have the answers to those questions, but they are incredibly important to consider as more data becomes available and the narrative gets shaped with time. Both parties need to consider how their futures will be shaped. - To read the rest of this column online, visit thetowerlight.com.

Men’s mental health is serious SAMUEL SMITH Columnist

This article discusses mental health and suicide. According to Mental Health America, over 6 million men suffer from depression, and over 3 million men have some sort of phobia or panic disorder. Yet the face of mental health is usually a white woman. Why are men not talking about this? We were conditioned to have a boys don’t cry type of mentality from a young age. This means, rather than talking about our feelings, we bottle them up. Rather than cry, we

can sometimes become aggressive. This isn’t healthy and it’s literally killing us. According to Psychology Today, every 20 minutes, another man takes his life. This needs to stop. What can we do? Check up on your brothers, your father and your friends. Even the happiest of guys can be suffering, and a simple text such as “You okay? I’m here to talk” can help change or save a life. Know the signs of depression, such as: -- Loss of appetite or increased appetite -- Withdrawal -- Low mood -- Guilt/hopelessness -- Loss of interest in doing things you usually enjoy

And get help if you notice these signs. If you notice these in your friend or friends, encourage them to get help, whether that’s talking to a doctor or talking to a therapist. Talk about it. Talk about mental illness with your peers or family. Normalize talking about mental health. Finally, take care of yourself. Finals are coming up, there’s a lot of projects due soon and it can be a stressful time with the holiday season coming up. Take some time to yourself. Do a face mask. Play video games. Crank up your music. Do what makes you feel happy, calm and in-tune with yourself. Encourage your friends and family to do the same.

NICHOLAS KOSKI Columnist

The recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report reminded us of the gravity of climate change and the immediate political action that needs to be taken. This past Tuesday, voters in the U.S had the chance to stand for climate action by voting for environmental initiatives and leaders. Although several climate leaders were elected at the midterms, many key initiatives were defeated. One proposal on the ballot was Washington’s landmark Initiative 1631, which would have enacted the first carbon emissions fee in the U.S meant to curb greenhouse gases while also collecting revenue to fund clean air, water, and forest health programs. Initiative 1631 was one of several important environmental initiatives on this year’s ballot that were defeated. Colorado proposition 112 would have created setbacks for oil, gas and fracking projects with minimum distance requirements. Both Arizona proposition 127 and Nevada question 6 would increase the use of renewable energy for electric utilities by 2030. Out of these three, only Nevada question 6 was approved and will have to be approved again

in 2020 to take effect. Despite efforts in several states to move toward cleaner energy and a healthier planet, the fossil fuel industry pushed back hard. Oil, gas, and electric companies contributed over $90 million in opposition to the initiatives in Washington, Colorado and Arizona, according to state campaign finance reports. At the very least, this did not stop candidates keen on climate change from being elected to office. Many who were considered as priorities or “climate heroes” by Vote Climate U.S., an environmentally oriented political action committee, were elected for positions in the House and Senate, including Maryland’s own Ben Cardin. There were also some important races for governorship that were won by environmentally minded leaders such as Michelle Grisham of New Mexico and Steve Sisolak of Nevada. Although the elections are over now, that does not mean you have to wait around for the next one to work toward climate action. Now is the time for anyone who is concerned about the well-being of the planet as a whole to come together for community and global effort, regardless of political leanings.

CONNOR McNAIRN Columnist

Last Tuesday’s midterm elections featured a variety of high stakes races. And since returns began flooding news headlines, party diagnoses have varied. For conservatives, Senator Ted Cruz’s victory against Beto O’Rourke, Senator Heidi Heitkamp’s defeat at the hands of Kevin Cramer and Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley’s surprising win over incumbent Claire McCaskill are all reasons to be optimistic. Indeed, the president wasted no time declaring Tuesday night a major victory for his Republican Party, but Democratic analysts have different takes on the results. Before Election Day, many forecasts called for a Democratic blue wave in the House that exceeded 40 seats. The Democrats have thus far flipped over 30 seats, and with returns still developing in many hotly contested California districts, the party may in fact secure the 40-seat projection. It is first worth noting just how significant Democrats’ victories were on Tuesday. The Republicans currently enjoy total control of government, from the Congress to executive and state legislatures. What’s more, in 2011, following a major Republican takeover of state legislatures and, by

extension, districting responsibilities, highly gerrymandered districts secured Republican control for nearly a decade. Many of these same districts however, designed to favor Republican candidates, swung left on Tuesday. But House gains are not the only realm in which the Democrats have reason to celebrate. The Democrats also gained seven state legislatures and over 370 state legislative seats, proving that Democratic victories were consistent at all levels of government. These trends ran counter to those from both the 2010 and 2014 midterms, during which Republicans dominated. Given gains in both the House and state legislatures, Democrats also have reason to be hopeful in Senate and gubernatorial races. Although Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum initially conceded the Florida governor’s race to Ron DeSantis, as votes continued to trickle in, Gillum pulled within 0.4 percent of DeSantis, triggering a state-mandated recount. Similar trends were also present in the state’s Senate race, with incumbent Bill Nelson eventually coming within 0.2 percent of current Florida Governor Rick Scott. Moreover, a potential runoff in the Georgia governor race following multiple reports of voter

suppression has instilled new hope in Democratic voters. So what does a strong midterm showing – the first in nearly a decade – mean for the Democratic Party and the country in aggregate? First, a Democratically-controlled House effectively handcuffs President Donald Trump’s hitherto unchecked agenda. The House of Representatives also maintains the power to issue subpoenas and investigate Trump’s highly pursued tax returns. And perhaps most significantly, any budget designed by either the president or the Republican Senate will require Nancy Pelosi’s (presumably) stamp of approval, thereby diluting potentially radical spending initiatives. Simply put, the Democrats’ performance on election night has implications regarding both legislative processes and overall political sentiment. Increased Democratic influence in Congress will undoubtedly lead to more moderate legislation, given that compromise is now required to pave the government’s way forward. But the political ramifications of Democratic victory, especially in previously held Republican districts, are not lost on either the Republican Party or Trump, who faces an impending election in less than two years’ time.

at The Avenue at White Marsh

8149 HONEYGO BLVD | WHITE MARSH, MD 21236 410.931.PUBS

Winter SESSION 2019 Hey Tigers!

Did you know you need to average 30 credits a year to graduate in 4 years?

Dealing with depression CINDY IBARRA Columnist

The idea of college sounds fun and exciting because of all the freedom one can get. But it can also be the most stressful years of your life. Being in college is not easy. The workload can be overwhelming and there just might not be enough time in a day to get it all done. If you are depressed, it can possibly be harder to keep up and maintain a good grade point average. Depression is the constant act of feeling down and having little to no energy to do regular day to day activities. Symptoms may include sadness, hopelessness, dark thoughts and

pessimism. According to the World Health Organization, more than 300 million people of all ages suffer from depression. Students can be impacted by depression by not only their mood and loss of appetite, but also in their academics. Grades are more prone to decrease due to depression. According to Beck’s cognitive theory of depression, in achievement-oriented environments, depressed individuals are prone to react to low grades with a sense of failure due to tendencies to display negative perception of themselves, the world and the future. - To read the rest of this column online, visit thetowerlight.com.

Tech usage awareness vital KAYLA HUNT Columnist

As the advancements of technology continue to increase, the concern over people’s relationships with technology increases as well. There are many concerns regarding how much time people are spending interacting with technology, and even going to lengths of labeling some people as addicts. According to a study conducted by King University, Americans spend

about 5 hours a day browsing on their smartphones and touch their phones about 2,617 times per day. Tech companies are joining the conversation as well and making attempts to limit the amount of time people spend with technology. In Apple’s recent update, iOS 12, they included a new feature called “screen time.” Screen Time allows iPhone users to monitor and track their phone usage and allows parents to control their children’s phone time as well. This new feature gives users the

ability to view how much time they spend on each app and allows them to set limits for them. After users set a limit, the app will lock once they reach it. Even though the lock is easy to bypass, this new feature is still useful because it allows users to be more conscious of how much time they are spending with their smartphone. Screen time also notifies users with a weekly report that breakdowns their phone usage for that week. - To read the rest of this column online, visit thetowerlight.com.

If you’re heading home for winter break, UMBC Winter Session 2019 is a great way to stay on track to graduate on time. • Take up to 4.5 credits • Choose from over 100 courses • Online, hybrid, and in-person classes are available

Visit winter.umbc.edu to get started!

JANUARY

2 – 25

CLAIM YOUR FUTURE

5


4

Opinion

November 13, 2018

Climate action Blue Wave hits the nation after the election RYAN KIRBY Columnist @RyanHKirby

On Election Day, voters went to the polls to cast their ballot. Voters turned out in record numbers with the highest midterm turnout in over half a century. Just over 47 percent of eligible voters cast a ballot. With Republicans in control of every branch of government, there was much media coverage over whether or not Democrats would be able to create a wave election to take back much of they had lost in the past decade. As the results have continued to trickle in, it is clear the blue wave made landfall this year. Democrats sent a clear message to the Republican Party by picking up approximately 38-39 seats in the House of Representatives, seven governorships and over 300 state legislative seats. Some will try to point to the losses Democrats took in the Senate, but that argument lacks a basic understanding of the context surrounding those races. Republicans were handed the most favorable map possible with 24 Democrats, and two independents who caucus with the Democrats, up for

re-election and only nine Republicans. Ten of those Democrats up for re-election were running in states that President Donald Trump had won. The simple fact that Republicans were only able to take two seats when they were handed their best-case scenario shows that many Senate Democrats were protected by a Blue Wave during a strong campaign. In Maryland, we were unsuccessful in our attempt to elect Ben Jealous as our next governor, and we will have four more years of Governor Larry Hogan. Maryland Democrats were successful in re-electing Senator Ben Cardin, Attorney General Brian Frosh and Comptroller Peter Franchot. District 6 will have David Trone as its new representative in Congress, but overall there was no partisan difference in our congressional delegation. Hogan initiated his “Drive for Five” with the intention of winning five seats in the State Senate to break the Democratic supermajority. With some amazing campaign work across the state, Democrats were able to hold supermajority and will be able to override Governor Hogan’s vetoes if necessary. Democrats also picked up three county executive seats in Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties. There were countless wins up and

down the ballot across the country that could be written about and analyzed in thousands of words as to why they won, but I would rather focus a discussion on how this year’s elections shaped the two parties. When it comes to the Republican Party, was Trump more beneficial or harmful to his party? Has Trump altered the major policy issues of the Republican Party? Did the 2018 elections provide evidence as to whether Trumpism is only temporary, or will it have a long-lasting impact on the future of the Republican Party? When it comes to the Democratic Party, are there any meaningful lessons that can be draw from the election results? Democrats ran progressives and moderates in tough elections and in some cases came up defeated. Does the party focus on the lessons we can learn from losses and victories of progressives or does the focus get placed on the moderates? I don’t claim to have the answers to those questions, but they are incredibly important to consider as more data becomes available and the narrative gets shaped with time. Both parties need to consider how their futures will be shaped. - To read the rest of this column online, visit thetowerlight.com.

Men’s mental health is serious SAMUEL SMITH Columnist

This article discusses mental health and suicide. According to Mental Health America, over 6 million men suffer from depression, and over 3 million men have some sort of phobia or panic disorder. Yet the face of mental health is usually a white woman. Why are men not talking about this? We were conditioned to have a boys don’t cry type of mentality from a young age. This means, rather than talking about our feelings, we bottle them up. Rather than cry, we

can sometimes become aggressive. This isn’t healthy and it’s literally killing us. According to Psychology Today, every 20 minutes, another man takes his life. This needs to stop. What can we do? Check up on your brothers, your father and your friends. Even the happiest of guys can be suffering, and a simple text such as “You okay? I’m here to talk” can help change or save a life. Know the signs of depression, such as: -- Loss of appetite or increased appetite -- Withdrawal -- Low mood -- Guilt/hopelessness -- Loss of interest in doing things you usually enjoy

And get help if you notice these signs. If you notice these in your friend or friends, encourage them to get help, whether that’s talking to a doctor or talking to a therapist. Talk about it. Talk about mental illness with your peers or family. Normalize talking about mental health. Finally, take care of yourself. Finals are coming up, there’s a lot of projects due soon and it can be a stressful time with the holiday season coming up. Take some time to yourself. Do a face mask. Play video games. Crank up your music. Do what makes you feel happy, calm and in-tune with yourself. Encourage your friends and family to do the same.

NICHOLAS KOSKI Columnist

The recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report reminded us of the gravity of climate change and the immediate political action that needs to be taken. This past Tuesday, voters in the U.S had the chance to stand for climate action by voting for environmental initiatives and leaders. Although several climate leaders were elected at the midterms, many key initiatives were defeated. One proposal on the ballot was Washington’s landmark Initiative 1631, which would have enacted the first carbon emissions fee in the U.S meant to curb greenhouse gases while also collecting revenue to fund clean air, water, and forest health programs. Initiative 1631 was one of several important environmental initiatives on this year’s ballot that were defeated. Colorado proposition 112 would have created setbacks for oil, gas and fracking projects with minimum distance requirements. Both Arizona proposition 127 and Nevada question 6 would increase the use of renewable energy for electric utilities by 2030. Out of these three, only Nevada question 6 was approved and will have to be approved again

in 2020 to take effect. Despite efforts in several states to move toward cleaner energy and a healthier planet, the fossil fuel industry pushed back hard. Oil, gas, and electric companies contributed over $90 million in opposition to the initiatives in Washington, Colorado and Arizona, according to state campaign finance reports. At the very least, this did not stop candidates keen on climate change from being elected to office. Many who were considered as priorities or “climate heroes” by Vote Climate U.S., an environmentally oriented political action committee, were elected for positions in the House and Senate, including Maryland’s own Ben Cardin. There were also some important races for governorship that were won by environmentally minded leaders such as Michelle Grisham of New Mexico and Steve Sisolak of Nevada. Although the elections are over now, that does not mean you have to wait around for the next one to work toward climate action. Now is the time for anyone who is concerned about the well-being of the planet as a whole to come together for community and global effort, regardless of political leanings.

Dealing with depression CINDY IBARRA Columnist

The idea of college sounds fun and exciting because of all the freedom one can get. But it can also be the most stressful years of your life. Being in college is not easy. The workload can be overwhelming and there just might not be enough time in a day to get it all done. If you are depressed, it can possibly be harder to keep up and maintain a good grade point average. Depression is the constant act of feeling down and having little to no energy to do regular day to day activities. Symptoms may include sadness, hopelessness, dark thoughts and

pessimism. According to the World Health Organization, more than 300 million people of all ages suffer from depression. Students can be impacted by depression by not only their mood and loss of appetite, but also in their academics. Grades are more prone to decrease due to depression. According to Beck’s cognitive theory of depression, in achievement-oriented environments, depressed individuals are prone to react to low grades with a sense of failure due to tendencies to display negative perception of themselves, the world and the future. - To read the rest of this column online, visit thetowerlight.com.


Opinion

November 13, 2018

www.redbrickstation.com at The Avenue at White Marsh

Democratic victories gained CONNOR McNAIRN Columnist

Last Tuesday’s midterm elections featured a variety of high stakes races. And since returns began flooding news headlines, party diagnoses have varied. For conservatives, Senator Ted Cruz’s victory against Beto O’Rourke, Senator Heidi Heitkamp’s defeat at the hands of Kevin Cramer and Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley’s surprising win over incumbent Claire McCaskill are all reasons to be optimistic. Indeed, the president wasted no time declaring Tuesday night a major victory for his Republican Party, but Democratic analysts have different takes on the results. Before Election Day, many forecasts called for a Democratic blue wave in the House that exceeded 40 seats. The Democrats have thus far flipped over 30 seats, and with returns still developing in many hotly contested California districts, the party may in fact secure the 40-seat projection. It is first worth noting just how significant Democrats’ victories were on Tuesday. The Republicans currently enjoy total control of government, from the Congress to executive and state legislatures. What’s more, in 2011, following a major Republican takeover of state legislatures and, by

extension, districting responsibilities, highly gerrymandered districts secured Republican control for nearly a decade. Many of these same districts however, designed to favor Republican candidates, swung left on Tuesday. But House gains are not the only realm in which the Democrats have reason to celebrate. The Democrats also gained seven state legislatures and over 370 state legislative seats, proving that Democratic victories were consistent at all levels of government. These trends ran counter to those from both the 2010 and 2014 midterms, during which Republicans dominated. Given gains in both the House and state legislatures, Democrats also have reason to be hopeful in Senate and gubernatorial races. Although Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum initially conceded the Florida governor’s race to Ron DeSantis, as votes continued to trickle in, Gillum pulled within 0.4 percent of DeSantis, triggering a state-mandated recount. Similar trends were also present in the state’s Senate race, with incumbent Bill Nelson eventually coming within 0.2 percent of current Florida Governor Rick Scott. Moreover, a potential runoff in the Georgia governor race following multiple reports of voter

suppression has instilled new hope in Democratic voters. So what does a strong midterm showing – the first in nearly a decade – mean for the Democratic Party and the country in aggregate? First, a Democratically-controlled House effectively handcuffs President Donald Trump’s hitherto unchecked agenda. The House of Representatives also maintains the power to issue subpoenas and investigate Trump’s highly pursued tax returns. And perhaps most significantly, any budget designed by either the president or the Republican Senate will require Nancy Pelosi’s (presumably) stamp of approval, thereby diluting potentially radical spending initiatives. Simply put, the Democrats’ performance on election night has implications regarding both legislative processes and overall political sentiment. Increased Democratic influence in Congress will undoubtedly lead to more moderate legislation, given that compromise is now required to pave the government’s way forward. But the political ramifications of Democratic victory, especially in previously held Republican districts, are not lost on either the Republican Party or Trump, who faces an impending election in less than two years’ time.

8149 HONEYGO BLVD | WHITE MARSH, MD 21236 410.931.PUBS

Winter SESSION 2019 Hey Tigers!

Did you know you need to average 30 credits a year to graduate in 4 years?

Tech usage awareness vital KAYLA HUNT Columnist

As the advancements of technology continue to increase, the concern over people’s relationships with technology increases as well. There are many concerns regarding how much time people are spending interacting with technology, and even going to lengths of labeling some people as addicts. According to a study conducted by King University, Americans spend

about 5 hours a day browsing on their smartphones and touch their phones about 2,617 times per day. Tech companies are joining the conversation as well and making attempts to limit the amount of time people spend with technology. In Apple’s recent update, iOS 12, they included a new feature called “screen time.” Screen Time allows iPhone users to monitor and track their phone usage and allows parents to control their children’s phone time as well. This new feature gives users the

ability to view how much time they spend on each app and allows them to set limits for them. After users set a limit, the app will lock once they reach it. Even though the lock is easy to bypass, this new feature is still useful because it allows users to be more conscious of how much time they are spending with their smartphone. Screen time also notifies users with a weekly report that breakdowns their phone usage for that week. - To read the rest of this column online, visit thetowerlight.com.

If you’re heading home for winter break, UMBC Winter Session 2019 is a great way to stay on track to graduate on time. • Take up to 4.5 credits • Choose from over 100 courses • Online, hybrid, and in-person classes are available

Visit winter.umbc.edu to get started!

JANUARY

2 – 25

CLAIM YOUR FUTURE

5


6

News

November 13, 2018

Activists talk civic engagement 2011 Nobel Peace Prize Speakers promote active community involvement ALBERT IVORY Staff Writer @Intellectu_Al

Julian Castro and Michael Benitez, Jr. came to Towson Thursday as part of the the Division of Student Affair’s semesterly Diversity Speaker Series in SECU Arena at 7 p.m. The series brings culturally relevant speakers, educators, activists, and entertainers to campus. This semester’s theme was “With Liberty and Justice For All,” and featured Castro, former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and Benitez, the Dean of Diversity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer from University of Puget Sound. Associate Vice President for Student Affairs Santiago Solis kicked the event off with opening remarks about the impact of the event. Solis extended thanks to Towson University President Kim Schatzel, Vice President of Student Affairs Deb Moriarty, and Vice President of Inclusion and Institutional Equity Leah Cox for their efforts in making the event happen. “With many events of significance happening in our country and abroad, never have our lives been so interconnected to the experience of others across the world,” Solis said. “Tonight we explore what it means to engage purposely for the shared vision of liberty and justice for all of us.” Solis introduced the student speaker for the evening, Jonathan Gallo, a senior majoring in Latin American studies and minoring in electronic media and film. Gallo is also a member of Lambda Theta Phi Latin Fraternity, Inc. and served as the president of the Latin American Student Organization (LASO). Gallo applauded his parents for their hard work in building a life as United States immigrants. “I began my experience at Towson University with a goal...a goal to graduate.” Gallo said. “But what I didn’t know was that I also had responsibilities for being a son who has to contribute to his family.” According to Gallo, Benitez has written books that discuss student identity, hip hop culture, institutional research and supporting students and faculty of color. Benitez completed his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Pennsylvania State University, and has a Ph.D in Educational Leadership and Policy from Iowa State University.

Castro became the youngest elected city council member in San Antonio history in 2001 at age 26. In 2009, he was elected mayor of San Antonio and became known as a national leader in urban communities, expanding education to the city’s low income students. He recently released a book called “An Unlikely Journey: Waking Up From My American Dream,” which is a memoir about race and poverty in America. Castro provided the first remarks by reminiscing on Apr. 16, 2014, the day he got the phone call from Obama about his interest in being the Secretary of HUD. At first, he was a little hesitant to take the position, because when he had previously thought about getting into public service, he had thought of serving as San Antonio’s mayor. “A couple of days later, I told him ‘yes’ because I thought about all the tremendous opportunity the Department of [HUD] makes possible for families that are struggling in our country,” Castro said. Castro acknowledged his grandmother and mother’s efforts in working to provide a better life for their families as immigrants. “If we learn the lessons over the generations of our country is that equality, fairness, and the expansion of opportunity just doesn’t happen overnight,” Castro said. “It happens because there is always groups of people who are determined to fight and push to expand that.” Benitez detailed his experience coming to New York from Puerto Rico, facing racism and xenophobia and Puerto Rico’s colonial history.

He recounted leaving a youth detention center for the third time at 15 years old. He witnessed the disappointment from his mother, and decided to use the moment as a drive to go into education. “It was at that time that I started to really get engaged in the community, already at age 15,” Benitez said. “When we step into spaces like academia, community and society, we don’t step in to create belonging, we step into things that [are] already ours.” He had started to see his friends being mistreated by police and teachers, spurring his desire to become engaged in his community. “Also having to confront stereotypes and prejudices that perpetuate the marginalization of oppressed communities, such as hearing ‘Where did you come from?,’ even though the Latinx community have been in the United States since the 1800s,” Benitez said. Both speakers encourage students to stay civically involved. Castro suggested making engagement fun and appealing for others. “The issues that are going on today doesn’t have to be boring,” Castro said. “You can get involved by volunteering in campaigns, making phone calls to your officials, tutor other young people and educate them on these issues.” Benitez hopes that first generation students, and all students, trust their brilliance. “Step into unfamiliar spaces and own how they look in those spaces because nobody has seen them yet,” Benitez said.

winner speaks at TU

Marcus Whitman/ The Towerlight

2011 Nobel Peace Prize Winner Leymah Gbowee talked to Towson students about her experiences as a social worker on Saturday. MARCUS WHITMAN Contributing Writer

Towson University hosted Nobel Peace Prize winner Leymah Gbowee, an international peace activist, as she talked about ways people can generate peaceful resolutions to global issues on Saturday. Gbowee won a Nobel Peace Prize in 2011 for her work in leading a women’s peace movement that ended the Second Liberian Civil War in 2003. She is also the founder and president of Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa, which provides educational and leadership positions to youth and women in West Africa. Gbowee got into her field of work when she questioned her desire to be a pediatrician. “The war was going on at that time” said Gbowee. “So I thought, ‘Do I really want to spend four years studying to become a doctor, or do I wanna do something else?’ I became very disillusioned with going to school. I saw that children were getting hurt and in need. I thought about it and decided that I wanted do social work.” Gbowee felt then that she could do more as a social worker treating trauma victims than she could as a doctor. She then went on to talk about how she feels that the means to achieve peace is not through militaristic actions, but that she wants people

to work on recognizing others as human instead. Gbowee said that a key to human rights is to recognize individuals as human beings and not anything less, and to convey to these individuals that have been treated as less than humans that they are individuals humans with rights. Seeda Williams, a freshman majoring in Psychology and English who is from Liberia, was one of the students who got to see Gbowee speak. “My advisor, Dr. Alison McCartney, had recommended that I come out tonight,” Williams said. “Since day one we have been talking about equality and social justice. So, getting to hear what Leymah had to say, about her push for social justice and equality in her work [was impactful].” Alison McCartney, a political science professor, said she feels Gbowee coming to Towson was good for students, and mentioned that a big way for students to help others is, like Gbowee said, by helping out your communities first and sharing the knowledge learned in the classroom. “I think this event provided a unique experience for students to have meaningful contact, and [to] have [connected] with someone who is achieving her goals, and achieving them at an international level,” McCartney said.

I became very disillusioned with going to school. I saw that children were getting hurt and in need. I thought about it and decided that I wanted do social work.

Brendan Felch/ The Towerlight

Michael Benitez, Jr and Julian Castro spoke about the importance of civic engagement as part of Towson’s Diversity Speaker Series.

LEYMAH GBOWEE Nobel Peace Prize Winner


News

November 13, 2018

7

Towson prepares for finals Tigers test their

Students look for ways to “Study Smarter, Not Harder” KJ HESLEN Contributing Writer

As the semester comes to a close and finals season approaches, students start to hit the books to cram in the last bit of information they need to pass their classes. Heidi Carlson, a graduate assistant in Cook Library, led an online seminar Thursday to help students learn about ways to “Study Smarter, Not Harder.” The seminar went over tips and tricks to make studying easier, including techniques like allotting time to study, making study agendas, and taking enough breaks as pieces of a successful study regimen. According to Carlson, where you study matters. “Your study area should be available to you whenever you need it,” she said. “It should be free from distractions and interruptions.” She also suggested having enough room to spread out and get organized. Taking personal comfort into consideration is important, and Carlson advised students to ensure they have enough light and a comfortable chair. Carlson said that consistency is key in making studying a regular part of a daily routine. The best way to study is going to be what works for you. “It is important to choose study

times and days when you’re likely to feel energetic,” Carlson said. According to Carlson, 60 minutes of study during the day is equivalent to around 90 minutes of studying at night. Cramming for something the night before has been proven not to work, so make the most of the daylight hours. “I try to study in small increments because cramming doesn’t really help me,” said freshman and integrated elementary and special education major Julia Roush. “I study as soon as my classes end instead of waiting until the weekend. I make a big to do list and prioritize to make sure the right stuff is completed.” Taking breaks is also important. For every 50 minutes spent studying, Carlson said, there should be a 10 minute break for getting up and walking around, getting a snack and some water and giving yourself a brain break. Carlson also described the differences between passive and active learning. Passive learning includes things such as reading, listening, observing, seeing and hearing. These are things that do not really involve the student in the learning process. Most of the time, students are learning passively; they sit in class

and are not engaged directly in the learning process. Active learning, however, includes speaking, group discussion and reciting things aloud. These methods of studying engage the brain and are scientifically proven as a better study method. Freshman and geography major Bradley Crissman, said that he tries to relate to the different concepts he learns in class to help him better learn the material. “When I think of one concept, I can connect it to something different, eventually making me remember multiple things in a kind of domino effect,” Crissman said. For more information, Carlson suggested that students use LASSI (Learning and Study Strategies Inventory), a test that can be taken to help determine students’ awareness about and use of various learning and study strategies. Carlson also recommended www. goconqr.com, which has a variety of online study tools, and www.hippocampus.org which has study tools specifically for visual learners. There are also resources available to students on campus, including the Tutoring and Learning Center, the Writing Center and the Public Communications Center.

Courtesey of Cook Library

Graduate Assistant Heidi Carlson suggested that students look for study areas on campus that have enough room to stretch out and get organized in her online seminar Thursday.

marketing skills

Marcus Whitman/ The Towerlight

Students got the opportunity to show off their buisness and marketing knowledge last Friday during the CBE Case Competitions. MARCUS WHITMAN Contributing Writer

Students got to show their knowledge of business through case competitions for supply chain management and marketing intelligence all day Friday in Stephens. Students were given case scenarios to study that were based off real world business plans written by the members of the judging panels. The Marketing Intelligence panel consisted of Steve Rosenfeld, Director of Alumni Communication & Recognition, as well as marketing professors Philippe Duverger, Hua Chang, Sarah Magnotta, and Tony Stovall. The Supply Chain Management panel was made up of Coushatta Cunningham, a Senior Demand Planner for Pandora, Americas at Pandora Demand Planners Jessica Smuck, Ana Carolina Boraschi and Lauren Rudolph. Steve Gibson, a Logistics Manager at Bottcher America Corp, Lisa Flohr, an Operations Manager at Nexterus, INC, Annette Danek-Akey, a Senior Vice President in Supply Chain and Alyssa Oles, Vice President Fulfilment Operations and IT at Penguin Random House, were also in attendance. Rosenfeld wrote the marketing intelligence case scenario, and three teams of students had to create a marketing strategy for how they would get alumni to join the social network Towson University Tiger Connect. Rosenfeld said some judges, including himself, were expecting the contestants to use the knowledge and understanding of social media and networking sites to solve the real-world problems. “I was looking for creativity, and outside the box thinking, and what all is a common problem,” said Rosenfeld. Cunningham explained that Tobin Porterfield, Chair of the EBTM department, gave her and the other judges a

grading sheet with contestant evaluation criteria. Judges were looking for components such as preparedness, explanation, teamwork and material comprehension. “Another thing is what is the extra steps the teams are taking to stand and show they understand the material,” Cunningham said. “Example from last year, I was on the judge’s panel then as well as, and for the supply chain the topic was the holiday gift sets and two of the teams took the time and went to a store in mall to look at it in person, as well as take pictures, measurements and even asked the store questions and included it in their presentation.” Students on the supply chain management side were also partnered with Towson Alumni, who acted as mentors for the teams. One such alumni was Marcus Wiles, class of 2015, who found the students’ intelligence fascinating. “A lot of times when we are in the industry, we like to think we have all the answers,” Wiles said. “So it really fascinates to see how creative the students are, and intelligent and smart they are. As well as how they come up with these solutions.” Wiles also expressed interest in continuing the peer mentor relationship with the students, as well as expressing that students could also teach him new things as well. Daniel Andrews, an accounting major who participated in the Supply Chain Management side, was part of team Lifo and felt that competing might open doors for him. “ I felt it would [be] interesting to have a practical application of everything I have so far,” Andrews said. “As well having something to add to my resume, and get to meet and speak with individuals from the professional world, as well as learn from professionals at Pandora.”


10 November 13, 2018

Arts & Life

Towson senior crowned Miss Maryland USA 2019 KERRY INGRAM Arts & Life Editor @Glaminista08

Mid-semester can mean balancing schoolwork and other responsibilities for any college student, but for Mariela Pepin, she had a separate calling that filled up her schedule. Passing by fellow students wearing their notebook-filled backpacks to class, Pepin wore the title of “Miss Maryland USA” engraved across her newly acquired sash. “I still am in disbelief,” Pepin said. “It’s all still such a blur.” Just a month ago, Pepin was in major preparation mode. The 22-year-old Towson communications major was in the midst of studies for her final semester, while also getting ready to compete in the annual Miss Maryland USA pageant for the 2019 title. Between classes and studying, Pepin trained regularly in the gym, practiced her poise and posture, and looked for ways to make herself just as emotionally well-rounded. Towson University President Kim Schatzel applauded Pepin’s accomplishment. “When we have students that aspire and have ambitions that they fulfill or [that] they advance, we just want to celebrate the fact that

they’re part of our community and the fact that our community supported them as they were moving in that direction,” Schatzel said. Marina Cooper, Vice President for University Marketing and Communications at TU, also shared Schatzel’s excitement towards Pepin’s accomplished role. Cooper once held the title of Miss Maryland USA, and went on to compete in the Miss USA pageant. “It’s always exciting for us to see our TU students set an ambitious goal, put in the hard work necessary, and then achieve it,” Cooper said. “That’s what I did, a long time ago. I wanted to pay for college and to be the first Marylander to compete at both Miss America and Miss USA. I did it and earned a spot as a finalist in both national competitions, which allowed me to graduate college debt-free.” Cooper expressed how juggling school studies with pageantry responsibilities was a feat to be proud of. Pepin agreed. “Pageants are definitely a lot of work,” Pepin said. “I had to learn how to walk properly, how to pose the right way with the right angles and narrow down what looks best for me and my body type...There’s a lot of physical prep involved, but the biggest thing is definitely the mental preparation that goes

into it.” Pepin stressed how although pageants involved physical-based categories, the core importance of them is based off of internal attributes. Pepin held level headedness and charity near to her, and her honest tone and authentic background only helped to further make her point. Pepin, who was born in Puerto Rico before moving to Maryland, didn’t originally have plans to compete in pageants. Growing up in a home with parents who nurtured the idea of giving back to the community, Pepin was more interested in finding ways to make a meaningful impact on those around her while helping to promote acceptance and diversity. She began to volunteer for Best Buddies, an international nonprofit dedicated to providing opportunities for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well as Happy Helpers for the Homeless, a group that gives back to individuals struck with poverty. Pepin discovered her passion for public speaking in high school, where she was approached by Bobbi Coffman, who introduced her to the idea of pageants. “Bobbi actually worked at my high school cafeteria,” Pepin said. “She was the head chaperon there

Brendan Felch/ The Towerlight

Pepin is currently finishing up her undergraduate studies as a communication studies major at Towson. She plans to take a year off to travel before going to school to obtain a master’s degree.

Brendan Felch/ The Towerlight

Pepin is one of six to have ever served both the title of Miss Maryland Teen USA and Miss Maryland USA in the state’s history.

at the time and had asked me if I’d be interested in competing.” After contemplating the offer for a while, Pepin finally agreed to try her hand at pageantry life. “She became my coach from that point on and helped me to prepare,” Pepin said. “I’ve been glad I did it ever since.” Coffman helped Pepin train for her first pageant, Miss Maryland Teen USA in 2014, which she went on to win. Pepin has only competed in four pageants total, with her latest being the Miss Maryland USA 2019 pageant that she won the title of. According to the Miss Maryland USA official website, Pepin’s recent win made her one of six women to ever have held both the Miss Maryland Teen USA and Miss Maryland USA titles. Pepin created Fearless for Life, an initiative to promote confidence and positivity no matter what obstacles life throws. She promotes her Fearless for Life messages through social posts and at public speaking engagements throughout the year. Pepin said she hopes to con-

tinue increasing the size of the impact she makes on those around her. She recently served on a mission trip to Puerto Rico, where she worked to help those still trying to rebuild their homes and lives after last year’s Hurricane Maria. With her graduating in December, she expressed how she also wanted to continue her schooling for a Master’s degree in nonprofit communications. With that degree, she hopes to get a career in marketing or public relations for an international charitable organization. “My major has helped me to realize how much I love communications, and how I can incorporate that into pageant life,” Pepin said. “I really enjoy seeing the other side of pageantry, with organizing and putting together the entire productions. The team in Maryland is really great and they communicate really well. I wouldn’t mind directing the [Miss USA Maryland] pageant one day.” With Pepin temporarily replacing her crown for a graduation cap come December, she’s determined to have her poise and positivity reflect onto the Towson community.


Arts & Life

e d e o r

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11

TU takes trip to Transylvania with Rocky Horror SUZANNE STULLER Staff Writer

The audiences in Paws on the nights of Nov. 9 and 10 screamed as they watched Dr. Frank-N-Furter strut across the stage and caress Rocky’s body. The same scene had unfolded on Paws’ stage many times before, but this time was different. With more energy and unapologetic confidence showcased than ever before, Actors Anonymous’ 2018 rendition of The Rocky Horror Picture Show gave the traditional performance a sense of newness. Actors Anonymous, a student-run acting group at Towson, produces musicals, plays and other theatrical events each semester. The Rocky Horror Picture show is traditionally held every other year. “This show has been going on way before I was even a club member,” said Molly Mendelson, president of Actors Anonymous. “It’s really about finding yourself and being comfortable in your own skin. You get a feeling like you belong even in places where maybe you wouldn’t normally feel like you belong. We get a lot of freshman with our fall

shows, so I think that’s such an important message when you’re starting out in college to have that sense of belonging.” Jacob Sanchez, a sophomore at Towson University, played the role Dr. Frank-N-Furter, a mad, alien scientist from the planet Transsexual. Sanchez walked the stage in a dazzling scarf, corset, fishnets, and heels, that seemed to awe the audience. “Doing this as a man is even more uncomfortable,” Sanchez said. “I was fortunate that my cast was extremely supportive and made me feel comfortable in the lingerie and heels. But now I’m not afraid to go out on stage wearing nothing but some lace. It felt empowering.” Towson student Miriam Bregman, who attended the show Friday night, agreed that Sanchez’s role seemed liberating. “The guy who played Dr. Frank was incredible, and his confidence was through the roof,” Bregman said. “I can’t even walk in heels like that.” Sanchez is an acting major at Towson and has been a part of Actors Anonymous for two years. He was influenced by his best friend during fresh-

man year at TU, who told Sanchez the club was a great way to get his name out there. After Sanchez saw “The Rocky Horror Show” film, he knew he wanted to be Dr. Frank-N-Furter. “The Rocky Horror picture show was so hated by audiences,” Sanchez said. “Now it has a cult following with certain call-outs and things to shout at the actors; it’s an amazingly unique show. I’m so glad that we were able to put on this production.” Kasie Lerner, a senior at Towson, had the opportunity to play Janet Weiss, a virgin who is recently engaged to her lover, Brad. After entering a spooky mansion, she is seduced for the first time by Dr. Frank-N-Furter, increasing her desire for sex and longing for the scientist’s hot invention, Rocky. Throughout the show, Rocky continues to tempt her into sex. “I definitely hit a point in the rehearsal process where I didn’t feel ‘sexy’ enough to do this show,” Lerner said. “It was really hard for me to take myself seriously. But this show almost forces you to accept yourself as you are and realize that everyone looks good in lingerie and dramatic eyeshadow. There is

just a lot of body positivity that runs in the show and with our cast.” Carly Hufford, a junior at Towson, spoke on her enjoyment towards the show Friday night. “My roommate encouraged me to see this show,” Hufford said. “And I thought, ‘Why not? It seems like a fun thing to do on a Friday night.’ This is so much better than the film. I really like sitting up close so you can see the actors run by and get a good look at

Courtesy of Actors Anonymous

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their costumes.” Actors Anonymous encourages any TU students with a love for acting or theatre to join the club, regardless of their major. “Actors Anonymous is the best way to establish a family in college,” Lerner said. “The members of this club are so supportive and accepting and truly love each other.” - To read the rest of this article online, visit thetowerlight.com.

Actors Anonymous’ 2018 cast of Rocky Horror prepared for their TU performances with a preview for Carroll County Arts Council.

HEY TIGERS! Earn your stripes and some extra credits.

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November 13, 2018

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Arts & Life

November 13, 2018

12

Baking 101: how to make your makeup last all day KERRY INGRAM Arts & Life Editor @Glaminista08

Attention all Martha Stewarts, Rachael Rays and Julia Childs: there’s a new chef in town and she’s coming for your baking skills in a new way. The art of baking, as most people know it, includes cooking food by dry heat, creating delicious and mouth-watering concoxions for all to indulge in and enjoy. However, the art of baking as those within the beauty community know it is a bit different. “Baking” your makeup is a technique used to prolong the wear of your cosmetics while also helping to create a mattified and airbrushed finish to your face. It involves packing on a generous amount of loose setting powder to the highpoints of your face, allowing it to sit for a

while to help the skin warm up the makeup. The powder is later dusted off and your face is left looking like a real-life version of a reconstructed selfie on the Facetune app. Or at least, that’s how you’re supposed to look afterwards. The technique originally began in the drag community, as an effort to help solidify the makeup applied to male faces and help create a more realistic allusion of them in the female form. Makeup artists eventually followed suit, with the technique becoming even more popularized as they used it on models who had oilier t-zones. However, it wasn’t until YouTube picked up that it became as big as it is today, with “beauty gurus” using the technique to mattify their oily skin and glamorously “beat” their faces. The only problem with baking is that for as many tutorials that exist which feature this technique, barely

any make the effort to point out how baking affects those of us who don’t have oily skin. Because people with dry skin still want their makeup to last long too, ya know? I use to hate baking with a passion, for the sole fact that my skin is more normal-to-dry. If I even dared to try to follow the techniques used by most, my skin would end up looking like the Sahara. I would try to bake my concealer beneath my eyes, and would end up looking like Betty Crocker and her crew literally baked my skin. After much trial and error, however, I finally figured out the trick to baking dry skin successfully, and it’s not as hard as it once seemed. It’s all about using the right products for your skin type and texture. And so behold: the magic of baking your makeup, no matter your skin type (and all without resulting

in a cake-face). Step 1: Hydrate Make sure your skin is toned, moisturized, and prepped for the makeup application. Step 2: Prime Apply a hydrating primer all over the face. My favorite is Too Faced’s Hangover RX Primer. Step 3: Apply a Hydrating Foundation/Concealer Go about your face-makeup as you normally would. Here, I’m just applying concealer beneath my eyes (I refuse to wear foundation; sue me) and in any problem areas to brighten and even the complexion. I like the Too Faced Sculpting Concealer, which is made to hydrate the skin while providing full-coverage. Once you have your makeup wear your want it, make sure to blend. Step 4: Apply Hydrating Powder with Damp Sponge

This step sounds weird but hear me out. A lot of brands have been creating setting powders with chemical compositions that allow them to hydrate the skin even though they’re dry. That’s the beauty of science people. The powder I love for dry skin is Becca’s Hydra-Mist Powder, which literally feels wet once applied to the skin. Using a damp sponge, start packing it on over top of the places you applied your concealer (or on the highpoints of the face, like your cheekbones and T-zone, if you applied foundation). Step 5: Wait Let the powder sit on your skin for two to three minutes. Step 6: Dust Yourself Off Use a compact brush to dust off the excess powder. Step 7: Finish off your makeup as per usual and get ready to floss on all your haters.


Puzzles Puzzles

November13, 13,2018 2018 November

Crossword Sudoku

? ?

See page 14 for answers to this week’s

Puzzles

?

Which one is safe? FACT, DID YOU KNOW:

For more information on smoking and how to quit visit towson.edu/chp/center/atodcenter

There are no safe methods Nicotine is highly addictive no matter how you ingest it. Cigars, cigarettes & e-cigs contain carcinogens E-cigs may increase your risk of a heart attack

13 13


14 November 13, 2018

Towerlight

Sports

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tu closes cross country The Tigers prepare to transition to indoor track and field

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The Tigers compete in the NCAA Mid-Atlantic Regional Cross Country Meet Friday at University Park, Pennsylvania at noon. Towson placed 21st out of 30 teams, marking an improvement from last season.

MUHAMMAD WAHEED Assistant Sports Editor @MuhammadKWaheed

Junior Erica Israel led the Tigers as they placed 21st out of 30 teams at the NCAA Mid-Atlantic Regional Friday at University Park, Pennsylvania. Israel came in 79th timing 22:48, marking an improvement of 14 spots from last year. “She ran hard,” said Head Coach Mike Jackson. “She ran tough and finished strong at the end passing probably 10 to 15 athletes around the last 400 meters. She gave everything. She really put it all out on the line. Very proud of her performance and

efforts.” Freshman Olivia Janke placed 86th, timing 22:54 and was the second Towson athlete to cross the finish line. “She’s a person that we consider will be all-region in the future and someone who may have a chance to go to nationals,” Jackson said. “She’s just scratching the surface and she’s a name we’ll be talking about for the next four years.” Towson’s overall ranking in this event improved from last year as the team placed 24th in 2017. “It was most definitely encouraging from our conference championship,” Jackson said. “We talked about trying to set the tone and the purpose and it definitely showed today. They

ran very tough, so I was very happy with a lot of what happened.” Rainy weather conditions might have made running challenging, but Jackson contended that it tested the awareness of the competitors. “I don’t think it was too much,” Jackson said. “Honestly, it probably created more focus. Sometimes you think about the elements and you just focus on your job and run for your team. I think they handled it well and got ready to compete and gave their all and really focused on finishing strong at the highest level.” Towson will now transition into the indoor track and field season with the first competition being the Navy Lid Lifter held on Saturday, Dec. 1 in Annapolis, Maryland.

[Erica] ran tough and finished strong at the end, passing probably 10 to 15 athletes around the last 400 meters. She gave everything. She really put it all out on the line. Very proud of her performance and her efforts. MIKE JACKSON Head Coach


Sports

November 13, 2018

15

USTORE Baltimore is 4-5 this year, third in AFC North standings

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK Tom Flacco Football

Redshirt junior quarterback Tom Flacco recorded 326 yards and three touchdowns through the air in No. 15 Towson’s 41-10 upset win over No. 5 Elon Saturday afternoon at Rhodes Stadium.

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Courtesy of baltimoreravens.com

Quarterback Joe Flacco turns upfield against the Carolina Panthers. Flacco threw two interceptions in Baltimore’s 36-21 loss against Carolina on Sunday, Oct. 28. He also failed to surpass 200 passing yards.

TIMOTHY KLAPAC Columnist @pacofkla

There were very few words, but expressions aplenty among the purple and black-clad fans at The Greene Turtle Sports Bar and Grill in Hunt Valley as the clock slowly ticked down to zero in the Baltimore Ravens loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers on Nov. 4. Faces were buried in palms. Many couldn’t decide what to do with their hands while others simply stared into their phones, hoping to find an escape from Baltimore’s three-game losing streak that dropped the team to a 4-5 record heading into the bye week. Most of the criticism has been directed toward the play of quarterback Joe Flacco, who has averaged 234.7 passing yards per game over the last three games, less than 60 yards per game than his average through the first six games. Calls for backup quarterback.

Lamar Jackson to be named the sistent performances this season. new starter have General managgrown louder since er Ozzie Newsome, reports of Flacco’s who has been in injured hip may The instability in the Baltimore since the lead him to miss team’s arrival in organization has the team’s week 11 1996, announced been the catalyst this would be his last game against the Cincinnati Bengals. for the inconsistent season. Head Coach The Ravens John Harbaugh has performances this had questions surdefense has also season. contributed to this rounding his job TIMOTHY KLAPAC security, losing streak. despite Columnist After recording a receiving a contract franchise-record 11 extension last year. sacks in the week six victory over Flacco is in the final year of his Tennessee, the Ravens defense has contract, which has been criticized recorded two sacks and forced one since he signed it after the 2012 turnover in the last three games. season. The defense is the foundation of Without a clear future laid out this team, allowing 7.8 points per for the front office, coaching staff game in their four wins, but 25.8 and players, it’s hard for fans to feel points per game in their five losses. confident in their team’s chances to Despite the offensive and defenend the longest playoff drought in sive struggles, the problem with the franchise history. Ravens goes much higher up the With four of their final seven ladder than that. games against teams with a .500 or The instability in the organization better record, the outlook is bleak has been the catalyst for the inconfor Baltimore.

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Sports

November 13, 2018

16

Towson hands Elon huge upset Alexis Brown/ The Towerlight

Redshirt junior quarterback Tom Flacco hands the ball to junior running back Yeedee Thaenrat. Flacco posted 326 passing yards and three touchdowns in No. 15 Towson’s 41-10 win over No. 5 Elon Saturday afternoon. Towson closes the season hosting senior day against James Madison Saturday at Johnny Unitas Stadium. Kickoff is scheduled for noon.

JORDAN KENDALL Assistant Sports Editor @jordankendall54

The No. 20 ranked Tigers rebounded from back to back losses with a 41-10 upset win over No. 5 Elon Saturday afternoon at Rhodes Stadium. This marks the most lopsided Colonial Athletic Association (CAA) win for the Tigers (7-3, 5-2 CAA) this season, giving them their third victory against a top 25 opponent. “I'm very proud of this team,” said Head Coach Rob Ambrose. “They had to suffer through weeks of many people telling them that they weren't any good because they lost to two nationally ranked football teams by one score each. The way they rallied as a family, playing six seconds of football as hard

as they could, it is impossible of me to be more proud of them." Elon (6-3, 4-2 CAA) lost its starting quarterback last week, but its reserves stepped up in his absence. “They lost some really talented players, but adjusted their offense and are still effective,” Ambrose said. “They are running the ball extremely well.” After some early offensive struggles by both teams, the Tigers put together their first positive drive midway through the first quarter. Redshirt junior quarterback Tom Flacco completed an 18-yard pass to sophomore wide receiver Jabari Allen and two passes for 32 yards to redshirt junior wide receiver Brent Richardson to put Towson in scoring position. Flacco capped off the drive with a nine-yard touchdown pass to redshirt

sophomore tight end Chris Clark to give Towson an early 7-0 lead. The Tigers refused to relinquish their lead for the rest of the game. The Phoenix notched a 21-yard field goal early in the second quarter, and junior defensive back Greg Liggs Jr. picked off a Flacco pass on the ensuing drive to regain possession for Elon. “He’s understanding the offense versus defense so much more that he’s taking step three before step one and puts us in bad situations,” Ambrose said. Elon failed to capitalize on the turnover. The Tigers marched down the field on their next drive with two passes to Allen for 50 yards, setting up a 16-yard touchdown to redshirt junior wide receiver Shane Leatherbury. Towson held the Phoenix scoreless for the remainder of the half and took a

14-3 lead into intermission. The Tigers ran the ball heavily to open the second half as redshirt junior running back Shane Simpson toted three consecutive carries. Flacco scrambled for 21 yards to put Towson in Elon’s territory. Liggs recorded his second interception of the game to halt the drive, but a roughing the passer penalty resulted in the visitors maintaining possession. Flacco took advantage of the penalty, connecting with Leatherbury for a nineyard score to put his team ahead 21-3. The Phoenix finally found the end zone late in the third quarter as sophomore quarterback Jalen Greene rushed for a 17-yard touchdown to cut Towson’s lead to 21-10. Redshirt senior defensive lineman Grant Udinski recorded a strip sack, and

redshirt junior linebacker Keon Paye recovered the ball to set up junior kicker Aidan O’Neill for a 45-yard field goal. The Tigers leaned on sophomore running back Kobe Young and junior running back Yeedee Thaenrat midway through the fourth quarter as they rushed a combined seven times over that period. Thaenrat found the end zone on a three-yard scamper to give Towson a 34-10 lead. Senior linebacker Chris Tedder recovered the ball on the ensuing kickoff, and Young scored on the next play to seal the upset for the Tigers. The Tigers look to keep up their strong play as the team hosts James Madison on senior day at Johnny Unitas Stadium Saturday afternoon. Kickoff against James Madison is scheduled for 2 p.m.

Profile for The Towerlight

The Towerlight (November 13, 2018)  

INSIDE: TU senior Mariela Pepin was crowned Miss Maryland USA for 2019 (pg. 19), 2011 Nobel Peace Prize winner speaks at TU (pg. 6), Towson...

The Towerlight (November 13, 2018)  

INSIDE: TU senior Mariela Pepin was crowned Miss Maryland USA for 2019 (pg. 19), 2011 Nobel Peace Prize winner speaks at TU (pg. 6), Towson...

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