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Brenau opens exhibition on Depression-era artists, page 7

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Thursday, November 1, 2012 | gainesvilletimes.com/getout

on the web http://naturesoundsfor.me

Love the sound of the great outdoors? This site brings it right to your headphones. Use this free tool to play nature sounds while reading, meditating or just for fun.

arts

The Arts Council, Inc. and Gainesville State College will screen the independent feature film “Smokin’ Fish” as part of the South Arts Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers. PAGE 4

movies

If you were ever worried about the Bond franchise, fret no more. “Skyfall” could be one of the best yet. PAGE 10

The Associated Press

music

on the cover

Marketplace will include more than 70 merchants from eight states offering items hard to find in North Georgia while benefitting the Northeast Georgia Medical Center’s cancer treatment center. PAGE 5

The Ludwig Symphony Orchestra will present “A Beethoven Fall Fiesta” at the Gwinnett Center-Performing Arts Center while the acclaimed Blue Man Group will be in Athens. PAGE 14

outdoors

More than 100 mountain bicycling advocates will attend a Gainesville meeting and enjoy the bicycle trails at Chicopee Woods Park. PAGE 15


Thursday, November 1, 2012

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Available at Frames You-Nique, Saul’s, Carol’s Closet, Cozy Corner and the Gainesville Civic Center!

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etc events This week

SCCA American Road Race of Champions, Braselton. Nov. 2-4. Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 770-967-6143, www.roadatlanta.com. Tickets $10-$40. Recycle Fair, Gainesville. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 3. Gym of ’36 parking lot, 332 Washington St., Gainesville. Recycle fair and open house in honor of America Recycles Day. Free. 770-531-1102, info@ keephallbeautiful.org. “A Time That Was: The Habersham Mills Story,” Cornelia. 1-3 p.m. Nov. 3. North Main St., Cornelia. Book signing with author. 706-778-4563. Free yoga, Gainesville. 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 2 p.m. Nov. 4. Flip Your Dog Yoga Studio, 2480 Limestone Parkway, Gainesville. First class power flow all levels, second class deep stretch gentle yoga, third class power hour yoga. Ages 12 and older. 678-983-7717, doinyoga.net or doinyoga@ gmail.com Gordon Sawyer: “Marketing Your Book the Old-Fashioned Way and the E-Way.” Gainesville. 1-3 p.m. Nov. 7. Free. Peach State Bank, 325 Washington St., Gainesville. Northeast Georgia Writers, www. negawriters.org, HolmesLynda@bellsouth. net.

Screening set for Nov. 8 Film series continues with documentary ‘Smokin’ Fish’ From staff reports The Arts Council, Inc. and Gainesville State College present the independent feature film “Smokin’ Fish” as part of the South Arts Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers. The screening is set for Nov. 8 at the Gainesville State College Martha T. Nesbitt Academic Building. A reception afterward will be held with director and producer Luke Griswold-Tergis. The documentary focuses on a quirky Tlingit businessman hustling to make a dollar in Juneau, Alaska, by smoking fish at his family’s traditional fish camp. The unusual story of his life and the untold history of his people interweave with the process of preparing traditional food as he struggles to pay his bills and keep his business afloat. The film won Best Documentary Feature at the Arizona International Film Festival and People’s Choice

Upcoming

Bringing Nature Home, Gainesville. 7 p.m. Nov. 8. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Author Doug Tallamy will discuss the important ecological roles of plants in landscapes. $10 general admission, $5 students. www.elachee.org 21st annual Marketplace. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Nov. 8. Gainesville Civic Center, Gainesville. Proceeds

benefit Radiation Oncology at The Cancer Center at Northeast Georgia Medical Center. 770-219-1830. Pet Photos with Santa Claws, Gainesville. 1-5 p.m. Nov. 9, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 10 and 1-5 p.m. Nov. 11. Humane Society of Northeast Georgia, 845 W. Ridge Road, Gainesville. $30 donation. 770-5326617, www.HSNEGA.org. Cumming Steam, Antique

‘Smokin’ Fish’ Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers When: 7 p.m. Nov. 8 Where: Gainesville State College Martha T. Nesbitt Academic Building, Oakwood How much: $7 adults, $5 students and seniors; $38 for six-film series More info: www.theartscouncil.net, 770-534-2787

Award at the Cowichan International Aboriginal Film Festival. Upcoming films in the series include “Girl Model,” Feb. 14 at Gainesville State; “Free China,” March 28 at the Smithgall Arts Center; and “Strong!” April 18 at the Smithgall Arts Center. Each screening includes a meet and greet afterward with the director. Trailers for each film in the series may be viewed at the Arts Council website, www.theartscouncil.net. Tickets may be ordered online or by calling 770-5342787. Series tickets are $38 per person. Individual tickets are $7 adults and $5 students and seniors. For tickets and more information, call 770-534-2787 or visit www. theartscouncil.net.

Tractor and Gas Engine Exposition. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 9-10. Cumming Fairgrounds. $5, ages 12 and younger free. www.cummingfair.net. Veterans Day Program, Pine Mountain. 9:3010:30 a.m. Nov. 10. F.D. Roosevelt State Park, 2970 Ga. 190, Pine Mountain. $5 parking. 706-663-4858, www.GeorgiaStateParks.

org/fdroosevelt 4-H fundraiser, Gainesville. 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 10. Hall County Farmers Market, Gainesville. 9th annual Dahlonega Literary Festival. Nov. 10-11. www. literaryfestival.org. Veterans Day and Family Day: Honoring Our Military and Their Families. 1-4 p.m. Nov. 11 and 13, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 17. Exhibits of military

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To have your event listed, we must have the following information: ■ The name, time and date of the event, and a short description ■ The location, street address ■ Admission and contact information ■ Send to getout@gainesvilletimes.com ONLY emails will be accepted. No faxes, flyers, mailers or phone calls. The deadline to have your event listed in Get Out is the FRIDAY before the next publication. Listings run at the discretion of the editor. If you would like to purchase an ad, call Betty Thompson at 770-532-1234 or email bthompson@gainesvilletimes.com artifacts and memorabilia, Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St, Gainesville. 770-297-5900, visit www.negahc.org. East Georgia Genealogical Society monthly meeting, Winder. 2 p.m. Nov. 13. Piedmont Regional Library, Belview St., Winder. www. rootsweb.com/~gaeggs. Jackson County Historical Society meeting, Jefferson. 2:30 p.m. Nov. 11. First Christian Church of Jefferson, 104 Lee St., Jefferson. 706-207-6889.

Ongoing

Buford Lanier Woman’s Club monthly meeting, Buford. 9:30 a.m. second Wednesdays. Buford Community Center, 2200 Buford Highway, Buford. Meetings start with coffee and fellowship. www. bufordlanierwomansclub. com. American Business Women’s Association,

Gainesville. 6 p.m. fourth Tuesday each month. Recess Southern Gastro Pub, 118 Bradford St., NE Gainesville. Dinner, speakers, meeting. 770654-9277, www.abwallcc. org. Learn Conversational Spanish. Free. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursdays. Goodwill Oakwood Career Center, 3715 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. 770-538-4209 Friendship Woman’s Club, Flowery Branch. Meets every fourth Thursday. Flowery Branch Depot, Flowery Branch. 404-394-9865 or SallyWeatherbee8@aol. com. Toastmasters, Gainesville. Improve your public speaking skills. 5:45 to 6:45 p.m. Mondays. Jacobs Building Room 208, Brenau University, 340 Green St., Gainesville. Free. 678-469-2777. gainesvilletoastmasters@ yahoo.com.


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gainesvilletimes.com/getout | Thursday, November 1, 2012

Make a list and check it twice! Get a jump on holiday shopping at Marketplace



FAmily events

go o y famil

This week

Chili Cookoff & Car Show, Lula. 9:30 a.m. Nov. 3. 6459 Main St. Lula. $15 early registrants, $20 on registration day. 678-316-6003 or 770-869-3200.

Upcoming

BY CHRISTEN ROBINSON crobinson@ gainesvilletimes.com

Halloween is done and Thanksgiving is weeks away; for many, that means it’s time to start shopping for Christmas. And the first chance at finding some dazzlng bargains will be available to those attending the 21st annual Marketplace Nov. 8-10. The preview party is set for 6:30-9:30 p.m. Nov. 8 at the Gainesville Civic Center. Tickets are $40 per person, which includes return admission and a $20 tax deduction. The preview event offers visitors a place to shop, enjoy a buffet and bid in a silent and live auction for prizes that include Atlanta Falcons tickets, a threenight stay at The Chateau in Highlands, N.C., and a personal visit from Santa. Marketplace officially opens from 9:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Nov. 9 and 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 10. Tickets are $5 for adults, and children 12 and younger are free. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 770-219-1830. Marketplace will include more than 70 merchants from eight states offering items hard to find in North Georgia, including jewelry and accessories, clothing, art, books, antiques, home

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FILE PHOTOS | The Times

The 21st annual Marketplace will include more than 70 merchants from eight states offering items hard to find in North Georgia. Items available will include jewelry and accessories, clothing, art, books, antiques, home accessories, gourmet food, garden and holiday items.

Marketplace When: Nov. 8-10 Where: Gainesville Civic Center, 830 Green St., Gainesville How much: $5 ($40 for preview party) More info: 770-2191830, www.nghs. com/marketplace

accessories, gourmet food, garden and holiday items. Southern Living’s James Farmer will speak about his gardening designs at 1 p.m. Nov. 10. “He is a best-selling author, editor at large for Southern Living magazine and has appeared on the ‘Today’ show. He’s an in-demand author of the South,” said Emily Embry,

Skylake Fall Festival, Sautee Nachoochee. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 10. Artists, vendors, children’s activities and food. Free parking, no admission. Skylake Community, Skylake Road, Sautee Nacoochee. 706-878-3563, ccc1015@earthlink.net. Fun at the Fort, Winder. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 17. Fort Yargo State Park, Winder. Fun for the whole family; tours includes various interactive activities and educational opportunities. $3 admission, $5 parking. 770-867-3489. Appalachian Thanksgiving, Dawsonville. 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Nov. 22. Amicalola Falls State Park and Lodge, Dawsonville. Explore the magic of handmade folk toys and churning butter. Reservations required lodge’s Thanksgiving Buffet. $5 parking. 706-3441505. Lighted Christmas Display, Cornelia City Park. Thanksgiving through New Years Day. Festival of Trees, Helen. 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Nov. 23. to Dec. 8. Unicoi State Park and Lodge, Helen. View the beautifully decorated trees throughout Unicoi Lodge. $5 parking. 800-573-9659 ext. 305. Flowery Branch Christmas Tree Lighting & Roll ‘n’ Stroll. 2-6 p.m. Dec. 1. Flowery Branch. 678-698-1387, flowerybranchga.org Habersham Christmas Parade, Cornelia. Dec. 1. Christmas in Cornelia. Dec. 7-9 and 14-16. 2013 Apple Drop, Cornelia. Dec 31.

Ongoing

Young Architects: Designing the Future, Buford. Oct. 26 to Jan. 19. An exhibit designed by the Children’s Museum of Cleveland and sponsored by the Gwinnet Environmental and Heritage Center Foundation. www. gwinnettEHC.org. “Waters of Time: The Chicopee Woods Story,” Gainesville. Learn about previous eras and inhabitants of Chicopee Woods. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. $5 adults, $3 children age 2-12; age 1 and younger and members free. 770535-1976.

Marketplace chairwoman. The event is sponsored by The Medical Center Auxilary, with all proceeds going toward radiation oncology at the Northeast Georgia Medical Center’s cancer treatment center.

“We’re really excited about this year’s event. We are expecting about 475 people to attend the preview party,” said Lynne Allen, director of volunteer services for The Medical Center Auxiliary.

‘We are expecting about 475 people to attend the preview party.’ Lynne Allen, director of volunteer services for The Medical Center Auxiliary


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Laugh it up with ‘Producers’ GTA brings hit Broadway flop to Gainesville From staff reports Can a flop make more money than a hit? “The Producers,” the Mel Brooks film that became a hit Broadway show, comes to Gainesville this month in a Gainesville Theatre Alliance production. The play centers on struggling Broadway producer Max Bialystock and his neurotic accountant Leo Bloom, who hatch a plan to put on the worst show in Broadway history in the hopes of making a fortune. Yet their musical, “Springtime for Hitler,” complete with dancing Nazis, turns out to be the smash of the season. GTA’s own Bialystock and Bloom will present “the worst show in town” from Nov. 6-17 at Brenau University’s Hosch Theatre. A preview performance is set for Nov. 5, with an audiodescribed matinee for the visually impaired Nov. 17. Shows begin at 7:30 p.m., with 2:30 p.m. matinees on Nov. 11 and 17. The show is rated PG-15 for suggestive storylines. Gainesville Theatre Alliance is a collaboration between Brenau University, Gainesville State College, theatre professionals and the northeast Georgia community. Attendees can meet the cast at a free, catered opening night reception following the Nov. 6 performance. Tickets are $20-$24 for adults, $18-$20 for

theater events This week

Cirque du Soleil, Atlanta. 8-10 p.m. Nov. 2. Atlantic Station, 1380 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta. Proceeds go toward mission of healing children, strengthening families and building community. $50-$160. 404262-3000, www.cirquedusoleil.com/en/ shows/totem/tickets.aspx GTA’s “The Producers,” Gainesville. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 6-10 and 13-17; 2:30 p.m. Nov. 11 and 17. Brenau University’s Hosch Theatre in the John S. Burd Center, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. $20-24 for adults, $18-22 for seniors and $14-16 for students. 678-717-3624, www.gainesvilletheatrealliance.org.

Upcoming

SCOTT ROGERS | The Times

The Gainesville Theatre Alliance presents “The Producers” starring Alan Kilpatrick, bottom right, and Conor Brophy, bottom left, Stefanie Lehmann, and David deVries.

‘The Producers’ Gainesville Theatre Alliance production When: 7:30 p.m. Nov. 6-10, 13-17; 2:30 p.m. matinees Nov. 11, 17 Where: Brenau University’s Hosch Theatre, 429 Academy St., Gainesville How much: $8 preview performance Nov. 5; $20-$24 adults, $18-$20 seniors, $14-$16 students More info: www.gainesvilletheatrealliance.org, 678717-3624

seniors and $14-$16 for students depending on seat location. Patrons can select their own

seats online at www. gainesvilletheatrealliance. org or by calling 678-7173624.

Gainesville Lions Club Children’s Theater, Gainesville. 10 and 11:30 a.m. Nov. 17. Gainesville Civic Center, 830 Green St., Gainesville. To volunteer or sponsor, call 404-310-0905. Comedian James Gregory, Dahlonega. 7 p.m. Nov. 17. The Holly Theater, 69 W. Main St., Dahlonega. $27 & $35. “The Curious Savage,” Gainesville. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 27-29. Gainesville Performing Arts Center, 830 Century Place, Gainesville. $5. ghstheatre@bellsouth.net “A Christmas Story,” Clarkesville. 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 30-Dec. 2. Habersham Community Theater, 1370 Washington St., Clarkesville. 706-8391315, www.habershamtheater.org. “The Nutcracker,” Gainesville. 7:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. Nov. 30-Dec. 2. Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, Gainesville. $12 children, $18 adults,

For Get Out

Mountain Music & Medicine Show. 7:15 p.m. Nov. 3. The Holly Theater, 69 W. Main St., Dahlonega. $15.

$14 seniors. 770-532-4241, www. gainesvilleballet.org. “It’s a Wonderful Life,” Dahlonega. 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. Dec. 7-9, 14-16, and 21-23. The Holly Theater, 69 W. Main St., Dahlonega. $15. www.hollytheater.com. “Madeline’s Christmas,” Atlanta. 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m. Dec. 8-30. Horizon Theatre Company. $15 adults, $12 children. 404584-7450, horizontheatre.com.

ongoing

“Titus Andronicus,” Atlanta. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 3-25. The New American Shakespeare Tavern, 499 Peachtree St., Atlanta. $20 adults, $15 students, $5 parking. 404-874-5299, www.shakespearetavern.com


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gainesvilletimes.com/getout | Thursday, November 1, 2012

View a little part of history Brenau show features work of Depression era From staff reports Get an artistic look at history with a new exhibition opening at Brenau University. “Historical Perspectives: A New Deal” opens at 6 p.m. today in the Castelli Gallery of the Burd Center for Performing Arts on Academy Street. The show opens with a wine and cheese reception and a presentation by Brenau Art Professor Mary Beth Looney, who curated the show. The exhibition features work from Brenau’s permanent collection produced in the 1930s by American artists such as Rico LeBrun, Childe Hassam, Maurice Sterne and Albert Abramowitz. The artists worked in the

federal government’s Works Progress Administration. In exchange for pieces of art produced for libraries, schools and other public buildings, the WPA provided the artists a livelihood during the Great Depression. Although Looney concedes that the Federal Arts Project of president Franklin Roosevelt’s “New Deal” initiative is a controversial topic, she said the exhibition has significance. “Against the uniquely political landscape of this time of year, we feature works by artists who may have sustained lengthy careers in part because they were encouraged in a similarly challenging economic climate” by a federal program, she said. “I cannot say with

‘Historical Perspectives: A New Deal’ When: Reception 6 p.m. Nov. 1 Where: Castelli Gallery,

Brenau campus

How much: Free More info: www.

Brenau.edu

absolute certainty that the pieces you will see in this exhibition were produced while the artists were ‘federal government employees,’ but they were from that era and there is a good chance that some of them were.” The event is free to the public, and the exhibition will run until Jan. 6.

Enjoy holiday-themed works Christmas is getting an early start in Helen From staff reports The Helen Arts & Heritage Center is celebrating “Helen for the Holidays” with a show-opening reception from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1. The exhibit will continue through the first week of January. It is free and open to the public. “As always, the HAHC gallery showcases a wide variety of work by our members,” Director Theresa Rice said. “Our featured artists for this show, potter Debbie Dowdy and photographer Russ Keen, have their own unique take on the holiday theme.” Local favorite Dowdy has produced more than 60 new pieces of pottery for the show, including several dish sets. “To me, the holidays are about celebrating the blessings of life, food, family and friends,” Dowdy said.

‘Helen for the Holidays’ When: Opens Nov. 1 Where: Helen Arts and Heritage Center, 25 Chattahoochee St., Helen How much: Free More info: www.helenarts.org, info@helenarts.org, 706-878-3933

Because of that, she is showing many functional dishes for food as well as a new venture, pieces she calls “bottle heads.” Visitors to the show familiar with photographer Keen’s camerawork will be impressed with his range, according to Rice. “The work he has done for this show expresses his deep attachment to the natural beauty of North Georgia. Keen’s photographs, specially printed on canvas, depict familiar and beloved views of the area taken from his unique perspective,” said Rice. For more information, contact the Helen Arts & Heritage Center at 706-878-3933.

arts events This Week

Green St. NE, Gainesville. 770-536-2575, www. quinlanartscenter.org. “Drivers Wanted,” Suwanee. 7 p.m. Nov. 5. Movie Tavern, 2855 Lawrenceville-Suwanee Road, Suwanee. $6. Part of the South Arts Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers. 770-945-8996.

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Independent Filmmakers. $7 adults; $5 students and seniors. 770-534-2787, www.TheArtsCouncil.net. Northeast Georgia Arts Tour. Nov. 9-11. Make Your Own Basket, Helen. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 10 and 17. Smithgall Woods State Park, Helen. Leave with a completed berry basket. Advance registration required. $35, $5 parking. 706-878-3087. Slotin Folk Art Auction, Buford. Nov. 10-11. Historic Buford Hall, 112 E. Shadburn Ave., Buford. 770-532-1115 or 404-403-4244, auction@ slotinfolkart.com

go o the arts

Fall Arts Festival, Murrayville. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 3-4. 5172 Thompson Bridge Road, Murrayville. 770-315-5946. “The South American Song,” Gainesville. Through the month of November. Works by artist Cecillia Espinosa Murphy. Inman Perk Cafe, 102 Washington St., Gainesville. Free. 770-5321636. Dog and Pony Show, Gainesville. Winter 2012. Call for artists to submit work relating to animals. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Humane Society of Northeast Georgia. $10 for one, $15 for two. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514

Upcoming

“Smokin’ Fish,” Oakwood. Nov. 8. Martha T. Nesbitt Academic Building, Gainesville State College, Gainesville. Part of the South Arts Southern Circuit Tour of


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family

movies

music

For Get Out

Rebecca Loebe CD Release Party, Dahlonega. 8-11 p.m. Nov. 1. The Crimson Moon Café, 24 North Park St., Dahlonega. $10. www. thecrimsonmoon.com

Corey Crowder, Dahlonega. 8-10:30 p.m. Nov. 2. The Crimson Moon Café, 24 N. Park St., Dahlonega. $12 in advance, $15 day of show. www. thecrimsonmoon.com.

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Free yoga, Gainesville. 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 2 p.m. Nov. 4. Flip Your Dog Yoga Studio, 2480 Limestone Parkway, Gainesville. First class power flow all levels, second class deep stretch gentle yoga, third class power hour yoga. Ages 12 and older. 678-

“Skyfall” is at least as good as the outstanding “Casino Royale” that rescued the franchise from complete irrelevance, and it might end up ranked as one of the top Bond movies of all time. ... Some have even begun to dub Daniel Craig the best Bond ever. By the time his tenure ends, the argument may well be whether he or Sean Connery was the best, with no one else even in the discussion.

‘Skyfall’

ProMusica Community Outreach Event, Gainesville. 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nov. 4. Free. First Presbyterian Church, 800 S. Enota Drive, Gainesville. Classical guitarists Duo Orfeo, Jamie Balmer And Joseph Ricker will perform. jackbell@promusicaconcertseries. com, 770-380-7018. ProMusica Community Outreach Event, Gainesville. 3 p.m. Nov. 4. Free. Good News At Noon Ministries, 979 Davis St., Gainesville. Classical guitarist Duo Orfeo will perform. jackbell@ promusicaconcertseries.com, 770-380-7018.

THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

weekeND plANNeR

Northeast Georgia’s entertainment guide

gainesvilletimes.com/getout

The Associated Press


Recycle Fair, Gainesville. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 3. Gym of ’36 parking lot, 332 Washington St., Gainesville. Recycle fair and open house in honor of America Recycles Day. Free. 770-531-1102, info@ keephallbeautiful.org.

983-7717, doinyoga.net or doinyoga@gmail.com

Mountain Music & Medicine Show, Dahlonega.. 7:15 p.m. Nov. 3. The Holly Theater, 69 W. Main St., Dahlonega. $15.

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Gainesville Theatre Alliance will present “the worst show in town” from Nov. 6-17 at Brenau University’s Hosch Theatre.

DeC. 1:

North Georgia Chamber Symphony concert, Dawsonville. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 29, Grace Presbyterian Church, Dawsonville. Seasonal music, sing-along with Christmas music, Vivaldi’s Guitar Concerto, Mahler’s Song of the Wayfarer Holst’s St. Paul’s Suite. 706-867-9444, northgeorgia chambersymphony.org.

“A Christmas Story,” Clarkesville. 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 30-Dec. 2. Habersham Community Theater, 1370 Washington St., Clarkesville. 706-839-1315, www. habershamtheater.org. “The Nutcracker,” Gainesville. 7:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. Nov. 30-Dec. 2. Pearce Auditorium, Brenau University, Gainesville. $12 children, $18 adults, $14 seniors. 770-5324241, www.gainesvilleballet.org.

Habersham County Christmas Parade & Tree Lighting, “Miracle on Main Street,” Cornelia. 4-7 p.m., downtown Cornelia. Decorated floats, Christmas tree lighting at Depot, visits with Santa, cocoa & cookies.

Stars Over Elachee hands-on telescope workshop, Gainesville. 5–7 p.m. Nov. 17. Elachee Nature Science Center. Learn how a telescope works, how to set up a large 6-inch Dobsonian telescope and then use it to take a tour of the constellations. Reservations required for telescopes. $10 adults, $5 under 12 and free for Elachee members. Recommended for ages 8 and up. 770-535-1976.

NOV. 17: NOV. 29: NOV. 30:

NOV. 9:

“Carry Me Over the Sea,” Dahlonega. 7 p.m. Nov. 9. Shott Hall, North Georgia College & State University, 82 College Circle, Dahlonega. North Georgia Children’s Chorus presents a program of seafaring and seasonal music. Free. 706-482-9968, rppurcell@windstream.net or ngachildrenschorus.org.

lOOkING AHeAD

“Death Trap,” Cumming. 8 p.m. and 3 p.m. Sunday matinee Through Nov. 4. Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming. 770-7819178, www.playhousecumming.com.

“Cirque du Soleil,” Atlanta. 8-10 p.m. Nov. 2. Atlantic Station, 1380 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta. Proceeds go toward mission of healing children, strengthening families and building community. $50$160. 404-262-3000, www. cirquedusoleil.com.

Evening of Dance, Gainesville. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 2-3. Brenau University’s Pearce Auditorium, dance majors. $6, $4 seniors, children and students, free for Brenau students. 770-534-6245, vgreene@brenau.edu.

“The South American Song,” Gainesville. Through the month of November. Works by artist Cecillia Espinosa Murphy. Inman Perk Cafe, 102 Washington St., Gainesville. Free. 770-532-1636.

‘The Producers.’

TUeS:

theater

arts

page 7

“Historical Perspectives: A New Deal” opens at 6 p.m. today in the Leo Castelli Gallery of the Burd Center for Performing Arts on Academy Street.

Art opening.

For Get Out


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Thursday, November 1, 2012 | gainesvilletimes.com/getout

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Even at 50, Bond is double-O cool JEFF MARKER jmarker@gsc.edu

Film Review The James Bond movie franchise is now 50 years old — a birthday featured prominently in the film’s promotional materials, yet “Skyfall” injects the character and the franchise with renewed attitude and purpose. It’s a film that pays homage to Bond’s past, while also plotting a course for the future. The movie opens with a thrilling, extended action sequence which results in Bond (Daniel Craig) being shot by a fellow MI6 agent (Naomie Harris). The agent knows the bullet might hit Bond rather than Francoise Duhamel | AP Photo/Sony Pictures her intended target, but she is Daniel Craig, left, is James Bond and Javier Bardem is his nemesis, Raoul Silva, in a scene from “Skyfall.” Bardem ordered to take the shot by M portrays one of the finest arch-enemies in the 50-year history of Bond films. (Judi Dench). Why is M willing to risk Bond’s cinematography and filmmaking reminiscent of Heath Ledger, the outstanding “Casino Royale” life? Because they are trying craft match the sophistication of yet he conducts himself with the that rescued the franchise from to recover a computer disk the character. calculated physical control of complete irrelevance, and it with the names of every NATO For instance, one of the best Hannibal Lecter. The character might end up ranked as one of undercover agent in the field. sequences of the film takes is exactly what the franchise the top Bond movies of all time. That is, admittedly, a wellplace in Shanghai. Mendes films needed. Some have even begun to worn plot device for the spy the entire segment at night and Visually, this might be the dub Daniel Craig the best Bond genre, but it works well enough. uses several aerial shots. The most impressive of all Bond ever. By the time his tenure Especially when we meet the whole city is alive with dazzling movies. Director Sam Mendes, ends, the argument may well villain behind the plot to steal light and energy. better known for insightful be whether he or Sean Connery the list. His name is Silva (Javier With that as its setting, one dramas (“Road to Perdition,” was the best, with no one else Bardem), and he holds a very of the better action sequences “Revolutionary Road”) and witty even in the discussion. personal grudge against M and plays out high above the city comedies (“American Beauty,” The argument will also all of MI6. with an electronic billboard in the “Away We Go”), is a gifted be made that Bardem has Helped by a baby-faced but background. Jellyfish-shaped, filmmaker known for injecting created one of the classic brilliant new Q (Ben Whishaw) glowing blue lights flow and poignant imagery into his films. Bond villains. Bardem proved and questioned by M’s new undulate as Bond and his enemy He is not a typical choice to in “No Country for Old Men” boss, Gareth Mallory (Ralph battle in silhouette. helm a James Bond film, but that he plays a great heavy, Fiennes), Bond’s mission is to The effect is stunning, it proves a perfect fit. Even and here he combines evil recover the disk and protect M. beautiful even. This is the kind of though the current iteration of joy, subtle perversity and Oh, and Bond of course visual innovation Mendes brings Bond has some working class intimidating intelligence into a gets to romance an impossibly to the entire film, effectively rough edges, he is still a refined character capable of doing any beautiful, exotic woman named raising the bar to a level this character. This might be the unspeakable act at any time. Sévérine (Bérénice Marlohe). franchise has never attained. first time in history that the Silva is an agent of chaos “Skyfall” is at least as good as

‘Skyfall’ Starring: Daniel Craig, Judi Dench, Ralph Fiennes, Javier Bardem Rated: PG-13, for intense violent sequences throughout, some sexuality, language and smoking Runtime: 2 hours, 23 minutes Bottom line: Best Bond film in decades

The producers would be wise to maintain that sophistication in future films. MGM has struggled for literally decades, after being bought by a casino owner who couldn’t care less about filmmaking, being downsized and split into various sub-entities, and ultimately going through a structured bankruptcy in 2010. They are clearly doubling down on James Bond. If future Bond movies display the same combination of reverence for the past, willingness to write a new future, and sheer filmmaking joy, I say God save Bond. Jeff Marker teaches film and literature at Gainesville State College. His reviews appear weekly in Get Out and on gainesville times.com/getout.


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gainesvilletimes.com/getout | Thursday, November 1, 2012

Showtimes

Hollywood Stadium Cinemas 770-539-9200

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120 Green Hill Circle NW, Gainesville

Regal Mall of Georgia Stadium 20 678-482-5858

3333 Buford Drive, Suite 3000, Buford

Alex Cross (PG-13) Thu. 12:05-1:10-2:303:45-4:55-6:20-7:20-9:00-9:45 Fri.-Sat. 12:05-2:25-4:55-7:20-9:50-12:10 Sun. 1:05-3:25-5:55-8:20-10:50 Argo (R) Thu. 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:20 Fri.Sat. 10:30-1:30-4:25-7:30-10:20 Sun. 11:30-2:30-5:25-8:30-11:20 Chasing Mavericks (PG) Thu. 12:05-2:405:15-7:50-10:25 Fri.-Sat. 12:05-5:05-10:05 Sun. 1:05-6:05-11:05 Cloud Atlas (R) Thu. 12:30-2:50-4:30-7:008:30 Fri.-Sat. 12:30-4:30-8:30 Sun. 1:305:30-9:30 Cloud Atlas: The IMAX Experience (R) Thu.

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2:35-4:55) 7:45-10:05 Pitch Perfect (PG-13) Thu. (1:00-4:00) 7:009:55 Fri.-Sun. (1:00) 7:00 Silent Hill: Revelation (R) Thu.-Sun. (2:40) 7:30 Silent Hill: Revelation 3D (R) Thu.-Sun. (12:15-5:05) 9:55 Sinister (R) Thu.-Sun. 7:10-9:50 Taken 2 (PG-13) Thu.-Sun. (12:25-2:50-5:15) 7:40-10:10 Wreck-It Ralph (PG) Fri.-Sun. (2:45) 8:05 Wreck-It Ralph 3D (PG) Fri.-Sun. (12:00-5:25)

Bargain shows denoted by parenthesis ( ).

Alex Cross (PG-13) Thu. 4:15-7:00-9:45 Fri.Sun. 4:15-9:45 Argo (R) Thu. 4:00-6:45-9:30 Fri.-Sun. 1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30 Chasing Mavericks (PG) Thu. 4:15-7:00-9:45 Fri.-Sun. 1:45-7:00 Cloud Atlas (R) Thu. 5:00-8:30 Fri.-Sun. 1:30-5:00-8:30 Flight (R) Fri.-Sun. 1:15-4:00-7:00-9:30 Frankenweenie (PG) Thu. 7:15 Frankenweenie 3D (PG) Thu. 4:30-9:30 Fun Size (PG-13) Thu. 4:00-7:00-9:30 Fri.Sun. 1:30-4:15-7:00-9:15 Here Comes the Boom (PG) Thu. 4:45-7:159:45 Fri.-Sun. 1:45-4:45-7:15-9:45 Hotel Transylvania (PG) Thu. 6:45-9:15 Fri.Sun. 1:30-6:45-9:15 Hotel Transylvania 3D (PG) Thu.-Sun. 4:30 House at the End of the Street (PG-13) Thu. 4:45-7:30-10:00 The Man With the Iron Fists (R) Fri.-Sun. 2:15-4:45-7:30-10:00 Paranormal Activity 4 (R) Thu. 4:00-4:457:00-7:30-9:15-10:00 Fri.-Sun. 2:15-4:457:15-10:00 Pitch Perfect (PG-13) Thu. 4:15-6:45-9:30 Fri.-Sun. 1:45-4:15-6:45-9:30 Silent Hill: Revelation (R) Thu.-Sun. 4:309:45 Silent Hill: Revelation 3D (R) Thu. 7:00 Fri.Sun. 2:00-7:00 Sinister (R) Thu. 4:30-7:15-9:45 Fri.-Sun. 2:00-4:30-7:15-9:45 Taken 2 (PG-13) Thu. 4:45-7:15-10:00 Fri.Sun. 2:15-4:45-7:15-10:00 Wreck-It Ralph (PG) Fri.-Sun. 2:00-4:307:30-10:00 Wreck-It Ralph 3D (PG) Fri.-Sun. 1:15-4:007:00-9:30

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Habersham Hills Cinemas 6 706-776-7469 2115 Cody Road, Mount Airy

JAIMIE TRUEBLOOD | AP Photo/Paramount Pictures

From left, Victoria Justice, Chelsea Handler and Thomas Mann star in “Fun Size.” 12:00-4:00-8:00 Fri.-Sat. 12:00-4:00-8:0011:30 Sun. 1:00-5:00-9:00 Flight (R) Fri.-Sat. 10:35-1:00-1:35-4:004:35-7:00-7:35-10:00-10:35 Sun. 11:352:00-2:35-5:00-5:35-8:00-8:35-11:0011:35 Frankenweenie (PG) Thu. 3:15-7:45 Fri.-Sat. 10:45-12:55-3:05-5:15 Sun. 11:45-1:554:05-6:15 Frankenweenie 3D (PG) Thu. 1:00-5:3010:00 Fun Size (PG-13) Thu. 12:15-1:45-2:303:55-4:45-7:10-9:20 Fri.-Sat. 12:15-2:304:45-7:10-9:20-11:35 Sun. 1:15-3:30-5:458:10-10:20 Here Comes the Boom (PG) Thu. 1:30-4:007:05-9:35 Fri.-Sat. 11:00-1:35-4:10-7:059:35-12:05 Sun. 12:00-2:35-5:10-8:0510:35 Hotel Transylvania (PG) Thu. 12:00-2:152:50-4:35-7:05-7:40 Fri.-Sat. 12:25-2:507:40-9:55-12:10 Sun. 1:25-3:50-8:4010:55 Hotel Transylvania 3D (PG) Thu. 12:30-5:209:55 Fri.-Sat. 5:20 Sun. 6:20 Looper (R) Thu. 12:00-10:35 The Man With the Iron Fists (R) Fri.-Sat. 10:30-12:50-3:10-5:30-7:25-7:50-9:4510:10-12:05 Sun. 11:30-1:50-4:10-6:308:25-8:50-10:45-11:10 Paranormal Activity 4 (R) Thu. 12:45-1:252:55-3:40-5:15-5:55-7:25-8:10-9:50-10:25 Fri.-Sat. 11:10-1:25-3:40-5:55-8:10-10:25 Sun. 12:10-2:25-4:40-6:55-9:10-11:25 The Perks of Being a Wallflower (PG-13) Thu. 12:00-2:25-4:55-7:25-9:55 Fri.-Sat. 2:407:40 Sun. 3:40-8:40 Pitch Perfect (PG-13) Thu. 2:20-5:00-7:3510:15 Fri.-Sat. 11:40-2:20-5:00-7:35-10:15 Sun. 12:40-3:20-6:00-8:35-11:15 Seven Psychopaths (R) Thu. 9:25 Silent Hill: Revelation (R) Thu. 12:40-2:555:10-7:30-9:45 Fri.-Sat. 7:30-9:45-12:01

Sun. 8:30-10:45 Silent Hill: Revelation 3D (R) Thu. 2:25-4:407:00-9:15 Fri.-Sat. 12:10-2:25-4:40-7:009:15-11:30 Sun. 1:10-3:25-5:40-8:0010:15 Sinister (R) Thu. 2:10-4:50-7:45-10:30 Fri.-Sat. 11:20-2:10-4:50-7:45-10:30 Sun. 12:20-3:10-5:50-8:45-11:30 Taken 2 (PG-13) Thu. 12:50-3:10-5:35-7:008:00-9:20-10:20 Fri.-Sat. 10:35-12:503:10-5:35-8:00-10:20 Sun. 11:35-1:504:10-6:35-9:00-11:20 Wreck-It Ralph (PG) Fri.-Sat. 11:00-12:001:30-2:30-4:00-5:00-7:30-10:00 Sun. 12:00-1:00-2:30-3:30-5:00-6:00-8:3011:00 Wreck-It Ralph 3D (PG) Fri.-Sat. 11:3012:30-2:00-3:05-4:30-5:35-7:00-8:059:30-10:35-12:05 Sun. 12:30-1:30-3:004:05-5:30-6:35-8:00-9:05-10:30-11:35

Movies 400 678-513-4400

415 Atlanta Road, Cumming

Alex Cross (PG-13) Thu. (1:10-3:45) 7:2010:00 Fri.-Sun. (3:45) 9:45 Argo (R) Thu.-Sun. (12:45-3:35) 6:45-9:35 Atlas Shrugged: Part 2 (PG-13) Fri.-Sun. (1:15-4:00) 7:00-9:45 Chasing Mavericks (PG) Thu. (12:00-3:00) 6:30-9:30 Fri.-Sun. (2:20) 7:30-10:20 Cloud Atlas (R) Thu.-Sun. (1:00-4:35) 8:10 Frankenweenie (PG) Thu.-Sun. (12:00-2:204:45) Fun Size (PG-13) Thu. (12:30-2:50-5:10) 7:35-10:00 Fri.-Sun. (12:00-5:10) Here Comes the Boom (PG) Thu.-Sun. (12:503:25) 6:50-9:25 Hotel Transylvania (PG) Thu. (12:00-2:254:55) 7:20 Fri.-Sun. (12:10-2:35-5:00) 7:25 Paranormal Activity 4 (R) Thu.-Sun. (12:15-

Alex Cross (PG-13) Thu. 4:30-7:15-9:45 Cloud Atlas (R) Thu.-Fri. 4:30-8:00 Sat.-Sun. 1:00-4:30-8:00 Fun Size (PG-13) Thu. 5:15-7:30-9:45 Fri. 5:30-10:00 Sat. 12:45-10:00 Sun. 12:457:30-10:00 Here Comes the Boom (PG) Thu. 4:00-7:009:30 Fri. 4:15-7:15-9:30 Sat.-Sun. 1:304:15-7:15-9:30 Paranormal Activity 4 (R) Thu.-Fri. 5:157:30-9:45 Sat.-Sun. 12:45-3:00-5:15-7:309:45 Taken 2 (PG-13) Thu.-Fri. 5:30-7:45-10:00 Sat.-Sun. 1:15-3:15-5:30-7:45-10:00 Wreck-It Ralph (PG) Fri. 4:00-7:00-7:30-9:45 Sat. 1:00-3:15-4:00-7:00-7:30-9:45 Sun. 1:00-3:15-4:00-7:00-9:45

Dawson 400 Stadium Cinemas 706-216-1622 189 North 400 Center Lane, Dawsonville

Alex Cross (PG-13) Thu. 5:10-7:35-9:55 Argo (R) Thu. 4:15-7:15-9:15 Fri.-Sun. 1:05-4:15-7:15-9:15 Chasing Mavericks (PG) Thu. 4:10-7:10-9:10 Fri.-Sun. 1:10-7:10 Fun Size (PG-13) Thu. 5:00-7:20-9:30 Fri.Sun. 4:10-9:45 Here Comes the Boom (PG) Thu. 4:05-7:159:35 Fri.-Sun. 1:00-4:05-7:15-9:35 Hotel Transylvania (PG) Thu. 4:55-7:00-9:50 Fri.-Sun. 12:35-2:45-4:55-7:00-9:50 The Man With the Iron Fists (R) Fri.-Sun. 12:35-2:50-5:05-7:20-9:40 Paranormal Activity 4 (R) Thu. 4:50-7:309:40 Fri.-Sun. 12:30-2:40-4:50-7:30-9:40 Pitch Perfect (PG-13) Thu. 4:50 Silent Hill: Revelation (R) Thu. 4:55-9:25 Fri.Sun. 12:30-4:55-9:25 Silent Hill: Revelation 3D (R) Thu. 7:10 Fri.Sun. 2:45-7:10 Sinister (R) Thu. 7:00-9:30 Fri.-Sun. 12:504:00-7:00-9:30 Taken 2 (PG-13) Thu. 4:50-7:05-9:50 Fri.Sun. 12:30-2:40-4:50-7:05-9:55 Wreck-It Ralph (PG) Fri.-Sun. 5:00-9:15 Wreck-It Ralph 3D (PG) Fri.-Sun. 1:15-7:10


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now showing Movie reviews from Associated Press. Stars out of four.

opening

‘Skyfall’ ■ Review, 10 ‘Flight’

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Thursday, November 1, 2012 | gainesvilletimes.com/getout

HHH½ R for sex, nudity, drugs, alcohol, profanity, adult themes). It’s unlikely the Pilots Association will put its seal of approval on “Flight,” a high-wire drama about a commercial airline captain — Denzel Washington, in an extraordinary, Oscar-worthy performance — who crash-lands a jet carrying “102 souls,” saving all but six. But not only were his alcohol levels off the charts, blood tests show he had been using cocaine before the flight left Orlando for Atlanta. The audience is already keenly aware of this fact: “Flight,” bracingly directed by Robert Zemeckis, begins with the alarm buzzing in Whip’s motel room, where he has spent the night in the company of a coworker in an orgy scene of substance abuse. “Flight,” with its surprisingly raw depiction of binge drinking, of the ingestion of illegal drugs is a movie about addiction. It examines the nature of faith, and the failures and flaws of human beings, plagued by self-deception, selfdestruction. Washington, as he demonstrated in “Training Day,” is at his best when he is exploring moral compromise and corruption, when he plays someone gone bad, given in to temptation, to despair. The road to redemption in “Flight” is an exceedingly rocky one, and director Robert Zemeckis is smart enough to have us believe for a time Whip might never get there.

Continuing

‘Seven Psychopaths’ HH½ (R for strong violence, bloody images, pervasive language, sexuality, nudity and some drug use.) In his second movie, Irish playwright Martin McDonagh has mangled together a comic, self-aware revenge flick that’s half Guy Ritchie, half Charlie Kaufman. It’s manic and messy. But it’s also filled with deranged wit and unpredictable genre deconstruction that make it, if not quite a success, a fascinating mutt of a movie. Colin Farrell plays Marty, a hard-drinking screenwriter in Los Angeles. He has his movie title — “Seven Psychopaths” — but little else. He gets sucked into the hijinks of his friend Billy (Sam Rockwell), whose dog-napping scheme turns bloody when Billy and his friend Hans (Christopher Walken) swipe the Shih Tzu of a pooch-loving gangster (Woody Harrelson). Rockwell — enthusiastic and deranged — is exceptional. In the film’s meta narrative, he’s a kind of stand-in for movies, themselves: violent, funny, crazy and irresistible. When the action decamps to the desert, the film finds its footing. The writer-director is best in such Beckett-like limbos, heavy with Catholic guilt, an enthralling talent even when obscured by all the selfaware playfulness here. After breaking apart the crime film, he puts it back together again for a conclusion worthy of the genre. ‘Alex Cross’ H½ (PG-13 for violence including disturbing images, sexual content, language, drug references and nudity.) James Patterson titled his 12th Alex Cross crime novel simply “Cross.” The filmmakers who adapted it expanded the title to “Alex Cross.” They might as

ROBERT ZUCKERMAN | AP Photo/Paramount

Denzel Washington portrays Whip Whitaker in a scene from “Flight.”

well have gone for broke and called it “Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Stab at Expanding Her-His Hollywood Marketability as James Patterson’s Alex Cross.” Perry’s name will draw his fans in. Patterson’s name will draw his fans in. There’s no trace of Madea in director Rob Cohen’s adaptation, yet the spirit of the sassy grandma inevitably hangs over the project for viewers curious to see Perry playing it straight and dramatic. Alex Cross the man and the movie wind up suffering for it. It’s perfectly reasonable for Perry to try to broaden his enormous popularity

beyond the Madea lineage in his own raucous portraits of family life. It’s also perfectly reasonable to say that casting Perry as Cross was a bad idea, though it’s not necessarily the worst in a movie built on bad ideas. Perry looks the part of Patterson’s big, athletic hero, but he’s low-keybordering-on-sleepwalker dull, and the standard-issue cop-vs.-serial-killer story presents Cross as more of a dopey psycho-babbler than a guy whose incisive mind cuts right to the heart of the case. With Edward Burns, Matthew Fox and Cicely Tyson.

‘Argo’ HHHH (R for language and some violent images.) A movie about the 1979 Iranian hostage crisis probably doesn’t sound like it would be a laugh riot but that’s just one of the many ways in which this is a glorious, gripping surprise. Directing his third feature, Ben Affleck shows a deft handling of tone, especially in making difficult transitions

between scenes in Tehran, Washington and Hollywood, but also gives one of his strongest performances yet in front of the camera as the film’s star. “Argo” reveals his further mastery of pacing and storytelling, even as he juggles complicated set pieces, various locations and a cast featuring 120 speaking parts. And the story he’s telling sounds impossible, but it’s absolutely true (with a few third-act tweaks to magnify the drama). When protestors stormed the U.S. embassy in Tehran, taking 52 people hostage, six employees sneaked out a back door and sought refuge at the home of Canadian Ambassador Ken Taylor (Victor Garber). Longtime CIA operative Tony Mendez (Affleck) comes up with a crazy scheme to rescue them: He’ll fly to Tehran, pretend that they all entered the country together to scout locations for a schlocky scifi movie called “Argo,” then walk right out the front door with them and fly home. Bryan Cranston, John Goodman and Alan Arkin are among the excellent supporting cast.


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goo movies ‘Cloud Atlas’ H½ (R for violence, language, some sexuality/ nudity and drug use.) Maybe if you’re 20 years old and high in your dorm room with your friends, the platitudes presented here might seem profound. Anyone else in his or her right mind should recognize it for what it is: a bloated, pseudo-intellectual, selfindulgent slog through some notions that are really rather facile. Ooh, we’re all interconnected and our souls keep meeting up with each other over the centuries, regardless of race, gender or geography. We’re individual drops of water but we’re all part of the same ocean. That is deep, man. Perhaps it all worked better on the page. “Cloud Atlas” comes from the best-selling novel of the same name by David Mitchell that, in theory, might have seemed unfilmable, encompassing six stories over a span of 500 years and including some primitive dialogue in a far-away future. The A-list actors who comprise the cast (including Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Susan Sarandon, Hugh Grant, Jim Broadbent) play multiple parts across the various stories and in elaborate makeup that’s often laughable. But rather than serving as a satisfying, cohesive device, this strategy feels like a distracting gimmick. ‘Here Comes the Boom’ HH (PG for bouts of MMA sports violence, some rude humor and language.) This comedy starring Kevin James as a tubby science teacher who becomes a mixed martial arts sensation is every bit as ridiculous as it looks. That’s not such a bad thing for the movie, whose makers embrace the fact that they’re essentially

gainesvilletimes.com/getout | Thursday, November 1, 2012

“Frankenweenie” to be a full-length, stop-motionanimation feature, but he didn’t have the means; instead, he made a 30minute, live-action short. Both films are about the powerful bond between a boy and his dog, one that goes on even after death — a heartrending subject, to be sure, but one that Burton infuses with his trademark mix of lively energy and macabre laughs. Even then, you could see Burton’s sympathetic, protective portrayal of an outsider, an affectionate skewering

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of the sanctity of suburbia and a deep love of monster movies. Charlie Tahan provides the voice of Victor, a 10-year-old loner who’s understandably devastated when his only friend — his bull terrier, Sparky — gets hit by a car. But a lesson from his science teacher (a wonderfully melodramatic Martin Landau) inspires Victor (whose last name happens to be Frankenstein) to try and bring Sparky back to life. Catherine O’Hara, Martin Short and Winona Ryder are among the Burton veterans in the strong cast.

go o movies TRACY BENNETT | AP Photo/Columbia-Sony Pictures

From left, Bas Rutten, Henry Winkler, Mark Dellagrotte and Kevin James star in a scene from “Here Comes the Boom.”

doing a live-action cartoon. Co-writer James and director Frank Coraci assemble a likable gang of oddballs that make it kind of work. Everyone surrounding James is so disarmingly incredulous yet perversely enthusiastic about his MMA foray that they disarm the audience to the outrageousness of this guy getting into the cage against ferocious brutes and coming back out with his teeth and vital organs intact. The real flaws are the stabs at genuine moments — the inspirational classroom hijinks, the simpleheaded critiques of the shortcomings of public schools, the humdrum romancing as James slowly wins the heart of Salma Hayek (yeah, like that’s going to happen). Coraci lets all of that stuffing linger and wander too loosely. There are decent gags and laughs, but in between, it’s “here comes the boor” — James acting the buffoon to little

effect for much of the movie. He’s helped by the amiable supporting cast, especially Henry Winkler as the music teacher faced with budget cuts that propel James onto the fighting circuit to raise cash and former UFC champ Bas Rutten as James’ trainer, who steals scenes with his lowbrow, bear-hugging charm. ‘Frankenweenie’ HHH (PG for thematic elements, scary images and action.) Tim Burton reminds us of why we love Tim Burton with this feature-

length version of the 1984 short that revealed early glimmers of the veteran director’s darkly humorous style. Beautifully detailed and painstakingly rendered in 3-D, black-and-white, stop-motion animation, “Frankenweenie” is a visual and thematic return to the best Burton has offered in his earliest films, such as “Edward Scissorhands” and “Beetlejuice.” And it is a welcome return, given the reheated, unfocused nature of some of his more recent films like “Dark Shadows.” Burton has said he’d always intended for


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go o music

Thursday, November 1, 2012 | gainesvilletimes.com/getout

ASO to perform in Athens Sample a fourth of Beethoven From staff reports The UGA Performing Arts Center will present the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 4, in Hodgson Concert Hall. Guest conductor Asher Fisch will lead the orchestra in a program that includes Mozart’s Rondo in D Major, Death and Transfiguration by Richard Strauss and Richard Wagner’s Suite from Die Meistersinger. The program will also include a performance of Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 24 in C Minor featuring pianist Stewart Goodyear. Israeli-born conductor Asher Fisch has appeared with many of the world’s most renowned opera companies and symphony

orchestras and is particularly known for his interpretive command of core German Romantic and post-Romantic repertoire, including the works of Wagner and Strauss. Fisch is currently the principal guest conductor of the Seattle Opera and formerly served as music director of the New Israeli Opera and the Wiener Volksoper. In September 2013, he will take up the baton as principal conductor and artistic advisor of the West Australian Symphony Orchestra. Performing Arts Center Director George Foreman will give a pre-concert lecture 45 minutes prior to the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra performance. The pre-concert lecture

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra When: Nov. 4 Where: Hodgson Concert Hall, 230 River Road, Athens How much: $20-$59 More info: pac.uga. edu, 706-542-4400, 888-289-8497

is free and open to the public. Tickets for the Atlanta Symphony concert are $20-$59 with discounts for UGA students and groups of 10 or more. Tickets can be purchased online at pac.uga.edu or by calling the box office at 706-542-4400 or toll free at 888-289-8497.

Blue Man Group to color Athens From staff reports One of the world’s most unique theatrical experiences will come to town when the UGA Performing Arts Center presents Blue Man Group Nov. 6-7. Both shows begin at 8 p.m. at the Classic Center Theatre in downtown Athens. Blue Man Group is best known for multimedia performances that feature three bald and blue characters who take the audience on a journey that is funny, intelligent and visually stunning, accompanied by a live band. While Blue Man Group has enjoyed successful engagements in cities such as New York, Las Vegas and Berlin, this will be the show’s first U.S. national tour. “People may ask why it’s taken more than 20 years for us to mount a theatrical tour,” says Blue Man co-founder Matt Goldman. “The answer is simple: We wanted to get it right. As we prepare to bring our show to new audiences across the country, we needed to make sure we incorporated all of the knowledge

Blue Man Group When: 8 p.m. Nov. 6-7 Where: Performing Arts Center and Classic Center, Athens How much: $39-$79 More info: 706-357-4444, 706-5424400, 888-289-8497, pac.uga.edu, www.ClassicCenter.com, arts.uga. edu.

we have gained over the years to make the most entertaining and emotionally powerful production ever.” Tickets are $39 to $79 with discounts for UGA students and groups. Tickets can be purchased through the UGA Performing Arts Center box office at 706542-4400, toll free at 888-289-8497, or online at pac.uga.edu. Tickets can also be purchased through the Classic Center box office at 706-3574444 or online at www.ClassicCenter. com. For more information, visit arts.uga. edu.

From staff reports The Ludwig Symphony Orchestra will present “A Beethoven Fall Fiesta” concert for the opening of its 15th season at 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 4, at the Gwinnett CenterPerforming Arts Center. The performance will feature an international flavor with renowned Brazilian pianist Paulo Ricardo Gazzaneo interpreting the popular Beethoven “Emperor” Piano Concerto No. 5; local soprano Leah McRath in arias by Puccini, Verdi and Cilea; violinist Luke Hsu performing the Vieuxtemps Violin Concerto No. 5; and guest conductor Helen Gonzalez conducting Chabrier’s flamboyant “Espana.” Maestro Thomas Ludwig, former music director of the New York City Symphony and resident conductor for American Ballet Theatre with Mikhail Baryshnikov at the Metropolitan Opera House, will

Concert Calendar This week

Rebecca Loebe CD Release Party, Dahlonega. 8-11 p.m. Nov. 1. The Crimson Moon Café, 24 North Park St., Dahlonega. $10. www. thecrimsonmoon.com Rush, Clock Work Angels Tour. Nov. 1. Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre at Encore Park, 2200 Encore Parkway, Alpharetta. www. vzwamp.com. Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra, Athens. 8 p.m. Nov. 1. Hodgson Concert Hall, Athens. 706-542-4400 or 888-289-8497, www.pac. uga.edu. Corey Crowder, Dahlonega. 8-10:30 p.m. Nov. 2. The Crimson Moon Café, 24 N. Park St., Dahlonega. $12 in advance, $15 day of show. www.thecrimsonmoon.com. Boys of Longstreet Station, Gainesville. 9 p.m. Nov. 2. Locos, Gainesville. Mountain Music & Medicine Show, Dahlonega. 8 p.m. Nov. 3. $15. The Holly Theater, 69 W. Main St.,

Ludwig Symphony Orchestra When: 4 p.m. Nov. 4 Where: Gwinnett Center, Performing Arts Center, 6400 Sugarloaf Parkway, Duluth How much: $22, $19 over age 65, $12 under age 21 More info: 770-623-8623, www. ludwigsymphony.org

lead the 85-piece orchestra. The program includes Verdi’s “Triumphal March” from Aida and the Atlanta premiere of Ludwig’s Symphony No. 2. Tickets are $22 adults, $19 seniors ages 65 and older, $12 for students under age 21. To buy them, call 770-623-8623 or visit www.ludwigsymphony.org.

Dahlonega. The Woodgrains, Dahlonega. 7 p.m. Nov. 3. The Crimson Moon, 24 N. Park St., Dahlonega. Free. www.thecrimsonmoon.com. Aurora Swing Nights, Lawrenceville. 8 p.m. Nov. 3. Live band. $18. 678-2266222, www.auroratheatre. com Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Athens. 3 p.m. Nov. 4. Hodgson Concert Hall, Athens. 706-542-4400 or 888-289-8497, www.pac. uga.edu. ProMusica Community Outreach Event, Gainesville. 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nov. 4. Free. First Presbyterian

Church, 800 S. Enota Drive, Gainesville. Classical guitarists Duo Orfeo, Jamie Balmer And Joseph Ricker will perform. jackbell@ promusicaconcertseries. com, 770-380-7018. ProMusica Community Outreach Event, Gainesville. 3 p.m. Nov. 4. Free. Good News At Noon Ministries, 979 Davis St., Gainesville. jackbell@ promusicaconcertseries. com, 770-380-7018. Blue Man Group, Athens. 8 p.m. Nov. 6-7. The Classic Center Theatre, Athens. 706-542-4400 or 888-2898497, www.pac.uga.edu.


CMYK

goo outdoors outdoors calendar This week

Elachee’s Trail Crew Work Day. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. first Saturday each month. Bring water, lunch, gloves and rain gear. Tools, training, and refreshments provided. Free. Under age 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Call to preregister. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville, 770-535-1976. www. elachee.org. First Saturday Hike, Gainesville. 10-11:30 a.m. first Saturday each month. Guided hike. $5 adults, $3 ages 2-12, under 2 and Elachee members free. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. 770535-1976. www.elachee. org. Tour de Tugaloo, Toccoa. 8 a.m. Nov. 3. Yonah Dam Park, Toccoa. 10th annual bike ride in memory of Lainie Weade. Benefits the Stephens County Foundation in support of the Tugaloo River Project. Discount for 10 or more. Information/registration at tourdetugaloo.com and active.com. CF Cycle for Life, Gainesville. Nov. 3. Meeting in Gainesville and caravaning toward Atlanta. Three routes of 15, 30 and 65 miles. 678-591-0853, www.cff.org. Jaemor Farms 8th annual Cornfield Maze Adventure, Alto. Through Nov. 4, Jaemor Farms, 5340 Cornelia Hwy, Alto. 770-869-3999, www. JaemorFarms.com Veterans Day at Chattahoochee National Forrest. Nov. 10-12. The U.S. Forest Service is waiving fees at most of its day-use recreation sites over the Veterans Day holiday weekend. www. fs.usda.gov/conf.

Upcoming

Evening Kayak and Wildlife Watching Adventures, Winder. 4–6 p.m. Nov. 9. Fort Yargo State Park, Winder. The stealthy kayak is a great vessel to sneak up on all sorts of wildlife. Ages 4 and older. $15, $5 parking. 770-867-3489. “Run of The Mill” 5K. 8 a.m. Tot Trot, 8:30 a.m. 5K, Nov. 10. 1210 W. Ridge Road, Gainesville. Benefits student ministries of Montgomery Memorial Baptist Church. Tot Trot $15, 1K $15, 5K $20, Phantom Runner $20. Register at active.com. 770-534-3469. Stars Over Elachee handson telescope workshop, Gainesville. 5–7 p.m. Nov. 17. Elachee Nature Science Center. Learn how a telescope works, how to set up a large 6-inch Dobsonian telescope and then use it to take a tour of the moon, planets, stars and constellations. Reservations are required for each of the telescopes. $10 adults, $5 under 12 and free for Elachee members. Recommended for ages 8 and up. 770535-1976 Full Moon Hike, Tallulah Falls. 6– 8 p.m. Nov. 28. Tallulah Gorge State Park, Tallulah Falls. Enjoy the gorge in the magical, shimmering light of the full moon. $5 admission, $5 parking. 706-754-7981. Jingle Bell Run/Walk, Lawrenceville. 8 a.m. Dec. 1. 2125 Tribble Mill Parkway, Lawrenceville.

Wear a holiday-themed costume and tie jingle bells to your shoelaces. Adult $30, ages 18 to 6 $25, 5 and younger $10. 678-2374458, pmcadams@arthritis. org or www.jbrwgwinnett. org

Ongoing

“2012 — The End of Time?” Dahlonega. 8 p.m. Fridays through Nov. 16. What does the Mayan Calendar really have to say about the world coming to an end on Dec. 21. Free. Coleman Planetarium North Georgia College & State University, Dahlonega. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. With clear sky, the observatory will open for telescope viewing following the show. jjones@northgeorgia.edu. CCC Wednesday evening rides, Gainesville. 6 p.m. Leave from Frances Meadows Aquatic Center parking lot. No ride in precipitation. Chicken City Cyclists 770-534-7075, or unnoldl@charter.net. Triathlon Club, Gainesville. No experience necessary. Meets 7 p.m. second Tuesdays, Fit 2 Tri Store, 1292 Thompson Bridge Road, Gainesville. 770712-9129, fit2tri@gmail. com. ISI Cycling, Gainesville. 7:30 a.m. Saturdays; 7:30 a.m. Sundays, Corinth Baptist Church, Thompson Bridge Road; Thursdays 6 p.m. Dewberry Baptist Church, Clarks Bridge Road. Free. www. isicycling.com.

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Off-road bike enthusiasts unite for SORBA meeting

go o outdoors

From staff reports

The Southern Off-Road Bicycle Association will be host to the board of directors of the International Mountain Bicycling Association at its Nov. 10 meeting at Elachee Nature Science Center in Gainesville. More than 100 mountain bicycling advocates will attend the Gainesville meeting, and enjoy the bicycle trails at Chicopee Woods Park. Over the threeday session, social events are scheduled to take place in Flowery Branch and downtown Gainesville. A not-for-profit advocacy and education organization for mountain bicyclists, SORBA is headquartered in Gainesville, where it has held annual meetings since 2000. In 2008, SORBA

merged its membership with that of IMBA, based in Colorado, and has functioned as IMBA’s southeastern division since. “It is an exciting moment in the development of mountain bike advocacy,” says Tom Sauret, SORBA’s executive director and IMBA’s regional director. “Our coming together like this illustrates how closely the two organizations are in mission, and how important the southeast is to IMBA.” This is the first time the SORBA board of directors will meet jointly with the IMBA board. SORBA includes 5,200 members in seven states. With its 35 chapters, SORBA is the largest IMBA Region. To learn more, visit www.sorba.org or www.imba.com.


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get out

• gainesvilletimes.com/getout

Thursday, November 1, 2012

Choreography and performance by Brenau University dance majors.

Brenau junior Christina Evans, left, and Annette Barcelona, a senior.

Friday & Saturday, Nov. 2-3, 7:30 p.m. Brenau University’s Historic Pearce Auditorium, Gainesville Campus Tickets available at the door. $6 general, $4 seniors, children and students. For info call 770.534.6245 or vgreene@brenau.edu

www.brenau.edu


Get Out November 1 2012