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Sunday, August 29, 2010

A publication of

HARVEST Fall events calendar

History

Festival schedule

in our hills

3 North Georgia towns make their beginnings a centerpiece


HARVEST

Sunday, August 29, 2010 | Harvest | A publication of

A festive fall Community festivals share unique tastes of mountain culture

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Harvest is a publication of The Times, Gainesville, Ga., and gainesvilletimes.com. To offer comments and suggestions, contact Keith Albertson at kalbertson@ gainesvilletimes.com. Cover design by Colin Dunlop, photo by Tom Reed.

In this issue A history of gold n The center for the North

Georgia gold rush got its start as a mining center, and even once was site of a U.S. mint. Today, the gold theme runs through the

Murphy

N.C. 441

19

Blairsville

129

HABERSHAM

Cleveland

197

19

441

384

HALL

52

Murrayville

23

365

Toccoa

Cornelia

STEPHENS

Baldwin

Lavonia

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Festival, this Habersham

85 985

Gillsville

Gainesville

400

17

BANKS

Lula

53

n Home to the Apple

365

Clarkesville 60

lachia with a golden sheen.

197

Clermont Demorest

FORSYTH

S.C.

WHITE

DAWSON 53

looking for a taste of Appa-

Helen

Dahlonega

Dawsonville

Clayton

197

180

Suches

52 52

RABUN

19

UNION

LUMPKIN

TOWNS

A bite of the mountains

town as it brings in tourists

Dillard

515

Young Harris

FRANKLIN

HART

20

Oakwood

Cumming Buford

Suwanee

0

10 Miles

98

JACKSON

85 985

Braselton

Sugar Hill

Commerce

Pendergrass

Flowery Branch 985 985

11

53

441

JACKSON

Winder

Fall events

As the weather cools in the mountains, there’s plenty of stuff to do. PAGE 18-23

Y’all kommen in!

County town has its own unique draw as a gateway

n Once a mountain lumber town,

to the Appalachians, Tal-

this White County burg remade

lulah Falls, Sky Valley and

itself in the 1970s as a Bavarian-

other points nearby.

themed draw for visitors from around the world. It now serves as a regional hub for the mountains. PAGE 12

PAGE 8 Photos by SARA GUEVARA & TOM REED


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September 4th - 5th IPRA (International Professional Rodeo Association) World Championship Rodeo Saturday 8 PM • Sunday 7 PM Admission: 13 & up - $15.00, 5 - 12 - $10.00 4 & under - FREE, Seniors 65+ $12.00

7 Event Rodeo includes:

Bull Riding, Barrel Racing, Steer Wrestling, Saddle Bronc Riding, Bareback Riding, Calf & Team Roping

October 7th - 17th Cumming Country Fair & Festival

Mon- Thurs 4 pm - 10 pm, Friday 4 pm - Midnight Sat. 10 am - Midnight, Sunday 12:30 - 9:00 pm Admission: Adults - $7.00, Students 5 - 18 - $3.00 4 & under - FREE, Parking - $3.00 Advance Tickets Available Sept. 1st - 30th Adults - $5.00, Students 5-18 $2.00

Free Concerts & Shows with Paid Admission • • • • • • •

Heritage Village • Indian Village • Working Exhibits Cotton Gin • Sawmill • Sorghum Mill • Cider Press Blacksmith • Grist Mill • Quilters • Schoolhouse • Churches Doctor’s Office • Dentist’s Office • Barber Shop • Post Office General Store • Printing Press • Midway Rides Daily Ground Acts • Petting Zoo & Local Entertainment Grand Concert Lineup

November 12th & 13th Cumming Steam Engine, Antique Tractor & Gas Engine Exposition Friday 10 am - 6 pm, Saturday 8 am - 6 pm Admission: 13 & Up - $5.00, 12 & under - FREE

December 10th & 11th Christmas Celebration & Christmas in Cumming Arts & Crafts Festival Friday - 4 pm - 10 pm & Sat 10 am - 5 pm Free Hayrides, Photos with Santa

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gold A history of

Dahlonega preserves its mining past with plenty of present-day attractions


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Story by MIMI ENSLEY & Photos by SARA GUEVARA

he way Dahlonega Gold Museum volunteer Fred Boggs tells it, it all started with a large gold nugget and a stumped toe. But from the day gold was discovered in the mountains of Northeast Georgia, Dahlonega has never been the same. It’s become a tourist center with an enticing history centered around something that will always draw people to the small mountain town: a legacy of gold. Two men stand at the entrance of a mine in Dahlonega in 1905 or 1906.

Courtesy of Vanishing Georgia, Georgia Division of Archives and History, Office of Secretary of State

(Inset) This 1929 photo shows the Lumpkin County Courthouse that is now the Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site. Courtesy of Vanishing Georgia, Georgia Division of Archives and History, Office of Secretary of State

The Dahlonega Gold Museum is located inside the the historic 1836 Lumpkin County Courthouse, the oldest courthouse in Georgia.

“They say to start with, some of the gold was just laying on top of the ground,” Boggs said. In Boggs’ account, the gold rush began when a man walking through the woods around Auraria southwest of Dahlonega kicked an unusual-looking stone. As he bent down to pick up the object, he thought it might be valuable, and he had it assayed. Come to find out, he’d stumbled upon gold. “From what I heard, he was mad because he stumped his toe — it was a good-sized nugget,” Boggs said, laughing. “But I don’t know how true

that was.” Whether or not Boggs’ anecdote is the real story, by 1828 miners flocked to Lumpkin County to strike it rich and get a taste of the gold-mining lifestyle. At first the gold was easy to find, but as the mining progressed, the job got harder. By the 1840s, the rush was over. Miners headed west to California, but the town was forever changed. Now, more than 150 years after Dahlonega’s gold rush, people from across the country still come to visit the former mining town. The allure of a golden


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NOT TO BE MISSED ‘Golden chicken’ The Smith House Hotel and Restaurant features its famous fried chicken, which some visitors may call “golden.” It’s always been on the menu and the recipe never changes. A variety of famous visitors, including Bob Hope, Jimmy Carter and Newt Gingrich, have given this signature dish their stamp of approval. The restaurant offers a relaxed, family-style atmosphere that makes dining there a truly unique experience.

Sugar rush

If you don’t strike it rich in one of Dahlonega’s gold mines, you can at least find some gold at the Fudge Factory, located on the town’s Public Square. Visitors from far and wide come to get a taste of the shop’s “Dahlonega nuggets,” the shop’s version of a turtle. Seasonally, the store also features caramel apples — made with apples from Blue Ridge — and chocolate dipped strawberries. They’re famous for their fudge, but they also have 80 different varieties of old-fashioned candies, including delicious pralines.

Frozen frenzy

When temperatures climb into the 90s, a tour through Dahlonega will have to include a stop at Connie’s Ice Cream Parlor. The restaurant has a charming diner feel, complete with a lunch counter and a variety of sandwiches. On any given day, tourists pepper the Public Square holding dripping ice cream cones and treats from Connie’s.

Shoppin’ for supplies

A visit to Dahlonega is not complete until you pop into the General Store, where visitors can peruse a variety of signature jams and jellies. Patrons sit and chat in rocking chairs as others browse through T-shirts, antiques and collectables. Children can’t leave without getting their hands on some old-fashioned rock candy, one of the store’s most popular items.

Mimi Ensley

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history has become Dahlonega’s chief industry, and visitors looking for a chance to strike it rich, or at least enjoy a bit of nostalgia, come out every day to see what’s going on. Dahlonega’s tourist industry began when the old Lumpkin County Courthouse, which stands in the center of the town’s bustling public square, was converted into the Gold Museum. The museum attracts between 45,000 and 75,000 visitors a year. They can walk through the artifacts, look at a gold coin collection and watch a film about the history of the mining community. The building is 174 years old, and volunteers and staff work to preserve its history — because history is what brings visitors to the site. “It’s the oldest courthouse building in existence,” said Lori Hamby, exhibit guide for the museum. “The way the building looks is the way it looked when it was built in 1836. Nothing’s been changed. The building’s history itself is a draw.” Though the museum is the centerpiece, the buildings surrounding it downtown have a history all their own. The downtown area has 60 historic commercial buildings, including retail stores, restaurants and music venues, and many remain in their original state. “From an economic view, it’s the No. 1 asset in the county,” said Joel Cordle, downtown development authority director. “It’s also the No. 1 social and community asset as well. So it’s really the center of social and busi-

square features a “Dahlonega nugget,” the store’s version of a turtle candy. “A lot of visitors get a kick out of the fact that we’re trying to tie into the town in that way and tying into the history of the town,” said Tony Owens, Fudge Factory owner. “Folks in the past came for gold of one kind, and now I guess they come for gold of another kind.” At the Smith House Restaurant and Hotel, the history of gold lives ness activity not only for the county within the property. The building was constructed in the but in North Georgia.” 1890s, and the original owner found And local business owners embrace a rich gold vein in the land. The city the town’s history in their stores. An old-fashioned general store wouldn’t allow a mine so close to the sells gold panning gear and nostalgic public square, so the owner moved treats, and the Fudge Factory on the forward with building the house.

The way the building looks is the way it looked when it was built in 1836. Nothing’s been changed. The building’s history itself is a draw. — Lori Hamby


Harvest | A publication of

A family takes a look at an exhibit during a visit to the Dahlonega Gold Museum.

In 2006, when the new owners made renovations to the dining room, they found a mine shaft going straight into the ground. Chris Welch, a third-generation family owner, said his grandfather passed away before even knowing about the shaft, but now people come from far and wide to view artifacts and an unusual history. “Everybody’s fascinated,” Welch said. “It’s just an amazing find. It’s just a really cool thing to find that has been covered up for many years.” But the biggest tourist draw in Dahlonega might be the actual gold panning that goes on at one of two locations in the area. Visitors to either the Crisson Gold Mine or the Consolidated Gold Mine can get a taste of what it was really like to pan for gold during the rush. “I don’t plan to get rich from it, but it’s just a lot of fun,” said Raymond Callahan, visiting Dahlonega

from Flowery Branch. School groups and families frequent the mines, said Crisson employee JoJo Tester. She said tourists come from the Ukraine, England and across the United States. “I have people that are drawn to the history and some people that are thinking they’re going to get rich quick, but most of the time it’s for the history and the excitement,” she said. That history and excitement brings more than 225,000 visitors to Dahlonega’s visitors center every year — only Savannah’s center has more. They come for the mountains, the gold, the wine, the shops and the stories of the past. “We’ve got a lot of treasures that have been preserved, and we have a lot of stories to tell,” Cordle said. “We’ve got landmarks and legends, and a lot of things for visitors to learn about and experience.”

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bite

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of the mountains Cornelia’s Big Red Apple remains at the core of the city’s tourism future


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Story by KRISTEN MORALES & Photos by TOM REED

f you’re looking for a taste of the Big Apple, there’s no need to leave the mountains of North Georgia. Nestled in the Appalachian foothills, this railroad town is known for its 85-year-old red apple that proudly stands next to the downtown train depot. And it’s a fitting place for this metal monument of fruit, because it’s Cornelia’s apple production — and the trains that carried the apples to places like Athens, Elberton and Atlanta — that first put Cornelia on the map.

The old train depot in downtown Cornelia is now a museum and is open to the public.

(inset) An old postcard depicts the Cornelia train station of years ago. For The Times

The Big Red Apple sits next to the train depot. The Cornelia landmark was a gift to the town from Southern Railway in 1925.

Today, just one orchard remains in Habersham County: Jaemor Farms, in Alto. But that’s OK; the apple theme continues in festivals, signs and virtually anything related to Cornelia. It’s tradition, said Cornelia’s Better Hometown Manager Andrea Harper. “Every event we do is somehow apple-related,” said Harper, whose office sits alongside the railroad tracks that cut through downtown. “Having the apple and the depot together, it is the heart of the city.”

From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 2, downtown Cornelia will be packed with visitors for the annual Big Red Apple Festival. Its spring counterpart is the Apple Blossom Festival, and the town is gearing up for a new event in September, the Apple Box Car Derby. The events fill the otherwise quiet downtown with music, vendor booths and family activities like horseshoes. A local church serves up plates of soul food, and there is a hay ride out to the Chenocetah Tower, a stone fire tower built in the 1930s that offers panoramic views of Lake Russell.


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CORNELIA ETC. Cornelia trivia How much do you know about the railroad town of Cornelia? Here are some quick facts: Originally called: Blaine; Cornelia was the name of the second wife of the attorney working on behalf of the railroad company when it secured the town’s charter Incorporated: Oct. 22, 1887 Population in 1900: 467 Population in 2000: 3,674

When in Cornelia... Planning a visit to Cornelia? Here are some places you have to check out: Fender’s Diner Take in a malted milkshake and some 1950s charm at this retro diner. Habersham Hardware If you can’t find it in this kitchen drawer of a store, you don’t need it. Cornelia Community Center and parks There are six parks in Clarkesville, all outfitted with walking trails and shady areas. The community center is a stone structure that’s listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Fenders Diner waitress Carol Donovan takes a lunch order from city of Cornelia employees Butch Morgan, left, and Andy Pilgrim.

Tracks of history

When there isn’t a festival celebrating the red apple, downtown Cornelia looks pretty close to photos depicting it in the early 1900s. Cornelia Pharmacy, housed in a stately brick building across from the train depot, harkens back to the pharmacies of generations ago. Down the street is Fender’s Diner, with its retro pink and sea-foam green decor. Within a few blocks are family-owned boutiques and restaurants, all in buildings that, from the outside, stay true to

their original design. And, true to its origins as a railroad town, traffic through downtown stops several times a day to let a train through. “We get 30 trains a day,” said Harper, noting that investor Warren Buffett always looks to the railroad when looking for economic indicators. “If this is any indication, we’re doing all right.” Before its incorporation in 1887, Cornelia made a living in a decidedly different way: Moonshine.

Mark of the Potter It’s the oldest craft store in the state, located along Ga. Highway 197 in a historic mill.

Kristen Morales

Back then the town was called Blaine, and was so well secluded in a forest bordering the Cherokee and Creek tribes that a moonshine still was in operation where downtown now stands. But when the Charlotte-Airline Railroad came through to lay tracks, it dawned a new era for Cornelia. Trains from Charlotte and Franklin, N.C., Tallulah Falls and Atlanta all came through Cornelia, and on the way they stopped for one precious commodity: Apples.


Harvest | A publication of

A source of pride

of farms have pushed out wholesale Thanks to the railroad, Harper apple orchards across Habersham said, Cornelia got its icon: The big County. But nevertheless, Cornelia red apple. It was delivered in 1925 as is situating itself to be a tourist destination. a gift from Southern Railway. It’s 7 feet tall, 22 feet in circumfer- The future of ence and weighs 5,200 pounds. tourism An apple queen was crowned. A The trains through Cornelia now festival was born. And while the Big carry machines and grain rather Red Apple Festival isn’t the original than apples, but it’s an icon the town festival begun by the town’s metal keeps, said Judy Taylor, president of apple, it carries on the tradition. the Habersham Chamber of ComBy the late 1950s, according to merce. the local history book “The Hills of Tourism is a major industry across Habersham,” it was common to see the North Georgia mountains, and “schooner” wagons through down- towns need some kind of icon visitown, loaded with apples and headed tors can identify with. to the market. “We have changed our tourism Today, development and other types promotions here. We’ve even had

workshops training our front-line employees on how to provide customer service to tourists,” Taylor said. “Tourism is just very important; it’s what drives this county. We want people to see Habersham County as a destination, not just a pass through.” The town is adjacent to Lake Russell, and down the road is Tallulah Gorge and several other waterfalls. There are five museums in the county — three in Cornelia — and Mark of the Potter, a pottery and store located in an old mill on Ga. Highway 197, is the oldest craft store in Georgia, Taylor said. “We have our own natural beauty for this area. there are many waterfalls in this area, this county has two rivers

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of its own; one is the Chattahoochee, the other is Habersham’s own river, the Soque River,” she added. “It starts and ends in Habersham. On Oct. 9, the area will host its first Hills of Habersham bike ride, a metric century ride, and the Chattahoochee Mountain Fair is Sept. 10-18 at the fairgrounds in Clarkesville. But, Taylor said, it all comes back to the big red apple adorning Cornelia’s downtown, and the fall festival that bears its name. “The Big Red Apple Festival comes from the idea that we have this humongous monument out in front of the Cornelia depot that is a big red apple,” she said. “It pretty much is the signifying thing of Cornelia.”


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Helen evolved from a sleepy lumber town into a Bavarian-themed tourist destination

y’all kommen in!


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Story by TASHA BIGGERS & Photos by TOM REED

ou might be surprised, if you’ve never been to Helen, to find a tiny Bavarian-themed town nestled in the North Georgia mountains. Helen was a nondescript lumber mill town before its red-roofed, gingerbread makeover more than 40 years ago. “It was an old lumber mill town, and it was sort of dilapidated,” said Clarkesville painter John Kollock, who had a hand in the transformation of Helen. A horse-drawn carriage shares the road cars along Main Street in Helen.

▼ Helen is now made up of storefronts to resemble an Alpine village. The theme is replicated in all the buildings in town.

(Inset) Downtown Helen as it appeared in 1969 before the makeover of the town into a Bavarianthemed village. Courtesy of Helen Visitors Center

Now the little city is known as the place to go to get a fix for your bratwurst craving, while dressed in your best lederhosen. So what happened between the lumber and the lederhosen? The story of Helen as a tourist attraction began in 1968. A couple of area businessmen, Jimmy Wilkins and Pete Hodkinson, talked over lunch about how to get tourists to stop in the city, which already had hunters and fishermen driving through town to visit Unicoi

State Park. In 1969, the two tapped Kollock, who found a way to make Helen unique. Kollock, who served in the military in Bavaria, Germany, saw Helen’s misty mountains and thought of the German town where he was stationed years ago. “The mountains around the city (reminded me of Bavaria.) At that time, everything was above the bridge. It was just tiny, little ... two sides of the street, and it looked like a picture,” he said.


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MORE THAN JUST SIGHTS

Edie Telford packages candy at Brookstown Fudge in downtown Helen. The small candy shop makes everything on site and offers samples of its products.

Helen happenings Oktoberfest 40th Anniversary German dancing, bands, food and drink When: Thursday-Sunday Sept. 9-19; daily Sept. 23-Oct. 31; parade, noon Sept. 11 Where: Helen Festhalle, 1074 Edelweiss Strasse, Helen; parade on Main Street How much: $7 per person; Sundays free More info: 706-878-1908

Christkindlmarkt Market with German food, drinks and candy; gifts and decorations When: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, Nov. 26-Dec. 5 Where: Marktplatz, downtown Helen How much: Free to attend More info: 706-878-1908

Lighting of the Village When: 6 p.m. Nov. 26 Where: Downtown Helen How much: Free More info: 706-878-2181

Festival of Trees Benefits the United Way of White County. Area organizations decorate trees and wreaths for a silent auction. When: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Nov. 25-Dec. 11 Where: Unicoi State Park, 1788 Ga. 356, Helen How much: Free to attend More info: 800-573-9659, ext. 305

Kinderfest Children’s festival with games, face painting and balloon tying When: 10 a.m. Nov. 26 and 28 Where: Downtown Helen More info: 706-878-1908

Places to visit Helen/White County Convention and Visitors Bureau Where: 726 Bruckenstrasse, Helen More info: 800-858-8027 or helenga.org Innsbruck Resort and Golf Club Golf course, swimming, tennis and club house Where: 664 Bahn Innsbruck, Helen More info: 706-878-2101 Hansel & Gretel Candy Kitchen Two locations with candy made on site Where: 8651 Main St., Helen and 8078 S. Main St., Helen More info: 706-878-7704, 706-878-2443 or www.hanselandgretelcandykitchen.com Brookstown Fudge Fudge and other candy made on site Where: 8619 N. Main St., Helen Black Forest Bear Park & Reptile Exhibit See grizzly bears, Syrian grizzly bears, black bears and cinnamon bears, and a variety of reptiles Where: 8160 S. Main St., Helen How much: $5 for entry to bear and reptile exhibit; $1 per tray of food. More info: 706-878-7043 or www.black forestbearpark.com

Jolly’s Toys Toys made on site by woodworker Jolly Nichols. German toys, puzzles, games. Where: 880 N. Main St., Helen More info: 706-878-2262 Betty’s Country Store Grocery store with specialty meat, cheese and gourmet items Where: Yonah St., Helen More info: 706-878-2943 or www.bettysin helen.com Hofer’s Bakery and Café German food and pastries Where: 8758 N. Main St., Helen More info: 706-878-8200 Unicoi State Park & Lodge Fishing, hiking, restaurant and lodge Where: 1788 Ga. 356, Helen More info: 706-878-2201 or www.gastate parks.org/info/unicoi Nacoochee Village Various shops and restaurants including Nacoochee Antique Mall, The Willows Pottery, Nacoochee Grill, Habersham Winery and Nora Mill Where: 7091 S. Main St., Helen More info: 706-878-1800 or nacoochee village.com

“My degree was in scene design and theater ... (and I thought), ‘Well, just a little bit of cosmetic change on the front of these buildings, and it’d look like a Bavarian village.’” He sketched out his ideas for Helen’s new look, and business owners got to work adding gingerbread trim and other Bavarian details to their shops. Kollock, who is well known in Northeast Georgia for painting historic scenes of the region, also painted some of the murals throughout the city himself. “If you go down what they call

Olde Street, up in the gables of the buildings up above, I did the history of Helen in scenes,” he said. “I used local people in the pictures so they would preserve them — they wouldn’t paint over them.” Along with the murals, workers installed balconies and other special touches to pre-existing shops. “We tried to put in things that tourists would like,” said Kollock. “Originally, we tried to have no duplications from shop to shop.” Helen was transformed by 1972. “It’s what sets us apart from the other mountain towns,” said


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Alpine yodeler and singer Heidi Schaefer leads a circle dance through the crowd at the Helen Festhalle during last year’s Oktoberfest celebration. This year’s Bavarian festival begins Sept. 9.

Scott Rogers

Debbie Gagliolo, director of the Alpine Helen-White County Convention and Visitors Bureau. Gagliolo said Helen would not stand out as much “if we didn’t have the Bavarian-style architecture, if we didn’t have ... our festivals that we base our tourism around.” Now, fudge shops, souvenir stores and restaurants fill each side of Helen’s Main Street and its cobblestone alleyways. There are many mainstays — including Betty’s Country Store, Jolly’s Toys, Hansel & Gretel Candy Kitchen and Hofer’s Bakery — that have been established in Helen for decades, and although some shops or attractions come and go, certain new ones have staying power. An example is the newer Black Forest Bear Park & Reptile Exhibit, which has been in operation since 2001. Oktoberfest, Helen’s biggest

The Festhalle is on the banks of the Chattahoochee in the downtown area... — Debbie Gagliolo annual event, draws about 30,000 visitors to Helen each fall. Christkindlmarkt, a German holiday market, spreads out on Marketplatz in November. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the celebration of Oktoberfest in Helen — the 200th in Germany. This year’s event begins Sept. 9 at the Festhalle. “The Festhalle is on the banks of the Chattahoochee in the downtown area, and they have bands that come in,” Gagliolo said. “It’s headquartered in there, but the whole atmosphere kind of spills over from there into the entire town.”

For this year’s Oktoberfest, a band from Fussen, Helen’s sister city in Bavaria, will perform. “We have a different band every week. We serve German food, domestic imported beer and wine, soft drinks, snacks,” said Jane Sims of the Helen Chamber of Commerce, who organizes Oktoberfest and Helen’s other German festivals. Sims said Helen’s holiday season also is a busy time for the city. She said Christkindlmarkt is “a German tradition. Their mer-

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chants set up booths outside during Christmas season. We set up booths in the Marketplatz area downtown, and invite the merchants in town to have a booth and sell ... decorations and gifts, and some of the restaurants sell food.” The Christmas parade will march down Main St. on Dec. 4 following the Lighting of the Village, planned for Nov. 26. In the summer, with the Chattahoochee River running through it, Helen also attracts families that want to “tube the ’Hooch in neoncolored inner tubes. “I’ve been here for 30 years, and I think it has become more of a year-round community,” Gagliolo said.


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A festive fall

Community festivals share unique tastes of mountain culture

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omehow, as the weather cools and the leaves begin to turn, North Georgians find themselves in the mood for a little mountain music, maybe some pottery or woodwork, and always with something fried on a stick to munch on. Fall festival season is a unique slice of mountain culture in which each community seeks to celebrate its heritage with a weekend, or more, full of regional events. Whether it’s mules, moonshine, gold or a Bavarian band, there’s a little something for every taste. Yet each festival also offers a common thread beyond the banjo music, homemade baskets and plastic bears full of sourwood honey: Love of community and pride in its unmatched style and history. Here’s a brief look at some of the best-known fall festivals in Northeast Georgia and what you can look for at each this season:

Sara Guevara

A petting zoo, including the festival’s namesake critters, is a popular attraction at Gainesville’s Mule Camp Market festival, set for Oct. 8-10.

Oktoberfest, Sept. 9-Oct. 31, Helen The 40th annual Bavarian celebration runs 6 to 10:30 p.m. Thursdays, 6 p.m. to midnight Fridays, 1 p.m. to midnight Saturdays and 1 to 7 p.m. Sundays. Visitors can enjoy German music, dancing, food and drink while taking in the sights and shops in the Alpine village. The annual Oktoberfest Parade is set for noon Sept. 11, followed by “tapping of the keg” at Festhalle. Admission is $7, free on Sundays. Contact: 706-878-1908, 706-878-2181, info@ helenga.org, www.helenga.org.

is The Mountaineer Festival, which includes more than 35 exhibits and demonstrations such as pottery, cornshuck dolls, crocheted and knitted items, berry basket making, woodworking, broom-making, flint knapping, blacksmithing, chair-bottoming, folk art painting, nature & wildlife photography, hand-made jewelry, stained glass and railroad history. Field event competition will include archery, greased pole climbing, log tossing, wood splitting and sack racing. Daily raffles and live auctions will be held as well. Admission is $5 per person, maximum of $20 per immediate family. All proceeds benefit Foxfire’s Local Educational Programs and The Rabun County Mountaineer Festival.

Foxfire/Mountaineer Heritage Festival, Oct. 2, Clayton

Big Red Apple Festival, Oct. 2, Cornelia

The blending of two annual events runs from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Rabun County Civic Center. The 16th annual Foxfire festival will feature food, crafts and music. Joining this year

Annual festival runs 10 a.m.-5 p.m. in downtown Cornelia. Included are booths, entertainment, food, crafts, arts, music and family activities. Contact Andrea Harper, Better Hometown Manager, City of Cornelia, 706-778-7875.


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Indian Summer Festival, Oct. 2-3, Suches

Restored vintage race cars parade through downtown Dawsonville during last year’s Mountain Moonshine Festival. The event celebrates Dawsonville’s roots in stock car racing. this year’s edition is set for Oct. 23-24.

This event features arts and crafts, antiques, pottery, leather, produce, folk art and food. In addition, The Run Above the Clouds 10-kilometer road race is set for 9 a.m. Saturday. A square dance with a live band begins at 8 p.m. Saturday. Other events include clogging, turkey shoot, archery demo, auction and food. Admission is $4, parking free; all proceeds going to Woody Gap School. Contact: 706747-2401, www.suches.com.

Georgia Mountain Fall Festival, Oct. 8-16, Hiawasee The nine-day event runs from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays at the Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds. Festivalgoers will find mountain arts and crafts, plus exhibits, live music, a pioneer village and a Live Shark Encounter, an educational exhibit of live sharks. In addition, the festival will serve as the state fiddlers convention, bringing together top musicians from around the Southeast. Tickets are $9 per day, parking $2. Contact: 706-896-4191, gamtfair@windstream. net, georgiamountainfairgrounds.com.

Tom Reed

Sorghum Festival, Oct. 9-10, 16-17, Blairsville

Mule Camp Market, Oct. 8-10, Gainesville

This annual tribute to sweet syrup is held at Meeks Park off Ga. 515. Syrup making is the key craft on display, along with other art exhibits, contests, music and plenty of activities to keep children busy. The Sorghum Parade is set for Oct. 9 in downtown Blairsville, with a car show on Oct. 16 at United Community Bank. Contact: Jaycees, 706-745-4745, www. sorghumfestivalblairsville.com; car show, Good Neighbors Auto Club 828-837-8539 or 706-745-3985.

This annual event on the downtown square began as a farmer’s cub market, then became the Corn Tassel Festival. The Gainesville Jaycees took over in the early 1990s and changed the name to Mule Camp Market, reflecting Gainesville’s original name. The festival draws some 75,000 visitors each year to sample arts and crafts, music and food. Kids’ activities include face painting and a petting zoo. Contact: Gainesville Jaycees, www. gainesvillejaycees.org, 770-532-7714.

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Gold Rush Days, Oct. 16-17 Dahlonega Annual event marks Dahlonega’s 1828 discovery of gold with more than 300 art and craft exhibitors on the town’s square and historic district. Included are a parade, children’s activities, fashion show, gold panning contest, wheelbarrow race, King and Queen Coronation, hog calling, buck dancing contest, gospel singing and other live entertainment. Contact: 706-864-3513, www. dahlonega.org.

Moonshine Festival, Oct. 23-24, Dawsonville The roots of stock car racing in Dawson County, stemming from the prohibition-era “moonshine runners,” is the theme of this annual event. The celebration includes a car show and a parade Saturday. Visitors can listen to storytellers, see a moonshine still and enjoy crafts, food, music and dancing beginning at 8 a.m. daily. Other activities include children’s games and rides. Admission is free; some vendors and events include a charge, with proceeds to benefit Kare for Kids in Dawson County. Contact: 706-265-6278, 877-302-9271, www.dawson.org.


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Harvest | A publication of

| Sunday, August 29, 2010

Murphy

N.C. 441

19

Blairsville

197

129

HABERSHAM

Cleveland

197

19

Clermont Demorest

60

HALL

52

Murrayville

23

365

Toccoa

365

Cornelia

STEPHENS

Baldwin

Lavonia 85 985

Gillsville

Gainesville

400

17

BANKS

Lula

53

FORSYTH

441

384

Clarkesville

DAWSON

Fall events

S.C.

Helen

Dahlonega

Dawsonville

Clayton

WHITE

Suches

52 52

RABUN 197

180

53

TOWNS

19

UNION

LUMPKIN

Dillard

515

Young Harris

FRANKLIN

20

Oakwood

Cumming Buford

Braselton 0

10

JACKSON

85 985

985 985

Sugar Hill Suwanee

Pendergrass

Flowery Branch

11

53

Miles

Hall County ONGOING Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, Gainesville. Arts and

crafts themes vary weekly. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. $8 kids age 2 and older; $1 activity fee. 770-5361900, www.inkfun.org. “The World Around Me,” “Amalgam” and “Colors of the World,” Gainesville. Art exhibits on display through Oct. 9, Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. Free. 770-536-2575. “Waters of Time: The Chicopee Woods Story,” Gainesville. See the history of Chicopee Woods, do hands-on projects and see Chicopee habitats and animals. $5 adults, $3 kids age 2-12, free for Elachee members and kids age 2-12. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. “Searching for Space Ship Earth,” Gainesville. Learn about outer space. Hands-on activities, video with recent images from the Hub-

Commerce 98 441

HART

Hall County

18

Banks County

20

Dawson County

20

Forsyth County

20

Habersham County 21 Jackson County

22

Lumpkin County

22

Ga. Mountains

22

White County

22

JACKSON

Winder ble Space Telescope. $5 adults, $3 kids age 2-12, free for Elachee members, ages 2-12. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. First Saturday Hike at Elachee. 10-11:30 a.m. Sept. 4, Oct. 2, Nov. 6 and Dec. 4. Guided hike. $5 adults, $3 kids age 2-12, free for Elachee members and kids age 2-12. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. 770-535-1976, www.elachee. org. Stars Over Elachee at Chicopee Lake, Gainesville. Recommended for kids age 8 and older. Learn how to use a telescope to view the night sky, chart constellations. Call ahead to reserve a telescope. 7:15-9:15 p.m. Sept. 11; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Oct. 16; 5-7 p.m. Dec. 11, Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. $10 adults, $5 kids age 2-12, free for Elachee members and kids age 2-12. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. Trail Crew Work Day, Gainesville. Age 17 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 9 and Dec. 4, Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Free. 770535-1976, www.elachee.org.

Tuesday Night Sketch Club. Sketch from a live model. 7-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. $5 per person; reservations required. 770-536-2575, www.quinlanartscenter.org. Through Sept. 16: “Identity,” an art exhibit. Roy C. Moore Art Gallery, Gainesville State College, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. 678-717-3438 or bsale@gsc.edu. Through Sept. 18: Art in the Square Silent Auction to benefit Challenged Child and Friends. Bid on hand-painted lamps, paintings and other media. Auction ends 4 p.m. Sept. 18. Gallerie 110, 110 Washington St., Gainesville. www.artinthesquarega.com.

SEPTEMBER Sept. 2-Oct. 10: “Orientation.” Crafts created from discarded or repur-

posed materials. Reception, 6:30 p.m. Sept. 23, John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Leo Castelli Gallery, Brenau University, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. 770-534-6263, www.brenau.edu.


Harvest | A publication of Sept. 2-Nov. 21: “Short Fuses and Long Streets: A Logical Lapse.” Amanda Hughen and Jennifer Starweather. Drawings abstracted from biology, architecture, geology, topography and highly layered constructions. Presidents Gallery, Brenau University, 500 Washington St., Gainesville. Free. 770-534-6263. Sept. 3 and 7: Captain Conservation will visit INK to teach kids about water conservation. 11 a.m. to noon both days, Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. 770-5361900, www.inkfun.org. Sept. 7-9: “Harvey.” Gainesville High School Drama Department. 7:30 p.m., The Ware House, Gainesville High School, 830 Century Place, Gainesville. $5. ghstheatre@bellsouth.net. Sept. 11: Taste of History Concert. Featuring the Northwinds Symphonic Band, the North Georgia College and State University Patriot Choir, Michelle Martin, Bill and Patti Risinger, the Lakewood Trio, Kenjohnston and master of ceremonies Jim Hammond. 7:30 p.m., Riverside Military Academy Auditorium, 2001 Riverside Drive, Gainesville. $10. 770-297-5900, gkyle@brenau,edu, www. negahc.org. Sept. 11: Elachee’s Annual Snake Day. See live native and exotic snakes, do crafts and activities. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. $5 adults, $3 kids age 2-12, free for Elachee members and kids age 212.770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. Sept. 12: Family day. “Patriots’ Path.” 1-4 p.m., Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. Free. 770-297-5900, jcarson@ brenau.edu, www.negahc.org. Sept. 14: Forum. “Faces of Freedom.” 7 p.m., Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. Free for members, $3 nonmembers. 770-297-5900, jcarson@brenau.edu, www. negahc.org. Sept. 14: “Power of the Purse” fashion show. Local merchants featured. Brenau fashion students and Fashion Merchandising Program Director Karen Garbow will produce the show. 6 p.m., Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. 770-534-6252. Sept. 15-30: Elachee’s Pre-order Native Plant Sale. Fall plants. Pick-up day Oct. 14, noon-6 p.m., Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. 770-535-1976, www.elachee. org. Sept. 16: “Dear Lemon Lima.” Film. 7:30 p.m., Arts Council Smithgall Arts Center, Gainesville. 770534-2787, www.theartscouncil.net. Sept. 18: Art in the Square. Youth Artist Market and more than 90 artists. 10 a.m.-7 p.m., downtown Gainesville square. 770-718-7586, 770-965-3340, www.artinthesquarega.com. Sept. 18: Movie in the Braselton Park. Dusk, Braselton Park, one block west of Ga. 53, Braselton. Sept. 21-23: “All Shook Up.” Gainesville High School Drama Department. 7:30 p.m., The Ware House, Gainesville High School, 830 Century Place, Gainesville. $5. ghstheatre@bellsouth.net. Sept. 23: Bruce Burch and Friends Concert Honoring John Jarrard. Singer/songwriters. 6 p.m., Brenau University front lawn, 500 Washington St., Gainesville. $30 per ticket; $25 in blocks of five or more. Benefits the John Jarrard Foundation. 770710-9191, www.johnjarrardconcert.org. Sept. 23-Oct. 26: “Wild Culture: Ecological Perspectives.” Art exhibit. Reception, noon Sept. 23, Roy C. Moore Art Gallery, Gainesville State College, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. 678-717-3738 or bsale@gsc.edu. Sept. 24-25: Fall Garden Expo. Hall County Master

Gardeners. Children’s booth, gardening workshops, garden arts and crafts. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday; 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Saturday, Chicopee Woods Agricultural Center, 1855 Calvary Church Road, Gainesville. Free admission and parking; plants for sale. No pets allowed. 770-535-8293, www. hallcountymastergardeners.org. Sept. 25: Old Friends Classic Car Show. 11 a.m.5 p.m., downtown Gainesville. Rain date Oct. 23. 770-297-1141, www.downtowngainesville.com. Sept. 28: Miss GHS. 7:30 p.m., The Ware House, Gainesville High School, 830 Century Place, Gainesville. $5. ghstheatre@bellsouth.net. Sept. 28: Taste of History Dinner. Social hour, 6 p.m.; dinner, 7 p.m., Gainesville Civic Center, 830 Green St., Gainesville. 770-297-5900, gkyle@brenau.edu, www.negahc.org. Sept. 29-Oct. 2: 13th Annual Petit Le Mans. LMP, GT, LMPC and GTC championships. Autograph sessions, Petit Pit Stop for kids, open paddock and grid so you can meet teams and drivers and a vendor area. Kids free with paying adult. Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 800849-7223, www.roadatlanta.com.

OCTOBER

Oct. 1: The Amigos for Christ Golf Classic. 11 a.m.5 p.m., Lake Lanier Islands Resort, 7000 Holiday Road, Buford. For more information, call 770-6149250 or go to www.amigosforchrist.com. Oct. 1-8: “The Briar Patch: Tales of Joel Chandler Harris.” WonderQuest GTA for Young Audiences. 7:30 p.m. Oct. 1-3 and 8; 2:30 p.m. Oct. 3, Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Centennial Circle, Gainesville. $10-$12 adults and seniors, $7$8 students and children. 678-717-3624, www. gainesvilletheatrealliance.org. Oct. 2: Ride for Good News at Noon. Details to be announced. 770-297-5040. Oct. 2: “Inspired by Nature” Elachee’s Safari Benefit Dinner and Auction. 6-10 p.m. Dinner, jazz, live and silent auctions. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Reservations required. Benefits Elachee’s educational programs. $75 per person; call for sponsor table prices. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. Oct. 3: Joel Chandler Harris discussion. 1-2 p.m., Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Centennial Circle, Gainesville. Free. 678-717-3624, www.gainesvilletheatrealliance.org. Oct. 6: Northeast Georgia Writers Conference. Sandra Brim, poetry. 1-3 p.m., Peach State Bank, third floor, 325 Washington St., Gainesville. Free for members, $25 preregistration required for nonmembers. 678-943-2576 or holmeslynda@ bellsouth.net. Oct. 6, 13, 20: Blue Sky Concerts. Noon-1 p.m., downtown Gainesville square. Free. 770-2971141, www.downtowngainesville.com. Oct. 7-Nov. 21: “Links” exhibit by Darryl Pottorf; artist talk, 6 p.m. Oct. 7, Sellars Gallery, Brenau University, 500 Washington St., Gainesville. 770534-6263. Oct. 8-10: Mule Camp Market. Gainesville Jaycees. Vendors, 4-H Annual Chicken Barbecue. Downtown Gainesville square. 770-532-7714. Oct. 10: Family day. “Harvest of History.” Hands-on activities, displays included. 1-4 p.m., Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. 770-297-5900, jcarson@brenau.edu, www. negahc.org. Oct. 12: Forum. “T.R.R. Cobb House.” 7 p.m., Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. Free for members; nonmembers, $3. 770-297-5900, jcarson@brenau.edu, www. negahc.org.

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Harvest | A publication of

Oct. 14-17 and 21-23: “Don’t Cry for me Margaret Mitchell.” Georgia Mountain Players. Georgia Mountains Center Theatre, 301 Main St. SW, Gainesville. gmplayer@bellsouth.net. Oct. 14: 4-H BB Rifle Safety Program. Learn safety issues, how to hit a target. For ages 9-13. 6:30-8 p.m., Chicopee Woods Agricultural Center, 1855 Calvary Church Road, Gainesville. Free. Preregistration required. 770-535-8291. Oct. 14-Dec. 4: 63rd Annual Members’ Exhibition. Open to members of Quinlan Visual Arts Center. Reception, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Oct. 14. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. 770536-2575. Oct. 21: “Children of Invention.” Film. 7:30 p.m., Smithgall Arts Center, 331 Spring St. SW, Gainesville. 770-534-2787, www.theartscouncil.net. Oct. 21-30: “The Mousetrap.” Fifth Row Center. 7:30 p.m. Oct. 21, 22, 28 and 29; 3 p.m. Oct. 23 and 30. Location to be announced; call for details. 678-357-7359, www.fifthrowcenter.com. Oct. 22: Pig Pickin’ Event. Live music and folk art. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. 770-536-2575, www.quinlanarts center.org. Oct. 23: Children’s Center for Hope and Healing Gala. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. 770-532-6530. Oct. 23-24: Fall Antique & Gardening Festival. Braselton Park, one block west of Ga. 53 Braselton. Oct. 25, 27: “25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.” Gainesville High School Drama Department. 7:30 p.m., The Ware House, Gainesville High School, 830 Century Place, Gainesville. $5. ghstheatre@bellsouth.net. Oct. 26: “Singin’ in the Rain” stage tour. Gainesville Theater Alliance. 6 p.m., Hosch Theatre, John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Brenau University, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. Free. 678717-3624, www.gainesvilletheatrealliance.org. Oct. 28-Nov. 21: “Trends are History.” Exhibit of clothing and accessories highlighting trends from the past and how they influence today’s fashion. Reception, 6:30 p.m. Oct. 28, John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Leo Castelli Gallery, Brenau University, 429 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. 770-534-6263. Oct. 29-30: Ghost Walk. Guided tour around Brenau’s campus. 6 p.m. nightly, Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. 770297-5900, jcarson@brenau.edu, www.negahc. org. Oct 29: Trick or Treat on the Square.3-5 p.m., Downtown Gainesville. 770-297-1141, www. downtowngainesville.com. Oct. 30: Elachee’s Family Fall Festival. Crafts, games, animal programs and hikes. 2-5 p.m., Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. $5 nonmembers, $3 members. 770-535-1976, www.elachee.org. Oct. 16: “A Night at the Movies.” Gainesville Symphony Orchestra. 7:30 p.m., Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. $20-$30 adults, $18-$27 seniors, $8 students. 770-532-5727, www.gsomusic.com or info@gainesvillesymphony.com.

NOVEMBER Nov. 3: Home School History Day. “World War

II on the European Front.” 10 a.m. to noon, Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. $5 nonmembers; members and children free. 770-297-5900, jcarson@brenau.edu, www.negahc.org. Nov. 4-Dec. 9: “An Artistic Discovery: the Congressional Art Competition.” Reception, 5:30 p.m.

| Sunday, August 29, 2010 Dec. 9, Roy C. Moore Art Gallery, Gainesville State College, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. Free. 678-717-3428 or bsale@gsc.edu. Nov. 6: Horse Lover’s Field Day. Hall County 4H Horse Club. Grades 3-6 are invited. Riding, grooming, classes on Western and English riding. Preregistration required. Chicopee Woods Agricultural Center, 1855 Calvary Church Road, Gainesville. 770-535-8291. Nov. 6: Street dance. Harrison Street, Braselton. Nov. 9: “Markers and Monuments” forum. Dr. Steve Gurr will speak. 7 p.m., Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. Free for members; nonmembers, $3. 770-297-5900, jcarson@brenau.edu, www.negahc.org. Nov. 9-14, 16-20: “Singin’ in the Rain.” Gainesville Theatre Alliance. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 9-13 and 16-20; 2:30 p.m. Nov. 14 and 20, Hosch Theatre, John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Brenau University, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. $18-$22 adults, $16-20 seniors, $14-$16 students. 678717-3624, www.gainesvilletheatrealliance.org. Nov. 11: Veterans Day celebration. Displays and programs throughout the day. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. Free. 770-297-5900, jcarson@brenau.edu, www. negahc.org. Nov. 11: “Reporter.” Film. 7:30 p.m., Smithgall Arts Center, 331 Spring St., Gainesville. 770-534-2787, www.theartscouncil.net. Nov. 12-13: Adopt-A-Stream Training at Elachee. Learn to delineate your watershed, chemically analyze streams and more. Children younger than 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 6-10 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. $5 in advance due for materials. Registration required. 770-535-1976. Nov. 13: Annual Lighting of the Christmas Tree and Movie in the Park. Braselton Brothers Store and Braselton Park, Braselton. Nov. 14: Family day. “Making Monuments and Markers.” 1-4 p.m., Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. 770-2975900, jcarson@brenau.edu, www.negahc.org. Nov. 18: Jingle Mingle. Food, live music, carriage rides and Santa. 5-8 p.m., Main Street Gainesville, downtown Gainesville. 770-297-1141, www. downtowngainesville.com. Nov. 16-18: “The Escape Triad.” Gainesville High School Drama Department. 7:30 p.m., The Ware House, Gainesville High School, 830 Century Place, Gainesville. $5. ghstheatre@bellsouth.net. Nov. 20: Evenings of Intimate Jazz. Arts Council. Smithgall Arts Center, 331 Spring St., Gainesville. 770-534-2787, www.theartscouncil.net. Nov. 26: Lighting of the Chateau. Chateau Elan, 100 Rue Charlemagne, Braselton. Nov. 29-Dec. 17: Juried Studen Design Show. Fashion design, 2-dimensional works, digital and interior design. Free. Presidents Gallery, Brenau University, 500 Washington St., Gainesville. 770534-626.

DECEMBER Dec. 1-3: “Funny Girl.” Gainesville High School

Drama Department. 7:30 p.m., The Ware House, Gainesville High School, 830 Century Place, Gainesville. $5. ghstheatre@bellsouth.net. Dec. 2-5: “The Nutcracker.” Gainesville Ballet Company. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday, Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Washington St., Gainesville. $24 adults, $16 students and children, free for Brenau faculty, staff and students with valid ID. 770-532-4241, www. gainesvilleballet.org.

Dec. 3-4: Downtown Open House. Music, food, drinks, Santa and carriage rides. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., downtown Gainesville. Dec. 3-4: Hall County 4-H Winter Equine Classic. Western, contest, hunt seat and fun classes. Free for spectators. 770-535-8291. Dec. 3-5: Festival of the Nativity. More than 500 nativity scenes from around the world. 2-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. each day, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 1234 Riverside Drive, Gainesville. 770-561-3060. Dec. 4: The Northwinds Symphonic Band. 7:30 p.m., First Baptist Church Banquet Hall, 751 Green St. NW, Gainesville. Dec. 4, 11, 18: Mingle with Kringle in Main Street Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Main Street Market, downtown Gainesville. Dec. 11: Winter in the Woods Holiday Celebration. Crafts, candy cane hunt, face painting, cookie decorating, music and hikes. 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. $5 adults, $3 kids age 2-12, free for Elachee members and kids age 2-12.770-5351976, www.elachee.org. Dec. 12: Family day. “Christmas Then and Now.” Make old-fashioned and present-day crafts, hear the GHS Crimson Chorus, visit with Santa. 1-4 p.m., Northeast Georgia History Center at Brenau University, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. 770-2975900, jcarson@brenau.edu, www.negahc.org. Dec. 14: Holiday Pops Concert. Gainesville Symphony Orchestra. 7:30 p.m., Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. $20-$30 adults, $18-$27 seniors, $8 students. 770-532-5727.

Banks County

SEPTEMBER Sept. 4-5: Annual Labor Day Festival, Historic

Courthouse lawn, Homer. Contact: Banks County CVB, 706-677-5265. Sept. 9-12: Lucas Oil Drag Racing Series, Atlanta Dragway, 706-335-2301, www.atlantadragway. com. Sept. 18: Summit Bracket Racing Series, NHRA King of the Track Race, Atlanta Dragway, 706-3352301, www.atlantadragway.com . Sept. 25: Summit Bracket Racing Series, Championship Points Race, Atlanta Dragway, 706-3352301, see www.atlantadragway.com .

OCTOBER Oct. 2: Saturday Insanity, “No Box Pro Series,”

Atlanta Dragway, 706-335-2301, see www.atlanta dragway.com . Oct. 2: Turning and Burning Old Time Festival, Hewell’s Pottery, Gillsville. 770-869-3469, www. hewellspottery.com. Oct. 3: CVB Car & Truck Show, 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Commerce Crossing Mall at Banks Crossing. Admission: $20. Contact: Banks County CVB, 706677-5265. Oct. 15: ORSCA Test & Tune, Atlanta Dragway, 706335-2301, www.atlantadragway.com. Oct. 16-17: ORSCA Outlaw 10.5 Racing Series, Atlanta Dragway, 706-335-2301, www.atlanta dragway.com.

NOVEMBER Nov. 6: Southern Super Heavy Shootout, Atlanta Dragway, 706-335-2301, www.atlantadragway. com. Nov. 8: Banks County CVB Chocolate Fair. Banks County CVB, 706-677-5265, bankscvb@ windstream.net.

Dawson County

SEPTEMBER Sept. 3: Celebrating 10 years of Art Excellence,

national juried Art show, through Oct. 2. Bowen Center for the Arts, 334 Ga. Highway 9 N, Dawsonville, 706-216-2787, info@dawsonarts.org, www. dawsonarts.org. Reception: 7 p.m. Sept. 25. Sept. 4: Uncle Shuck’s Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch, Ga. 53, Dawsonville. Open 4-10 p.m. Fridays, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sundays through Nov. 21, daily in October. Mazes, goat trek, hay ride, bonfire, children’s activities. Admission: $9 maze, combo ticket $12, ages 3 and under free. www.uncleshucks.com, 1-

888-OSHUCKS OCTOBER

Oct. 8: “Drawing with Light,” juried photography show, through Nov. 9, Bowen Center for the Arts, 334 Ga. Highway 9 N, Dawsonville, 706-216-2787, info@dawsonarts.org, www.dawsonarts.org. Reception: 2-4 p.m. Oct. 9. Oct. 22-24: 43rd annual Mountain Moonshine Festival, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., downtown Dawsonville. Moonshine still, storytellers, arts and crats, food, entertainment, children’s activities, vintage race cars. Parade begins 9 a.m. Saturday. Free. Proceeds for paid events to benefit Kare for Kids Inc. Contact: Dawson County Chamber of Commerce and CVB, 706-265-6278, 877-302-9271, www. dawson.org

NOVEMBER

Nov. 11: Veterans Day Celebration, 3-5 p.m., Dawson County Middle School. Nov. 13: “Home for the Holidays,” juried exhibit, through Dec. 31, Bowen Center for the Arts, 334 Ga. Highway 9 N, Dawsonville, 706-216-2787, info@dawsonarts.org, www.dawsonarts.org. Artist’s reception and awards, 2-4 p.m. Nov. 13.

Forsyth County

ONGOING Lakewood 400 Antiques Market, Sept. 17-19,

Oct. 15-17, Nov. 19-21, Dec. 17-19 1321 Atlanta Highway, Cumming. Features antiques, collectibles, home decor, jewelry, framing, rugs, art, coins, sports collectibles, glassware, lighting, signage, shabby chic and primitives. Contact: 770-889-3400, www.lakewoodantiques.com, lakewood400@earthlink.net.

SEPTEMBER Sept. 4-5: IPRA World Championship Rodeo, 8 p.m. Saturday, 7 p.m. Sunday, Cumming Fairgrounds, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, 770-781-3491, www.cummingfair.net. Features bull riding, bareback riding, barrel racing, calf roping, steer wrestling, team roping and saddle bronc riding. Tickets: Adults $15, seniors ages 64 and older $12, ages 5-12 $10, ages 4 and under free. Sept. 11, 17-18: North Georgia Quarter Midget Racing, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, 770-781-3491, www.cummingfair.net. Sept. 12: Family Fest, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, www.cummingfair. net. Contact Bob Jolly, 770-887-2428. Sept. 9-25: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 8 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Friday, Saturday, 1 p.m. Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday. The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www.playhousecumming.com.

OCTOBER Oct. 1-23: “MAME,” The Cumming Playhouse,

101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www. playhousecumming.com.


Harvest | A publication of Oct. 7-17: Cumming County Fair and Festival, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, 770-781-3491, www.cummingfair.net. Hours: 4-10 p.m. Monday, Thursday, 4 p.m.-midnight Friday, 10 a.m.-midnight Saturday, 12:30-9 p.m. Sunday. Music concerts, rides, family activities. Includes Heritage Village, chain saw carving, petting zoo, pony rides, Bear Mountain shows, Little Miss Forsyth pageant. Tickets: Adults $7 ($5 advance Sept. 1-30), students ages 5-18 $3 ($2 advance), ages 4 and under free; parking $3. Oct. 29-31: “To Kill A Mockingbird,” The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-7819178, www.playhousecumming.com. Oct. 30: North Georgia Quarter Midget Racing, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, 770-781-3491, www.cummingfair.net.

NOVEMBER Nov. 5-7: “To Kill A Mockingbird,” The Cumming

Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-7819178, www.playhousecumming.com. Nov. 6: North Georgia Quarter Midget Racing, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, 770-781-3491, www.cummingfair.net. Nov. 12-13: Cumming Steam, Antique Tractor and Gas Engine Exposition, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m.-6 pm.. Saturday, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, 770-781-3491, www. cummingfair.net. Tickets: Ages 13 and 9older $5, ages 12 and under free. Contact: John Walls 770886-3507, johnhn_walls@genpt.com; or Michael Moore, michael.moore@langsigns.com. Nov. 13-14: The Noteworthy Show Band of the South “ Holiday Musical Review,” The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-7819178, www.playhousecumming.com. Nov. 18-19: Christmas Classics, 8 p.m., The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-

781-9178, www.playhousecumming.com. Nov. 26-Dec. 18: “It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas,” musical based on “Miracle on 34th Street,” The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www.playhousecumming.com.

DECEMBER

Dec 10-11: Christmas in Cumming Arts & Crafts Festival, Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming, 770-781-3491, www.cumming fair.net. Arts and crafts festival, 4-10 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday; admission $1 adults, ages 12 and under free. Photos with Santa 6-9 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. Hay rides, 7-10 p.m. Friday. Contact: Bill Watson, 770-4231330; JRM Management, 770-423-1330. Dec.14:CummingPlayhouseSingersChristmasConcert, 8 p.m., The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www.playhouse cumming.com. Dec. 21: Christmas Around the World, 8 p.m., The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www.playhousecumming.com. Dec. 22: Sounds of Sawnee Christmas Concert, 8 p.m., The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming, 770-781-9178, www.playhouse cumming.com.

Habersham County ONGOING Clarkesville “Homemade Jam,” free concerts, 3-5 p.m. Saturdays, downtown square gazebo, September and October. www.clarkesvillega.com Tallulah Falls Bluegrass, Saturdays through November, Main Street, Tallulah Falls. Music, bonfire, marshmallow and hot dog roasts.

SEPTEMBER Sept. 4-6: Holiday Gorge Floor Hike, 10:30 a.m.– 2:30 p.m., Tallulah Gorge State Park, Tallulah Falls. Guided hike for ages 10 and older, includes rock climbing, getting wet; wear proper footwear (no flip-flops or crocs). Bring lunch and water. Register in advance. Fee: $5 plus $5 parking. Contact: 706-754-7981. Sept. 10-18: Chattahoochee Mountain Fair, Habersham County fairgrounds, Ga. 17/Toccoa Highway, Clarkesville. Carnival, livestock judging, horse shows, arts and crafts, exhibits and demonstrations, nightly entertainment, Miss Chattahoochee Pageant. Contact: Brenda Kinsey, mom_30563@ yahoo.com. Sept. 23-24: Full Moon Suspension Bridge Hike, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Thursday, 8-10 p.m. Friday, Tallulah Gorge State Park, Tallulah Falls. Guided moonlit hike into the gorge. Register in advance. Fee: $5 plus $5 parking. Contact: 706-754-7981. Sept. 25: Taste of Clarkesville, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Clarkesville. Food and wine tasting, live music. Contacts: 706-754-0789, 706-754-2220, www. clarkesvillega.com OCTOBER Oct. 2: Big Red Apple Festival, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., downtown Cornelia. Booths, entertainment, food, crafts, arts, music, family activities. Contact Andrea Harper, Better Hometown Manager, City of Cornelia, 706-778-7875.; Oct. 15-16: Fall Heritage Festival, Grace-Calvary Episcopal Church, Clarkesville. Family event includes arts and crafts, food, chili cookoff, live auction, music, picnic, auto show, children’s portrait painter. Contact: 706-754-2451, grace-calvary. org. Oct. 30: Howl-A-Ween Paw-rade, downtown Cornelia depot. Contact Andrea Harper, 706-

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778-7875 Oct. 30: Trick-or-Treat on the Clarkesville Square, 57 p.m., Clarkesville downtown square. Kid-friendly haunted house, costume contest. 706-754-2220, www.clarkesvillega.com NOVEMBER Nov. 12-14: Northeast Georgia Arts Tour, Appalchian artists, dcemonstrations, 1-5 p.m. Friday and Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Historic Mauldin House, Clarkesville. 706-754-2220, www. clarkesvillega.com. Nov. 20: Habersham Chamber Holiday Bazaar, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Ruby C. Fulbright Aquatic Center, Ga. 17E, 120 Paul Franklin Road, Clarkesville. Arts and crafts, breakfast with Santa, holiday treats, train rides, vendors, children’s activities. Habersham Chamber of Commerce, 706-778-4654, hburke@ windstream.net, www.habershamchamber.com. Nov. 26: Holiday Pottery Show, open daily (closed Tuesdays) through Dec. 12, Hickory Flat Pottery, 13664 Ga. 197 N, Clarkesville, 706-947-0030, hickoryflatpottery.com. Hand-made gifts, refreshments, holiday music. DECEMBER Dec. 4: Habersham County Christmas Parade, 11 a.m., Cornelia. Contact Andrea Harper, Better Hometown Manager, City of Cornelia, 706-7787875. Dec. 4: Moonshine Highway 197, Holiday Open House, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Hickory Flat Pottery, 13664 Ga. 197 N, Clarkesville, 706-947-0030, hickory flatpottery.com. Dec. 11: Santa Claus is Coming to Town, holiday performances, live theater, carolers, visits with Santa, extended shopping hours. Clarkesville Better Hometown, 706-754-2220, www.clarkesville ga.com.


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Harvest | A publication of

Jackson County

ONGOING American Street Rodders Cruise-in, Hoschton. 5 p.m. second Saturday each month through October, Towne Center shopping center, Towne Center Parkway off Ga. 53, Hoschton. www. americanstreetrodders.net. SEPTEMBER Sept. 18-19: Art in the Park Festival, Hurricane Shoals Park, Maysville. Duck Dash, 5K Mill Race, Heritage Village tours, arts & crafts, food, bluegrass music, children’s activities. 706-335-6723, www.hurricaneshoalspark.org.

Lumpkin County

ONGOING Appalachian Jam, free concerts, 2-5 p.m.

Saturdays through Oct. 9, Dahlonega Gold Museum. Convention & Visitors Bureau, 706-8643513, www.dahlonegadda.org First Friday Night Concert Series, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Friday through October, Hancock Park, Dahlonega. Contact: dahlonegadda@windstream. net, 706-864-6133 SEPTEMBER Sept. 26: Six Gap Century & Three Gap Fifty Bike Ride, Dahlonega-Lumpkin County Chamber of Commerce. Contact: cyclenorthgeorgia.com. OCTOBER Oct. 16-17: Gold Rush Days, Dahlonega town square. Arts and crafts, music, food, parade, children’s activities, a fashion show, gold panning and other contests. Includes Dahlonega Rock & Mineral Show, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Contact: 706-8643513, www.dahlonega.org. NOVEMBER Nov. 5-7: Hemlockfest Music Festival, Starbridge Retreat near Dahlonega. Numerous acts to feature folk, blues, rock, bluegrass. Proceeds benefit Lumpkin Coalition environmental organization to combat woolly adlegid parasites plaguing hemlock trees of the Blueridge Mountains. Contact: 706-867-5157, www.lumpkincoalition.org. Nov. 26: Old Fashioned Christmas, Dahlonega. Lighting of the Square. Contact: DahlonegaLumpkin County Visitors Center, 706-864-3513. DECEMBER Dec. 4: Christmas parade, visit from Santa, Dahlonega. Caroling, entertainment, wine sampling, live theater Christmas events. Contact: Dahlonega-Lumpkin County Visitors Center, 706864-3513.

GEORGIA Mountains ONGOING

First Saturday Cruise-Ins at the Square, 1-5 p.m. through October, Blairsville. www.blairsville cruisers.com Misty Mountain Model Railroad, 2 p.m. tours Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays through December, 16 Misty Mountain Lane, Blairsville. 706745-9819 Friday Night Concert Series, 7 p.m. through October, Union County Historical Society, One Town Square at the Old Courthouse, Blairsville. www. unioncountyhistory.org, history1@windstream. net, 706-754-5493 SEPTEMBER Sept. 4-5: Mountain Heritage Festival, The Heritage Center, Butt-Mock House, Blairsville. Mountain arts and crafts, music, living history activities, farm animals, games. Union County Historical Society 706-745-5493, www.unioncountyhistory.org Sept. 10-12: Wild Foods Foraging Hike and Dinner,

| Sunday, August 29, 2010 Beechwood Inn, Clayton. 706- 782-5485, www. beechwoodinn.ws. Sept. 11: Mountain Music & Arts & Crafts Festival, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Vogel State Park. Appalachian, bluegrass and gospel music; arts and crafts, demonstrations, food. www.gastateparks.org 706-745-2628 Sept. 17-19: Bluegrass Festival, downtown Blairsville. Performances on several stages, square. Music workshops, crafts and food. Union County Historical Society 706-745-5493, www.unioncountyhistory.org, history1@windstream.net Sept. 25: Mountain Harvest Run, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Meeks Park off Ga. 515, Union County. Three events with age divisions: Half-Marathon, 5K Race and Mile Walk. Sept. 25: ARTS in hARTwell Festival of Heritage and Fine Arts, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., downtown Hartwell. Juried art and crafts, entertainment, children’s activities, demonstrations. Free. Hartwell Downtown Development Authority, 706-376-0188, www.hart chamber.org Sept. 25-26: Summer’s Last Kiss, An Affair with the Arts, Lake Chatuge, Hiawassee. Art exhibits, music, dance, theatre, poetry, crafts, food, Saturday night street dance. Towns County Tourism Association, Young Harris, 706-896-4966. Sept. 28: Traveler’s Rest Pioneer Days, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Travelers Rest Historic Site, Toccoa. Admission: $2.75-$4. Contact: 706-886-2256. OCTOBER Oct. 1-2: Foxfire-Mountaineer Festival, Clayton. Parade, street dance 6-9 p.m. Friday. Cultural events, activites, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Admission: $5 (including competitions) $4 Foxfire only. mountaineerfestival.org, mountaineerfestival@ gmail.com, www.foxfire.org, 706-212-0349 Oct. 2-3: Indian Summer Festival, Woody Gap School, Suches. Arts and crafts, antiques, pottery, leather, produce, folk art, food, square dance. Admission: $4. Run Above the Clouds 10K road race, 9 a.m. Saturday. 706-747-2401, www.suches. com Oct. 8-16: Georgia Mountain Fall Festival. 10 a.m.– 8 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.– 6 p.m. Sundays, Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds, Hiawasee. Arts and crafts, exhibits, concerts, pioneer village, Live Shark Encounter, state fiddlers convention. Tickets: $9, parking $2. 706-896-4191, gamtfair@ windstream.net, georgiamountainfairgrounds. com. Oct. 9: Royston Fall Festival, 706-245-7577. Oct. 9-10, 16-17: Sorghum Festival, Meeks Park, Ga. 515, Blairsville. Arts/Crafts, syrup making, contests, music, children’s activities. Sorghum Parade Oct. 9, downtown Blairsville. Car show, Oct. 16, United Community Bank. Contact: Jaycees, 706-745-4745, www.sorghumfestivalblairsville.com; car show, Good Neighbors Auto Club 828-837-8539 or 706-745-3985 Oct. 16: Fall Hoedown, 2-9 p.m., Vogel State Park. Cakewalk, hayrides, chili and drinks for sale, campfire and dancing, professional storyteller around bonfire. Parking: $5. 706-745-2628, www. gastateparks.org/Vogel Oct. 22-23, 29-31: Haunted Hike, 7:30 p.m., Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa, 6321 U.S. 76, Young Harris, 706-379-4606, Brasstownvalley.com. Admission: $10. Oct. 23: Ty Cobb Museum Vintage Baseball Games, 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m., Royston. 706-245-1825. NOVEMBER Nov. 6: Depot Day, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Historic Depot Street, Hartwell. Entertainment, children’s activities, crafts, food. Contact: Kathy Neal, 706-4910833; Brenda Spears, 706-376-4286. www.hart

chamber.org. Nov. 20-21: Mistletoe Market and Sugar Plum Tearoom, North Georgia Technical College, Blairsville. Arts and crafts, homemade gifts, food and refreshments. Mountain Regional Arts & Crafts Guild, 706-896-0932, www.mtnregartsguild.org Nov. 26-27: Holiday Arts & Crafts Show, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa, 6321 U.S. 76, Young Harris, 706-379-4606, Brasstown valley.com. Nov. 27: Christmas in downtown Clayton. DECEMBER Dec. 3-5: Winegrowers Association of Georgia, Winter Wine High, 2-5 p.m. Friday, noon-5 p.m. Saturday, 12:30-5 p.m. Sunday. 813-503-0550, www.georgiawine.com. Dec. 4: Christmas on the Square, 1–6 p.m., downtown Blairsville. Parade, appearance by Santa Claus, tree lighting, caroling, holiday festivities. Union County Historical Society, 706-745-5493, www.unioncountyhistory.org Dec. 11: Holiday Children’s Workshop, 10 a.m.– noon, Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa, 6321 U.S. 76, Young Harris, 706-379-4606, Brasstownvalley. com. Free. Ages 2-12. Music, visit from Santa. Dec. 11: Free Holiday Concert. 10 a.m.-noon, Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa, 6321 U.S. 76, Young Harris, 706-379-4606, Brasstownvalley. com. Dec 11: Christmas Tree Lighting, 4:30 p.m., Vogel State Park. 706-745-2628, www.gastateparks. org/Vogel. Tree lighting, caroling, hayrides, Santa Claus visit, bonfires, hot beverages.

White County

ONGOING Center Gallery Exhibit: “Going to the Dogs...

and Cats.” 9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays, 1-5 p.m. Sundays through Sept. 26. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. Saturday Evening Music Concert Series, 8 p.m. through mid-November, Unicoi State Park 800-573-9659, ext. 305, www.gastateparks.org/ info/unicoi. Visiting Artist Series, every weekend until midNovember, Unicoi State Park 800-573-9659, ext. 305, www.gastateparks.org/info/unicoi. North Georgia Corn Maze, Cleveland. Opens Aug. 29. Maze and hay rides; haunted house opens Sept. 20. 559 Tom Bell Road, Cleveland. Admission: $10 adults, $9 ages 11 and younger. 800-959-1874. SEPTEMBER Sept. 1-Oct. 31: History Exhibit, “Helen, 40 Years Ago”, Helen Arts & Heritage Council, 706-8783933, www.helenarts.org Sept. 1- 19: Art Exhibit “Colorful Creations,” Helen Arts & Heritage Council, 706-878-3933, www. helenga.org. Sept. 4: Helenfest, Helen Festhalle, 706-878-1908, www.helenga.org. Live German Music, food beer and wine. Sept. 9-12: 40th annual Oktoberfest, Thursday– Sunday through Oct. 31, Helen, 706-878-1908, 706-878-2181, info@helenga.org, www.helenga. org. German music, dancing, food & drink. Hours:6-10:30 p.m. Thursdays, 6 p.m.-midnight Fridays, 1 p.m.-midnight Saturdays, 1-7 p.m. Sundays. Admission: $7, free on Sundays. Parade, noon Sept. 11. Sept. 7, 21: Tuesday Night Learn & Contra Dance, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. First and third Tuesdays each

month. Fee: $3, ages 12 and younger free. Sept. 11: Mountain Herb Day, Smithgall Woods, 706-878-3087, www.gastateparks.org/Smithgall Sept. 11-18: Mossy Creek Pottery Show, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Mossy Creek Campground Sept. 12: Rivers Alive, Unicoi State Park 800573-9659, ext. 305, www.gastateparks.org/info/ unicoi. Sept. 15: Youth Fishing Days, Buck Shoals, 706878-3087 Sept. 16: Open Stage Night, 7 p.m., Center Theatre. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. Musicians, singers, songwriters, writers and performers welcome. Free, no reservations required, donations welcomed. Sept. 18: Community Contra Dance, 6:30-11 p.m., Historic Gym. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www. snca.org. Admission: $7 for SNCA member; $8 non-members, $4 students. Sept. 18: Fall Festival, Babyland General Hospital, Cleveland. 706-865-2171, www.cabbagepatch kids.com Sept. 23-Oct. 31: Adult Art Competition, Helen Arts & Heritage Council, 706-878-3933, www.helen arts.org Sept. 23–Dec. 30: Art Exhibit “Alpine Holidays,” Helen Arts & Heritage Council, 706-878-3933, www.helenarts.org Sept. 24-25: Sautee Jamboree music festival, 7 p.m. nightly, Sautee Nacoochee Community Association. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org/performing arts/jamboree. Tickets: $35. Free camping. Allyou-can-eat pancake breakfast, 8-10:30 a.m. Saturday, Community Hall, $5 adults; $3 ages 6 to 12, under 6 free. Sept. 25: Outdoor Adventure Day, Unicoi State Park 800-573-9659, ext. 305, www.gastateparks. org/info/unicoi. OCTOBER Oct. 1: Center Gallery Exhibit: “Shadows.” 9 a.m.5 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays, 1-5 p.m. Sundays through Nov. 7. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, 706-878-3300, www. snca.org. Artists’ reception, 6:30-8 p.m. Oct. 16, Center Gallery. Oct. 1-31: Adult Art Competition, Helen Arts & Heritage Council, 706-878-3933, www.helenarts.org Oct. 2: Southern Appalachian Mushrooms, Smithgall Woods, 706-878-3087, www.gastateparks. org/Smithgall Oct. 5, 19: Tuesday Night Learn & Contra Dance, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. First and third Tuesdays each month. Fee: $3, ages 12 and younger free. Oct. 8: Lilies of the Valley Concert, 8 p.m. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association theater, 706878-3300, www.snca.org. Oct. 9: Community Contra Dance, 6:30-11 p.m., Historic Gym. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www. snca.org. Admission: $7 for SNCA member; $8 non-members, $4 students. Oct. 9: Fall Celebration, Smithgall Woods, 706878-3087, www.gastateparks.org/Smithgall Oct. 16: Country Comedy Tour, 8 p.m. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association gym, 706-8783300, www.snca.org. Oct. 21: Open Stage Night, 7 p.m., Center Theatre. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. Free, no reservations required, donations welcomed.


Harvest | A publication of Oct. 23: Simply Breakfast, 8-10:30 a.m. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. All-you-caneat pancakes and sausage. Cost: $5 adults; $3 ages 6 to 12, under 6 free. Oct. 23: Souque River Ramble 6K Run & Walk, 8 a.m. 3.75-mile course along Soque River and through a portion of Goshen Valley. www. scenic197.com/headwatersrealty. Oct. 23: Batesville Days Celebration, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Batesville, Ga. 197/ 255. Arts and crafts, music, food, artists. www.batesvilledays.com. Oct. 23: Hillbilly Hog Backyard BBQ Throwdown & Fall Leaf Festival, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., downtown Cleveland, 706-969-3336. Includes Cow Patty Bingo. Oct. 23-24: Smithgall Women for the Woods, Smithgall Woods, 706-878-3087, www.gastate parks.org/Smithgall Oct. 30: Southern Appalachian Mushrooms, Smithgall Woods, 706-878-3087, www.gastateparks. org/Smithgall Oct. 30: Trunk-or-Treat Halloween Festival, Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, 706-8783300, www.snca.org. Oct: 30: Community Hallowed Eve Contra Dance, 9 p.m.-midnight, Sautee Nacoochee Community Association gym, 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. Admission: $7 SNCA members; $8 non-members; $4 students. NOVEMBER Nov. 2: Sautee Seniors at the Center, noon, Community Hall. Potluck lunch, drinks provided. Nov. 2, 16: Tuesday Night Learn & Contra Dance, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. First and third Tuesdays each month. Fee: $3, ages 12 and younger free. Nov. 4: Late Night Off Center, 10:30 p.m., Adult

Cabaret performing in Sautee Nacoochee Center Theatre at 10:30 p.m. Admission: $4 plus roll of the dice. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. Nov. 6: Concert, Diane Durrett, 8 p.m. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association gym. 706-8783300, www.snca.org. Tickets: $15 SNCA members, $20 non-members, $8 ages 6 to 17. Nov. 12: Center Gallery Exhibit: “Better than ever Holiday Show.” Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays, 1-5 p.m. Sundays through Dec. 24. Artists’ reception, 6:30-8 p.m. Nov. 19, Center Gallery. Nov. 12-14: North Georgia Arts Tour, artists and gift ideas at area shops and galleries. For description and map, visit www.artstour.org. Nov. 13: Basket Making with Native Materials, Smithgall Woods, 706-878-3087, www.gastate parks.org/Smithgall Nov. 18: Open Stage Night, 7 p.m., Center Theatre. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. Musicians, singers, songwriters, writers and performers welcome. Free, no reservations required, donations welcomed. Nov. 19-21: Tale of Two Charlies, 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community theater. 706-8783300, www.snca.org. Nov. 20: Appalachian Christmas, Babyland General Hospital, 706-865-2171, www.cabbage patchkids.com Nov. 25–Dec. 11: Festival of Trees, , Unicoi State Park 800-573-9659, ext. 305, www.gastateparks. org/info/unicoi Nov. 26-28: Christkindlmarkt, downtown Helen, 706-878-1908, info@helenga.org, www.helenga. org. Booths offer holiday gifts, decorations, food

and drinks. Kinderfest for children offers games, face-painting and balloon-tying. Nov. 26: Lighting of the Village, 6 p.m., downtown Helen, 706-878-2181, iwww.helenga.org. Nov. 27: Simply Breakfast, 8-10:30 a.m. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. Cost: $5 adults; $3 ages 6 to 12, under 6 free. Nov. 27: Community Contra Dance, 6:30-11 p.m., Historic Gym. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www. snca.org. Admission: $7 for SNCA member; $8 non-members, $4 students. Nov. 27: Lantern Parade, 5 p.m., downtown Helen & Festhalle, 706-878-1908, info@helenga.org, www. helenga.org. Children’s parade with decorated lanterns, marshmallow roast, hot chocolate. DECEMBER Dec. 1-11: Festival of Trees, Unicoi State Park, 800573-9659, ext. 305, www.gastateparks.org/info/ unicoi. Holiday decorations, silent auction for trees and wreaths; proceeds go to The United Way. Dec. 3: Yuletide Celebration, Sautee Nacoochee Community Association. 706-878-3300, www. snca.org. Dec. 4: Tour of Homes, White County Chamber of Commerce, 706-865-5356 Dec. 4: Deck the Halls, Unicoi State Park 800573-9659, ext. 305, www.gastateparks.org/info/ unicoi. Dec. 4: Christmas in the Mountains Celebration, Cleveland, 706-969-3336. Parade, 7 p.m. Dec. 4: Christmas Parade, 2 p.m., downtown Helen, begins at Festhalle. 706-878-2181, info@ helenga.org, www.helenga.org. Christmas characters, elves, Santa. Also Christkindlmarkt, booths with holiday gifts, decorations, food and drinks. Kinderfest for children offers games, face-painting

| Sunday, August 29, 2010

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and balloon-tying. Dec. 4: Holiday Treasure Hunt, Ga. 197 businesses offering drawings for prizes. Drawing and party at 5 p.m., Batesville Country Store and Restaurant. Free refreshments, music. www.scenic197.com Dec. 4-5: Sautee Stars Children’s Theatre Performance, 8 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association theater. 706878-3300, www.snca.org Dec. 7: Sautee Seniors at the Center, noon, Community Hall. Potluck lunch, drinks provided. Dec. 7, 21: Tuesday Night Learn & Contra Dance, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. First and third Tuesdays each month. Fee: $3, ages 12 and younger free. Dec. 10-12: Sautee Nacoochee Community Chorale Concert, 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, Center Theatre. 706-878-3300, www.snca. org. Dec. 11: Nacoochee Village Christmas, Sautee Nacoochee Village, 706-878-2181. Storytelling, arts and crafts, food, gifts, visit from Santa Claus. Dec. 16: Open Stage Night, 7 p.m., Center Theatre. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org. Free, no reservations required, donations welcomed. Dec. 18: Community Contra Dance, 6:30-11 p.m., Historic Gym. Sautee Nacoochee Community Association, Community Hall. 706-878-3300, www. snca.org. Admission: $7 for SNCA member; $8 non-members, $4 students Dec. 18-19: Sautee Nacoochee Youth Choir Concert, 8 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Center Theatre. 706-878-3300, www.snca.org Dec. 20-22: Holi-Day Camp, ages 7–9, Smithgall Woods, 706-878-3087, www.gastateparks.org/ Smithgall


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Harvest | A publication of

| Sunday, August 29, 2010

Harvest  

Harvest 2010

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