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Ophiuchus Snakes its Way into the Sky P. 3

The Pleasures of Winter Learning P. 8

J. Jones: Kean’s Humble Star P. 10

The Tower Kean University’s student newspaper

www.keantower.com

Volume 11 • Issue 5 Feb. 10, 2011 - Mar. 2, 2011

First 2 Years of College a Waste?

Photo: Gabrielle Matarazzo

By Stephanie Musat

The Politician Among Us Jason Cilento, at first glance, may seem like your average political science student. He’s young, persistent, and embodies a love of the political changes in his own town. But for Cilento, it’s more than a passion—it’s his job. Last year, Cilento was elected to the position as a councilman for his hometown, Dunellen, New Jersey. “In college, I’ve learned how to go out and get things done,” he said. Cilento won the 2010 General Election to better the town he loves, and is working to improve the everyday life of the people. Raised near a maternal grandfather,

who moved his family to Dunellen from Newark in 1963 with hope of a better life, Cilento was inspired to be a part of the governing body, and got Jason Cilento his political start in 2009, when he first tried to run for town council. “[The same people] were always running unopposed—I figured, let’s give the people a choice,” he said. Though his name didn’t make it on the ballot, he received (Continued on page 9)

Photo: www.jasoncilento.org

By Rachel Rothspan and Brett Williams

Follow us on Twitter @KeanTower

Brendan O’Connell can remember what classes he took three years ago when he was a freshman, but that’s about it. Ask him a question from his first-year math class, and his mind goes blank. But he does remember making the final three cups in his fourth game of beer pong, bringing his team into overtime and eventually winning the game. “Classes were important, but it was my first year,” said O’Connell, a political science major. “I wanted to make friends and go out and have fun.” O’Connell isn’t alone. According to a study released Jan. 19, 45 percent of sophomores see no major improvements in critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing since high school. Thirty-six percent of seniors see no significant improvement in the same areas. The study, conducted by New York University sociologist Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa, a professor of sociology at the University of Virginia, polled 2,300 undergraduate students with an average 3.2 GPA using a standardized test to analyze critical thinking. Results found that students do not spend enough time studying, professors focus on research more than students, and classes are not academically demanding enough for a collegiate setting. Fifty percent of the time during sophomore year is spent socializing; the number increases if a student is involved in Greek life. According to the study, 12 to 14 hours is spent a week for independent studying, which is less than 50 percent compared to students “a few decades ago.” “I sometimes think about how much I

should have learned and just didn’t,” said Jennifer Campbell, a sophomore majoring in math. “I focused more on extracurriculars than classes. I probably could have gotten a lot more out of classes but I just wasn’t pushed to my potential.” The study, Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses, found that students just aren’t asked to do much.

“College is fun, don’t get me wrong. But it’s not all about academics.” Half of all students involved did not take a single course requiring 20 pages of writing during their prior semester, and onethird did not take a single course requiring even 40 pages of reading per week. Joe Roman, a senior majoring in education, said most of his sophomore year courses did not take more than an hour a week of work. Education, along with students majoring in business and social work, retained the least amount of information. “It was really repetitive for me,” he said. “A lot of information overlapped from other classes and what I learned in high school. College is fun, don’t get me wrong. But it’s not all about academics.” Two classes Roman took his freshman year consisted of more than 60 students; therefore, the professors did not develop a relationship with the students. With such large class sizes, students can’t be challenged the same way as a smaller class. Dr. Fred Fitch, a communication professor at Kean University, (Continued on page 9)

THE TOWER‘S FASHION COLUMNIST REPORTS FROM ENGLAND - PAGE 7

Professor Rating: In the Eyes of the Beholder By Andrea Edwards

The internet has brought with it, a mixed bag of good, bad, and indifferent feelings. Since the online world consists of such a diverse community, there seems to be a website for just about anything imaginable. However, some sites are so controversial that one can’t help but question their relevance. Over the past 12 years, the internet has served as a vehicle for students across the U.S. to grade their professors on a number of websites. Touted as “the sites professors like to hate,” these performance evaluation websites often serve as an electronic review of instructors. At Kean University, opinions on such websites are quite diverse among students.

Some students, such as freshman Asheia Mikell, confess to not putting much stock into such sites. “I think it’s good that a teacher can know what to advance or improve on,” said Mikell. “It can only be useful if professors use it as a valuable tool.” Freshman Emy Samad, a new user of RateMyProfessor.com, believes the site is accurate. “I actually just started using it this semester and I’m trying to switch out of a class based on the comments and of what I’ve seen in class,” Samad said. She also added that although no two students may perceive the same professor in the same way, she has left comments for professors she believed to be good. Critics question the validity of such

ratings, citing that, unlike formal evaluations, there is no representative sample of students.

“It can be useful if professors use it as a valuable tool.” “I pay no attention to RateMyProfessor.com. If they developed a better way to evaluate professors, one with a scale based on measurable standards, it may be of more use,” Donald Lokuta, a Kean professor in the Department of Design said. There are also no efforts made to ensure that student ratings are based on courses that they’ve actually taken. Some suggest

Can You Hear Me Now? The Battle

2

Arts & Entertainment

Pizza: Who Owns the Slice?

4

Op-Ed: The Pleasures of Winter Learning

Baby Food for the Adult Set

5

Achieving Good Health in 2011

the only way to obtain a good rating is to be “hot” or be an easy grader. However, two University of Maine professors, Theodore Coladarci and Irv Kornfield, conducted a study comparing the popular rating site RateMyProfessors. com (RMP) and the formal evaluation (SET) that U.S. universities continue to use. What they found was a strong link between SET evaluation and the overall quality of the course. “The few RMP items on which the students rate instructors typically pale in comparison to the many items and underlying dimensions found on SET forms,” Coladarci and Kornfield said in their published report. Both agreed that when it came to a true representation (Continued on page 8)

Player & Coach Profiles

10

8

Campus Sports

11

9

Giants & Jets: An “I” for Improvement

12

6-7


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Feb. 10, 2011 - Mar. 2, 2011 |

The Tower

Kean Creates Leaders with New Programs By Laura Urban

There’s few better ways to start off the year than by giving back to the community. This spring, Kean is implementing Leadership 2011 and the Leadership Challenge, two programs offered by the Center for Leadership and Service that will lead students on the path to helping others. “By participating in one of our leadership programs, students gain the unique opportunity to meet other students who share in their passion to lead and improve their organizations or communities,” Scott K. Snowden, assistant director for Student Life and Media Services at Kean said. Each participant will provide a unique perspective that will contribute to the overall experience of the programs. “We find that many of the students who participate in the program have a desire to improve and become better equipped to improve their organizations or communities,” Snowden said. Leadership 2011 will engage participants in a series of workshop lectures, discussions, activities, and games,

which are geared to develop the organizational leader. “The activities and exercises have a concentration on collaboration and identifying a common purpose,” Snowden said. “It will challenge its students to expand their minds and understanding of how they view leadership.” Leadership 2011 will also allow “the student leaders to work together to plan, propose, implement, and participate in a community service project demonstrating their skills and abilities,” the Center for Leadership and Service said on Kean’s website. “For the Leadership 2010 program, each group was asked to meet, brainstorm, plan, and propose a community service project that would bring about a positive social change in their local community,” Snowden said. “Each group then presented their project to a panel of University faculty and staff.” Participants were given two weeks to prepare their proposals before presenting them to a panel. As leaders in their communities and careers, they would have to present their proposals to a board for ap-

proval; therefore, the assignment showed them what would be expected of them. “The process went great, but there were concerns about the students not having

Photo: Center for Leadership and Service

Leadership Program 2010 closing dinner.

enough time to meet and brainstorm,” Snowden said. “These concerns have been addressed for the Leadership 2011 program based on the feedback provided during the program’s assessment.” The programs have been developed to help students entering today’s workplace. “For a student to be successful and lead others, they must understand themselves and know what their values are,” Snowden said. “Through interactive activities within the program, we are able to help students identify what their values are and make them conscience to their commitment to those values.”

Leadership 2011 has been developed to compliment the values of the Social Change of Leadership model which include collaboration, common purpose, and controversy with civility, according to the Center for Leadership and Service section on Kean’s website. “After a survey of Kean University’s student leaders was conducted in April and May of 2010, we have learned that Kean students have the most challenging time with collaboration and controversy with civility,” Snowden said. Although the application deadline has passed, approximately 25 positions will be available for the Leadership 2011 program, Snowden said. A third program is also being created that will focus on societal and community issues and complete the curriculum of the Social Change Model. “The Center for Leadership and Service has also been working on developing leadership training programs that are geared toward student group leaders,” Snowden said. “This fall approximately 52 leadership training workshops were offered for student group leaders through the Leadership Workshop Series.”

GSM vs CDMA: The Battle for Better Service Continues College students need a few things to help them keep their sanity throughout the semester: close friends, weekend relaxation, and, of course, a cellphone. These little devices have changed the way we communicate with one another. Today, cell phones are more like multimedia devices. They allow people to talk, search the web, text and maintain our Web-based social networks all at the same time. However, some phones are better at multitasking than other cellphones. It has to do with how the data is converted into the radio waves that your cellphone sends and receives. There are two types of carrier waves a cell phone can use: GSM [Global System for Mobile Communications] and CDMA [Code Division Multiple Access]. So, what’s the big difference? Cell phones that use GSM allow calls

to be made at the same time, whereas phones using CDMA take calls one right after another which can cause a network back-up. Consequently without GSM, CDMA phones have limited 3G capabili-

Photo: ID-Wireless.com

By Andrew Czirjak

T-Mobile Phone.

ties. For example, a cell phone that uses CDMA cannot simultaneously make a call and look at something else that requires network access. If you’re unsure which carrier signals

your cell phone uses, there is an easy way to find out; is the SIM card in the cell phone removable? Usually, many GSM phones permit the owner to remove the SIM card; for example, a BlackBerry. This allows any information that is on the card the ability to be transferred to a new cell phone.

“Trying to make a phone call from overseas was a nightmare with my cell.” However, CDMA phones are trapped to one network; for example, an iPhone. Consequently, CDMA phones are contracted to a network that stores information directly to the phone itself. This basically prevents the user from switching cell phones without getting permission from the old carrier to the new carriers.

Now, this hardly sounds like a major problem for the everyday cell phone user. However, knowing your carrier can be beneficial when traveling abroad. First, CDMA-only phones from companies such as Verizon or Sprint are only able to roam on other CDMA networks. This makes the phone harder to perform optimally when in another country. Unlike CDMAs, cell phones that use GSM are able to access/roam other networks. For people that like to travel, that means less time waiting for cell access and more time for sightseeing. “Trying to make a phone call from overseas was a nightmare with my cell,” said Diane Toro, an education major. “Last year when I was in Spain, every time I tried to use my cell I had to wait for a signal. Not only was it time consuming it was also frustrating.”

Crowd Draws For Haiti: One Year Later By Jaclyn Tuman

More than $15,000 and twelve pallets of medical supplies were collected, and over 700 lives were saved through blood donations by the Human Rights Center, Haitian Student Organization, and students from the campus.  Although these efforts have helped tremendously in bettering the lives of the Haitian people, the Executive Director of NJ for Haiti, Stan Neron, discussed during “Haiti: One Year Later,” an event hosted on Jan. 20 in Kean University’s Little Theatre, that so much more needs to be done. When those in attendance entered the theatre, Michael Jackson’s “We are the World” played over a slideshow that showcased the aid that the Kean community provided the victims throughout the past year, as well as highlighting upcoming support for Haiti.  “There was nothing short of immediate, dramatic and compassionate response when Kean heard about Haiti,” said

Beverly Nash, a spokeswoman involved in the event. Neron has been to Haiti three times, worked in 10 cities with at least 10,000 people, and was happy to report that most supplies donated made it to the people

Photo: Jaclyn Tuman

Event flyer from “Haiti: One Year Later.”

in need, while some had to be used to fund shipping costs. “If you stay there long enough it is easy to see that the spirit of strength, hope, and determination is in the air,” said Neron. Although relief was felt after the earthquake, simple luxuries such as proper sanitation, sufficient supplies of water,

proper hygiene, and personal safety are still among the major hardships that the Haitian people have to battle with every day. Their housing situations are extremely cramped and the medical conditions are horrific at times, Neron mentioned. NJ for Haiti, a collection of groups and individuals in NJ dedicated to providing relief and assistance to Haiti, has been working with the Haitian government in trying to create more fertile land for farming by developing villages that have water purification. “There is a lot more damage to Haiti than the ruble,” Neron said. “Many people do not know that it is even an island, full of beautiful areas, and with the proper teaching and treatment, can be a pleasant place to live again for all those that have lost.” Sharing his first hand experiences, Erik Parker, another speaker, a Kean alumni, and journalist, explained some of the travesties still going on since the day the earthquake happened and even before. Parker

discussed some of the hardships that have been happening in Haiti for quite some time and shared his own experiences. He wanted to pay tribute to the true heroes in Haiti, not shown in the media. The full video can be found on Vibe. com and is titled Haiti One Year Later: Rescue Regrets. “I don’t think it’s a big conspiracy that many known people, like Sean Penn, had cameras on them when helping children out during the Haiti earthquake,” said Parker. “I think that should always be shown, but you never see the Haitians doing the relief work that is done every day.” If interested in efforts to help Haiti, go to nj4haiti.org. People’s Organization for Progress is working on “Operation Saving Lives” and “Oral Rehydration Salt Program,” which goes hand in hand with helping purify the water in Haiti. If interested, contact People’s Organization for Progress, phone number (908) 576-5089.


The Tower | Feb. 10, 2011 - Mar. 2, 2011

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Kean’s Nursing Program Sees a Hopeful Future By Arkor Kolubah

Kean University’s nursing program continues to expand through its partnerships with five community colleges: Ocean County College, Raritan Valley Community College, Muhlenberg/Snyder School of Nursing, Middlesex Community College, and Bergen Community College. The partnerships will accommodate students who already hold their NJ registered nursing license and provide them with an affordable education—in comparison to private and for profit institutions —at a location relative to where they live and work, according to Dr. Minnie Campbell, the executive director of the School of Nursing. The first partnerships with Raritan Valley and Ocean County began in 2004; the most recent partnership with Bergen Community College was announced in the Dec. 14 issue of The Record, a northern NJ newspaper. Staff writer, Patricia Alex, reported that as a result of the partnership, “students

who hold an associate degree in nursing from Bergen will be able to enroll in the Kean University partnership as long as they maintain at least a 2.0 GPA and already hold their State of New Jersey registered nursing license.”

“The students have the opportunity to attend one of the best nursing programs in the state and to improve their career opportunities by advancing their education.” While the requirements for each of the partnerships may differ, they all share the same vision. “The students have the opportunity to attend one of the best nursing programs in the state and to improve their career

opportunities by advancing their education,” Campbell stated. She further noted that the program will also be beneficial to hospitals in that they would gain well trained nurses. The university will benefit as well by fulfilling part of its mission of providing affordable education to NJ residents and by “earning greater visibility,” as Campbell described. “According to the office of Institutional Research, there are currently 318 undergraduates and 102 graduate students for an overall total of 420 [students in the nursing program],” said Campbell. “However, that number does not account for students enrolled in the pre-licensure programs at RVCC and Kean Ocean. So the actual number is probably closer to 450-470.” Although the partnership program faced some problems at the beginning due to a shortage of nurses in NJ, as well as conflicting administration plans for the University, there has been an 86 percent increase in enrollment since 2005. However, the success of the partner-

ship program will be best examined in hindsight. “As with any new program, the determination of whether it is worthwhile will be made by reviewing the outcomes,” Campbell said. Nevertheless, it may be safe to project positive outcomes for the 30-year-old institution which has grown steadily since 2008 when the nursing department was designated as the School of Nursing. The School of Nursing has come a long way from 30 years ago when it only offered a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. Along with a graduate program that offers a MSN, the School of Nursing now offers a BSN, a post-baccalaureate certificate and five graduate options leading to either an MSN or MSN/MPA degree. Currently there are discussions underway about other partnerships to come, but Campbell could not disclose the names of the schools until the agreements are settled.

Ophiuchus Snakes its Way into the Sky New Zodiac (Gawker.com) Capricorn:

Jan. 20-Feb. 16.

Aquarius:

Feb. 16-March 11.

Pisces:

March 11-April 18.

Aries:

April 18-May 13.

Taurus:

May 13-June 21.

Gemini:

June 21-July 20.

Cancer:

July 20-Aug. 10.

Leo:

Aug. 10-Sept. 16.

Virgo:

Sept. 16-Oct. 30.

Libra:

Oct. 30-Nov. 23.

Scorpio:

Nov. 23-29.

Ophiuchus:* Nov. 29-Dec. 17. Sagittarius: Dec. 17-Jan. 20. Previous Zodiac (www.ask.com) Aquarius:

Jan. 21-Feb. 20

Pisces:

Feb. 20-March 21

Aries:

March 21-April 21

Taurus:

April 21-May 22

Gemini:

May 22-June 22

Cancer:

June 22-July 24

Leo:

July 24-August 24

Virgo:

Aug. 24- Sept. 24

Libra:

Sept. 24-Oct. 24

Scorpio:

Oct. 24-Nov. 23

Sagittarius: Nov. 23-Dec. 23 Capricorn:

Dec. 23-Jan. 21

By Rachel Rothspan

It’s war between the scientists and the astrologers, two groups that may seem closely related to the common person, as they argue over the stars. The fight started when an astronomy instructor, Parke Kunkle, released a story to a Minnesota newspaper that said that the earth wobbled on its axis, making the astrology signs, drawn up 2,000 years ago, old news. His assertion proposed that a new constellation was showing in the sky and needed to be accounted for, and the rest of the dates that corresponded were incorrect based on current sky readings, according to a BBC report. As a result, the entire world spoke of a new sign jumping into the zodiac, changing both the dates the existing signs already span over, and adding new personality to the zodiac itself. Ophiuchus, the new zodiac symbol whose original name meant serpent handler, is said focus on seeking wisdom and knowledge and is envied by many people, according to loveastorolgy.com. This website says that the sign was actually created in the image of Imhotep, an old physician who brought a lot to the medical table. Its constellation looks like a man holding a snake. Ophiuchus fits in between Scorpio and Sagittarius, from Nov. 29 to Dec.17. The addition, however, shortens the other signs and will cause some to see a change in their sign, even if it isn’t the new one. For example, a late August birthday is no longer a Virgo, but now a Leo. These changes are affecting a large capacity of the population. Refer to the sidebar to see the astrology dates. To astrology fans, this new sign can be both confusing and harsh. But to experts in astrology, there is little surprise. According to an article on ABC news, the zodiac has always been known to pick and

has followed Western Astrology for over fifty years, does not have a positive view of the idea. “…I have encountered nothing that warrants changing the zodiac, although I grant that from the point of view of astronomy the alignments certainly have changed,”

“It is one of many things about astrology that defIES logic and pointS to the fact that we really don’t have a rigorous, logical explanation of what is really going on.”

Photos: Gamespot.com; asklepionpharm.com

The original signs (top); the constellations (bottom).

choose sides. The article quotes astrologer Susan Miller in that there were more than thirteen signs that were whittled down over time. “I have some knowledge about the zodiac and I am aware that there were originally 13 signs,” said Andrew Czirjak. “Astrologers made it twelve because star patternsconstellations are not in the night sky for a full 30 days.” While the sign may not be new, it has caused enough of a stir to make people wonder if their astrological affiliations have changed. Some are saying that the change doesn’t take place in their own signs, because they were born under their current symbols. Still, many followers are unsure of the astrology change. Charles Campbell, who

he says. “It is one of many things about astrology that defies logic and points to the fact that we really don’t have a rigorous, logical explanation of what is really going on.” For most, the concern is over whether or not their sign has been changed. The answer is still a little unclear, but as most astrologers are not recognizing this as a formal change, they are insisting that the current signs remain. Still, the astrologers who recognize the change have been reporting that, since the change was not built into the pattern before, only births from 2009 and on are considered to follow the new zodiac chart. Chances are good that Ophiuchus will not be seen in newspaper horoscopes any time soon. Still, the argument will wage on to decide whether or not astrology is going to look different to the future, another change that will throw off the already mysterious world.

February 11, 9am

NJSBDC at Kean Presents Winter 2011 Small Business Developing a Winning Business Plan for Small Business NJ Department of Labor Business Resource Center, 2nd Floor, 200 West Second Street


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Feb. 10, 2011 - Mar. 2, 2011 | The Tower

What’s the Best Slice to Grab Between Classes? By Matt Marchesano

Looking to take a break from the typical college cafeteria food and experience something new? Here are three pizzerias you may, or may not, want to give a try. La Piccola Pizzeria and Deli Overall rating: 5.5 of 8 slices 1382 Morris Avenue, Union (908-687-4200)

This place is a great spot to stop in for a slice or two. The counter-person kindly took my order without hesitation and even struck up small-talk while I waited. More importantly, the pizza slices were quite satisfying. And at $1.87 for a plain slice, I most definitely got my money’s worth for a couple of slices. It’s “Jersey-style” Neapolitan pizza: fresh and tasty. The semi-thin crust had a delightful crunch and was not dried out too quickly.  On top, the fresh-tasting mozzarella cheese was cooked to a point just shy of becoming too greasy—an important trait for commuters who eat on the go and dislike to ruin clothing. The tomato sauce, however, was my fa-

vorite part: ripe and balanced. The oregano and pepper spices were paired nicely against the sweet fresh basil and garlic. Each bite was enjoyable to the palate. Located on Morris Avenue, La Piccola is a mile north from the train station and delivery is available to on- and off-campus locations. They have a lengthy-takeout menu and La Piccola offers 25% off to Kean students, with proof of a valid I.D.  Goombas Pizza Overall rating: 6.5 of 8 slices 1424 Morris Avenue, Union

In terms of real-deal, tasty pizza, Goombas is reminiscent of Brooklyn’s famous pizzerias. This place has character and their slices did not fall short either! Goombas is covered with Italian-American charm and decorated with funny cartoon caricatures of Sopranos stars. The restaurant’s logo is even a parody of The Godfather puppeteer hands. “How-a-ya-doin, buddy,” asked a man behind the counter. His New York accent convinced me that he probably knew a thing or two about pizza. I was right. The Italian-American sense

“Black & Yellow”Gets the Jersey Shore Treatment By D.J. Jean

One of the stars from MTV’s popular show “Jersey Shore” remixes the Steeler’s anthem “Black and Yellow,” made by Pittsburgh rapper, Wiz Khalifa. If you were unfamiliar with Khalifa before, you may have become more familiarized with his name and face on Jan. 23, when he performed his song before the Steelers defeated the Jets for the AFC championship. The self-proclaimed guidos of “Jersey Shore,” Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino and DJ Paul “Pauly D” Delvecchio remixed

it comes to being attracted to a woman, hence his wordplay when he replaces “Black & Yellow” with “Black and Guido.” Guadagnino even makes reference to Ciara, who is allegedly his celebrity crush. Guadagnino is just having some fun with his “Black and Guido” song, which is apparent throughout the whole video. Viewers see Guadagnino and his friends bouncing around, performing various dance moves throughout the song. Though the “Jersey Shore” star’s take on “Black and Yellow” may not add more than a few seconds to his fifteen minutes of fame, it could prompt the Taylor Gang,

“…the “Jersey Shore” star’s take on “Black and Yellow” may not add more than A few seconds to his fifteen minutes of fame …” the song to echo a song called “Beat Da Beat Up” and named it “Black and Guido.” To complete the MVP trio, Vinny Guadagnino, another character on the show, tips his hat to music, by engineering a remix of “Black & Yellow” called “Black and Guido.” Guadagnino’s version of the chart topping single hit the net as early as Jan. 10 in the form of a homemade video and has been gaining considerable notoriety. Other than MTV, the video has been posted on InFlexWeTrust.com, XXL Mag. com and billboard.com; all sites dedicated to displaying current popular trends in the world of music. In the song, Guadagnino shows there’s no discrimination in his love game when

Khalifa’s name for his crew and devoted fan base, to create a new “Taylor Gang or….” saying. These phrases usually seem to imply a consequence if one does not join the Taylor Gang movement. The Taylor Gang movement is said to have originated from a combination of Khalifa and his entourage’s love for Chuck Taylor sneakers and his high school alma mater, Taylor Allderdice. The Taylor Gang sayings were created by Khalifa’s fans because Khalifa says “Taylor Gang or…” during most of his songs. You can check out Guadagnino’s “Black and Guido” on www.YouTube.com.

of pride and tradition within this place shone through their comically-titled pizza pies. I had one “Tony Soprano” and one “Donnie Brasco”; or a plain slice and one “upside down” slice, featuring the cheese on bottom and the sauce on top.   The Goombas’ marinara sauce held a fresh tomato taste, smokey and savory with a fresh garlic-sweet aftertaste. A generous supply of fresh mozzarella cheese provided a substantial helping of rich dairy-flavor atop each slice.  Goombas will deliver at a $10 minimum and has an option to order online at www. goombaspizzanj.com. Right now, they’re offering 10% off for students dining in, with proof of Kean I.D.  Reggio Pizza Overall rating: ? of 8 slices 895 Magie Avenue, Union

The family-style atmosphere is Reggio’s finest asset. Walking inside feels as though you have been invited to a friend’s home for dinner.  The dimly-lit dining area along the side provides an ambience for patrons to chat,

or to watch television programs on the televisions throughout the restaurant. The bar stools at the front counter offer a spot to enjoy a quick slice. The pizze-

“I had one ‘Tony Soprano’ and one ‘Donnie Brasco’; or a plain slice and one ‘upside down’ slice.” ria’s atmosphere is inviting and was why I was intrigued. Unfortunately, however, my review ends here; because I never received my slice.  After almost 25 minutes of waiting on said barstool, my order was never processed - though two patrons, who had placed similar orders after mine, had. By the time later customers had eaten and left, I decided to do the same.    One thing I am thankful for after my visit to Reggio is that in my time of waiting, the nearest television had been playing a re-run of Seinfeld. It was the “Marble-rye” episode. 

T N T A S IN

s y a d n o i s i c de NEW

IVER N U Y T I C Y JERSE

SIT Y

efore you

answer b elf with an

e!

plication fe p er yours a w o 0 p 5 $ m e r u d yo Attend an e’ll waive w d n a s u p leave cam TRANSFER TUESDAYS Feb. 22, March 22, April 5 3:00 – 6:00 p.m. Transfer students must bring to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions (Hepburn Hall, Room 207): Official transcripts from all colleges attended, completed application and an essay. All transfer students must have earned a minimum of 12 college credits with a minimum grade point average of 2.0.

TO LEARN MORE CALL (866) 586-7823 OR E-MAIL ADMISSIONS@NJCU.EDU

need rything you professionally, e v e s a h U d an NJC , personally to succeed l economy. a in the glob .edu

edU.NJCU r e w o p m E

2039 KENNEDY BLVD. JERSEY CITY, NJ 07305-1597

February 18, 9am NJSBDC at Kean Presents Winter 2011 Small Business Financing a Small Business NJ Department of Labor Business Resource Center, 2nd Floor, 200 West Second Street


The Tower | Feb. 10, 2011 - Mar. 2, 2011

5

Baby (Food) Crazy By Rachel Rothspan

Companies such as Beech Nut formally catered exclusively to children, but thanks to a new Hollywood craze, they may have a new audience—adult dieters looking to shed some extra pounds. The Baby Food Diet (BFD) is a food replacement plan where the dieter eats jars of baby food and baby cereals instead of snacks, and sometimes, full meals. Numerous news sources, including The Huffington Post, report different celebrity women who are trying this diet and, as a result, other people are starting to catch on. The logic behind the diet is routed in the calorie and fat content that each food provides, as well as the portion sizes allotted. For example, one 4 oz jar of Gerber® mashed pears is only 70 calories, and Happy Baby™ makes organic puffs that are 25 calories for 75 pieces (1/2 a cup). A regular large pear can have up to 100 calories, and

1 cup of Kashi® Go Lean Crunch has 230 calories per serving (1 cup). For some, like 23-year-old mother Allison Cardullo, the baby food diet is about convenience. “I had baby food in my home and tried consuming it to help me loose post-baby

“I have this tiny little thing that looks like a ton of food but is really only a hundred calories.” weight,” she said. “It’s an inexpensive way to diet … it’s much safer than other pharmacologically-enhanced diet aids.” For others, like Courtney Manders, the baby food diet is about getting the bad food out of her life. Rather than heating up leftover Chinese food, which can be high in calories and sodium, she eats the toddler meals, such as Gerber spaghetti rings. “I have this tiny little thing that looks

Motor ways: Electric supercar becomes reality By charley falkenburg

As gas prices creep up and tolerance for emissions plummet, electric cars continue to gain popularity in the U.S. In a world where technology reigns, cars such as the Toyota Prius, Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt are high contenders in the auto market. But let’s face it, these Tonka toy sized cars lack a certain cool factor.

Photo: Allcarselectric.com

The Mercedes SLS AMG E-cell looking aggressive.

In the auto jungle where Mustangs and Camaros rule as cheetahs and panthers, electric cars are more like bunnies. Luckily, Mercedes is about to turn the tables with its 2013 SLS AMG E-cell, an all-electric supercar that is guaranteed to be fierce and intimidating. The E-cell debuted at the Detroit auto show in Jan. making a bold statement with its lack of oil and highlighter yellow paint job. The eco-friendly supercar looks like a far cry from the Nissan Leaf’s geeky exterior and is expected to be the world’s fastest production electronic vehicle, according to Techspotcoolstuff.com, a website that reviews cutting edge cars. Mercedes plans to put the E-cell into production in 2013 as part of the company’s “AMG performance 2015” project, which strives to create innovative fuel efficient vehicles. “The SLS AMG E-cell is evidence of the state-of-the-art development of an exciting super sports car featuring a zero-emission high tech drive,” a Mercedes press release said. The E-cell is powered by four electric motors which produce an impressive 525 horsepower and 650 lb-ft torque. Mercedes reports it will be able to reach 60 mph in only 3.7 seconds. While most elec-

like a ton of food but is really only a hundred calories,” she said. Still, many dieticians are concerned about this fad, as it can have some unhealthy sides to it as well. Susan Canonico, a registered dietician with the Summit Medical Group of New

tric cars rarely exceed 90 mph, the E-cell can reach 160 mph, which is remarkable for any vehicle that doesn’t run on gas. This two-seater comes with three drive settings, each tuned according to how aggressive the drive is feeling, according to Car and Driver, an auto enthusiast magazine. The comfort setting utilizes only 40 percent of the car’s power and is optimal for daily driving. The sport mode uses slightly more power and has a sharper throttle response, while the sport plus setting unleashes all of the e-cells unbridled power and capabilities. Mercedes incorporates other technologies into the E-cell, such as a regenerative braking system enabling the car to take the energy lost by stopping and recycle it back into the batteries.

“The SLS AMG E-cell is evidence of the state-ofthe-art development of an exciting super sports car.” Although the car is impressive and a pioneer of its kind, Mercedes still has a few issues to overcome. The E-cell has a limit of only 125 miles which isn’t too bad. However, aggressive speed demons could average to only 30 miles, Topspeed.com, a website for speed enthusiasts reported. The E-cell is also completely silent, which could be a turn-off for those in love with the aggressive growls a traditional supercar produces. Although Mercedes has yet to release an exact price, Car and Driver estimates it will cost around $250,000 which isn’t exactly pocket change. Thanks to Mercedes electric cars are starting to acquire a wow-factor that even a gas guzzler supporter can’t deny. Who knew bunnies could evolve into tigers?

Jersey, is alarmed by the spread of the BFD. She says that she is “insulted” by the standards that such a diet sets for those who choose to follow it, and considers the diet to be “unsustainable and unhealthy”. “Natural whole foods provide fiber & micronutrients that are possibly processed out of the baby food,” she said. She suggested that a piece of fruit or a serving of vegetables is a much more suitable venue for health and replacements.

She also mentions that the diet is not a maintainable strategy for losing weight; baby food cannot be ordered in a restaurant, and is not something likely to be on the table at a family gathering. While there is more research needed to deterime the effects of the BFD on adults, for the short term, it can be an effective program for those last few pounds that just won’t go away, as long as it is supplemented with vitamins. Manders has used the plan off and on since early in the summer. “I don’t see it as a diet, because I don’t do it all the time,” she said Still, it requires some maintenance, and for Cardullo, it wasn’t a practical answer. “I couldn’t handle the texture, smell, and taste,” she said. “Overall, I think it’s effective for short term, period, but not so satisfying.”

beauty marked: VAlentine’s day vixen By cellestE valeanu

Love is in the air! Therefore, your eyes and lips should be the two major features that will reel in the attention of your date this Valentine’s Day. Here’s a few beauty picks that you will love to love, and your significant other surely will too! Romance will fill the air with soft and simple smoky colors to emphasize your eyes. Taupe color eye shadow is definitely one of the most versatile colors. It is a lively neutral that can be paired up with browns, plums and charcoals. Try Urban Decay’s Underground deluxe eye shadow ($18) dusted all over the lid with a dense flat brush. With a fluffier crease brush, take your favorite beige bronzy neutral blush and lightly blend into the crease. I recommend MAC Cosmetic’s Warm Soul mineralize blush for light to medium skin tones or Love Joy for deeper skin tones. Use the flat brush along with a light frost eye shadow to add highlight underneath the brow bone. MAC Cosmetic’s Mega Metal shadow in Peek-at-You ($19.50) is a great choice and can be found at www. MACCosmetics.com. To complete the look, make sure to use several coats of mascara. Make yourself blush by applying the colors on to the apples of your cheeks. With your middle finger, dab a little bit of that highlight color you used for your brow bone and bring it down into a “C” shape along the cheekbones for an instant glow. Using your blush and highlight for both your eyes and cheeks will make it simple and allow the colors to compliment the romantic beauty look we are going for. A sublime smile speaks volumes to everyone you meet and to ensure your brightest smile ever I suggest Crest 3D white strips. These teeth whitener strips are priced at $24 and can be found at most major drugstores. I’ve seen results in about a week just using the strips 30 minutes each day. To frame those pearly whites you, without a doubt, need an oh-so-kissable lip color that stays put through your up close and personal encounters. I have experi-

February 11, 12pm - Blood Drive, UC 228

mented with many lip stains and recently dubbed Revlon’s Just Bitten lip colors my absolute favorite! For those too bashful to try a sultry red

“To frame those pearly whites you...need an oh-sokissable lip color that stays put through your up close and personal encounters.”

Shopping for the perfect Valentine’s day blush.

lip for this holiday, try the color Twilight. The subtle red will warm you up without being overpowering. Try them all to find the best one that suits your skin tone and personality. The applicator is shaped like a felt tip marker, making it effortless to stay within the boundaries of your lip line throughout the day. The opposite side of the marker reveals a lip balm to put on top of the color for a smooth “just bitten” look. It’s priced at $7.69 and can be found at drugstores or Target.com. Coming up next month: Makeup Bag Basics, five fabulous beauty items that every girl must carry in her makeup bag and embarrassing makeup confessions.


A&E ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

COMEDY

By casey murphy

Megan Bandelt, Josh Bellan, Raven Dunbar, Brandon Elia, David Farrington, Mackenzy Samedi, Katie Scala, John Silva, Brenna Singman, and Lissette Valentin. These names may sound familiar to you. Maybe you recognize them from classes you have together, or seen them featured in a theatre production here at Kean University. Or you may recognize them as the ten playwrights whose plays had staged readings on Jan. 28 and Feb. 2 in the Little Theater. Put together by Premiere Stages, the characters in each show were read by professional actors and Kean students. These student productions kicked off the Premiere Stages playwriting festival, where 300 submitted plays will be narrowed down to three. The three plays will then have a staged reading in March 2011 and the audience will choose which two to go on to become a full production.

By TOM MCWATTERS

“The meal isn’t over when I’m full. The meal is over when I hate myself.” Louis C.K. says in his Emmy nominated special, Chewed Up. If you’re looking for raw unfiltered laughs, then look no further. Louis C.K. is one of the funniest comedians out there today. His stand-up material consists mainly of observational comedy, surreal humor, and black comedy. C.K. is not for the easily offended. But, if you can take a joke, this guy can dish it. You may need an oxygen tank to help you catch your breath since you’ll be laughing so hard. His resumé houses an endless list of accomplishments throughout his career. C.K. wrote and directed “Pootie Tang,” a comical movie which became a cult film classic; was a writer on the Chris Rock Show, where he won an Emmy; and stretched out his acting legs with a roll on a sitcom on FX which is loosely based on his life.

“You may need an oxygen tank to help you catch your breath since you’ll be laughing so hard” Still, his most famous role is as an accomplished stand-up comedian. He has had three HBO specials showcasing his performances so far. In 2007, “Shameless” shows him rip on the people of California, who he feels express themselves too freely. “Chewed Up” was filmed in 2008 in Boston and contains nothing less than the pure, unadulterated, raunchy comedy that he is known for. His most recent stand-up special this year, entitled “Hilarious,” is indeed just what it says. He isn’t tooting his own horn, but rather referring to the people who go straight to the top shelf with their words, such as amazing and unbelievable. C.K. grew up in Boston, Massachusetts, an area that has produced many famous comedic writers, actors, and numerous well-known stand-up comedians; Lenny Clarke, Denis Leary, and Patrice O’Neal. I recommend checking him out first on YouTube, or somewhere on the internet, in order to really get a feel for him and his humor. C.K. also has a website you can visit, www.Louisck.net, where you can see out his bio, purchase some of his stand-up specials and albums online, and see where he is performing next. If you appreciate a good laugh, then you’re in for a real treat. Comic’s Corner gives Louis C.K. 9.5 out of 10. Louis C.K.

the journey from page to stage

Photo: wikipedia.com

Photos: Casey Murphy

COMIC’S CORNER

DRAMA

Left to right: Paul Molnar, Tony Mowatt, Ashton Heyl, and Dan Domingues doing a staged reading of “The New Student” by Josh Bellan.

“The festival is dedicated to helping playwrights make the journey from page to stage, developing plays, having the form to have their plays read, work shopped, and produced,” said John Wooten, the Producing Artistic Director and Administrator of Premiere Stages. Premiere Stages began in 2004 as a program of Kean University. Although it is a professional company, one of Premiere Stage’s main goals is to help Kean students in the Theatre and Communication departments find their way into the professional world. “A lot of what we do for students is to help give them a leg up so that once they graduate they have already kind of been exposed to the industry, the professional theatre industry, the professional television industry,” said Wooten. But Premiere Stage’s helping hand does not stop at helping those students who attend Kean. The play company also has residency programs for students from third grade into high school, that helps them prepare for college and learn to be excited about writing and literacy. “We also have a summer camp that we do where middle school students work together to come up with their own show, develop their own concept for a show,” said Wooten. “We have a high school camp that we do in July that’s an acting camp for high schoolers.” Through constant writing and editing during the 2010 fall semester, a process that wasn’t complete for any of the students before the staged readings, the playwrights are getting closer to their goal of completing a play they can be proud of. “They say you’re supposed to write about what you know,” said Brenna Singman, a Theatre Education major and playwright of “Miss Lottie,” which had a staged reading on Jan. 28. “It’s little germs of what you know. It starts with basics and it blossoms into a story.” Curious to find out what happens in the end of one of these student plays? You can find out on the Premiere Stages playwriting blog: http://premiereplayblog. wordpress.com.

“They say you’re supposed to write about what you know. Its little germs of what you know. It starts with basics and it blossoms into a story.”

Kean Stages: 2/20 2/25 2/26

3pm 8pm 2pm 8pm

O’Connor Quartet, Enlow Hall Sweeney Todd, Zella Fry Theatre VE 118 Sweeney Todd, Zella Fry Theatre VE 118 New Jersey Ballet: Swan Lake, Wilkins Theatre 8pm Sweeney Todd, Zella Fry Theatre VE 118

2/27 3/2

2pm 2pm 3pm 3pm 8pm

Cinderella: The Ballet, Wilkins Theatre Sweeney Todd, Zella Fry Theatre VE 118 Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Enlow Hall Spirituals, Kean Hall Sweeney Todd, Zella Fry Theatre


REVIEW: recettear - an item shop’s tale

By Eric albuen

The video game world is surrounded by thousands of role playing games (RPG). Whether Japanese or Western style, there is a large variety of games to play. One important aspect of RPGs is the item shop. With wares ranging from valuable items to weapons, armor and even healing items, the all too common item shop is a staple of the RPG world. But what really happens in these item shops? How do they produce the stock to offer us in these games? “Recettear: An Item Shop’s Tale” gives us a chance to experience what goes on in that world.

The item shop section of the game leaves some freedom for the player to attract customers, customize the shop by rearranging furniture and even expand the store. When customers shop, the player must haggle with them in order to make a profit. As the merchant level goes up, customers can place orders and sell items back. Successful interactions with customers allow the player to reap benefits such as extra experience and developing a relationship with the customers, which makes haggling easier. Another section of the game is dungeon crawling. The player goes to the Adventurer’s Guild to hire an adventurer to help them through the game’s various dungeons. In the dungeons, Recette can collect items dropped by monsters and help the adventurer get stronger. The dungeons grow more difficult as the game continues, take longer to complete, and no two experiences are ever the same. Overall the game is relatively easy Selling stock to in-game customers. to get into with an infinite amount of charm. It also has quite possibly the most ridiculous catchphrases you’ll ever hear in a video game. There is a high amount of replay value and several modes that, after beating the game, will extend the game’s life. Along with lovable characters and a charming art style, this game is definitely worth looking into, especially if you’re interested in seeing the other side of role playing games. I could easily recommend this game to anyone willing to give this unique independent game a shot. I give this game an .

“So as far as we’re concerned, what really happens in these item shops?”

Recettear started out as a video game created by Japanese hobbyists more for fun than profit. It was developed by EasyGameStation and released only in Japan. The game was later translated by a two-man translation team, Carpe Fulgar, and more widely distributed. The game takes place in a typical fantasy setting and follows the story of Recette Lemongrass, a woman whose father left to become an adventurer after before accumulating a large amount of debt to Terme Finance. A representative from Terme, a fairy named Tear, is sent to Recette’s house, which doubles as the item shop, to collect the debt. Since Recette has no money to pay the debt, Tear decides to help her run the item shop that her father had left behind. This begins the story of the item shop, Recettear, a combination of both main characters’ names. Throughout the course of the game, the player has one month to pay off a large debt that is owed to Terme Financing and increases every week. Items can either be purchased throughout town or an adventurer can be hired through the Adventurer’s Guild.

GAMES

By ayana gibbs reporting from ENGLAND

Guys—invest in tight long johns that can be worn under all attire, even skinny jeans. Wife beaters and thick socks go a long way, and are also very affordable. Faux-fur lined hoodies, military jackets

“fashion is architecture: it is a matter of proportions.” —coco chanel or fitted trench coats atop your favorite sweater or button-up will not only be stylish but keep you warm. Little accessories, such as leather gloves, Mohawk hats, and scarves will keep your hands and head warm. It has been proven that if you keep those sen-

Photo: www.thestir.cafemom.com

Bring on the chills! The spring semester means snow days and delayed openings. This blistery weather always hinders a good outfit by keeping it under wraps. Coats are the ultimate haters; they tend to hide your shape and what you have on. Don’t get stuck in the Stone Ages wearing a bulky coat or the dreadful sleeping bag. Be creative. As fashion evolves, coat lengths are shrinking and people are looking more prone to getting pneumonia. Maybe in the future there will be mobile body heat, but until then it’s important to layer. Layering is an art form, and in order to beat the freezing temperatures while walking to class, you must create the perfect base.

Photo: (L) www.omiru.com; (R) www.fashionising.com

Let’s Get Layered?

fashion

Clockwise from left: Layering can create different looks; adding T-shirts with Cardigans is a great way for men to layer; tunics paired with sweaters create sleek silhouettes.

sitive areas warm then your body won’t be as cold. Ladies—wearing long tunics under outfits can create sleek silhouettes and be chic, keeping the heat closer to your body. Tights under outfits look cute and keep you warm, helping you lose the shivers. Sweater coats with long t-shirts and leggings can also be very versatile; they come in many colors and styles. Chunky scarves are haute and can become a staple during the winter months, the perfect accessory to any cute outfit. Show off that physique and stop

letting your coat rule your life. Let your style prevail! When layering, remember the words of Coco Chanel: “fashion is architecture: it is a matter of proportions.” Be bulk-less. Be comfortable. Be fierce.

Check out http://thevonimanaffair.wordpress.com/

for more fashion looks, tips, and trend forecasting.

2/12 10am - Will You Be Mine? Craft Workshop, Liberty Hall


8

Feb. 10, 2011 - Mar. 2, 2011 | The Tower

EDITORIAL YOUR SOCIAL NETWORK DOESN’T HAVE TO JUST BE VIRTUAL Is it just me, or does Mother Nature seem to have a bone to pick? I’m sick of the snow! I’m tired of getting up an hour earlier than usual to dig out my car, driving 15 mph under the speed limit for fear of not being able to stop fast enough, and putting on layers upon layers to be warm outside but sweat indoors. One thing that has helped me get out despite the winter, (since I’m not one to hope on the slopes in a pair of skiis), is networking. In a few short months, many of us will begin that dreaded job search; sending our small time resume, housing little to no experience, to corporations of all sizes in hopes of one of them giving us a call back. With such a difficult economy, it truly isn’t so much of what you know and how much experience you have, but rather who you know. Websites such as njyp.org and meetup.com are home to numerous events for young professionals. With events such as Brewery Tour and Tasting, Happy Hour, Game Night and Hiking, you are bound to meet a lot of people who both share your interests and can help you enhance your professional network. I can speak from experience when I say that no two events are ever the same, but there is definitely something for everyone. Whether you’re looking to expand your career network, circle of friends, or looking for a date, networking events are bound to introduce you to people that could be beneficial in the future. In fact, just the other night I was at a “Speed Friending” event in which I walked away with 14 more gal pals then I started with. Can you say that you’ve “dated” 14 women in one night? I can! (Check out page 9 if you want the scoop). Whatever event you choose, just make sure you get your name out there. Who knows, the next person you meet at that Networking Happy Hour could one day be the person who helps you land your dream job! Megan Muller Editor-In-Chief thetower@kean.edu

What do you think? Post your own comment online at www.keantower.com

OP-ED WINTER COURSE: A PLEASANT SURPRISE By NICOLE MARIE PADINHA

My alarm clock went off and it was seven in the morning; Monday, January 3, 2011. Instantaneously, my arm flew over to hit the snooze button.   “Just five more minutes,” I begged, but sadly there was no one listening.  It is quite impossible to believe that anyone would enjoy the idea of waking up early on his or her day off.  As a matter of fact, a majority of students would cringe at just the thought of waking

As I made my way up to my classroom, I began to panic. We’re probably going to have a ton of exams! What if the professor is a hard grader? I hope we get out early!   I sat in the desk furthest away from the professor; this didn’t help much though, because we soon had to move all the desks into a circle. My master plan of napping for four hours was thwarted.

“There was a plethora of parking spots. It was almost as if I had entered the twilight zone.”

Photo: Nicole Marie Padinha

The finished product.

up before the sun rises. However, while most of the Kean population was still asleep (or still hung-over from New Year’s weekend), I was stepping out of the shower, gobbling down some oatmeal, and getting ready for the long day ahead.   As one of the 720 students registered for Kean’s first ever winter session, I was reluctant to wake up so early; dragging my feet and clutching my extralarge Dunkin’ Donuts coffee, pouting all the way.   I found the drive to be quite therapeutic. Contrary to the ever-hectic congestion and traffic, the Garden State Parkway was unusually serene at eight in the morning. Upon arrival at Kean, I was pleasantly surprised to see that there were a plethora of available parking spots.  It was as if I had entered the twilight zone. 

As the syllabus was handed out, my eyes zoned in on what I thought was an illusion---No exams, 50 percent of our grade is attendance and participation, and we get to leave 15 minutes early. This was too good to be true; I had to be dreaming. The class was not what I expected. Rather than the ever popular lectures and note taking, we started the day with Tai Chi. The professor never talked over us, rather talked with us, and encouraged very casual group discussions. We watched movies and spoke about them, instead of writing 12 page papers.   We learned the art of folding origami, and on the very last day, we had a cultural pot-luck party.  Although I can say I would have rather spent my break sleeping till noon and relaxing on the couch watching MTV reruns, I cannot say I regret taking this winter course. Unlike other courses, it did not once stress me out in the least.   After class was over and the grades were posted, I felt relaxed and accomplished. To this day, I still wonder if it was all a dream.

The Tower Department of Communication Kean University Center for Academic Success 1000 Morris Avenue Union, NJ 07083 Telephone: (908) 737-0468; Fax: (908) 737-0465 Email: thetower@kean.edu; www.keantower.com

The Tower is an independent, laboratory newspaper of Kean University’s print journalism option in the communication major program. It is published monthly through the regular academic year and supported by advertising and the Department of Communication. The Tower is not responsible for claims made by its advertisers. The Tower is a public forum and is free from censorship and advance approval of content by the university administration. The Tower staff is responsible for its content. Editor-in-Chief Megan Muller Deputy & News Editor Rachel Rothspan Copy Editors Andrew Czirjak Laura Urban Sports Editor Matt Chin Arts and Entertainment Editor Casey Murphy Features Editor Charley Falkenburg Online Editor Stephanie Musat Faculty Adviser Pat Winters Lauro Business Manager Eileen Ruf Designer Stephanie Skirvin

Staff Eric Albuen Ernst Constant Daniel Dolocheck Andrea Edwards Samantha Fellers Ana Ferrer Francesca Figalo Ayana Gibbs DJ Jean Arkor Kolubah Brian Konchalski Matt Marchesano Gabrielle Matarazzo Pamela Mata Danielle McFadden Tom McWatters Nicole Marie Padinha Jaclyn Tuman Christine Valdez Celleste Valeanu Brett Williams

Opinion pieces and letters to the editor The Tower welcomes guest columns and letters to the editor from any source. Such material should be submitted to thetower@kean.edu or left at The Tower’s offices. To verify sources of written material, submissions must include the writer’s name and contact information. Students should include their class (sophomore, graduate, etc.) and major. Faculty and staff should include campus title or position. On request, names may be withheld from publication if The Tower staff determines there is a legitimate reason to do so, but no anonymous letters will be accepted for publication. The Tower reserves the right to edit, and refuse publication of any submission.

Display and classified advertising Deadline for space reservations for display advertising is two weeks before the publication date. Ads submitted after that may be used on a space-available basis. All ads are run-of-the-paper unless an extra fee is collected for a paid position. Deadline for art work and copy is one week before the publication date. Classified advertising can be submitted up to the Thursday before publication as long as the payment is made at the same time. Call (908) 737-0468 or email thetower@kean.edu for a rate card.

Tower publication schedule SPRING 2011: Feb. 10, March 3, March 31, April 28.

PROFESSOR RATINGS

(Continued from page 1)

of both an institution’s student body and that of the desired construct, RMP is unsatisfactory. Yet Coladarci and Kornfield recommended higher education institutions to encourage students’ use of RMP and to post constructive and respectful comments. Since students tend to gravitate towards publicly available sites such as RMP, Coladarci and Kornfield also recommended that “institutions should make their SET available online.” While Coladarci and Kornfield predict that faculty would oppose online SET because of privacy concerns, they also agree that privacy is a thing of the past. Although RMP continues to gain popularity, it “will inevitably mischaracterize the true standing of many instructors as measured by formal student evaluations of teaching,” Coladarci and Kornfield stated.


The Tower | Feb. 10, 2011 - Mar. 2, 2011

9

OP-ED DATING WOMEN? By Megan Muller

Dating. When you hear the term you probably think of a man and a woman sitting at a candle-lit dinner table sipping on an alcoholic beverage and ogling over each other; “You like carrots? So do I!” “You like to ski? So do I!” “We have so much in common!” Sometimes, however, it’s nice to go on a date with a friend. I’ve always said, when in a dating rut, that I should just start dating women. My flirtatious ways do not see a gender difference when it comes to batting my eyelashes and giggling. Although the attention would be great, I don’t think I could take a casual drive down Lesbian Lane. But I found a caveat—I belong to the New Jersey Young Professionals, a networking group targeting men and women,

NEW STUDY

married and single, between the ages of 21 and 35. Recently, they hosted a “Speed Friending” event for women only. Who doesn’t need more gal pals? So I went. That night I dated 14 women in about 1½ hours. Are you jealous? I would be! It was by far one of the most fun nights and an event I’d love to attend again. It’s exactly how you may be picturing it. Small tables with two chairs set up in an orderly fashion around a small conference room. You even get a “score card” with everyone’s contact information, profession, and hobbies. The person in charge dings a concierge bell every four minutes and everyone rotates to the next table. It was like a first date with women and was so much fun. Let’s face it. When you go out to a bar the last thing on your mind is making a friend. You go out with the intent of hav-

ing fun with the friends you already have, maybe meeting someone attractive to make out with or buy you dinner (or your drinks for the night). Few females go out with the intent of walking up to another female and saying “Hey, you look like someone I’d really get along with. Want to come over Saturday night and paint each other’s nails?” She will look at you like you’re nuts and most likely have security escort you out. Well maybe not that extreme but you will most likely look like a fool. This event took out the awkwardness. We were all there for one purpose, well maybe two. Get to know other females that we’d get along with and maybe even network in hopes of expanding our career (after all, we’re all looking for the next best thing; whether it be money, jobs, friends, MEN—oh come on, you know it’s true!).

HEALTH & FITNESS

(Continued from page 1)

said that there is an inverse correlation between class sizes and learning. As class sizes get larger, professors cannot constantly assess their students, which can ensure more information retention. “I used to require four journals in my classes but now I have just two,” Fitch said. “My classes are packed.” To improve education retention, Fitch said learning needs to become a primary

THE POLITICIAN

I left the event beet red (because it was a group of 40 women all talking a mile a minute in a very small space, plus the wine … oy vey), and with 14 women I hope to see again. I met an Arbon representative, a former Broadway performer, 2 teachers who were so full of life (one was “pretty much married” and the first to get excited about my blog, hope you enjoy it doll!), an archeologist, numerous writers (cheers to you gals!), a conference planning manager (who hopefully can help out one of my gal pals get out of her lame-o job), and a fellow medical writer who works right around the corner from me! I should’ve started dating women sooner!

priority of universities, and there needs to be more teachers to limit class size, who focus on teaching students. Fitch said at Kean, students are more motivated than at other institutions he taught at. “There are more first generation college students here who see education not as an obstacle, but as an opportunity for the future.”

YOUR WAY TO GOOD HEALTH IN 2011 By DR. JOSH PALGI

You have heard it before and most likely said it yourself as part of various resolutions you have made over the years. New Year’s Eve has always been a time for looking back to the past, and more importantly the coming year, 2011. It is a time to reflect on the changes we want or need to make and resolve to follow through on those changes. Health related goals are very popular among people with New Year’s resolutions. The ones that are almost certain to lead to a healthier 2011 and beyond are:

(Continued from page 1)

200 write-in votes from the small town. This pushed him to change his major from Theatre, though he still minors in it, to Political Science. He continued to consider what he could do for the town, kept in the political loop, and ran again in 2010. Cilento closed the polls with 883 votes and 40.15% of

“In many ways, Kean University is just like Dunellen, they are both small and have good home values.” the winning polls; the closest competitor came in with 697 votes. Now that he is on the council, Cilento is working on making the town more transparent. “Sadly, Dunellen is not mentioned in many newspapers,” he says. “They overlook us.” To correct this issue, Cilento is starting organizations such as the Dunellen Redevelopment Economic Corporation (DERCO), a committee of business owners, residents, and Dunellen patrons that make decisions on prospective businesses within the town. Cilento hopes to create the perfect community where major businesses and even small, Mom and Pop type businesses, have an opportunity to contribute to Dunellen. He is also using social media, such as Facebook, to help enhance the town.

When he isn’t working on his papers or covering his responsibilities, he is volunteering. He created a program called Community Involved, which works with younger community members to help clean up the streets; is a board director for a group called Juggling Life, whose purpose is to entertain terminally ill children; and works with the volunteer department. He is, in every way, determined to provide a better Dunellen for all its residents, starting in its government. “It doesn’t matter what party you are, as long as everybody works together,” said Cilento. He identifies time as his biggest struggle. “I work, I go to school, I have a social life, I help run a community, and I volunteer,” he says. “I’m up late at night.” However, he doesn’t frown upon all the responsibility, rather understands that it is part of his success. He recommends that every Kean student start to make their own success before graduation. “Get involved as soon as possible, so you know if it’s what you want to do for the rest of your life,” he suggests. “And talk to those who are in the industry you want to get in to.” All of Cilento’s achievements are easily summed up in the work ethic that he embodies. “I like to give back. It’s my hometown. I love my town. I think the greatest gift you can give is to give back to your community,” he says. For more information, visit www.jasoncilento.org.

1. Resolve to eat healthier 2. Resolve to be more physically active and fit 3. Resolve to eliminate stress from your life 4. Resolve to lose weight 5. Resolve to quit smoking 6. Resolve to drink more water In the last twenty-five years, resolutions concerning weight, exercise, better relationships, and smoking cessation have been at the top of the calendar objectives for both sexes. Health and fitness should be at the first thing in your mind when writing your new year’s resolution. Why? It is only when you are healthy that you can enjoy your life and can share your love with the people you care about and when you are healthy and fit that you can live your life to the fullest. However, the path to good health is not an easy one with many roadblocks along the way. Statistics: • • • •

75% of people will make it past the first week 71% of people will make it past two weeks Following one month 64% of people are still on task Six months later, 46% are still putting forth effort to attain their goal

However, while the majority of people who make new year’s resolutions will break them, research shows that making a resolution is useful. The American Psychology Association suggests that individuals who “explicitly make resolutions are ten times

more likely to attain their goals than people who don’t explicitly make resolutions. What can we do to increase the odds of success? What can we do to avoid the instinctive resistance to substantial change? What does it take to make a decision a reality? Well, • • •

Looking back and ahead is the first step in making a conscious decision to live differently Incremental change is the key for most of us Have a realistic goal, a reason for that goal, and realistic expectations

The goal creates the right path and the reason helps guide you on the path. The secret to self improvement is persistence, not perfection. It is well within reach. The journey to better health is very exciting. So let me wish you a healthy and happy journey in 2011. Enjoy it! For more reliable health information resources go to • • • •

www.healthfinder.gov www.healthypeople.gov www.wonder.cdc.gov/data2010 www.odphp.osophs.dhhs.gov

Dr. Josh Palgi is a professor in the Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health Department.


10

Feb. 10, 2011 - Mar. 2, 2011 | The Tower

SPORTS PLAYER PROFILE: JOnathan jones By Daniel dolocheck

Raised in Newark until the age of 13, Jones eventually moved with his family to nearby Linden. He attributes his success

“He saw something in me that I didn’t even see in myself.”

Jonathan Jones.

Photo: Kean Athletics

in life to both of his parents. Jones relayed that it was his father who helped build his character, and taught him to always stay humble in success and failure. He stressed that it’s important to always be a gentleman and strive for righteousness. It was his mother, on the other hand, who enforced that the road to a successful life is paved through higher education. As for his success on the court, Jones praises current head coach Rob Kurzinsky

COACH PROFILE: SPORTS CAN BE A LIFE CHANGER By CHRISTINE VALDEZ

A new season is underway for Kean University’s men’s volleyball team. Starting the season with a brand new team is an accomplishment for Coach Don Perkins. Perkins, a native of Albany, NY, is guiding the Cougars in their new Varsity status this season. Although volleyball is an

of his favorite hobbies. Perkins started his coaching career with a girl’s youth volleyball club team and numerous college clubs, such as the Syracuse men’s club team. Yet, it was the call from SUNY Institute of Technology in Utica, NY, that changed his career indefinitely. After coaching the team for a year, he

“How could you do what you do for fun and get paid for it.”

Photo: Christine Valdez

Volleyball coach Don Perkins.

important part of his life, it wasn’t always that way. Growing up, Coach Perkins had different ambitions in mind. “I received a call one day to become a full time coach, I didn’t even know what that was,” said Perkins. “I didn’t know that was an option.” Perkins graduated from Syracuse University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science, and University of Albany, where he obtained a Master’s in Public Administration. Although he originally went to school on a debate scholarship, he admitted that he wanted to pursue a career in International Security, with a goal to work for the CIA. Throughout college, Perkins played basketball. However, during the offseason, he found volleyball as a way to keep active and prepare for the upcoming basketball season. Over time, volleyball became one

for turning him into the player that he is today. Coach Kurzinsky kept pushing him because he saw what Jones could become.

moved on to become an assistant coach for Mississippi State a Division I team for two years, and then took over the head coach position after the coach retired. Kean University was one of six institutions that offered Perkins a position when he began his job search. The position as coach for the Cougar’s volleyball teams was the one he accepted. Since arriving at Kean University in August 2009, Perkins has become the head coach for both women’s and men’s volleyball teams. This spring semester marks his first season with the men’s team as varsity status. He describes his relationship with both teams as “strange” because they both have needs, schedules, and recruiting to consider. “Whatever team I’m on at the time I focus one hundred percent,” said Perkins. Upon his six years of coaching, Perkins is thankful for all the opportunities that the sport has brought him. He started volleyball as a hobby and has now turned it into a full-time job. He says it’s been a lot of work but it’s something that he enjoys. “This is what I did for fun,” said Perkins. “How could you do what you do for fun and get paid for it?”

GO COUGARS!

“He saw something in me that I didn’t even see in myself,” said Jones. “He truly wanted to get the best out of me and did a great job.” Jones also praised former Kean basketball player, Vinnie Darpino, for teaching him the importance of working on his game all year long. His current teammate and best friend, Robert Lewis, also helped him by developing his skills on the defensive side of the ball. Success hasn’t always come easy for the senior forward. Jones played basketball in high school but didn’t get to much court time. In fact he never even started a game.

After his senior year in high school, he knew that he still wanted to play the game and was confident that he could compete on the Division III level. He chose Kean, which ended up being a great choice for both him and the school. He believes that Kean is where he is supposed to be and wants to stay and build the program up as much as he can. “I just want to build this program up. Kean is here. I want to help this team. It’s all about Kean. I’m thankful that I’m a catalyst for building this program up,” said Jones. Jones, who is currently studying therapeutic recreation, hopes to work with the elderly after graduation; something he has wanted to do since he was little. But for now, he is taking his senior year one day at a time. “I want to take each day and game one day at a time and help the team in the NJAC playoffs,” said Jones.

Beating the Winter Blues By Samantha Feller

Does winter have you feeling down in the dumps? When the sun seems to go into hibernation and the air is consistently frosty, it could seem impossible to dodge those pesky winter blues. It may be very hard for students to maintain their health, happiness, and energy during these icy months. In order to preserve your well being, it is important to take a break from your daily routine and make sure you are taking care of yourself. “The first thing that comes to mind is to be active,” said Certified Holistic Health Counselor, Jennifer Wisnew. “Any kind of movement or exercise will increase serotonin in the brain.” Serotonin is a chemical that is responsible for causing sensations of pleasure in the brain. “Keeping blood sugar stabilized is also important,” Wisnew said. “It can be done through eating low glycemic foods and avoiding sugar.” Maintaining a healthy diet and consuming the necessary vitamins is vital. Not only for health in the winter months, but all year round. Being healthy can become a priority with a small adjustment in routine and diet. “Whole grains are very good to eat,” Wisnew continued. “Taking vitamin D is important because of the lack of sunlight. Some foods that contain vitamin D are eggs, fish and milk.” So stay away from those candy bars! Get exercise and get out of the house. Do things that make you happy and put you in high spirits. “I like to play board games with my family and friends when it’s cold out,” Kori Cuomo, a student said. “Also, listening to pretty much any kind of music puts me in a good mood.” It is important to surround yourself with loved ones and friends especially around this time of year. Eating right and exercising are both crucial to maintain health. “Students should talk to people about

how they feel and if they recognize signs of depression,” said Licensed Clinical Social Worker at Gordon and Behar Counseling Associates, Dawn Behar. “Some symptoms are trouble with sleeping, irritability, anxiety, feeling blue, drastic weight change

Photo: Gabrielle M.

Some people dream about gracing the pages of Sports Illustrated. Jonathan Jones did just that, as he is featured in their Jan. 24 issue. He’s mentioned in their ‘Faces in the Crowd’ section due to his outstanding play on the basketball court this year. Jones had a double-double in each of Kean’s first 15 games of the season to lead Division III in that category, which now has stretched to 17. He also leads all NCAA divisions in rebounding, with just fewer than 15.0 per game. Jones is ranked third in Division III men’s basketball with 24.4 points per game. This season, Jones became the 30th member of the 1,000 point club at Kean University. He reached the milestone on Dec. 21st in Kean’s win over DeSales University. Jones has also been named the NJAC Player of the Week five times this season, and was named first-team Atlantic Region last year. The humble Jones described his style of play as calm, but with a burning fire inside to play well and hard.

“The first thing that comes to mind is to be active… any kind of movement or exercise will increase serotonin in the brain.” and isolation.” Kean offers exercise and dance classes at the Harwood Arena in D’Angola in room 170, which makes being active convenient and accessible. Starting Feb. 1, salsa and yoga classes will be available on Mondays and Wednesdays. Salsa class will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. and yoga class will be held 12 to 1 p.m. Beginning Feb. 2, Zumba class will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. and kickboxing sessions will be from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Both classes will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Besides exercise, choosing a good diet that includes all of the food groups can aid in maintaining daily energy. “Greens are very energizing because they give cells a lot of oxygen,” Wisnew said. “Dark leafy greens like spinach and romaine lettuce are good.” So by exercising, eating healthy and making time for yourself, those winter blues will be banished in no time!


The Tower | Feb. 10, 2011 - Mar. 2, 2011

11

CAMPUS SPORTS

Men’s Basketball Has Turnaround Season By Danielle McFadden

This year will require the men’s basketball team to make some changes, and they are embracing it. They have done more then come together as a team; they have united as a program. Since 2005, the men’s basketball team won no more than 14 total games in one season. In the 2010-2011 seasons, the team is currently 14-6 in the season, with seven games left to play before the playoffs begin. The team shows that hard work pays off with endless dedication. Last year’s season ended with nine wins and 16 losses. This year, Kean has six wins and two losses in the conference, and remains undefeated on the home court. With five conference games left in the regular season, and a top five in the NJAC,

Kean’s men’s basketball team is a threat to its competitors.

bounds this season; leading his team and the NJAC conference in scoring and re-

“We always remind ourselves that we enter every practice game or anything as if we never won anything, despite our success.” With a total of 17 players on the team, each player has contributed something to the success of the program. But some are truly showing through. All American Jonathan Jones has become the face of Kean men’s basketball. Jones is averaging 25 points and 14 re-

Photo: Danielle McFaddenz

The men’s team after playing Stevens.

bounding. Jones leads NCAA Division III in double-doubles with a total of 18 and all three NCAA Divisions in rebounding with 14 per game. From the outside looking in, Jones

seems to be the face of the team, however there are other players on the team that, although not scoring all the points, remind the team of their path to success. Freshman John Green, a forward, is valuable asset to lead to the team’s success. Green is a former manager of the team, known for his encouraging words and work ethic. “Last season it was hard to deal with not being able to play, but the fact that coach gave me a shot made me want the opportunity even more,” said Green. Their season has been successful so far, however, there is plenty more to come. “We always remind ourselves that we enter every practice game or anything as if we never won anything, despite our success,” said Green.

After Star Player Graduates, Womens Basketball Still Wins Games By Matt Chin

One might think that after a team loses a player of Melissa Beyruti’s caliber, it may be a struggle to win the following year. It would even be understandable. However, it’s not the case with the Kean’s women’s basketball team. The team opened the season with a decisive 90-47 win at McDaniel College.   “I mean we’ve always had other kids that could do what Melissa did and score points,” said head coach Michele Sharp.  

In years past, the Cougars may have had to rely upon Beyruti to provide a chunk of the team’s scoring, but this year, the players are working harder and it is showing. “If you look at our stats, at our games, it’s been a variety of kids depending on the game,” said Sharp. It’s been all of our starters at some point, and people coming off the bench.” For Sharp’s team, the name of the game this year is balance. “They’ve all taken turns really contributing in the scoring column. So there isn’t

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just one person,” said Sharp. “I think we’re just a more balanced team this year.” Leading the women’s team this season is senior forward, Tiffany Patrick. She is

“I think they’re good communicators, and they’ve acted as a good liaison between the team and the coaching staff.” Photo: Tara Polen

averaging 14 points a game. Patrick’s ability to rebound the ball is a major help with her scoring. “Tiffany is having a good year; she’s one of the top rebounders in our conference,” said Sharp.  Patrick, along with Simone Smith and Nicole Biesek, were named team captains this year. And the leadership of the three has helped the Cougars win 16 games so far this season. “I think they’re good communicators, and they’ve acted as a good liaison between the team and the coaching staff,” TMP PRODUCTION said Sharp.   CBUSBY The team’s ultimate goal this year is to kls Last year, the win a NCAA Championship. Cougars lost in the Elite Eight round of the tournament. “Obviously everybody was very disap-

Tiffany Patrick defending.

pointed. We had a lead late in the game,” said Sharp. “We just came undone.” Sharp thinks that this year could be different. The Cougars have a more challenging schedule, which means they could be better prepared for the tournament. “We played Amherst College and they were number one in the country. They hadn’t lost a regular season game in two years,” said Sharp. “We were the first team to beat them, here at home, a couple weeks ago.” Sharp hopes this year is different. BMM003562B 2011 Though, a little luck may be required. 5 x 3.75 N/A “They’re a talented group of kids. Any1 When you getBELLB0001 thing is possible. to that level, that deep in the tournament, you need a little bit of luck, too,” said Sharp.

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12

Feb. 10, 2011 - Mar. 2, 2011 | The Tower

SPORTS

Improvements Needed for Giant and Jets

TEAM DOLOCHECK

TEAM CHIN

Daniel Dolocheck

The New York Jets were an 11-win team and made it to the AFC Championship game for the second consecutive year. This is a tremendous feat for any team, but they didn’t win the Super Bowl, which was promised by second-year head coach, Rex Ryan. In order for the Jets to make it to the big game in the future and win it, they are going to have to have a smart and productive off-season. These are the areas I feel the Jets need to address most. Receiver: The Jets are going to have to make some tough decisions with their receiver corps. Santonio Holmes, Braylon Edwards, and Brad Smith are all set to be free agents. The Jets will most likely be unable to hang on to all three. I foresee the Jets keeping Holmes and Smith. Holmes had almost 800 yards receiving, despite missing the first four games of the season. Brad Smith is Mr. Versatility; he can play receiver, quarterback, and kick returner. He plays a huge role and should be retained. Linebacker: Their most productive linebacker, David Harris is a free agent. This is a no brainer. He must be resigned. Defensive Line: This is where the Jets need to do the most work. They have almost no pure pass rush. They were eighth in the league in sacks, but most were because of coverage and blitz packages. They need to either draft or trade for a pure pass rusher. The Jets longest tenured player is Sean Ellis. The 11-year veteran is 33 years old and can still get the job done. However, if he wants an extension and sizeable contract, I don’t see the Jets retaining his services. The Jason Taylor experiment did not work out. He does have one year left on his contract, but I don’t expect to see him back next year. Kris Jenkins, their star defensive tackle is trying to come back from his second consecutive major knee surgery. He’s played just seven games in the past two years. The Jets need to add depth at this position because he is such a question mark.   Safety: Jim Leonard is the general of the Jets secondary, but he is currently rehabbing after fracturing his right tibia. He should be good to go when training camp begins. It’s the other side of the field that the Jets need to think about. Eric Smith, Brodney Pool, and James Ihedigbo are all set to be free agents. All three are capable players but I doubt the Jets will be able to retain all three.   Cornerback: The Jets are set on one side of the field with Darrell Revis. Butthe other side of the field is going to need some improvement. Antonio Cromartie will be a priority for the Jets this off-season. They shipped a second round pick to the Chargers to get him. While he does have his shortcomings, he is still a dynamic complement to Revis. Drew Coleman is also a free agent. The only way I see the Jets retaining Coleman is if Cromartie’s demands for a new contract are not exuberant.  

“They need to either draft or trade for a pure pass rusher.”

By Matt Chin

Photo: nymag.com

Football season is over and until next September, there is nothing left to watch all day on Sundays. Teams, however, will still be making moves during the off-season to better prepare for the upcoming season. While the Giants didn’t make the playoffs, the team finished 10-6. There were some areas in which the team improved, and other areas where it regressed. Let’s check out some of the positive and negatives from

this past season: Quarterback: Eli Manning is a Super Bowl MVP. He is a borderline elite talent. He has a good arm and is relatively accurate; some passes, however, can get away from him. He has been able to make a play in the clutch. This season he made some really good plays, and then he made some really dumb plays. He threw 31 touchdown passes this year. Unfortunately, his 25 thrown interceptions negated a lot of that. It’s up to Manning to fix it. He’s a better quarterback than that. Hopefully, next season will be a different story.  Coaching: Tom Coughlin is one of the best coaches out there. The Giants made the right choice by not firing him. Wide Receivers: Hakeem Nicks, Mario Manningham, and Steve Smith are great receivers. Nicks and Manningham are young and are sometimes prone to making mistakes. A lot of balls tipped off their hands this season. Smith was injured for a large portion of the season, causing Manning to lose his security blanket. They will be better next season.  Running Backs: Ahmad Bradshaw and Brandon Jacobs formed a pretty solid duo this season. Bradshaw was a hard runner, as was Jacobs. But Bradshaw fumbled a lot. He needs to fix that. He’s an unrestricted free agent this off-season and he needs to be resigned. Jacobs may not be back next year. If not, the Giants need to think about drafting another running back. Maybe Alabama’s Mark Ingram?  Offensive Line This area needs significant improvement. The players here are still good, but they’re old. They’re always injured. The team might consider drafting a center out of the draft, and possibly acquiring other linemen through free agency.   Defensive Line and Linebackers: This is probably the strongest area of the team. Justin Tuck, Osi Umenyiora, Jason Pierre-Paul, and Barry Cofield are all still great players. None of them show any signs of slowing. However, the one area that needs to be filled in this front seven is middle linebacker. Jonathan Goff did an admirable job this season, but some depth may be required.  Secondary: In 2009, this was a much-maligned unit; this year, it was a muchimproved unit. Rolle and a healthy Phillips solidified this part of the defense. Terrell Thomas and Corey Webster have the ability to change games. Some depth may be required in both the safeties and the cornerbacks.

CRAVING PIZZA? GET THE DISH ON WHERE TO SATISFY IT - PAGE 4

Diana Marchese Senior, English Major

Michelle Cannizzaro Senior, English Major

“To remember I may not be able to control the situations that come my way, but I can control how I experience them.”

“To increase my GPA from a 3.64 to a 3.65 in order to graduate ‘magna cum laude.’”

By Francesca Figalo

Mike Shaughnessy Sophomore, Physical Education Major

“To be more respectful to others.”

Florie Nikovic Junior, Early Childhood Education Major

“To exercise more often in order to stay healthy and in shape.”

Photos: Francesca Figalo

INQUIRING PHOTOGRAPHER: What is your new year’s resolution?

Kean Tower - Feb. 10 - March 2, 2011  

The Tower, Kean University's student nespaper

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