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The resource for newcomers to North Georgia




The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Welcome

A publication of Page 3

From Gainesville’s origins as Mule Camp Springs to Dahlonega’s gold legacy and Helen’s beginnings as a logging town, Northeast Georgia has made its claim in the South’s past, adding allure to its present.

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Did you ever wonder how the area’s towns and cities got their names? Many of the key figures in the region’s history live on, from Lyman Hall to James Longstreet and beyond.

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The arts community in Hall County celebrates the creative spirit of its people in many ways, providing residents with music, dance, theater and the visual arts in many venues.

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The area’s nonprofit agencies serve the community in many ways, helping residents connect with their neighbors and the causes that fit them best.

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Gainesville and Hall County offer dozens of parks and community centers that provide a wide variety of amenities, fun and natural beauty.

Community calendars

Banks County Dawson County Forsyth County Habersham County Hall County Jackson County

19 19 19 19 16 19

Lumpkin County Rabin County Towns County Union County White County Region Map

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On the cover

Staff photographer Scott Rogers caught this shot of a butterfly at Wilshire Trails last year after the annual Friends of the Parks Butterfly Release.




The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Region shines in its rich history A cultural blend from Mule Camp to gold to bavaria

By Jennifer Jackson Whitley

N

For Welcome

ewcomers to Northeast Georgia may have already experienced its mountainous beauty and Southern charm, but where this area shines is in its rich history. From Gainesville’s honorary origins to Dahlonega’s gold legacy and Helen’s beginnings as a logging town, Northeast Georgia has made its claim in the South’s past, adding allure to its present. Gainesville, established as “Mule Camp Springs” in the 1800s, received the suggestion of its current name from John V. Cotter, one of its original settlers, who named the town in honor of Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines, whom he fought with during the War of 1812. Many other cities are named in honor of Gaines, from Florida to Missouri. Although Gainesville has humble beginnings, it is not without a quirky past. “There is a weird tale from downtown,” said Jeff Pierce, a lifetime Gainesville resident and active volunteer for the Northeast Georgia History Center. “Where the Jackson building is now lived a young attorney. He became very ill, and changed his will a few days before he died. In it, he asked his best friend to marry his fiancé after he passed. When he died, he was buried at his residence and the friend married the fiancé.” Known for many things, Gainesville may be best known as the “Poultry Capital of the World,” named so after World War II, when Jesse Jewell founded the now $1 billion a year poultry industry. “As far back as the late 1800s, poultry was a major component of the agricultural economy. It really began to boom as a poultry center during the 1950s. It helped to diversify Hall County’s industrial and commercial bases,” said Johnny Vardeman, retired editor of The Times who writes a Sunday column on local history. “As crop farming waned, this gave farmers another option.”

Scott Rogers | Welcome

The Dahlonegha Gold Museum sits on the square in downtown Dahlonegha.

Vardeman has lived in Gainesville for 65 years. “My advice to newcomers would be to study the community’s history, get to know a longtime resident who can fill you in on places to shop, eat, be entertained, worship and navigate traffic,” Vardeman said. “Gainesville is a good home because of friendly people, diversity, emphasis on arts and culture, charity, nearness to big city and beautiful mountains, Lake Lanier, educational opportunities, numerous church choices, parks and green space.”

On top of its current attraction, Gainesville has had nine presidents visit since its inaugurations. “In 1938, Roosevelt gave ‘The Gainesville Speech’ here that caused disruption all over the world for its anti-capitalism content,” Pierce said. Although many visitors have passed through, possibly the most famous resident lives in Pearce Auditorium at Brenau University: Agnes the ghost.

» Please see History, 4

‘My advice to newcomers would be to study the community’s history, get to know a longtime resident who can fill you in on places to shop, eat, be entertained, worship and navigate traffic.’ Johnny Vardman




The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

History Continued from 3

“Two years ago, my daughter and I joined paranormal investigators in Pearce Auditorium,” Pierce said. “At midnight, after we finished setting up the equipment, my daughter, an investigator and I were sitting in the balcony.” “At the same time, my daughter and I looked at each other. She asked me, ‘Did you hear that? I heard somebody crying.’ I heard somebody crying, too, so I told the investigator,” he said. Two weeks later, after the investigators finished studying the tapes, they brought Pierce some interesting news. “They played the tapes and I distinctly heard crying on the radio. I have to tell you, I’m not a believer in any of this stuff, but boy did that make the hair on the back of my neck stand up,” Pierce said.

Dahlonega’s legacy of gold Up the road from Gainesville is Dahlonega, site of the first major U.S. gold rush in 1828, 20 years before California’s Gold Rush. And visitors can still luck up and find some nuggets of their own these days. “With gold now at $1,500 an ounce, adults and kids go wild panning for gold at two real mines where they get to take home any treasure they find,” said Tourism Director Jay Markwalter of the Dahlonega-Lumpkin County Chamber of Commerce. Visitors can see giant chunks of gold at the Dahlonega Gold Museum, located in the Old Lumpkin County Courthouse, one of the oldest surviving courthouses in Georgia. “This was the largest operation east of the Mississippi,” Markwalter said. “Some of the ruins remain, and visitors can explore the tunnels deep below where gold-bearing rock can still be found.” Though most known for its gold legacy, Dahlonega became a Hollywood film location for silent movies around 1915. “The original version of the historic Holly Theatre, built in 1939, first showed one of the earliest John Wayne movies when he was still named Marion Morrison,” Markwalter said. “Today, it’s a thriving center for contemporary and historical productions.” The oldest surviving building on the square is the Crimson Moon Cafe, built in 1858, one of the South’s oldest music halls. “Many of Dahlonega’s restaurants are located in the carefully-restored wooden historic buildings on the Downtown Square, with welcoming porches that serve as the perfect place for people-watching or enjoying a delicious meal, snack or refreshment,”

» Please see History, 5

Photos by Scott Rogers | Welcome

Visitors observe the Chestatee River diving bell in its permanent home in downtown Dahlonega.

To find out more Gainesville History: www.gainesville.org/history President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s visits: georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu/FDRvisit. htm FDR’s speech to Gainesville: http://tinyurl. com/bta459n

Dahlonega History of Lumpkin County: www. lumpkinhistory.org/ About the city: www.Dahlonega.org Chestatee Wildlife Preserve & Zoo: www. chestateewildlife.com Gold mines: www.consolidatedgoldmine. com/

Helen About the city: www.helenga.org The Dahlonega Gold Museum is located on the square in downtown Dahlonega and was formerly the historic town’s courthouse.




The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Photos by Scott Rogers | Welcome

Visitors to Helen dart in and out of shops during a snowfall earlier this year.

History Continued from 4

Markwalter said. “Even our nationally-acclaimed local wineries have a tasting room in a restored building.” One of the area’s most recent historical finds is the 6 ton, 14-foot by 6-foot by 8-foot Chestatee River Diving Bell, an artifact from Dahlonega’s mining era, on display in Hancock Park. “The bell was brought to Dahlonega in 1875 by Philologus Loud, an inventor/entrepreneur whose company spent a fortune on it, along with a steamboat to transport it on the river. All was lost the very next year when the boat sank in the Chestatee — a financial disaster like many others associated with the lure of gold,” said Markwalter. “For the past 31 years, an amazing series of discoveries and events has led to the restored Chestatee River Diving Bell receiving a permanent port of call in Hancock Park. This early technological monstrosity has been quite a draw recently,” he said.

Helen’s Alpine transformation Another Northeast Georgia treasure is Helen, entirely revitalized in the late 1960s. Once a rural mountain community, Helen has been remodeled to look like an Alpine Village. Prior to 1800, the area was the center of Cherokee Indian culture, with villages scattered throughout Nacoochee and what is

now known as Helen valleys. A townhouse was located on top of at least one of the four ceremonial mounds in Nacoochee Valley. Gold was discovered on Dukes Creek in Nacoochee Valley in 1828. The Great Georgia Gold Rush belt was bound by Dahlonega on the west and Nacoochee-Helen Valley on the east. In 1912, the Byrd-Matthews Lumber Co. built a great sawmill in Helen, taking advantage of the abundant virgin timber in the valley. The town was named after Helen McComb, the daughter of a Byrd-Matthews manager. The lumber company, located in the center of Helen on the Chattahoochee River, continued sawmill operations until 1931. After settlers left for other opportunities, by the 1960s, there was nothing left except a dreary row of concrete block structures. In 1968, local businessmen met to discuss what could be done to improve their town. They approached a nearby artist who had been stationed in Germany, and he sketched the look of the town in an Alpine theme. In January 1969, business owners and local carpenters began turning ideas into reality. By 1972, its makeover was complete and it became a major tourist attraction. One of Helen’s main attractions is Anna Ruby Falls, a 150-foot waterfall in the Chattahoochee National Forest. No matter what city newcomers visit, Northeast Georgia has much to offer — for history buffs, nature-lovers and visitors of all kinds.

A horse-drawn carriage makes its way through the streets of downtown Helen during a snowfall in February.




Welcome

Inside this guide you will find plenty of resources for whatever county you live in: Hall County Population: 179,684 (2010 census) Square miles: 393.7 Founded: 1818 Named for: Dr. L yman Hall, signer of the Declaration of Independence and later governor of Georgia. County seat: Gainesville Government: Five-member Board of Commissioners elected by district, with elected chairman, all serving four-year terms.

contact info Government County offices: 770-535-8288, www.hallcounty. org Chamber of Commerce: 770-532-6206, www. ghcc.com; Convention and Visitors’ Bureau, 770-536-5209, www.lakelaniercvb.com Gainesville: City Hall, 770-535-6865, pr@ gainesville.org, www.gainesville.org; police, 701 Queen City Parkway, 770-534-5252; fire, 725 Pine St., 770-534-3612; municipal court, 770-531-2668 Braselton: Town Hall, 4982 Ga. 53, 706-6543915, www.braselton.net.; library, 132 W. Broadway, Braselton, 706-654-1992. Clermont: P.O. Box 257, 770-983-7568, www. clermont.georgia.gov Flowery Branch: City Hall, 5517 Main St., 770967-6371, www.flowerybranchga.org Gillsville: City Hall, 6288 Ga. 52, 30543, 770869-9000 Oakwood: City Hall, 4035 Walnut Circle, 770534-2365, www.cityofoakwood.net Lula: City Hall, 6055 Main St., P.O. Box 99, 770869-3801, www.lula.georgia.gov

The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013 Hall County Library System: 127 Main St. N.W., Gainesville, 770-532-3311; Blackshear Place branch, 770-287-3654; Clermont branch, 770983-3196; East Hall branch, 770-531-2500 Gainesville City Schools: 508 Oak St. N.W., Gainesville; 770-536-5275, www.gcssk12.net Hall County Schools: 711 Green St., Suite 100, Gainesville, 770-534-1080, www.hallco.org Chattahoochee Christian School: 640 Main St., P.O. Box 254, Clermont, 770-983-9433, chattahoocheechristian.org/index.html Hopewell Christian Academy: 5086 Poplar Springs Road, Gainesville, 770-297-0220, www.hopewellchristianacademyonline.org Jubilee Christian Academy: 1221 Harmony St., Gainesville, 770-531-7576, www. jubileestallions.com/index.html Lakeview Academy: 796 Lakeview Drive, Gainesville, 770-532-4383, www. lakeviewacademy.com Maranatha Christian Academy: 5135 McEver Road, Oakwood, 770-536-6334, www. maranathaacademy.com Riverside Military Academy: 2001 Riverside Drive, Gainesville, 770-532-6251, www.cadet.com North Georgia Christian School: 1397 Thompson Bridge Road, Gainesville, GA 30501, 770-5341081, northgeorgiachristian.org University of North Georgia, Gainesville campus: 770-718-3639, www.ung.edu Brenau University: Gainesville, 770-534-6299, 800-252-5119, www.brenau.edu Lanier Technical College: Oakwood, 770-5316300, www.laniertech.edu

Banks County Population: 18,395 (2010 census) Square miles: 233.7 Founded: 1858 Named for: Dr. Richard Banks of Gainesville, who treated not only settlers of the area but their Cherokee neighbors when smallpox struck. County seat: Homer Government: Five-member commission led by chairman, elected to four-year terms

contact info Government Board of Commissioners: 144 Yonah-Homer Road, Suit 1, Homer, 30547. 706-677-6200 Chamber of Commerce: 706-677-2108, bankscountychamber@alltel.net, www. bankscountyga.org; Convention and Visitors Bureau, 706-677-5265 Homer City Hall: 706-677-3510

Emergency services

Emergency services

Hall County Sheriff’s Office: 225 Green St., Gainesville, 770-531-6900 Hall County Fire Dept.: 731 E. Crescent Drive, Gainesville, 770-531-6838

County Sheriff’s Office: 706-677-2248 Clerk Of Court: 706-677-6243 Fire Chief: 706-677-1812

Community resources Northeast Georgia Medical Center: 743 Spring St. NE, Gainesville, 770-219-9000 Hall County Health Dept.: 1290 Athens St., Gainesville, 770-531-5600

Community resources Banks County Public Library: 226 Ga. 51 S., Homer, 706-677-3164 Health Department: 706-677-2296 Northridge Medical Center: 70 Medical Ave., Commerce: 706-335-1000

Banks County School System: 102 Ga. 51 S., Homer, 30547, 706-677-2224, www.banks. k12.ga.us.

Dawson County Population: 22,330 (2010 census) Square miles: 211 Founded: 1857 Named for: Judge William C. Dawson, who served in both houses of the state legislature, then in the U.S. Congress prior to the Civil War. County seat: Dawsonville Government: Five-member commission, four representing districts and a chairman, all elected at-large to four-year terms.

contact info Government County government: 25 Justice Way, Dawsonville, 30534, 706-344-3501, fax 706344-3889, www.dawsoncounty.org. Chamber of Commerce: 706-265-6278, newcomer@dawson.org, www.dawson.org Dawsonville: 706-265-3256; www.dawsonvillega.gov, cityhall@dawsonville.com Clerk, Superior Court: 706-344-3510

Emergency services Dawson County Sheriff’s Dept.: Dawsonville, 706344-3535, www.dawsoncountysheriff.org Ambulance Service: 706-344-3711 EMA: 706-265-7813 County Fire Chief: 706-344-3666

Community resources Health Department: 706-265-2930 Dawson County Library: 342 Allen St., Dawsonville, 706-344-3690, dawson@ chestateelibrary.org Dawson County School System: 706-265-3246, www.dawson.k12.ga.us

Forsyth County Population: 175,511 (2010 census) Square miles: 225.8 Founded: 1832 Named for: John Forsyth, attorney general of Georgia, member of both houses of Congress and U.S. secretary of state under Presidents Jackson and Van Buren. County seat: Cumming Government: Five-member commission serving districts, elected to four-year terms; chairman chosen by members.

Contact info Government Board of Commissioners: 110 E. Main St., Suite 210, Cumming, 770-781-2101, www.forsythco. com Administration Building: 110 E. Main St., Sharon Springs Branch Office, 1950 Sharon Road, Cumming, 770-781-2112

Chamber of Commerce: 770-887-6461, www. cummingforsythchamber.org City of Cumming: 100 Main St., 770-781-2010; police, 770-781-2000

Emergency services County Sheriff’s Department: 202 Old Buford Road, Cumming, 770-781-2222; www. forsythsheriff.org; twpaxton@co.forsyth.ga.us Fire Department: 3480 Settingdown Road, Cumming, 770-781-2180

Community resources Northside Hospital: 1200 Baptist Medical Center Drive, Cumming, 770-844-3200, www. northside.com Libraries: Cumming branch, 585 Dahlonega Road, 770-781-9840; Sharon Forks branch, 2820 Old Atlanta Road, Cumming, 770-7819840 Forsyth County School System: 1120 Dahlonega Highway, Cumming, 770-887-2461, www. forsyth.k12.ga.us

Habersham County Population: 43,041 (2010 census) Square miles: 278.2 Founded: 1818 Named for: Maj. Joseph Habersham, President George Washington’s postmaster general and a mayor of Savannah County seat: Clarkesville Government: Five-member commission, all elected at-large to four-year terms, chairman and vice chairman elected by board

contact info Government County Commission: 555 Monroe Street, Unit 20, Clarkesville; 706-839-0200, www. co.habersham.ga.us Chamber of Commerce: 706-778-4654, www. habershamchamber.com Cornelia: 181 Larkin St., 706-778-8585 Clarkesville: 210 East Water St., 706-754-4216 Alto: 162 Grant St., 706-778-8035 Baldwin: 130 Airport Road, 706-778-6341 Demorest: 579 Georgia St., 706-778-4202 Mount Airy: 869 Dick’s Hill Parkway, 706-7786990 Tallulah Falls: 255 Main St., 706-754-6040

Emergency services Central Dispatch: 706-778-3911 Emergency medical services: 706-754-6262 Fire department: 706-754-2822 Sheriff’s office: 1000 Detention Drive, Clarkesville, 706-839-0500

Community resources Habersham County Medical Center: 541 U.S. 441 N., 706-754-2161, www.hcmcmed.org Clarkesville Library: 178 E. Green St., Clarkesville, 706-754-4413




The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013 Cornelia Library: 301 N. Main St., Cornelia, 706778-2635 Schools Habersham County School System: P.O. Box 70, W. Stanford Mill Road, Clarkesville, 706-7542118, www.habershamschools.com Tallulah Falls School: Ga. 441, Tallulah Falls, 706-754-3171, www.tallulahfalls.org Piedmont College: 165 Central Ave., P.O. Box 10, Demorest, 800-277-7020, 706-776-0103; www.piedmont.edu North Georgia Technical College: Ga. 197 N, Clarkesville, 706-754-7700, www.ngtcollege. orgvww

Jackson County Population: 60,485 (2010 census) Square miles: 342.4 Founded: 1796 Named for: Gen. James Jackson, Revolutionary War leader and later member of Congress County seat: Jefferson Government: Five-member commission with an elected chairman, four members elected by district to four-year terms

contact info Government Board of Commissioners: County Administrative Building, 67 Athens St., Jefferson, 706-3676312, www.jacksoncountygov.com. Courthouse: 706-387-6000 Chamber of Commerce: 706-387-0300, www. jacksoncountyga.com Jefferson: City Hall, 147 Athens St., Jefferson, 30549, 706-367-5121, www.cityofjeffersonga. com; police, 706-367-5231, www. cityofjeffersonpolice.com; fire, 706-387-7400, dispatch 706-367-1234, www.jeffersonfd.com; library, 379 Old Pendergrass Road, 706-3678012, www.prlib.org/jefferson Arcade: City Hall, P.O. Box 417, Jefferson, GA 30549, 706-367-5500, cityofarcade@ windstream.net; police, 706-367-1821; fire, 706-367-4488 Braselton: Town Hall, 4982 Ga. 53, P.O. Box 306, Braselton, 706-654-3915, www.braselton. net; police, 706-658-2852 Commerce: P.O. Box 348, 27 Sycamore St., Commerce, 706-335-3164, www.commercega. org; police, 706-335-3200; fire, 706-335-2190; library, 1344 South Broad St., 706-335-5946 Hoschton: City Hall, 79 City Square, Hoschton, 706-654-3034, www.cityofhoschton.com Maysville: Town Hall, P.O. Box 86, Maysville, 706-652-2274; police, 706-652-3494; fire, 706-652-2050; library, 9247 Gillsville Road, 706-652-2323 Nicholson: 17175 Lakeview Drive, Nicholson, GA, 706-757-3408, www.nicholson-ga.com; fire, 706-757-3912; library, 5466 U.S. 441 S., 706-757-3577 Pendergrass: City Hall, 41 Blackberry Lane, Pendergrass, GA 30567, 706-693-2494, www. cityofpendergrass.com; police, 706-693-2386; fire, 706-693-2701; library, 706-693-4450 Talmo: City Hall, P.O. Box 70, 45 AJ Irvin Road, Talmo, 706-693-2325, talmo-ga.com; library, 706-693-1905

Emergency services Jackson County Sheriff’s Office: 268 Curtis H. Spence Drive, Jefferson, 706-367-8718, www. jacksoncountysheriff.us Volunteer fire departments: Plainview, 706-6934260; South Jackson, 706-548-0888; West Jackson, 706-654-2500, www.westjacksonfd. com

Community resources Jackson County Superior Court: 5000 Jackson Parkway, Jefferson, 706-387-6392; Clerk of Courts, 706-387-6255 Jackson County Health Department: 260 Lee St., Jefferson, 706-367-3643, publichealthathens. com; Commerce Health Clinic, 623 South Elm St., Commerce, 706-335-3895; Jefferson Health Clinic, 341 General Jackson Drive, Jefferson, 706-367-5204 Jackson County Board of Education: 1660 Winder Highway, Jefferson, 706-367-5151, www. jackson.k12.ga.us Jefferson City Schools Board of Education: 575 Washington St., Jefferson, 706-367-2881, www.jeffcityschools.org Commerce City School System: 270 Lakeview Drive, Commerce, 706-335-5500, www. commerce-city.k12.ga.us

Lumpkin County Population: 29,966 (2010 census) Square miles: 284.5 Founded: 1832 Named for: Gov. Wilson Lumpkin. County seat: Dahlonega Government: Five-member commission, including elected chairman

contact info Government Lumpkin County: 99 Courthouse Hill, Suite A, Dahlonega, 706-864-3742; www. lumpkincounty.gov, commissioner@ lumpkincounty.gov Chamber of Commerce: 706-864-3711, www. dahlonega.org. Dahlonega: 465 Riley Road, Dahlonega, 706864-6133; cityofdahlonega.com

Emergency services Sheriff’s office: 194 Courthouse Hill, Dahlonega, 706-864-6101 Chestatee Regional Hospital: 227 Mountain Drive, Dahlonega, 706-864-6136; www. chestateeregionalhospital.com

Community resources Lumpkin County Library: 342 Courthouse Hill, Dahlonega, 706-864-3668, lumpkin@ chestateelibrary.org Lumpkin County Board of Education: 51 Mountain View Drive, Dahlonega, 706-864-3611; www. lumpkin.k12.ga.us University of North Georgia: 32 College Circle, Dahlonega, 706-864-1400; www.ung.edu

Towns County Population: 10,471 (2010 census) Square miles: 166.5 Founded: 1856 Named for: George Washington Towns, Georgia governor from 1847 until 1851 County seat: Hiawassee Government: County governed by a single commissioner.

contact info Government County government: 48 River St., Suite B, Hiawassee, 706-896-2276, townscommissioner@windstream.net, www. townscountyga.com Chamber of Commerce: 706-896-4966, www. townscountytourism.com Building Inspector/Building Permits: 706-8960938 Tax Commissioner: 48 River Street, Suite H, Hiawassee, 706-896-2267, cbrtctc@hotmail. com Hiawassee: 229 Chatuge Way, 706-896-2202 Young Harris: P.O. Box 122, 706-379-3171

Emergency services Sheriff’s office: 4070 Ga. 339, Young Harris, 706-896-4444 Emergency response: 1400 Jack Dayton Circle, Hiawassee, 706-896-2228 Ambulance: 706-896-6254 Fire: 706-896-2090

Community resources Board of Education: 67 Lakeview Circle, Suite C, Hiawassee, 706-896-2279, www.towns.k12. ga.us Health Department: 706-896-2265 Mountain Regional Library: Young Harris,706379-3732 Library: 99 South Berrong St., Hiawassee, 706896-6169

Union County Population: 21,356 (2010 census) Square miles: 322.7 Founded: 1832 Named for: John Thomas, the area’s representative in the state legislature, named the county Union “because none but union-like men reside in it.” the county and its neighbors upheld Unionist loyalties throughout the secession controversy and the Civil War. County seat: Blairsville Government: Single commissioner manages county government, elected to a four-year term.

contact info Government County Commissioner: 65 Courthouse St., Blairsville, 706-439-6000, unioncounty@ uniongov.com, www.unioncountyga.gov Chamber of Commerce: 706-745-5789, www.

blairsvillechamber.com

Emergency services Sheriff’s office: 378 Beasley St., Blairsville, 706439-6066 Fire and rescue: 439-6095

Community resources Union County School Board: 706-745-2322, www. union.k12.ga.us Library: 194 Hospital Circle, Blairsville, 706745-7491

White County Population: 27,144 (2010 census) Square miles: 241.6 Founded: 1857 Named for: State Rep. David T. White of Newton County, whose support in the legislature led to the county’s creation. County seat: Cleveland Government: Five-member commission, including elected chairman

contact info Government Commissioners Office: 59 S. Main St., Cleveland, 30528, 706-865-2235, www.whitecounty.net Chamber of Commerce: 122 North Main St., Cleveland, 30528, 706-865-5356, 706-8650758, www.whitecountychamber.org, www. whitecounty.com. Planning Commission: 59 S. Main St., Cleveland, 706-865-6496 Cleveland: 85 S. Main St., Cleveland, 706-8652017 Helen: Chattahoochee Street, Helen, 706-8782722; Chamber of Commerce, 706-878-1619, helenchamber.com; Welcome Center, 800-8588027, www.helenga.org

Emergency services County Sheriff’s Office: 1210 Hulsey Road, Cleveland, 706-865-5177 Cleveland Police: 85 S. Main St., Cleveland, 706865-2111 White County Fire Dept.: 706-865-3855 Helen Fire Dept.: 706-878-3676 Emergency Communications Office: 706-8651224

Community resources White County Health Department: 1241 Helen Highway, Unit 210, Cleveland, 30528, 706-8652191 Ambulance Service: White County EMS, 1331 Helen Highway, Cleveland, 706-865-7475 White County Library: 60 Bell St., Cleveland, 706-865-5572; Helen branch, 90 Petes Park Road, Helen, 30545, 706-878-2438 White County School System: 113 North Brook St., Cleveland, 706-865-2315, www.white.k12. ga.us Truett-McConnell College: 100 Alumni Drive, Cleveland, 30528, 706-865-2134, www.truett. edu




The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

History at the drop of a name Ever wonder who counties, cities and roads are named for? There’s a story behind each. By Charles Phelps

H

cphelps@gainesvilletimes.com

ave you passed through a city and wondered why it’s there? Who’s from here? Where does someone come up with a town name? In North Georgia, the towns and counties are full of history that some don’t know. Famous people were born, lived or are still around today in the region. “Local history, like we have at the history center, builds connections between the past, the present and the future that are relevant to us personally, and to the places we live, work and play every day,” said Glen Kyle, executive director of the Northeast Georgia History Center. The center gives information about people like Gen. Edmund P. Gaines, the man for whom Gainesville is named. According to the Georgia government website, Gainesville was incorporated as a city on Jan. 1, 1821. The name was changed from Mule Camp Springs to Gainesville. It also gives information about Lyman Hall, for whom Hall County was named after, and was one of three men from Georgia to sign the Declaration of Independence. Hall County was established on Dec. 15, 1818. He was also a former governor of Georgia. Jesse Jewell is heralded as the man who made Gainesville the “Poultry Capital of the world.” He was a national figure in the poultry industry, and very prominent in the North Georgia and Gainesville area. Jewell was a founder and first president of the National Broiler Council, president of the Southeastern Poultry and Egg Association and he was a U.S. delegate to the 1951 World

Tom Reed | Welcome

The Piedmont Hotel was bought by Confederate Gen. James Lonstreet in 1875. The Longstreet Society now cares for the historic landmark.

Poultry Congress. Jesse Jewell Parkway in Gainesville is named for him. Much of Gainesville’s historic past can be found in Alta Vista Cemetery, final resting place for many of the region’s most famous residents. Tourists can enjoy self-guided tours of the cemetery and find the graves of prominent Gainesville and Georgia residents like Confederate Gen. James Longstreet; Manley “Sonny” Carter, former astronaut; Billy Lothridge, a standout football star; and others. “Alta Vista Cemetery is a very popular spot,” said Deb Gregson, tourism manager for Gainesville Trade and Tourism. However, Gregson said that more of their visitors are steered toward Longstreet’s gravesite, old house and the Piedmont Hotel. The Piedmont Hotel stands full of Longstreet’s and Gainesville’s past. Longstreet

settled in Gainesville and bought the hotel in 1875, 10 years after the Civil War, and owned it until his death in 1904. The Longstreet Society now preserves the historic landmark as a museum. For the past 15 years, a memorial service has been held at his grave. In a January 2013 article in The Times, Peter Claymore, president of the Longstreet Society, which oversees the Piedmont Hotel, said, “We’re in the business of trying to maintain and expand the understanding of Longstreet as a Civil War general, but also a post-war patriot.” Not only does Gainesville and Hall County have a storied past, but places like Lumpkin County, Habersham and Banks have a history too. These places were part of a gold rush, home to a NASCAR champion and the

The Wilson Room in the historic Piedmont Hotel in Gainesville. President Woodrow Wilson once slept inside the hotel owned by Gen. James Longstreet.

» Please see Name, 9

Scott Rogers Welcome




The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Name

Continued from 8 birthplace to one of baseball’s greatest legends. Lumpkin County was named after Wilson Lumpkin. He was a governor, a Georgia House Representative, a U.S. Representative and a U.S. senator. According to the National Governors Association website, Lumpkin County was given the name in 1832. According to Lori Hamby of the Dahlonega Gold Museum, Lumpkin was governor at the time the county was named. “Most counties back then were named after someone of prominence,” she said. “Lumpkin County actually took land from Cherokee, Habersham and Hall County to establish itself.” Dahlonega, a city located in the heart of Lumpkin County, wasn’t named after a person, but it was a word derived from the Cherokee Indians, according to Hamby. The word means “yellow” or “gold,” because in 1829 there was a Gold Rush in the area. Dahlonega has been around ever since. Another county with some history to the North Georgia area is Dawson County. The county was established on Dec. 3, 1857, and is named after William C. Dawson. He was a

Lyman Hall, the man for whom Hall County is named after, was one of three Georgia men to sign the Declaration of Independence. He was also a former governor of Georgia. For Welcome

judge who served in the Georgia legislature, and both house and the senate of the U.S. Congress. Dawson County is synonymous with moonshine and the annual Moonshine Festival, which takes place every fall in Dawson County. With the moonshining business, a sport grew out of it, and became what is now known as NASCAR. Former driver Bill Elliott is from the Dawson County area. He won the NASCAR championship in 1988, and won the most popular driver award a record 16 times, according to his website. Habersham County was named after Col. Joseph Habersham. According to the Georgia Government website, Habersham was the former mayor of Savannah, and the postmaster general to President George Washington. Parts of the county split off to become parts of other surrounding counties, including Banks and Lumpkin County. Clarkesville, the main city of Habersham County and home to the

Other historic figures Other key people in Gainesville’s storied past ■ Beulah Rucker was an advocate for African-American education. There’s a museum dedicated to her work and contributions. According to the museum’s website, the museum was the first dedicated to African-American heritage in the Gainesville and Hall County area. “We focus mainly on African-American history,” said Rojene Bailey, grandson of Rucker and volunteer executive director of the museum. “We look at a timeline of education and African-American education.” ■ If you’re a golf fan and know Masters history, you’d like to know Tommy Aaron, the 1973 Masters champion, is from the Gainesville area. This year will mark the 40th anniversary of his victory. He still resides in the Gainesville area. ■ Ed Dodd was a cartoonist, who found fame with his Mark Trail comic strip. The history center has many of Trail’s works on display, along with accolades that Dodd had received throughout his career. ■ Billy Lothridge was a standout football player at Gainesville High School. He went to Georgia Tech, where he played quarterback and finished runner-up to Roger Staubach in the 1963 Heisman voting. He was drafted to both the NFL and AFL in 1964. He played for the Dallas Cowboys, L.A. Rams, Atlanta Falcons and Miami Dolphins in his nine-year professional career, according to pro football reference. Charles Phelps

county seat, is named after former Gov. John Clarke. Jackson County was named after Revolutionary War Gen. James Jackson. Jackson was also a Georgia statesman. The county was formed in February 1796, according to the county’s website. The county seat of Jefferson was named after President Thomas Jefferson, according to the city’s website. Originally, the city was called Jeffersonville,

then changed to Jeffersonton, then was shortened to Jefferson. Banks County was named after Richard E. Banks. The county was created in 1858, and was the 129th county established in the state, according to the county’s website. Banks County was the birthplace of Ty Cobb, a member of baseball’s Hall of Fame, and former Georgia Gov. Allen D. Candler was a resident of the county; he also is buried in Alta Vista.

White County, Georgia Cleveland, Helen, Sautee-Nacoochee.

The Art & Soul of the Northeast Georgia Mountains Shop for unique gifts, dance to an oompah band in a Bavarian setting, taste our vintage wines, canoe or kayak on our pristine lakes and streams, try your hand at gold panning, go repelling off Yonah Mountain, fish ‘til your heart’s content, take a horseback ride on a winding trail, tube the Chattahoochee….imagine the possibilities in White County, Georgia! Today, Helen is known as “Bavaria South” and has been recreated as an Alpine Village, complete with 200 import and specialty shops, themed restaurants, and 2,000 quality rooms and accommodations. On the outskirts of Helen is the State of Georgia’s Unicoi State Park & Lodge. Nearby is Anna Ruby Falls, the famous “double waterfall”. Visit the Sautee-Nacoochee Community Center, a virtual historical and educational resource museum. The Folk Pottery Museum gives visitors a look into the cultural history of pottery. Nacoochee Valley, near where the modern day town of Helen is located, once was a meeting place and commercial crossroads for the Cherokees. Several ceremonial mounds stand as mute testimony to this historic fact. Visit our charming town square in Cleveland, our county seat. The best way to gain an appreciation for our colorful past is to visit the original White County Courthouse, which also houses our historical museum. Cleveland’s claim to fame is Babyland General® Hospital, home to the famous “Cabbage Patch Kids®”.

For more information, contact the White County Chamber of Commerce at 1-800-392-8279 or www.whitecountychamber.org


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The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Beauty to behold Art organizations give life to local community

By Christen Robinson

I

crobinson@gainesvilletimes.com

n a region known for its natural beauty, the arts community does its part to celebrate the creative spirit of its people. Gainesville’s art community includes organizations such as The Arts Council, Quinlan Visual Arts Center, the Georgia Mountain Players and the Gainesville Ballet Company, inspiring North Georgia residents with their respective works. Each organization brings its own unique flavor and gives Gainesville a taste of the big city life. One organization, however, ties all of them together. Initially called the Junior Service League in 1970, The Arts Council grew into

what it is today. The council, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, promotes more than 30 organizations that produce fine art and performing art-related clubs, according to Executive Director Gladys Wyant. After many years of promoting various organizations in Northeast Georgia, The Arts Council’s upcoming events include its Evenings of Intimate Jazz series. Upcoming performers include the Evan Christopher Trio on March 23; the Annie Sellick Trio, April 13; and Joe Gransden and Friends on May 18. All are scheduled for 8 p.m.; tickets are $30. For information about The Arts Council or any of its upcoming events, please call 770534-2787 or visit the website, TheArtsCouncil.net.

Quinlan Visual Arts Center The Quinlan Visual Arts Center began in 1946 as a sketch club before founder Leslie Quinlan thought of a way to improve the future of the community. Beginning with the love of art, Quinlan Visual Arts Center was born. The art gallery and museum offers classes, workshops, clubs and internships.

» Please see Beauty, 11

The Quinlan Visual Arts Center was founded initially as the Gainesville Arts Association in 1946.

Photos by Scott Rogers | Welcome

The Quinlan Visual Arts Center is a comprehensive visual arts center providing art education opportunities for all ages and all stages of artistic development.


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The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Scott Rogers | Welcome

The Georgia Mountain Players perform the popular “Smoke on the Mountain” at the Georgia Mountains Center theater in 2012.

Beauty Continued from 10

The exhibit has something for the entire family and a gift shop offering art visitors can take home. Quinlan’s regular business hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. It is closed Sundays. Quinlan plans to host two upcoming events that are both open to the public. The 35th annual Gala Fine Art Auction will be held 6:30 p.m. March 2. Tickets are priced at $125 per person. This year’s black-tie fundraiser will honor local artist Jay Kemp, as well as feature the artwork of many other regional and national artists. The center then will join the Kiwanis Club of Gainesville, an international organization geared toward helping children and the community, to sponsor the 10th annual Youth Art Month. “Since March is recognized as youth art month, that’s when we choose to have this exhibit,” said Amanda McClure, executive director for the Quinlan Visual Arts Center. The Youth Art Month is for the Hall County and Gainesville middle and high school students who want to participate and showcase their art. The winner receives a cash scholarship of $2,500 toward college. The event takes from March 15 through April 13. Admission is free. An opening reception is scheduled for 5:30-7 p.m. March 15. “I think art is very important because of how it helps people. It also helps children and teens and makes a difference through

hands-on art therapy,” McClure said. For information about Quinlan, the 35th annual Gala or the 10th annual Youth Art Month, please call 770-536-2575 or visit the website, www.quinlanartscenter.org.

The Georgia Mountain Players A 14-cast member theater company, the Georgia Mountain Players are in their 20th year of performing comedies and musicals for the entire family. “We put on shows every February, April, August and October. Every August we do ‘Smoke on the Mountain’ because people love the show so much,” manager and artistic director Mike Martin said.

Gainesville Ballet Company Another organization affiliated with The Arts Council is the Gainesville Ballet Company. The company, also a 501(c)3 nonprofit, was founded in 1974. It includes Brenau University dance majors, professional dancers and Gainesville’s School of Ballet elite members. Gainesville Ballet teaches more than 6,000 children and 2,000 adults and is continuing to grow every year. The company performs “The Nutcracker” in December and chooses a storybook ballet in March. This year’s performance of “Cinderella” is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. March 22, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. March 23 and 2 p.m. March 24. Tickets are $18-$26 for adults, $14-$22 for seniors and $12-$18 for children. For more information about the Gainesville Ballet Company, Gainesville’s School of Ballet classes or any upcoming shows please call 770-532-4241 or 770-534-6282.

Tom Reed | Welcome

The Gainesville Ballet Company will perform “The Nutcracker” in December and “Cinderella” in March.


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The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Clubs keep residents connected Organizations strive to add quality of life to NE Ga.

BY BRANDEE A. THOMAS

W

For Welcome

hen trying to adjust quickly to your new community, it’s best to get to know its people. One of the fastest and most heartwarming ways to accomplish that task is by volunteering with a local cause that is near and dear to you. In Hall County, there is no shortage of worthwhile causes or nonprofits that would love to have your support. For instance, if you are a proponent of education, consider lending your time to Junior Achievement of Gainesville or the Gainesville/Hall County Alliance for Literacy. “The Gainesville-Hall County alliance is the umbrella agency for all literacy programs (in this community),” said Executive Director Dorothy Shinafelt. “Our primary focus is adult literacy. We serve about 200 nonreaders each year.” Each year, the center’s basic literacy classes help around 200 adults, who read on a zero to fourth-grade level, Shinafelt said. “All of the classes we offer are free,” she said. “In addition to the basic literacy classes, we offer GED prep and English as a second language. In the language program, we have people from all over the world – not just Spanish speakers. It isn’t uncommon to have 15 to 18 different nationalities in one classroom.” The alliance needs volunteers to train as tutors for the “lowest level literacy students” as well as math tutors for the GED prep students. “These classes meet in the morning and evening throughout the week,” Shinafelt said. “It would be great if you had an educational background, but it certainly is not required. You really just need to have a heart and compassion for wanting to help students succeed.”

Get involved Arts The Arts Council: www.theartscouncil.net, call 770-534-2787 Gainesville Theatre Alliance: www.gta.gsc.edu, email info@ gainesvilletheatrealliance.org Quinlan Visual Arts Center: www.quinlanartscenter.org, call 770536-2575 or email info@quinlanartscenter.org

Civic Gainesville Evening Optimist Club: Call Teressa Glazer at 770-5342595 or email OptimistTess@aol.com Hall County Evening Optimist Club: www.hallcountyoptimist.org Gainesville Jaycees: www.gainesvillejaycees.org, call 770-5327714

Junior Achievement of Gainesville: www.georgia.ja.org/getinvolved/ gainesville, call 770-297-1222 or email Lee Highsmith at lhighsmith@georgia.ja.org

Environment and nature Elachee Nature Science Center: www.elachee.org, call 770-5351976 or email elachee@elachee.org Keep Hall Beautiful: www.keephallbeautiful.org, email info@ keephallbeautiful.org

Museums

Health

Northeast Georgia History Center: www.negahc.org, contact Julie Carson by email at jcarson@brenau.edu or call 770-297-5900 Interactive Neighborhood for Kids: www.inkfun.org, call 770-5361900 or email info@inkfun.org

Good News Clinics: www.goodnewsclinics.org, call 770-503-1369

Women’s issues

Education

WomenSource: www.womensource.info, call 770-503-9060 or email Laura Haynes at laura@womensource.info My Sister’s Place: www.my-sisters-place.org, call 770-532-5111 or email volunteerMSP@gmail.com

Gainesville/Hall County Alliance for Literacy: www.allianceforliteracy. org, call 770-531-4337

Junior Achievement of Gainesville strives to prepare students for life after graduation by bringing the “real world” into their classrooms. According to the group’s organizers, “The dynamic interaction between students and volunteers promotes active learning and brings theory to lie, while also allowing students to see a real-world model of someone who can demonstrate the value of business on a first-hand basis.” If women’s empowerment is more of your speed, consider getting involved with WomenSource. “We are a women’s organization that provides programming to encourage women to be the best they can be professionally and personally,” said Robyn Lynch, WomenSource Board of Directors chairwoman. “We organize a number of events throughout the year, including our monthly Brown Bag Lunch and our health series.” At each of the monthly lunches, the group invites a different speaker to enlighten attendees. Previous topics have included: “Living Wealthy on a Moderate Income,” “Nutrition and Fitness for Every Woman,” and “Perspectives on Other Religions.” The group isn’t just focused on empowering adults. It also is host to an annual Girl Power event geared towards middle and high school-aged young women.

WomenSource started several years ago because of a need identified by a 2007 survey conducted by the United Way of Hall County. “I was on the original steering committee,” Lynch said. “The United Way study’s showed that women’s needs were an untapped market in our community. During that same time, there was a local attorney talking about clients who were getting divorced in their 40s or 50s and had never balanced a checkbook before. Where do those women go to learn those skills? That’s one of the main reasons why we do our financial series. It’s one of those programs that we feel very strongly about.” All of the WomenSource activities are open to the community. The group uses volunteers to help out and even plan events. Although there are many organizations, like WomenSource, that are unique to the Hall County community, there are others like the Gainesville and Hall County Evening Optimist Clubs that fall under national umbrellas. The Hall County Evening Optimist Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the first and third Thursdays at Hibachi Grill and Sushi Buffet on Browns Bridge Road. The Gainesville Evening Optimist Club

meets every Tuesday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Yonah Burger on Thompson Bridge Road. Guests are always welcomed. “The whole focus of the Optimist brand is to be a service to the youth of the area,” said Teressa Glazer, past president of the Gainesville club. “We do everything from oratorical competitions to a youth-golf tournament. Everything is scholarship-based.” The group’s goal is to give students the extra push that they need to succeed. Sometimes that push comes in the form of scholarships for college or helping pay tuition for specialty camps that they may not be able to afford alone. “We also work closely with the Eagle Scouts to help them with their fundraising,” Glazer said. “Our whole focus is helping kids who need a little bit of encouragement and support. It’s important for kids to have other adults, in addition to their families, in the community who care about them and who are rooting for their success.” If you’re more artistically or historically inclined, groups like the Quinlan Visual Arts Center and the Northeast Georgia History Center regularly need volunteers to assist with administrative tasks and to help with new exhibits or special events.


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The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

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The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Park it anywhere Hall, Gainesville parks offer amenities for spring fun

BY CAREY SARTAIN

G

For Welcome

ainesville and Hall County is home to more than 40 parks and numerous community centers. The parks offer a wide variety of amenities to visitors and provide a venue for various events for the community throughout the year. Lake Lanier creates a back drop for many of the parks as well as boating, fishing and swimming opportunities.

Most popular parks The Rock Creek Greenway is one of the most popular and highly visited of the Gainesville City parks, said Melvin Cooper, head of the Gainesville Parks and Recreation Department. The greenway is a series of parks that includes Wilshire Trails, Rock Creek Park , Ivey Terrace Park and Longwood Park , and connects the downtown square to Lake Lanier. The area offers visitors walking pathways, pavilions, newly renovated play areas and a butterfly garden. Wilshire trails also features stops on the Solar Walk, an interactive trail that participants can follow while learning facts about each planet starting at either the sun on the downtown square or Pluto in Longwood Park . “Wilshire Trails is a clean family-oriented environment that has become a go-to activity for my family on a warm day,” said Caroline Nix, who is a frequent parkgoer. “My husband and I enjoy taking our daughter, Arabella, on strolls in the park. She loves swinging and watching the older children play on the set.” Nix lives walking distance from the park and said she appreciates the convenience. The Rock Creek Greenway has been expanding for years but local resident Todd

Photos by Scott Rogers | Welcome

Chris Nash grills hot dogs at Laurel Park near a picnic pavilion where members of the Lanier Canoe and Kayak Summer Day Camp are spending the day.

West remembers visiting Wilshire Trails as a student at Gainesville Middle School in the ’80s. “As a student we would have field trips there and I had a real good time as a kid. My childhood memories are very fond,” West said. “As an adult I like to go to exercise. You’re in the woods, it’s a nice walk, it’s a good environment and you can also exercise and enjoy the scenery.” West’s love of the park has stayed with him over the years and he said, as a father, it is a great place to bring his son. Mike Little, head of Hall County Parks and Recreation, said Clarks Bridge Park is one of

the most popular parks in the county. In 1996 the park was an Olympic venue for rowing and paddling competitions and is currently home of the Lanier Canoe and Kayak Club and the Lake Lanier Rowing Club. The park offers a designated swim area, picnic tables, grills, boat ramp and dock, bathrooms and more. Visitors also have the opportunity to rent kayaks and canoes from the Canoe and Kayak Club.

Historical parks Many significant historical events within Hall County have been honored with parks

» Please see Park, 15

Savannah Reeves, 5, runs through the streams of water while visiting the Laurel Park spray ground with her family last summer.


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The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Park

Continued from 14 and memorials. The Rock Creek Veterans Park in downtown Gainesville is a point of pride for veterans in the community. A new memorial has recently been added to the site honoring Hall County men who lost their lives in the Korean War. The Vietnam Veterans memorial is located in the same park. “I think it’s wonderful, we recently added the Korean War veterans monument and we’re hoping to add an archway with flower beds on either side,” said Paul Scroggs. “We’d like to get some Korean Children involved with the park to learn about the war as well.” The Poultry Park is home to a monument that honors the local poultry industry and what is conceived by many as the city’s mascot, the chicken. The park has a monument of the bird with benches surrounding it. The monument is adjacent to Jesse Jewell Parkway, a street named after a pioneer of the chicken industry, which brings billions in revenue to Georgia each year. The Engine 209 Park in downtown Gainesville features a retired coal car and red caboose. The engine was reportedly made for a Russian czar, but the order was canceled due

Scott Rogers | Welcome

Brittany Dyer, right, and Hannah Countiss contort themselves while playing a video game on an Xbox 360 inside the North Hall Community and Technology Center.

to the 1917 Russian Revolution. It went on to be used by the Gainesville Midland Railroad until being retired in 1959. The train is located near the old train depot and is surrounded by gardens and benches.

Community centers Gainesville and Hall County have community centers throughout the area that provide various activities for members and visitors. The Frances Meadows Community Center

in Gainesville has indoor pools, gyms, event areas and an outdoor pool area called the Splash Zone. The center also offers weekly fitness classes to members. Hall County has a series of community centers in East Hall, South Hall and North Hall. The North Hall Park is the newest and opened just last year. The center includes a fitness center, basketball courts, an indoor walking track, a game room and showers. “I love it because of its location in the North Hall area. If I can’t get out to the gym, it’s a go-to place just to walk around and exercise,” said Roxanne Kennon, a North Hall resident. The facility also has a technology center that includes a coffee shop, help desk, private study rooms as well as meeting rooms and game rooms for children and teens. The technology center is a part of the Hall County Library System. In the future, new additions to the park may include hiking/bicycling trails, a recreational lawn, sports fields and more, according to the park system’s website. Other community centers in Hall include the Mulberry Creek Community Center in Flowery Branch and the East Hall Community Center. Mulberry includes gyms, walking tracks and meeting rooms along with a dog park and playground. East Hall has two gyms with fitness equipment.


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The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Spring events Hall County

February

Ongoing

Feb. 11-15: Giraffe Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. Feb. 16: “Stars Over Elachee” 5:45-7:45 p.m. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Learn about astronomy, how to use a telescope to view the night sky. Bring a flashlight and pencil. Reservations are required. $10 adults, $5 children ages 2-12 and Elachee members free. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. Feb. 16-18: Marc Chatov workshop, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. Basic structure and strengthen fundamentals of drawing, value, color, and composition. $430. 770536-2575, www.quinlanartscenter.org. Feb. 18-22: President’s Day Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. Feb. 22-23: Linda Dragonette workshop,10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. Using value to make a better painting. $225. 770-5362575, www.quinlanartscenter.org. Feb. 22-24: “In Acting Shakespeare,”7:30 p.m. Buford Community Center’s Sylvia Beard Theatre, 2200 Buford Highway, Buford. $16-$18 adults, $14$16 seniors and $10-$12 for students and children. 678-717-3624, www. gainesvilletheatrealliance.org. Feb. 23: Casino Night fundraiser, 6:30 p.m. Smithgall Arts Center, 331 Spring St. SE, Gainesville. Vegas casino games, live music, hors d’ouevres, silent auction and cash bar. Black tie optional. Benefits The Arts Council. $75, $125 couple. 770-5342787, www.theartscouncil.net. Feb. 25: Great Decisions lecture series. Future of the Euro. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Martha T. Nesbitt (Academic 4) 3110-A, University of North Georgia, Gainesville campus. Free. www.ung.edu. Feb. 25-28: Dental Health Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. Feb. 28: Quinlan Visual Arts Center 35th annual Gala Art Auction. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. Through March 2. Original art work by local, regional and national talents juried by acclaimed art appraiser Robert Morring of Atlanta. $125. 770-536-2575, www. quinlanartscenter.org.

“Civil Air Patrol” exhibit, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Through March 31. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $3 for students and members free. 770-2975900, www.negahc.org or jcarson@brenau. edu. Rotating exhibit gallery, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through April 30, Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $3 for students and members free. 770-297-5900, www. negahc.org or jcarson@brenau.edu. Junior Master Naturalist home-school program for sixth grade and older, 1:303:30 p.m. Through May 1. Five-session semester. $50 student, $25 parent. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Pre-registration is required. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. Home School Day, first Tuesday of every month. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. All homeschoolers get in for half-price. 770-536-1900. “Mommy and Me” preschool program for 2-3 year-olds, second and fourth Wednesdays of each month. 10-11:30 a.m. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. $10 fee admits one child and parent to each individual program. $5 per additional parent or preschooler. 770-535-1976, www.elachee. org. First Wednesday home-school program, first Wednesday of each month. 1:30-3:30 p.m. 5 session semester $50 student, $25 parent. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Preregistration is required. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. First Saturday Hike, 10-11:30 a.m. first Saturday of each month. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Program fee $5 adults, $3 children ages 2-12. Children 2 and younger, Elachee members free. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. Trail Crew Work Day, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. first Saturday of each month. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Bring water, lunch, gloves and rain gear. Tools, training, and afternoon refreshments included. Free. 770-5351976, www.elachee.org. “Georgia Artists with Disabilities,” Exhibit, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Feb. 28. The Arts Council Smithgall Arts Center, 331 Spring St. SW, Gainesville.Free. 770-5342787, www.TheArtsCouncil.net.

SCOTT ROGERS | Welcome

A canoe racer paddles his craft on Lake Lanier.

March Through March: Kiwanis Visual Arts Showcase. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. Hall County and Gainesville City middle and high school students are invited to participate.770-5362575, www.quinlanartscenter.org. March 4-8: Lion Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. March 4: Great Decisions lecture series. Humanitarian Intervention. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Martha T. Nesbitt (Academic 4) 3110-A, University of North Georgia, Gainesville campus. Free. www.ung.edu. March 8-10, 15-17: “Almost, Maine.” Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays at 3 p.m. Fifth Row Center Studio, 5509 Main St., Flowery Branch. $15, $12, $10. 678-357-7359, info@fifthrowcenter. com or fifthrowcenter.com. March 8-10: National Auto Sport Association races, Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. Tickets: $10. 800-849-7223, 770-967-6143, www. roadatlanta.com. March 9: New “Nature Play” Preschool Program. Second and fourth Saturdays of each month. 10:30 a.m. to noon. Through May 25. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Ages 2-5 and their parents. Program fee $10 for 1 child plus parents. Space is limited and preregistration is required. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. March 10: Family Day, 1-4 p.m. Northeast

Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. Free. 770-297-5900, www. negahc.org or jcarson@brenau.edu. March 11: Gospel Choir, 7:30 p.m. Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Free. 770538-4764, www.brenau.edu/music. March 11-31: CIDA Student Design Display Show. Simmons Visual Arts Center, Sellars Gallery, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Opening reception 5:30-7 p.m. March 11. Free. 770-534-6263. March 11-15: St. Patrick’s Day Week,10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. March 12: Templeton Mint Forum, 7 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. Free for members, $3 nonmembers. 770-297-5900, www.negahc.org or jcarson@brenau.edu. March 15: Cat Massey Recital, 7:30 p.m. John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Banks Recital Hall, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. Free. 770-538-4764, www. brenau.edu/music. March 15-17: SCCA National Double, Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. Tickets $15-30. www.atl-scca. org, 800-849-7223, 770-967-6143, www. roadatlanta.com. March 16: Dirty Spokes trail race, 5.3-2.5 mile run. 7a.m. to 2 p.m. University of North Georgia, Gainesville campus. Registration is between $25 and $40 depending on the event and time of registration. www. dirtyspokes.com/gainesville-state-college, www.ung.edu.


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The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013 March 16 and April 13: “Stars Over Elachee,” 7:15 p.m. Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Learn about astronomy and how to use a telescope to view the night sky. Bring a flashlight and pencil. Call to register and reserve a telescope. $10 adults, $5 children ages 2-12. Elachee 770-5351976, www.elachee.org. March 18: Vocal Chamber Ensemble, 7:30 p.m. John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Burd Atrium, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. Free. 770-538-4764, www.brenau.edu/music. March 18-22: Spring Is Here Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. March 19: “What is Accompaniment ... really,” 1 p.m. Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. 770-538-4764, www.brenau.edu/music. March 21: UNG Foreign Film Series. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Martha T. Nesbitt (Academic 4) 3110A, University of North Georgia,

Gainesville campus. Tickets are $1. www.ung.edu. March 21: “Natureversity” Brown-Bag Lunch & Lecture Series, 12:30 p.m. $10 donation requested. Call to reserve seating. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. March 22: Guest artist recital, Mariane Lemieux and Tyler Wottrich. 5-9 p.m. CEPA lobby, University of North Georgia, Gainesville campus. Soprano Mariane Lemieux and pianist Tyler Wottrich performing at University of North Georgia’s Gainesville campus. Free. www.ung.edu. March 22-24: “Cinderella,” 7:30 p.m. March 22, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. March 23, 2 p.m. March 24. Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. $12-$26, Brenau faculty, staff and students $6 with valid ID. 770-532-4241, www. gainesvilleballet.org. March 23: “Trillium Trek,” 5k Walk/ Run, 10K, half marathon, and Kids’ Fun Run. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org.

March 23: “Monsters Under the Bed,” 7:30 p.m. Sylvia Beard Theatre, Buford Community Center, 2200 Buford Highway, Buford. $5. 678-717-3624, www. gainesvilletheatrealliance.org. March 23: Evenings of Intimate Jazz “Evan Christopher Trio” 8 p.m. The Arts Council Smithgall Arts Center, 331 Spring St. SW, Gainesville. Individual ticket $30; six or more tickets $25. 770-5342787, www.TheArtsCouncil.net. March 23: “The Tragedy of Macbeth,” 9 p.m. Sylvia Beard Theatre, Buford Community Center, 2200 Buford Highway, Buford. $5. 678-717-3624, www. gainesvilletheatrealliance.org. March 24: Healthy Habits Event, 14 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. Free with paid admission to museum, $6 admission every Sunday. 770536-1900. March 25: Honors Il Portale Musical, 7:30 p.m. Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Free. 770-538-4764, www.brenau.edu/music. March 25-29: Doctor Week,

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. March 26: Stage Tour “Twelfth Night,” 6 p.m. Ed Cabell Theatre, University of North Georgia, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. Free. www.gainesvilletheatrealliance. org. March 28: University of North Georgia and The Arts Council present the Tour of Independent Film Makers series. “Free China: The Courage to Believe.” 7 p.m. Smithgall Arts Center, Gainesville. Film screening, filmmaker Qand-A session, reception. $7 for adults; $5 for students and seniors. For more information or to purchase tickets: www. theartscouncil.net.

April April 1-5: Easter Craft Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. April 1-5: Spring Break Camp, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Elachee Nature

Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Call for details and to register. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. April 4: Georgia Master Naturalist Program, 1-5:30 p.m. Thursdays through June 20. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Naturalists share their knowledge with their communities by volunteering. $160. Ages 18 and older. 770535-1976, www.elachee.org. April 5: Brenau Collaborative, Brenau University Galleries, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Through May 5. Undergraduate juried and senior projects and portfolios. Opening reception 5:30-7 p.m. April 13. Free. 770534-6263. April 5-14: “The 39 Steps.” Sylvia Beard Theatre, Buford Community Center, 2200 Buford Highway, Buford. Adults $1618, seniors $14-16, students $10-12. 678-717-3624, www. gainesvilletheatrealliance.org. April 5: Yuxi Liu Recital, 7:30 p.m. Banks Recital Hall, Burd Center for the Performing Arts, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. Free. 770-538-4764, www.brenau.edu/ music.


18 April 6: Arielle Crumley and Terri Greene Recital, 7:30 p.m. John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Banks Recital Hall, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. Free. 770-5384764, www.brenau.edu/music. April 9: Georgia Poetry Circuit Reading: Paul Hostovsky, 12:30 p.m. John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Banks Recital Hall, Brenau University, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. Free. 770-534-6179. April 9: Music Forum, 7 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. Free for members, $3 nonmembers. 770-297-5900, www.negahc.org or jcarson@brenau.edu. April 8-12: Encourage a Young Writer Craft Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-5361900. April 9-20: “Twelfth Night,” 7:30 p.m. April 9-13 and 16-20; 2:30 p.m. April 14 and 20. Ed Cabell Theatre, University of North Georgia-Gainesville campus, 3850 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. Free stage tour 6 p.m. March 26. $16-18 for adults, $14-16 for seniors and $10-12 for students. 678-7173624, www.gainesvilletheatrealliance.org. April 11-13: Change is the Only Constant. John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Hosch Theatre, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. Adults $6, seniors, students, children $4, free for Brenau University students, faculty and staff. 770-538-4757, jlong@brenau.edu. April 11-20: The Dixie Swim Club. Georgia Mountains Center Theatre, 301 Main St. SW, Gainesville. Adults $17; seniors, students, children $13. 770-536-4677, www.georgiamountainplayers.org. April 13: The Brenau Student Fashion Show, 4:30 p.m. Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Free. 770-534-6240. April 13: Kirstin Marsh Recital, 7:30 p.m. John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Hosch Theatre, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. Free. 770-538-4764, www. brenau.edu/music April 14: Family Day, 1-4 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. Free. 770-297-5900, www. negahc.org or jcarson@brenau.edu. April 15: Spectrum Singers, “There Is Sweet Music,” Gainesville. 7:30 p.m. Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Free. 770538-4764, www.brenau.edu/music. April 15-19: Owl Craft Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. April 18: UNG Foreign film series, Gainesville. 6:30-9:30p.m. Martha T. Nesbitt (Academic 4) 3110-A, University of North Georgia, Gainesville campus. Tickets

The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Scott Rogers | Welcome

Abigail Sarvis looks at a turtle during last year’s annual Butterfly Release at Wilshire Trails Park in Gainesville. This year’s event is set for May 19. are $1. www.ung.edu. April 18: Tour of Independent Film Makers series, University of North Georgia and The Arts Council. “Strong!” 7 p.m. Smithgall Arts Center, Gainesville. This event includes a film screening, filmmaker Q-and-A session, and reception. $7 for adults; $5 for students and seniors. For more information or to purchase tickets: www.theartscouncil. net. www.ung.edu. April 19-20: Grand-AM Rolex Sports Care Series, Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. Tickets: $45-$55, ages 12 and under free. 800-849-7223, 770-9676143, www.roadatlanta.com. April 20: Earth Day 2013 Festival, 10 a.m. to noon. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Open house for nature preschool. 770-535-1976, www. elachee.org. April 21: Appreciation and Recognition Reception for History Center volunteers, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. 770-297-5900, www.negahc.org or jcarson@brenau.edu. April 22-26: Earth Day Craft Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. April 23: Spelling Bee 2013, 7 p.m. Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Adults $5, children $2. 770-531-4337, www.

allianceforliteracy.org. April 25-28: The Mitty Challenge, Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. Historic race cars on display and competing, tickets $30-$70. www.hsrrace. com, 800-849-7223, 770-967-6143, www. roadatlanta.com. April 28: Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers, 7 p.m. The Arts Council Smithgall Arts Center, 331 Spring St. SW, Gainesville.Free. 770-534-2787, www.TheArtsCouncil.net. Adult $7, student and seniors $5. All tickets inclusive of ‘Meet the Director/Producer’ reception. 770-5342787, www.TheArtsCouncil.net.

May May 1-3: Fish Craft Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. May 4: Joe Gransden & Kenny Banks, 8 p.m. The Arts Council Smithgall Arts Center, 331 Spring St. SW, Gainesville. $30. 770-534-2787, www.TheArtsCouncil.net May 4-5: Peach State Chevelle Car Show, Gainesville. 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. University of North Georgia, Gainesville campus. www. peachstatechevelles.com. May 6-10: Mother’s Day Craft Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK

members free. 770-536-1900. May 9: Brenau Family ties. Simmons Visual Arts Center, Presidents Gallery, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Through July 7. Free. 770-534-6263. May 10-11: Drift Atlanta, Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 800-849-7223, 770-967-6143, www.roadatlanta.com May 10: Annual “Flights of Fancy” Benefit Auction, 6-9 p.m. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Proceeds benefit Elachee’s education programs and conservation efforts. 770535-1976, www.elachee.org. May 12: Mother’s Day, 1-5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. All moms are free on Mother’s Day. May 13-17: Dinner Craft Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. May 14: Forum, 7 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. Free for members, $3 nonmembers. 770-297-5900, www. negahc.org or jcarson@brenau.edu. May 16: President’s Summer Art Series Exhibit. Simmons Visual Arts Center, Presidents Gallery, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Through June 30. Opening reception 5:30-7:30 p.m. May 16. Featuring Patricia Burd, Jane Hemmer, Jean Westmacott and Mary Hart Wilheit. Free. 770-534-6263. May 18: “Rock In The Spring,” 6 p.m. Brenau University’s Amphitheatre, 102 Prior St., Gainesville. Featuring Mid-Life Crisis, benefiting Challenged Child and Friends. Tickets $20, tables $300 and up. 770-5358372, lmiller@challengedchild.org May 18-19: SCCA Rational, Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. Tickets: $15-30. 800-849-7223, 770-967-6143, www.atl-scca.org, www.roadatlanta.com May 19: 17th Annual Butterfly Release, 1-4 p.m., Wilshire Trails Park, Gainesville. Free. 770-531-2680. May 19: Northeast Georgia History Center’s Family Day, 1-4 p.m. Wilshire Trails Park, 849 Wilshire Road NW, Gainesville. Gainesville. Free. May 20-24: Frog Craft Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900. May 25: Brenau Barbecue Championship. Brenau University Campus, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. $5, kids are free. 770-534-6160, jbrown9@brenau.edu or www.berenau.edu/bbq. May 27-31: Patriotic Craft Week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $1 with paid admission to museum, INK members free. 770-536-1900.


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The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Banks County April April 13-15: NMRA/NMCA All Star Nationals, Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce, 706-335-2301, www. atlantadragway.com. April 26: Banks County Chamber CVB Spring Golf Tournament, Scales Country Club, Homer. 706-677-2108, bankscountychamber@windstream.net.

May

Concert, 8 p.m., The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www.playhousecumming.com. Tickets $15$20. March 29: Sounds of Sawnee Spring Concert, 8 p.m. The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www. playhousecumming.com. Tickets $15-$20. March 30: Taste of Forsyth, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, www.cummingfair.net. Contact Tracy Helms, 770-781-3491. Community Easter Egg Hunts, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free.

May 4-6: Summit Racing Equipment NHRA Southern Nationals, Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce, 706-335-2301, www.atlantadragway.com. May 26: Day at Fort Hollingsworth, 10 a.m., Alto. 706-754-4538, www.forthollingsworthwhitehouse.com.

April

Dawson County

May

March March 29: Moonlight Flight 5k/Fun Run, 6:30 p.m. signups, 7 p.m. race, War Hill Park, 4081 War Hill Park Road, Dawsonville. Benefits Relay for Life/American Cancer Society. Fee: $20 advance, $25 race day, $15 fun run. Kris Rowan, 706-344-3646 ext 221, krowan@ dawsoncounty.org.

April April: Spring Fling Festival, arts and crafts garden show, Historic Old Rock School, Dawsonville. www.dawsonarts.org.

Forsyth County Ongoing Steel Magnolias, 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through March 24. The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www. playhousecumming.com. Tickets $25.

February Feb. 28: Great Decisions Lecture, Cumming. Future of the Euro. 6:30-8:30 p.m. University of North Georgia, Cumming campus, room 162. www.ung.edu.

March March 7: Great Decisions Lecture, Cumming. Humanitarian Intervention. 6:30-8:30 p.m. University of North Georgia, Cumming campus, room 162. www.ung.edu. March 22-23: Forsyth County Master Gardner Plant Sale, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, www. cummingfair.net. Contact Pam & Palmer Haffner at 678-315-5111. March 26: Cumming Playhouse Singers Spring

April 4-21: “Footloose: The Musical,” 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www. playhousecumming.com. Tickets $25.

May 3-4: Relay for Life, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, www. cummingfair.net. Contact Suzanne Hendricks, 770-297-1176. May 2-19: “The Marvelous Wonderettes,” off-Broadway musical, 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays. The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www. playhousecumming.com. Tickets $25.

Habersham County February Feb. 28: Storiano Trio, Dutch Chamber Music, 7:30 p.m., Piedmont College Chapel, Demorest. Tickets $10 adults, $5 seniors and students, free to Piedmont students, faculty and staff. www.piedmont.edu. Feb. 28-March 3: “Boeing, Boeing,” Habersham Community Theatre, 1370 Washington St., Clarkesville, 706-8391315, www.habershamtheater.org, info@ habershamtheater.org. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets $13 adults, $8 for children and fulltime students.

March March 4: Jessica Wohl, mixed media, opening reception 6 p.m., Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of Art, Piedmont College, Demorest. Free. Exhibit runs Feb. 25-April 4. www. piedmont.edu. March 8: Cornelia Casino Night Fundraiser, 7-10 p.m., Cornelia Community House, 601 Wyly St., Cornelia. $25, includes $4,000 in fun money, raffle and drink tickets, food. 706778-8585, bht@corneliageorgia.org, www. explorecornelia.com. March 16: Great Composers Series, The Music of Britten, Bernstein, & Vaughan Williams, 7:30 p.m., Piedmont College Chapel,

Demorest. Tickets $10 adults, $5 seniors and students, free to Piedmont students, faculty and staff. www.piedmont.edu. March 16-17: 3rd Annual Clarkesville Shuffle 5K, noon, downtown Clarkesville. May 18: 51st annual Mountain Laurel Festival, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., downtown Clarkesville.

April April 9: Piedmont Cantabile A Cappella Choir, 5 p.m., Brooks Hall, Piedmont College, Demorest. Free. www.piedmont.edu. April 11–14: “J.B.,” 7:30 p.m., April 11-13, 2 p.m. April 14, Piedmont College, Demorest. Tickets $10 adults, $5 seniors and students, free to Piedmont students, faculty and staff. www.piedmont.edu. April 14: Isabella Demers, Sewell Organ 10th Anniversary Concert, 4 p.m., Piedmont College Chapel, Demorest. Free. www. piedmont.edu. April 18: Piedmont Wind Ensemble, 7:30 p.m., Piedmont College Chapel., Demorest. Free. www.piedmont.edu. April 19-20: Cornelia Apple Blossom BBQ Festival, downtown Cornelia. Movie screening, beer garden, kids’ activities, cooking demonstrations. Free. 706-7788585, bht@corneliageorgia.org, www. explorecornelia.com. April 20: Dr. Phillip Hayner Piano Concert, “Morningstar,” 7:30 p.m., Swanson Mainstage Theater, Piedmont College, Demorest. Free.

www.piedmont.edu. April 21-21, 25-28: “The Big Five-Oh,” Habersham Community Theatre, 1370 Washington St., Clarkesville, 706-8391315, www.habershamtheater.org, info@ habershamtheater.org. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets $13 adults, $8 for children and fulltime students. April 27: Piedmont Chorale, 7:30 p.m., Piedmont College Chapel., Demorest. Free. www.piedmont.edu.

May May 5: Dr. James Mellichamp, 850th anniversary of Notre Dame Cathedral Organ Concert. Piedmont College Chapel., Demorest. Free. www.piedmont.edu. May 31: Cornelia Summer Concert Series, John King Band, 8 p.m., Cornelia Depot. Free. 706-778-8585, bht@corneliageorgia.org, www.explorecornelia.com.

Jackson County March March 1-3: Folk-to-Fine Arts Festival & Expo, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Commerce Civic Center. Meet the artists reception, 5-10 p.m. March 1, admission $15, includes weekend admission, beverage tickets. Festival admission $7. www.folk-finearts.com.


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The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013 April 27-28: Celebrate Clayton, music and arts festival, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Clayton. Free. April 12-13: Foxfire Living History Days, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Foxfire Museum & Heritage Center, 98 Foxfire Lane, Mountain City. Demonstrations of Appalachian life. Admission: $6 adults, $3 ages 7-11, ages 6 and under free, $3 for home-school family members ages 6 and older Friday. 706-7465828, www.foxfire.org, foxfire@foxfire.org.

March 22: Jackson County Humane Society FurBall, 7-11 p.m., Braselton-Stover House, 5257 Georgia 53, Braselton. Doors open at 6. Black-tie optional, plated dinner, live jazz music, silent auction, raffles. Tickets $100 per person, $150 per couple. www.hsjc.com/events_fur_ball.html

April April 20: Relay for Life 5K, 8 a.m., Braselton Park. register.runnersfit.com. April 26-27: Braselton-Hoschton Relay for Life, Hoschton Park. relayforlife.org/bhga. April 27-28: Braselton Antique and Gardening Festival, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, downtown Braselton. Antiques, collectibles, artwork, outdoor gardening, ironworks, statuaries, primitives, advertising, pottery, wood working, folk art, jewelry, glassware, textiles. Donna, 706-824-7204, webmaster@countrysideantiques.net, countrysideantiques.net/festival.htm.

May May 3: Jackson Derby, 6-9 p.m., Bouchard Farms, Commerce. Jackson County Area Chamber of Commerce, www. jacksoncountyga.com. May 11: Braselton Beach Bash, Braselton Park. Danielle, dgaustin@braselton.net. May 22: “Ask Granny” genealogical giftmaking, Crawford W. Long Museum, 28 College St., Jefferson, 706-367-5307, info@ crawfordlong.org.

Lumpkin County Ongoing Traditional Music Jam, 2-5 p.m. Saturdays through October, Dahlonega Gold Museum, 1-4 p.m. Crimson Moon Café, 24 N. Park St., Dahlonega, 706-8643982. jason@thecrimsonmooncafe.com, www.thecrimsonmoon.com.

March March 9-21: Department of Visual Arts Senior Capstone exhibition group II, Dahlonega. Library Technology Center, University of North Georgia, Dahlonega campus. An exhibit reception will be held April 18, 5-6:30 p.m. www.northgeorgia. edu/library/hours. March 22-24: Wine Highway Weekend, Winegrowers Association of Georgia. www. georgiawine.com. March 31: Yahoola Spring Powwow, Yahoola United Cherokee Museum and Cultural Education Center, Crown Mountain at Findley Ridge, Dahlonega. yahoolacherokeemuseum.com. March 26-April 7: Department of Visual Arts Senior Capstone exhibition group I, Dahlonega. Library Technology Center,

Towns County March

For Welcome

Broom-making is one of the old-time skills from Appalachian life demonstrated at the Foxfire Living History Days, set for April 1213 in Mountain City. University of North Georgia, Dahlonega campus. An exhibit reception will be held April 4, 5-6:30 p.m. www.northgeorgia.edu/ library/hours.

April April 19-21: Bear on the Square Mountain Festival, Dahlonega. Music, arts and crafts, live auction, Gospel Jam, Mountain Dance, Saturday Open Mic, kids’ activities, food. Most events free. www.dahlonega.org, www.bearonthesquare.org. April 28-May 3: Writers Workshop, Lily Creek Lodge, Dahlonega. 706-864-6848, info@ lilycreeklodge.com, www.lilycreeklodge. com.

May May 18-19: Mountain Flower Art Festival, Dahlonega Public Square. Parking free around square, $5 at University of North Georgia garage. www.dahlonegaarts.org. May 4: U.S. Army Mountain Ranger Open House, Camp Frank D. Merrill, Wahsega Road, Dahlonega. Skill demonstrations including helicopters, night vision devices, weapons and parachutes, 5K/15K Mountain Ranger Run. www.dahlonega. org.

Rabun County April April 14: Gran Fondo Bike Race/ Ride, Clayton. 706-212-0241, www. gamountains.com.

March 9: Three Dog Night concert. 7 p.m., Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds, Anderson Music Hall, 1311 Music Hall Road, Hiawassee. Tickets: $37. 706-896-4191, www.georgiamountainfairgrounds.com. March 15: Rollins Planetarium Show, “The Little Star That Could,” 7 p.m., Young Harris College. Admission: $3 adults, $2 children and students, free to Young Harris students, faculty and staff free with ID. 706379-5195, www.yhc.edu. March 17: Young Harris College Recital, Dr. Nicolas Deuson, guitarist, 3 p.m., Susan B Harris Chapel, Young Harris College. 706379-4307, www.yhc.edu. March 19: Young Harris College Guitar Ensemble, 7 p.m., Susan B Harris Chapel, Young Harris College. Free. 706-379-4307,

www.yhc.edu. March 22-24: Spring Mountain Wine Highway Weekend, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 1-6 p.m. Sunday. www. georgiawine.com. March 22: Cosmic Concert: Led Zeppelin, 7 and 8 p.m., Rollins Planetarium, Young Harris College. Admission: $3 adults, $2 children and students, free to Young Harris students, faculty and staff with ID. 706-3795195, www.yhc.edu. March 23: Steve Augeri Live!, 7 p.m., Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds, Ga. 76, Hiawassee. 706-896-4966, www. georgiamountainfairgrounds.com. March 30: Jackrabbit Adventure Race, Hiawassee. 828-231-7728, www. jackrabbitadventurerace.com, www. trailblazerar.com.

April April 11-20: “Becky’s New Car,” Theatre Young Harris, 7 p.m., 2 p.m. Sunday April 14. Dobbs Theater-Goolsby Center, Young Harris College. Tickets: $10 adults, $5 ages 65 and older or with Young Harris ID. 706379-4307, www.yhc.edu. April 12-13: Young Harris College Spring Fest, Ga. 76, Young Harris. Games, activities on YHC Lawn and Plaza. www. yhc.edu.


21

The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013 April 12, 19, 26: Cosmic Concert: Led Zeppelin, 7 and 8 p.m., Rollins Planetarium, Young Harris College. Admission: $3 adults, $2 children and students, free to Young Harris students, faculty and staff with ID. 706-379-5195, www.yhc.edu. April 16-17: “God of Carnage,” awardwinning play, 7 p.m, Dobbs Theatre, Young Harris College. 706-379-4307, www.yhc. edu. April 20-21: Spring Arts Festival, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, Mayors Park Ga. 76, Young Harris. 706897-6179, www.robinrobertspromotions. com.

May May 10: “Saturn: Jewel of the Heavens,” 8:30 p.m., Rollins Planetarium, Young Harris College. 706-379-5195, www.yhc. edu. May 11-12: Mother’s Day Arts & Craft Show, 10 a.m., Brasstown Valley Resort, 6321 Ga. 76, Young Harris. 706-379-4606, www. brasstownvalley.com. May 17-18: Georgia Mountain Eggfest, Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds, 1311 Music Road, Hiawassee. 706-896-4966, hthomason@georgiamountainfair.info, www.georgiamountainfairgrounds.com. May 25: Mountain Wine Country Spring Festival, Crane Creek Vineyards, 916 Crane Creek Road, Young Harris. 706-379-1236, www.cranecreekvineyards.com.

Union County March March 15: Shamrock Dulcimer Blast, 7 p.m., Historic Courthouse, downtown Blairsville. Anne Lough and members of the North Ga. Foothills Dulcimer Association. www. blairsvillechamber.com. March 16: Dulcimer classes, 9 a.m., First Methodist Church MAC, 938 Ga. 515, Blairsville. 706-745-5493, www. unioncountyhistory.org. March 23: Easter Egg Hunt, 10 a.m. Meeks Park, 11 Pool Lane, Blairsville. 706-4396074, www.blairsvillechamber.com.

April April 26-27: Mountain Home Show, 2-7 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, North Georgia Technical College, 121 Meeks Ave., Blairsville. Exhibits, giveaways. Free. 706-439-6300, www.mountainhomeshow. com. April 9-14: Blairsville Kiwanis Fair, 5 p.m., Tuesday-Friday, noon Saturday, 1 p.m. Sunday. Airport Industrial Park, Airport Industrial Drive, Blairsville. Carnival rides, games, cattle show, bluegrass music, food, petting zoo. 706-781-6552, www. blairsvillekiwanis.com.

Welcome file photo

Northeast Georgia wineries will take part in the annual Spring Wine Highway Weekend March 22-24.

May May 10-11: 4th annual Butterfly Benefit Bluegrass Festival, 8 p.m., Union County’s Saddle Club Arena, 73 Saddle Club Drive, Blairsville. Music, craft and food vendors. Admission $5; proceeds benefit Glenda Gooch House. 706-745-3420, www. butterflybluegrassfestival.com. May 31: American Cancer Society Relay For Life, 6 p.m.-6 a.m., Union County Farmers Market, 148 Old Smokey Road, Blairsville. 706-835-8384, www.unioncountyrelay. com. May 18: Armed Forces Day, 11 a.m. to noon, downtown Blairsville. 706-745-5493, www. unioncountyhistory.org. May 25-26: Spring Arts & Crafts Festival. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., downtown square, Blairsville. Juried artists and craftsmen, live performances by dancers and musicians, food. Free. 706-994-4837, www.downtownblairsville.com, www. robinrobertspromotions.com. May 25: Memorial Day Parade, 10 a.m., War Memorial Park, Blairsville. 706-745-6341, www.unioncountyhistory.org.

White County March March 2: Volunteer Training, 9-11 a.m. Smithgall Woods. Optional site tour: 11 a.m. to noon. Register by Feb. 29. 706-8783087. March: 3-16: Youth Art Competition and Pottery Studio Exhibit, Helen Arts & Heritage Center, Helen. Opening reception March 3. 706-878-3933, www.helenarts.org.

March 7: Georgia Heritage Center for the Arts, artists reception 5-6:30 p.m.. 706892-1033, www.experiencegeorgiaarts.org. March 9: Survival Preparation & Skills Course, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Smithgall Woods. 706-878-3087. March 12: Helen Arts & Heritage Center Second Tuesday Get-Together, 706-8783933, www.helenarts.org. March 16: St. Patrick’s Celebration, Babyland General Hospital, Cleveland. Prize drawings, coloring pages, costume character. 706-865-2171, www. cabbagepatchkids.com. March 16: Swinging in the Vines Music Series, 2-5 p.m., Sautee Nacoochee Vineyards. Complimentary wine tastings. 706-878-1056, www. sauteenacoochpeevineyards.com. March 16: Flies and Fly Water, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Smithgall Woods. Presentation on stream entomology by Sheila Humphrey. 706-878-3087. March 21: “Mountain Matters,” Gallery Exhibit opening reception, 5-7 p.m., Helen Arts & Heritage Center. 706-878-3933, www.helenarts.org. March 22-24: Spring Wine Highway Weekend, various area wineries participating. 706-878-9463, www. georgiawine.com. March 23: Make a Gourd-eous Birdhouse, 10 a.m. to noon, Smithgall Woods.

706-878-3087. March 23: Magical Easter Eggstravaganza, Babyland General Hospital & White County Chamber of Commerce, Cleveland. Breakfast with the Easter Bunny, $10 per person, reservations required; easter egg hunt, arts & crafts show, Easter Bonnet Contest, Easter parade. 706-865-2171, 706-865-5356, www.cabbagepatchkids. com. March 23: Contra Dance, 6:30-11 p.m., Sautee-Nacoochee Center Historic Gym. Potluck dinner 6:30, dance begins 8 p.m. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. March 30: 24th annual Trout Tournament, Helen Chamber, 706-878-1908, www. helenchamber.com. March 30: Easter Fun, Unicoi State Park, Helen. Easter basket-making, egg hunt, Easter Bunny. 1-800-573-9659, www. GeorgiaStateParks.org.

April April 4: Georgia Heritage Center for the Arts, featured artist for the month Evie Somogyi, watercolorist. Reception 5-6:30 p.m. 706892-1033, www.experiencegeorgiaarts.org. April 6: Springfest 2013, 6-11 p.m., Festhalle, Helen. Bavarian music, dancing, food, beverages. Helen Chamber of Commerce, 706-878-1908, www. helenchamber.com.


22 April 6, 13, 20: Wild About Wildflowers, 1 p.m., Unicoi State Park, Helen. Guided hike. Pre-registration required. 1-800-5739659, www.GeorgiaStateParks.org. April 9: Helen Arts & Heritage Center Second Tuesday Get-together. 706-8783933, www.helenarts.org. April 13: Cabbage Patch Tea Party, Babyland General Hospital, Cleveland. Reservations required, 706-865-2171, www.cabbagepatchkids.com. April 13: Botanical Preparations for Spring, 9 a.m. to noon, Smithgall Woods. 706-8783087. April 20: Youth Fishing Days at Buck Shoals, 8 a.m. to noon, third Saturday each month through September. Bring own bait and rod; no registration required. 706-878-3087. April 20: Swinging in the Vines Music Series, Sautee Nacoochee Vineyards. 2-5 p.m., Sautee Nacoochee Vineyards. Complimentary wine tastings. 706-8781056, www.sauteenacoochpeevineyards. com. April 27: Taste of Sauteee, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sautee Village. Wine, art, food, music. 706878-0144. April 27: Contra Dance, 6:30-11 p.m., Sautee Nacoochee Center Historic Gym. Potluck dinner 6:30 p.m., dance begins 8 p.m. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org.

May May 2: Georgia Heritage Center for the Arts, featured artist for month Bonnie McCarty, equine artist in acrylic). Reception 5-6:30 p.m. 706-892-1033, www. experiencegeorgiaarts.org. May 3: First Fridays Music Pickin’ on the Porch, 6-9 p.m., Sautee Village. Music, food. Free; donations accepted. Pproceeds go to Charles Smithgall Humane Society. 706-878-0144. May 4: Winefest, Habersham Winery. Wine, food, music. 706-878-9463. May 4: Twelve Rivers Art Festival, Sautee Nacoochee Center, 706-878-3300 www. snca.org. May 14: Helen Arts & Heritage Center, Second Tuesday Get-together. 706-8783933, www.helenarts.org. May 18: Youth Fishing Days at Buck Shoals, 8 a.m. to noon, third Saturday each month through September. Bring own bait and rod; no registration required. 706-878-3087. May 18: Swinging in the Vines Music Series, Sautee Nacoochee Vineyards. 2-5 p.m., Sautee Nacoochee Vineyards. Complimentary wine tastings. 706-8781056, www.sauteenacoochpeevineyards. com. May 18: Contra Dance, 6:30-11 p.m., Sautee Nacoochee Center Historic Gym. Potluck dinner 6:30 p.m., dance begins 8 p.m. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. May 23: “Dreamwork” Gallery Exhibit opening reception, 5-7 p.m., Helen Arts

The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Murphy

N.C. 441

19

Blairsville

197

129

HABERSHAM

Cleveland

197

19

441

384

Clermont Demorest

60

HALL

52

Murrayville

23

365

Toccoa

365

Clarkesville

DAWSON

Cornelia

STEPHENS

Baldwin

Lavonia 85 985

Gillsville

Gainesville

400

17

BANKS

Lula

53

FORSYTH

S.C.

WHITE

Dahlonega

Dawsonville

Clayton

Helen

Suches

52 52

RABUN 197

180

53

TOWNS

19

UNION

LUMPKIN

Dillard

515

Young Harris

FRANKLIN

HART

20

Oakwood

Cumming Buford

Braselton 0

10 Miles

& Heritage Center. 706-878-3933, www. helenarts.org. May 25: Bavarianfest, 6-11 p.m., Festhalle, Helen. Music, dancing, beer and wines, soft drinks, food. Helen Chamber of Commerce, 706-878-1908, www.helenchamber.com. May 25: Art in the Park, Unicoi State Park, Helen. 1-800-573-9659, www. GeorgiaStateParks.org. May 25: 24th annual Pig Out Barbecue, noon to 5 p.m., Sautee Nacoochee Center, fundraiser for volunteer firefighters. Capt. Roger Williams, 706-878-9349. May 25: Saturday Evening Music Concert

JACKSON

85 985

985 985

Sugar Hill Suwanee

Pendergrass

Flowery Branch

11

53

Commerce 98 441

JACKSON

Winder

Series, 8 p.m., Unicoi State Park, Helen. Free, donations welcome. 1-800-573-9659, www.GeorgiaStateParks.org. May 30-June 1: 40th annual Helen to the Atlantic Hot Air Balloon Race, Helendorf Inn, 706-878-2271. May 31-June 2: 13th annual US Riders News Reunion Run and 7th annual Southeast Victory Run, Helen Riverside Park, 478-2373761.

Tourism bureau contacts Banks County, www. bankscountyga.org Forsyth County, www. cummingforsythchamber. org Habersham County, www. habershamchamber.com Hall County, www. ghcc.com; www. discoverlakelanier.com

Dahlonega-Lumpkin County, www.dahlonega.org Jackson County, www. jacksoncountyga.com Rabun County, www. gamountains.com Towns County, www. townscountytourism. com Union County, www. blairsvillechamber.com White County-Helen, www. whitecounty.com; www. helenga.org


23

The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013

Easton Corbin March 2

The Lovin’ Spoonful March 29

Mike Snider String Band May 11

Angelina Ballerina™ March 16

Š 2012 HIT Entertainment Limited

Moral Revolution 2013 March 17

The Isaacs March 23

Vince Gill April 5

Annie Get Your Gun April 18 - 21

Sponsored by Kurti Orthodontics

Herman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone May 4

Georgia Symphony Orchestra May 25

Mark Lowry & Stan Whitmire Unplugged & Unplanned June 1

May 18

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24

The Times, Gainesville, Georgia | Sunday, February 24, 2013


Newcomers February 24 2013