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History Center events take families back in time, page 7

Eye candy Quinlan Visual Arts Center opens new exhibit featuring TULA artists page 5

Thursday August 16, 2012

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Thursday, August 16, 2012 | gainesvilletimes.com/getout

on the web www.favoritearchitecture.org

View and comment on the top 150 projects selected by the American public as part of the American Institute of Architects 150th anniversary. The architecture includes buildings, bridges, monuments and memorials.

art

The annual Folk Fest has returned to North Georgia with lots of art to choose from and an artist meet-and-greet. PAGE 6

movies

What the “Bourne Legacy” lacks in story and directing, it doesn’t make up for anywhere else. Don’t expect the days of Jason Bourne to return. PAGE 10

The Associated Press

family

Nearly everyone knows somebody who has been touched by cancer. The local nonprofit Glory, Hope & Life will hold a tailgate party to raise funds for cancer patients and their families. PAGE 7

on the cover

Whether you like contemporary, abstract or traditional works of art, there is sure to be something for everyone at the Quinlan Visual Arts Center’s new exhibit. PAGE 5

outdoors

Check out the events at Smithgall Woods State Park this weekend and learn all about our native wetlands and their inhabitants. PAGE 14 gainesvilletimes.com/getout: Find more events and stories on our website.


Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Thursday, August 16, 2012 | gainesvilletimes.com/getout H

etc. events

If it’s free...

IT’S FOR ME!

This week

Rain barrel workshop, Clarkesville. Noon to 2 p.m. Aug. 16. North Georgia Technical College Visual Technology Building. Free and open to the public. The workshop will also make fully fitted 60 gallon barrels available to all participants for $35. 706-754-9382, soque@windstream.net. Forgotten Past: Keeping Traditions Alive, Gainesville. 10 a.m. Aug. 18. Learn and practice several methods of starting a fire other than using matches. Make a bowl from tulip wood. Participation fee is $40 for members and $45 for nonmembers. Advance registration appreciated. Class size limited to 12. Instructed by folk naturalist Dean Smith. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., NE, Gainesville. 770-297-5900, www.negahc.org. Rabies Clinic/Adoption Event, Oakwood. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 18. Tractor Supply Co. 3640 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. $10 for rabies vaccination, $20 for microchipping and $85 for adoptions. Residents from all counties are welcome. Pets must be at least 3 months old to get vaccinated. Please bring your pet on a leash or in a carrier. Cash or credit cards accepted. 678-450-1587, animal shelter.hallcounty. org Solar Cooking, Gainesville. 10 a.m. to noon, Aug. 18. Learn how to harness the energy of the sun for cooking healthy meals. From a simple model built with cardboard boxes to an industrial solar cooker, explore recipes and methods for keeping the heat out of your home. This may be a two-part class. $30 in advance; $35 after Aug. 10. Cedar Hill Enrichment Center, 5735 Dawsonville Hwy, Gainesville. 770-887-0051, www.discovercedarhill.org.

Highlighting free activities around the region this week. Historic Downtown Farmers Market, Gainesville. 2:30-6:30 p.m. Fridays. Downtown Gainesville Square. www. gainesville.org. Hall County Farmers Market, Gainesville. Tuesdays 6 a.m. until sellout, Saturdays 7 a.m. until sellout. Through October. East Crescent Drive and Jesse Jewell Parkway by Interstate 985 Exit 24 in Gainesville. www.hallfarmers.org. Summer concert featuring The KMacks, Clarkesville. 7-9 p.m. Aug. 18. Pitts Park. Free. Learn Conversational Spanish. Free. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursdays. Goodwill Oakwood Career Center, 3715 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. 770-538-4209 TULA exhibit, Gainesville. Reception 5:30-7 p.m. Aug. 16. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. 770-536-2575, www. quinlanartscenter.org. Family movie, Gainesville. 3:304:30 p.m. Aug. 20, Families

The Mountain Laurel Quilters Guild monthly meeting, Clarkesville. Noon, Aug. 21. Clarkesville United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall. Bring sack lunch. Program will be a trunk show and lecture by Ben Hollingsworth followed by a show-andtell. Guests welcome and new memberships are encouraged. 706-878-1898.

Upcoming

Fourth annual GarlicFest, Cleveland. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 25. LoganBerry Heritage Farm, 2660 Adair Mill Road, Cleveland. 706-348-6068, loganberryheritagefarm@ gmail.com. Lucky Dog Casino Night, Dawsonville. 6-10 p.m. Aug. 25. Georgia Racing

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are invited to enjoy a family movie. Call for more information and title. Free. 770-532-3311 ext. 151 www. hallcountylibrary.org. Family Day: The Cherokee of Northeast Georgia, Gainesville. 1-4 p.m. Aug. 19. View exhibits and demonstrations by Dean Smith, Joseph “Doc” Johnson and Sam Martin. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., NE, Gainesville. Free. 770-297-5900, www. negahc.org. S.E.B.A. Bluegrass Jam, Dahlonega. 2-5 p.m. Aug. 19. Free. The Crimson Moon Cafe, 24 N Park St., Dahlonega. 706-864-3982, www.sebabluegrass. org. ISI Cycling, Gainesville. 7:30 a.m. Saturdays; 7:30 a.m. Sundays, Corinth Baptist Church, Thompson Bridge Road; Thursdays 6 p.m. Dewberry Baptist Church, Clarks Bridge Road. Free. www. isicycling.com.

Hall of Fame, 415 Ga. 53 E, Dawsonville. blackjack, craps, poker, roulette, Texas Hold ’em, 3-card poker and slots. Benefits Dawson County Humane Society. $50 per person. 706-2656360, www.dawsoncounty humanesociety.org Crush Fest 2012, Cleveland. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 1. Yonah Mountain Vineyards. 706-878-5522, www. yonahmountainvineyards. com. Writing seminar, Gainesville. 1-3 p.m. Sept. 5. Anne B. Jones, Ph.D, author of the fictional thriller “Tides of Fear,” NASCAR autobiography “Gold Thunder” and racing memoirs “All Around the Track” presents “The Path to Publishing for Serious Writers, Tracking the

Northeast Georgia’s entertainment guide

If you would like your event listed in Get Out, here’s what we need to know: n The name of the event, or a short description n The time and date of the event n The location, street address or a short description of the location n Admission and contact information

Email your information to getout@gainesvilletimes.com. The deadline to have your event listed in Get Out is the FRIDAY before the next publication. Listings run at the discretion of the editor. If you would like to place an ad, call Betty Thompson at 770-532-1234 or email bthompson@gainesvilletimes.com

Family events THIS WEEK

All Day Craft Drop In, Hall County. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 16. All ages of youth are invited to drop in any time to make a friendship bracelet at libraries in the Hall County Library System. Free and open to the public. 770-532-3311 ext. 129, www.hallcountylibrary.org. Family movie, Gainesville. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Aug. 20, Families are invited to enjoy a family movie. Call for more information and title. Free. 770-5323311 ext. 151 www.hallcountylibrary. org. Tooth Fairy Craft Week, Gainesville. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 20 and 24. Make your very own mouth using fun craft materials as the teeth. $1 with paid admission to museum, members free. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St., Gainesville. 770-5361900, inkfun.org. Black Cow Storytime (Root Beer Float),

Gainesville. 5-6 p.m. Aug. 21. Gainesville branch Hall County Library System. Come celebrate the anniversary of the Black Cow, AKA “The Root Beer Float.” Enjoy a short storytime, craft and sample a mini Black Cow. All ages of youth are welcome. 770-532-3311 ext. 129. Free. www.hallcountylibrary.org.

Upcoming

Movies on the Green, Gainesville. Gates open at 7:30 p.m., film at dusk. Aug. 24. “The Lorax.” $5 adults nonmembers, $3 members, students. $3 optional chair rental. Smithgall Arts Center lawn, 331 Spring St. SW, Gainesville. 770-5342787, www.theartscouncil.net. Family Fun Fest, Clarkesville. 4-10 p.m. Aug. 25. Recreation Center, Clarkesville. Live entertainment, carnival games, fireworks and food. Parking is free. Proceeds benefit United Way of Habersham, Rabun and Banks counties. 706-778-0620, www. unitedwayhabersham.org.


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Expressions of creative minds

arts events

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Latest Quinlan show features work of 4 TULA artists Works by artist Cat Telsa will be on display at the Quinlan Visual Arts Center in Gainesville through Oct. 6. Other artists featured in the exhibit are Jan Eubanks, Lisa Moore and Joe Camoosa. All of the artists are current members of the TULA Art Center in Atlanta and range in style from traditional to contemporary.

From staff reports The Quinlan Visual Arts Center is ready to showcase the latest exhibits with a reception from 5:30-7 tonight. Four artists from the TULA Art Center in Atlanta will be highlighted through Oct. 6 in the Quinlan galleries. TULA is home to several resident artists ranging from traditional to contemporary as well as the Museum of Contemporary Art (Georgia). Once a factory in an industrial district, the building was turned into an art gallery and studio space in the early 1980s under the direction of Lil Friedlander. The Quinlan show offers a small peek into the world of TULA artists. “Exhale” a body of work by artist Cat Tesla of Snellville, explores her love of the outdoors and, in particular, water, with “ethereal landscapes and organic abstract designs — either originating from Mother Nature or inspired by her — executed in mixed media on canvas and birch supports.” In her artist statement Tesla notes, “One goal of my work is to transport the viewer into a realm of calm and respite, or perhaps to recall a memory of a favorite place or loved one. My visual vocabulary seeks to communicate the indescribable serenity and healing experienced from nature.” Award-winning artist Lisa Upchurch Moore, raised in Northwest Georgia, uses a variety of media in her work for “Moments,” a collection of stunning impressionistic pieces. A gifted colorist, she

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paints exceptional figures, children and rural settings. Recently her work has exploded, reaching new levels. By applying paint, wax, lace and plaster, she creates a dramatic surface, with the subject matter becoming more abstract. Moore’s work is instinctive and brings to life the underlying theme of the beauty that exists in our lives. Showcasing a body of landscape paintings for “Luminosity,” artist Jan Eubanks began her love for painting at the University of Georgia in the Lamar Dodd Fine Art School. While there, she was inspired by the master works of Paul Cezanne, Edgar Degas and Mary Cassett. She has continued her studies under such well-known artists as Mark Chatov, Roger Brown and C.W. Mundy. Her style lands somewhere between

Quinlan Visual Arts Center exhibit When: Aug. 16-Oct. 6; reception 5:30-7 p.m. Aug. 16. Where: Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. More info: 770-536-2575, www.quinlanartscenter.org.

realism and expressive contemporary. Sincerity is honored but the viewer is also challenged. In her artist statement, Eubanks says she is “intrigued with how the paint application communicates the importance of the scene and is always concerned with what the finished painting communicates to the viewer.” New Jersey native Joe Camoosa has been drawing in some fashion since he was young boy in the 1970s. His high-energy work builds on the use of positive and negative space created with varying marks. Camoosa says of his show “In-Between,” that he

was inspired by “my lifelong infatuation with maps — particularly those that detail railroad and subway lines.” He uses the formal elements of maps — line, color, scale, shape and size to create what he calls “large-scale gestural paintings” by building up layers of oil paint and cold wax on canvas, and interspersing that with frenetic mark-making in graphite, colored pencil and charcoal. Working intuitively and flowing from the unconscious, the paintings have evolved into part map and part abstract aerial landscape.



This Week

TULA exhibit, Gainesville. Reception 5:30-7 p.m. Aug. 16. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. 770-536-2575, www. quinlanartscenter.org. Basic watercolor class, Gainesville. 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 17, 24 and 31. Gainesville Watercolor Society, 895 Main St., Gainesville. Registration required. 786-208-4320. Debra Nadlehoffer Landscape Workshop, Gainesville. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 17-18. $225. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. 770536-2575, www.quinlanartscenter.org. The 19th annual Folk Fest, Norcross. Aug. 17-19. 1700 Jeurgens Court, Norcross. Self-taught art, Southern Folk pottery, outsider art and antique art. 770-532-1115 www.slotinfolkart.com.

Upcoming

Mary Ann Klimek Pottery Classes, Gainesville. 7-9 p.m. Thursdays Sept. 6-Oct. 25. Quinlan members $130, nonmembers $150. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. 770-5362575, www.quinlanartscenter.org. Harvest Festival, Clarkesville. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 8, John Kollock’s watercolor print release, “Pickin’ on the Porch,” Nathaniel Samsel’s dulcimer and banjo music, Sarah Samsel’s pressed-flower art and cornhusk dolls, Kathleen Kollock’s watercolors. The Saturday Shop, 450 Bybrook Trail, Clarkesville. saturdayshop@yahoo.com, 706-754-9200. 9th annual Art In The Square, Gainesville. Sept. 1516. Downtown Gainesville square. www.gainesville. org. Bark in the Park, Helen. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 15. Paint the nature, the dogs, the people, your experiences to your heart’s content. $30 vendor fee payable to Friends of Unicoi State Park. Funds go toward bear-proof containers and trash cans for the campground and to help raise awareness of rescued animals that can be adopted by area shelters. 706-219-4344, gwen.aumann@yahoo. com. 2012 HAHC Juried Competion, Helen. Opening reception Sept. 20. Helen. Helen Arts & Heritage Council, 25 Chattahoochee St., Helen. Free. 706878-3933, www.helenarts.org.


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Thursday, August 16, 2012 | gainesvilletimes.com/getout

Folk art on a grand scale

theater events This week

“Smoke on the Mountain,” Gainesville. 7:30 p.m. Aug. 16-17, 23-24 and 2:30 p.m. Aug. 18-19, 25-26. Georgia Mountains Center Theater, 301 Main St. SW, Gainesville. Presented by the Georgia Mountain Players. $17 for adults, $13 for seniors older than 59, students and children. Tickets available at the box office, online or by calling 770-534-8420. Additional fees apply when ordering by phone or online. Auditions for “The Foreigner,” Flowery Branch. 7-9 p.m. Aug. 16. One teen boy and 6 adult men and women needed. Cold readings from the script. Fifth Row Center, 5509 Main St., Flowery Branch. fifthrowcenter.com, info@fifthrowcenter.com.

Annual exhibit gathers top artists, works in Atlanta From staff reports Fans of folk art won’t want to miss this weekend’s Folk Fest exhibit at the North Atlanta Trade Center in Norcross. The event marks its 19th year with nearly 100 galleries and dealers taking part. Pieces for sale can range from $5 to a $50,000 museum masterpiece. The show begins Friday night with a meet and greet with the artists, including some of the biggest names in folk art. Folk Fest is organized by Steve and Amy Slotin, owners of Slotin Folk Art, based in Gainesville. Steve Slotin started in folk art when he ran across a Lanier Meaders face jug near his childhood summer camp in Cleveland. “I discovered there were primitive forms of pottery and art all over the South,” he said. “These incredible pieces were created by housekeepers, janitors, factory workers, farmers and house painters. They created art, but had very little formal education at all. They used found materials — rusty metal, stray sticks, discarded objects, leftover house paint, mud. “I took this enormous leap of faith, believing that if I could just share this primitive art, this local treasure with others, they would appreciate it as much as I did.” Over the course of its

Folk Fest

Upcoming

When: Aug. 17-19. Artists meet and greet 5-10 p.m. Friday ($15 includes readmission); 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday Where: North Atlanta Trade Center, 1700 Jeurgens Court, Norcross, exit 101 off I-85 How much: $7, ages 16 and younger free Contact: 770-5321115, auction@ slotinfolkart.com, www.slotinfolkart.com

19-year history, Folk Fest has doubled in size and attendance. “For a long time this art has been kept outside the mainstream art community,” Steve Slotin said. “Self-taught art is the most important visual culture America has ever produced. And it’s not country crafts, duck decoys or splitcane baskets. It is highly personal art. It’s religiously inspired paintings, crude tin cutouts, wood-relief carvings and environmental sculpture gardens. “Self-taught artists don’t seek out the art world. The art world, collectors and dealers passionately seek them out. Their art is done by untrained people who

Folk Fest 2012 begins Friday night with a meet and greet with the artists, including some of the biggest names in folk art. For Get Out

draw on their culture and experiences in an isolated world. It’s made with a

true, untutored, creative passion, raw and totally original.”

Singing auditions for the musical “Narnia,” Flowery Branch. 7-9 p.m. Sept. 10 Ages 6-86 needed. Bring CD, mp3, iPod or sheet music. Mostly teens and adults needed for this show, with few children. Fifth Row Center’s studio, 5509 Main St., Flowery Branch. fifthrowcenter.com, info@fifthrowcenter.com. Acting auditions for “Narnia,” Flowery Branch. 7-9 p.m. Sept. 11. Ages 6-18; 7-9 p.m. Sept. 12. Ages 18-senior citizens. Cold readings from the script. Fifth Row Center’s studio, 5509 Main St., Flowery Branch. fifthrowcenter.com, info@fifthrowcenter.com. GTA’s “The Frog Prince,” stage tour, Gainesville. 6 p.m. Sept. 18. Free. Brenau University’s Historic Pearce Auditorium, 500 Centennial Circle, Gainesville. 678717-3624, www.gainesvilletheatrealliance.org. “Bye, Bye Birdie!,” Clarkesville. 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sept. 20-23, 27-30. Habersham Community Theater, 1370 Washington St., Clarkesville. 706-839-1315, www.habershamtheater.org. “The Foreigner,” Flowery Branch. Sept. 28-30, Oct. 5-7. By playwright Larry Shue. Produced by Fifth Row Center and Live Arts Theatre at 5509 Main St., Flowery Branch. Tickets $12/adults, $10/seniors and students. 678-357-7359, FifthRowCenter.com or liveartstheatre.org for tickets and times. GTA’s “The Producers” stage tour, Gainesville. 6 p.m. Oct. 23. Free. Brenau University’s Hosch Theatre in the John S. Burd Center, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. 678-717-3624, www. gainesvilletheatrealliance.org.


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Native history Past is alive Explore Cherokee culture BY BRANDEE A. THOMAS

bthomas@gainesvilletimes.com Most folks in these parts are familiar with Chief Whitepath’s cabin exhibit at the Northeast Georgia History Center, but this week, visitors will be able to submerse themselves even more in Native American culture. From 1-4 p.m. Sunday, Family Day the center, at 322 Academy St. NE in Gainesville, will When: 1-4 p.m. Sunday host a special Family Day focused on the Cherokee of Where: Northeast Georgia History Northeast Georgia. Center, 322 Academy “Through exhibits and St. NE, Gainesville activities, we will provide How much: Free an interpretation of the More information: 770Cherokee culture prior to 297-5900 or www. the Trail of Tears,” said negahc.org Julie Carson, history center education and volunteer coordinator. In addition to Cherokee artifacts and literature, there will be a number of activities including a scavenger hunt at 2 that afternoon and sampling of food prepared from authentic Cherokee recipes. The family-friendly event will also include the opportunity for attendees to create their own replica of a blow dart, Carson says. As always, there’s no admission fee for the monthly Family Day event.

Events focus on traditions BY BRANDEE A. THOMAS

bthomas@gainesvilletimes.com In a world overflowing with gidgets and gadgets, sometimes it’s nice to get back to the basics. It is precisely that line of thinking that inspired the Northeast Georgia History Center to launch the Forgotten Past: Keeping Traditions Alive educational program. “On Saturday morning, we have the first of a series of five classes intended to teach our audience the old ways of the traditional methods and techniques our ancestors used as a matter of course in their lives,” said Julie Carson, center education and volunteer coordinator. The first class, “Fire as a Tool” will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at the center, 322 Academy St.

NE in Gainesville. The cost for each session varies depending on materials needed, but the fee for this month’s class is $40 for members and $45 for nonmembers. Advance registration is encouraged, but walk-ins will be accepted as long as space allows. For this week’s class, participants will learn different ways to start a fire, without the help of matches. “This topic was part of our summer camp, ‘Our Appalachian Heritage,’” Carson said. “Campers learned how to start a fire using tinder, flint and steel. Then they lit a campfire. “Some of the volunteers said, ‘The kids have all the fun. When are the adults going to have a chance to learn?’ So we decided to create a class for the

BY BRANDEE A. THOMAS

Glory, Hope & Life has found a way to give the best of both worlds to the folks who love fall sports and those who love helping others. From 5 to 8 p.m. Aug. 23, the group will host their Tailgate Party at the Nickel Back Building at 116 Bradford St. in downtown Gainesville. Tickets for the drop-in event are $35 per person, with $25 of that being tax deductible.

Glory, Hope & Life Tailgate Party When: 5-8 p.m. Aug. 23 Where: Nickel Back Building, 116 Bradford St., downtown Gainesville How much: $35 More info: 770533-4705, www. gloryhopelife.org

Among other things, there will be heavy hors

d’oeuvres, a silent auction, door prizes and a cash bar. The tailgate is Glory, Hope & Life’s largest fundraiser of the year. The nonprofit provides “opportunities and support for cancer patients, families and caregivers.” The group supports programs like For Her Glory, which provides wigs for cancer patients who can’t afford them, and Harvest of Hope — an annual event that strives to improve the awareness of cancer prevention,

detection and treatment. Proceeds from the fundraiser will go towards providing resources,



Forgotten Past: Keeping Traditions Alive

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Fire as a Tool

When: 10 a.m. Saturday How much: $40 for members or $45 for nonmembers Where: Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville More info: 770-297-5900 or www.negahc.org

adults.” Although the series is intended for grown-ups, children ages 11 and older will also be allowed to attend. In addition to learning how to start a fire the old-fashioned way, participants will also make a bowl from tulip wood under the guidance of Dean Smith, folk naturalist. The Forgotten Past classes will be held on the third Saturday of each month through the end of the year. The classes cover a range of skills, including teaching participants how to identify wild edibles, cook outdoors and create

Tailgate raises funds for cancer services bthomas@gainesvilletimes.com

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programs and services to individuals in the community who have been affected by cancer.

holiday crafts from items found in nature. Find a complete list of classes and dates online at www.negahc.org.


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movies

family

music

All Day Craft Drop In, Hall County. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 16. All ages of youth are invited to drop in any time to make a friendship bracelet at libraries in the Hall County Library System. Free and open to the public. 770-5323311 ext. 129, www. hallcountylibrary.org.

The Donna Hopkins Band, Dahlonega. 8 p.m. Aug. 17. $14/$17. The Crimson Moon Cafe, 24 N Park St., Dahlonega. 706-8643982, www. the crimson moon.com. For Get Out

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Universal Pictures and producer Frank Marshall have prolonged the life of the Bourne franchise, and even though none of the primary characters, star players, or directors that built the trilogy return, everything in “The Bourne Legacy” seems familiar. Too familiar, in fact. This story takes place in the same universe as the previous Bourne films, but it has little to do with the saga of Jason Bourne. As the movie poster tells us, there was never just one operative in the secret, experimental government programs that turned regular soldiers

‘The Bourne Legacy’

From 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, the Northeast Georgia History Center at 322 Academy St. NE in Gainesville will host a special Family Day focused on The Cherokee of Northeast Georgia.

Family Day.

Kenney – Blackmon Band, Dahlonega. 8 p.m. Aug. 18. $12/$15. The Crimson Moon Cafe, 24 N Park St., Dahlonega. 706-864-3982, www. thecrimsonmoon.com.

THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

weekeND plANNeR

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The event marks its 19th year with nearly 100 galleries and dealers taking part. Pieces for sale can range from $5 to a $50,000 museum masterpiece. The show begins Friday night with a meet and greet with the artists, including some of the biggest names in folk art. Folk Fest is organized by Steve and Amy Slotin, owners of Slotin Folk Art, based in Gainesville.

Folk Fest.

Columbia Pictures

programs that turned regular soldiers like Bourne into world class spies and assassins. Aaron Cross (Jeremy Renner) is the new assassin running for his life.

SepT. 22:

Fourth annual GarlicFest, Cleveland. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 25. LoganBerry Heritage Farm, 2660 Adair Mill Road, Cleveland. 706-348-6068, loganberry heritagefarm@gmail.com.

AUG. 23: AUG. 25:

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14th annual Taste of Gainesville. 6-9 p.m. Sept. 22. Enjoy the specialties of many local restaurants and caterers. Music from the Chattahoochee Cannibals. Proceeds from event going toward keeping the ‘96 Olympic legacy alive. Tickets are $25 in advance with children 10 and younger free. Olympic Plaza at Clark’s Bridge Park, 3105 Clark’s Bridge Road, Gainesville. 770-287-0077, www.lakelanierrowing.org.

Learn to Row Class, Gainesville. 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8-10 a.m. Saturdays. Sept. 15-29. Ages 14 and older, no special skills required. $100 for class and Lake Lanier Rowing Club membership. The last Saturday session of the class is a combined row with club members plus a graduation celebration. Olympic Rowing Venue at 3105 Clarks Bridge Road, Gainesville. 770-287-0077, www.lakelanierrowing.org.

Singing auditions for the musical “Narnia,” Flowery Branch. 7-9 p.m. Sept. 10 Ages 6-86 needed. Bring CD, mp3, iPod or sheet music. Mostly teens and adults needed for this show, with few children. Fifth Row Center’s studio, 5509 Main St., Flowery Branch. fifthrowcenter.com, info@fifthrowcenter.com.

SepT. 10: SepT. 15-29:

From 5 to 8 p.m. Aug. 23, Glory, Hope & Life will host a Tailgate Party at the Nickel Back Building at 116 Bradford St. in downtown Gainesville. The nonprofit provides “opportunities and support for cancer patients, families and caregivers.”

Tailgate Party.

lOOkING AHeAD

“Smoke on the Mountain,” Gainesville. 7:30 p.m. Aug. 16-17, 23-24 and 2:30 p.m. Aug. 18-19, 25-26. Georgia Mountains Center Theater, 301 Main St. SW, Gainesville. Presented by the Georgia Mountain Players. $17 for adults, $13 for seniors older than 59, students and children. Tickets available at the box office, online or by calling 770-534-8420. Additional fees apply when ordering by phone or online

Auditions for “The Foreigner,” Flowery Branch. 7-9 p.m. Aug. 16. One teen boy and six adult men and women needed. Cold readings from the script. Fifth Row Center, 5509 Main St., Flowery Branch. fifthrowcenter. com, info@fifthrowcenter.com.

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TULA exhibit, Gainesville. Reception 5:30-7 p.m. Aug. 16. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. 770-536-2575, www.quinlanartscenter.org.

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Thursday, August 16, 2012 | gainesvilletimes.com/getout

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‘Legacy’ a Bourne-again rehash JEFF MARKER jmarker@gsc.edu

Film Review Goodbye, Jason Bourne. Hello, Aaron Cross. Universal Pictures and producer Frank Marshall have prolonged the life of the Bourne franchise, and even though none of the primary characters, star players, or directors that built the trilogy return, everything in “The Bourne Legacy” seems familiar. Too familiar, in fact. As the movie poster tells us, there was never just one operative in the secret, experimental government programs, engineered by Dr. Albert Hirsch (Albert Finney), that turned regular soldiers like Bourne into world class spies and assassins. Hirsch’s programs require extreme behavioral conditioning and a regiment of mind- and body-altering drugs. When a YouTube video (yes, that’s right) threatens to expose the program to the public, retired Air Force Col. and current intelligence agent Eric Byer (Edward Norton) decides the program must be shut down and all the operatives killed. Cross (Jeremy Renner) is one of those operatives. While he is on a training exercise in the Arctic wilds, a drone attacks his location, and he knows instantly he is now a target of his former superiors. He also badly needs the drugs the program has forced him to take, for various reasons. So he tracks down Dr. Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz), who administered regular checkups and refills to the operatives, and with whom Aaron shares a connection.

‘The Bourne Legacy’

Universal Pictures

Rachel Weisz as Dr. Marta Shearing, right, and Jeremy Renner as Aaron Cross in a scene from “The Bourne Legacy.”

Once Aaron finds Marta, they are forced to go on the run together, eluding government operatives while they travel to the Philippines and beyond in search of the medication Aaron needs. Universal Pictures pulls a baitand-switch with the marketing for “The Bourne Legacy.” We know Renner replaces Matt Damon as the lead, but otherwise the posters and trailers make it seem like many of the supporting players return: Joan Allen, Albert Finney, David Strathairn and Scott Glenn. But actually none of those actors is given more than a few minutes of screen time, and in some cases, that screen time comes in the form of shots recycled from “The Bourne Supremacy” or “The Bourne Ultimatum.”

Do not expect the characters whom those actors play to factor into this movie in any meaningful way. This story takes place in the same universe as the previous Bourne films, but it has little to do with the saga of Jason Bourne. Most of the behind-the-camera talent is gone, too. Doug Liman produced and directed “The Bourne Identity” and is the reason the Bourne franchise exists at all. Paul Greengrass directed the last two films. Neither Liman nor Greengrass was involved in “Legacy.” The only consistency between the Bourne trilogy and “Legacy” is Tony Gilroy, who scripted all three Bourne films. He writes and directs “Legacy.” To be fair, though, Gilroy has directed two outstanding thrillers (“Michael Clayton” and “Duplicity”) and is

perhaps the ideal substitute for Greengrass. Yet the entire movie feels like a substitute for the Bourne movie we really wanted. It follows the formula to the letter: identity crisis, love on the run, government spooks hunting down the hero, rooftop chase, motorcycle chase, exotic locations, etc. That “Legacy” works at all is a testament to the lead actors. Renner is a powerful screen presence with an innate working class persona. Weisz is the rare actress who is believable as a scientist, yet she is just as comfortable once the story puts Aaron and Marta into action sequences. Norton does a fine job of creating a villainous heavy, too, even though the movie never

Starring: Jeremy Renner, Edward Norton, Rachel Weisz, Joan Allen, Oscar Isaac Rated: PG-13, for violence and action sequences Runtime: 2 hours, 15 minutes Bottom line: Average rehash of the Bourne formula

pits his character mano-a-mano against Cross. Gilroy does a respectable job of extending the franchise, but the movie offers nothing we haven’t already seen in the Bourne trilogy. And it does not pack the emotional punch, the thrilling action sequences, or the dramatic crescendo of its predecessors. “Bourne Legacy” hits all of the same notes of the original but does nothing to escape its status as second-rate. Jeff Marker teaches film and literature at Gainesville State College. His reviews appear weekly in Get Out and on gainesvilletimes.com/getout.


goo movies Showtimes

Bargain shows denoted by parenthesis ( ).

Hollywood Stadium Cinemas 770-539-9200 120 Green Hill Circle, Gainesville

The Bourne Legacy (PG-13) Thu. 4:00-5:007:00-8:00-9:30 Fri.-Sun. 1:00-2:00-4:005:00-7:00-8:00-9:30 The Campaign (R) Thu. 4:15-5:00-6:15-7:008:30-10:00 Fri.-Sun. 1:00-2:00-3:00-4:155:00-6:15-7:00-8:30-10:00 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) Thu. 4:15-5:008:00-9:00 Fri.-Sun. 2:00-5:30-9:00 Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG) Thu. 5:157:30-9:45 Fri.-Sun. 1:30-4:15-7:15-9:30 The Expendables 2 (R) Fri.-Sun. 1:45-4:157:00-10:00 Hope Springs (PG-13) Thu. 5:30-7:45-10:00 Fri.-Sun. 1:15-4:00-7:00-9:30 Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) Thu. 5:15-7:309:45 Fri.-Sun. 1:45-4:30-6:45-9:15 The Intouchables (R) Fri.-Sun. 1:45-4:157:15-9:45 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG) Thu. 4:007:15-9:45 Fri.-Sun. 1:30-4:30-7:15-9:45 ParaNorman (PG) Fri.-Sun. 1:00-5:30-10:00 ParaNorman 3D (PG) Fri.-Sun. 3:15-7:45 RiffTrax Live: Manos: The Hands of Fate (Not Rated) Thu. 8:00 Sparkle (PG-13) Fri.-Sun. 1:15-4:00-7:00-9:45 Step Up Revolution (PG-13) Thu. 4:30-7:009:30 Fri.-Sun. 1:45-4:30 Ted (R) Thu. 4:30-7:15-9:45 Fri.-Sun. 7:159:45 Total Recall (PG-13) Thu. 4:00-5:00-7:008:00-9:45 Fri.-Sun. 1:00-4:00-7:15-9:45 The Watch (R) Thu. 4:30

Regal Mall of Georgia Stadium 20 678-482-5858

3333 Buford Drive, Suite 3000, Buford

The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13) Thu. 1:307:30 Fri.-Sun. 4:10-9:40 The Amazing Spider-Man 3D (PG-13) Thu. 4:30-10:35 The Awakening (R) Fri.-Sun. 1:10-4:40-7:209:55 The Bourne Legacy (PG-13) Thu. 12:201:00-2:00-3:15-4:10-5:00-6:10-7:207:50-9:05-10:15-10:45-12:05 Fri.-Sat. 12:05-12:50-1:40-3:05-4:00-4:50-6:05-7:107:45-9:05-10:05-10:40-12:05 Sun. 12:0512:50-1:40-3:05-4:00-4:50-6:05-7:10-7:459:05-10:05-10:40 Brave (PG) Thu. 2:30-7:30 Fri.-Sun. 12:052:30-7:30 Brave 3D (PG) Thu. 12:00-5:00-10:00 The Campaign (R) Thu. 12:45-1:15-2:50-3:204:55-5:25-7:10-7:40-9:15-9:45 Fri.-Sat. 12:10-1:10-2:20-3:20-4:35-5:35-7:05-7:559:15-10:10-11:30 Sun. 12:10-1:10-2:20-

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gainesvilletimes.com/getout | Thursday, August 16, 2012

New ‘Bourne’ lands at No. 1 with $38.1 million debut LOS ANGELES — “The Bourne Legacy” has unleashed a new box-office hero. The film, with Jeremy Renner taking over from Matt Damon in the reborn franchise, opened as the No. 1 weekend draw with $38.1 million. The top 20 movies Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by Hollywood.com are: 1. “The Bourne Legacy,” Universal, $38,142,825, $38,142,825, one week. 2. “The Campaign,” Warner Bros., $26,588,460, $26,588,216, one week. 3. “The Dark Knight Rises,” Warner Bros., $18,979,397, $389,588,216, four weeks. 4. “Hope Springs,” Sony, $14,650,121, $19,103,178, one week. 5. “Total Recall,” Sony, $8,013,040, $44,101,432, two weeks. 6. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days,” Fox, $8,002,133, $30,356,174, two weeks. 7. “Ice Age: Continental Drift,” Fox, $6,380,929, 3,$143,694,981, five weeks. 8. “Ted,” Universal, $3,223,675, $209,848,585, seven weeks. 9. “Step Up: Revolution,” Lionsgate, 3:20-4:35-5:35-7:05-7:55-9:15-10:10 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) Thu.-Sun. 12:00-3:25-7:15-10:40 The Dark Knight Rises: The IMAX Experience (PG-13) Thu.-Sun. 12:20-3:40-7:00-10:20 Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG) Thu. 1:153:30-5:45-8:05-10:25 Fri.-Sun. 12:50-3:105:30-7:50-10:10 The Expendables 2 (R) Thu. 12:01 Fri.-Sat. 12:30-1:40-2:55-4:10-5:20-6:40-7:45-9:1010:10-11:40 Sun. 12:30-1:40-2:55-4:105:20-6:40-7:45-9:10-10:10 Hope Springs (PG-13) Thu. 12:15-12:502:35-3:10-4:55-5:30-7:15-7:45-9:35-10:05 Fri.-Sat. 12:35-1:45-2:55-4:15-5:15-6:457:40-9:20-10:00-11:45 Sun. 12:35-1:452:55-4:15-5:15-6:45-7:40-9:20-10:00 Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) Thu. 3:05-7:35 Fri.-Sun. 1:30-7:25 Ice Age: Continental Drift 3D (PG) Thu. 12:455:20-9:50 Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted (PG) Thu. 12:30-2:45-5:10 Fri.-Sun. 12:25-2:45-5:05 Nitro Circus: The Movie 3D (PG-13) Thu. 12:302:40-4:50-7:00-9:10 Fri.-Sat. 7:30-9:4512:01 Sun. 7:30-9:45 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG) Thu.-Sun. 12:45-3:10-5:35-8:00-10:25 ParaNorman (PG) Thu. 12:01 Fri.-Sat. 2:307:00-11:30 Sun. 2:30-7:00 ParaNorman 3D (PG) Thu. 12:10 Fri.-Sun.

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Hope Springs (PG-13) Thu.-Sun. (12:45-3:25) 6:30-9:10 Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) Thu.-Sun. (12:00-2:30-5:00) 7:30 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG) Thu.-Sun. (12:00-2:40-5:20) 8:00 ParaNorman (PG) Fri.-Sun. (12:10) ParaNorman 3D (PG) Fri.-Sun. (2:45-5:20) 7:55 Total Recall (PG-13) Thu.-Sun. (1:00-4:00) 7:00-10:00 The Watch (R) Thu. (12:00-2:35-5:10) 7:4510:20 Fri.-Sun. 7:30-10:05

go o movies

$2,941,818, $30,256,580, three weeks. 10. “The Watch,” Fox, $2,221,451, $31,396,079, three weeks. 11. “The Amazing Spider Man,” Sony, $2,121,235, $255,464,677, six weeks. 12. “Brave,” Disney, $1,802,665, $227,245,531, eight weeks. 13. “Nitro Circus: The Movie,” Arc Entertainment, $1,183,701, $2,166,159, one week. 14. “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” Fox Searchlight, $722,883, $7,160,156, seven weeks. 15. “Moonrise Kingdom,” Focus Features, $614,394, $42,074,792, 12 weeks. 16. “Men in Black 3,” Sony, $508,001, $177,549,434, 12 weeks. 17. “Ruby Sparks,” Fox Searchlight, $443,102, $1,240,600, three weeks. 18. “Magic Mike,” Warner Bros., $422,331, $112,238,949, seven weeks. 19. “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted,” Paramount, $421,435, $211,686,199, 10 weeks. 20. “To Rome with Love,” Sony Pictures Classics, $418,752, $15,089,051, eight weeks. Associated Press

12:15-4:45-9:15 Sparkle (PG-13) Fri.-Sun. 12:00-1:20-2:404:15-5:20-7:00-8:00-9:45-10:40 Step Up Revolution (PG-13) Thu. 12:40-5:3010:10 Fri.-Sun. 5:00-10:00 Step Up Revolution 3D (PG-13) Thu. 3:05-7:50 Ted (R) Thu. 12:25-2:55-5:20-7:55-10:25 Total Recall (PG-13) Thu. 12:05-1:40-2:454:20-5:25-7:05-7:25-8:05-9:45-10:05-10:45 Fri.-Sun. 1:00-4:30-7:35-10:20 The Watch (R) Thu. 1:05-3:25-5:45-8:1010:30

Movies 400 678-513-4400

415 Atlanta Road, Cumming

The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13) Thu.-Sun. (12:00-3:15) 6:40-9:55 The Bourne Legacy (PG-13) Thu.-Sun. (12:153:30) 6:45-10:05 Brave (PG) Thu.-Sun. (12:05-2:30-4:55) The Campaign (R) Thu.-Sun. (12:30-2:555:20) 7:45-10:10 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) Thu. (1:001:45-4:45-5:25) 7:30-8:30-9:30 Fri.-Sun. (1:45-5:25) 9:30 Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG) Thu.-Sun. (12:00-2:35-5:10) 7:45 The Expendables 2 (R) Thu. 12:01 Fri.-Sun. (1:00-3:45) 7:25-10:10

Habersham Hills Cinemas 6 706-776-7469 Ga. 365 at Cody Road, Mount Airy

The Bourne Legacy (PG-13) Thu. 12:3012:50-3:55-4:20-7:00-8:00 Fri. 4:45-7:55 Sat.-Sun. 1:05-4:15-7:25 The Campaign (R) Thu. 1:20-3:30-5:35-7:40 Fri. 4:00-6:35-8:40 Sat.-Sun. 1:30-3:306:05-8:30 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) Fri. 3:15-6:30 Sat.-Sun. 2:45-6:30 Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG) Thu. 1:55-4:30-6:35 The Expendables 2 (R) Fri. 3:25-5:45-8:15 Sat.-Sun. 2:30-5:00-7:45 Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) Thu. 2:25-5:007:25 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG) Fri. 4:257:30 Sat.-Sun. 1:15-3:55-7:00 ParaNorman (PG) Fri. 5:00-7:15 Sat.-Sun. 1:55-4:30-7:20 Total Recall (PG-13) Thu. 12:30-3:00-6:058:35

Dawson 400 Stadium Cinemas 706-216-1622 189 North 400 Center Lane, Dawsonville

The Bourne Legacy (PG-13) Thu. 4:00-7:009:00 Fri.-Sun. 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:25 The Campaign (R) Thu. 4:15-6:50-9:55 Fri.Sun. 1:00-3:05-5:10-7:25-9:30 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) Thu. 4:30-8:00 Fri.-Sun. 1:00-4:30-8:00 Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG) Thu. 4:40-7:10-9:15 Fri.-Sun. 1:45-4:40-7:309:50 The Expendables 2 (R) Fri.-Sun. 1:25-4:257:15-9:45 Hope Springs (PG-13) Thu. 4:50-7:10-9:30 Fri.-Sun. 1:30-4:50-7:20-9:40 Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) Thu. 4:30-6:509:05 Fri.-Sun. 12:45-3:00-5:15-7:20 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG) Thu. 4:307:05-9:35 Fri.-Sun. 1:15-4:30-7:15-9:45 ParaNorman (PG) Fri.-Sun. 12:45-5:15-9:55 ParaNorman 3D (PG) Fri.-Sun. 3:00-7:30 Sparkle (PG-13) Fri.-Sun. 1:35-4:15-7:159:40 Ted (R) Thu. 4:55-7:10-9:30 Total Recall (PG-13) Thu. 4:05-6:50-9:30 Fri.-Sun. 9:35 The Watch (R) Thu. 5:00-7:20-9:40


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Thursday, August 16, 2012 | gainesvilletimes.com/getout

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NOW SHOWING Movie reviews from Associated Press and McClatchy Newspapers. Stars out of four.

openING ‘The Odd Life of Timothy Green

HH (PG for mild thematic elements and brief language.) Novelist and filmmaker Peter Hedges, author of “What’s Eating Gilbert Grape” strains to Disney-ize the family dysfunction territory he explored so well in those works with this nauseatingly sweet fantasy. Adapting a short story by Ahmet Zappa (son of Frank), writer-director Hedges tries for oldfashioned wholesomeness only to flounder amid a well-intended but sappy tale of a childless couple mystically granted a test run at parenthood. Hedges assembled an impressive cast, led by Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton as parents to a mystery boy (CJ Adams) that comes into their lives, and the actors buy into the story’s conceits wholeheartedly. The characters are simplistic and artificial, though, behaving in ways that often are insultingly naive and sometimes just plain stupid. A movie’s in trouble when the characters are just as unbelievable as the premise. It’s a very pretty movie to look at, awash in postcard images of rural America and lush colors that turn from verdant to autumnal as the story unfolds. Beneath the pretty pictures is a silly, shallow stab at Capracorn, the sort of magical story of simple, genuine people mastered by Frank Capra with such films as “Meet John Doe” and “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Sadly, the movie’s is all corn, no Capra.

Focus Features

The character Norman, voiced by Kodi Smit-McPhee, is seen in the 3D stop-motion film, “ParaNorman.”

‘ParaNorman’

HH (PG for scary action

and images, thematic elements, some rude humor and language.) So much drawing for such an unworthy script. The labor necessary to create a movie like this is colossal, so it’s tempting to applaud it politely, simply because of the admirable work. No one wants to tell 60 puppet makers that their months of toil were ill spent. But the frequently wondrous and whimsical visuals far surpass the disappointingly slipshod story of an 11-year-old boy named Norman (voiced by Kodi SmitMcPhee) who can see and speak to the dead. “ParaNorman” is from the creators of 2009’s “Coraline,” and bears much of the same fantasy-horror spirit. It also has some of the comic elements of the British studio Aardman Animations (“Wallace and Gromit”); “ParaNorman” is directed by Sam Fell (who co-directed Aardman’s “Flushed Away”) and Chris Butler, who also wrote it. Norman’s uncle (John Goodman) bequeaths to him the duty of pacifying a witch that has haunted their town of Blithe Hollow for 300 years. After failing in the ritual, Norman and an improvised gang (Tucker Albrizzi, Casey Affleck, Anna Kendrick, Alex Borstein) flee from

a septet of zombies. The running around town takes up much of the film, robbing “ParaNorman” of pace and setting it on a tiresome and frantic trajectory before enough character development has taken place. Blessed with otherworldly animation, it can’t escape the demons of story.

continuING ‘The Bourne Legacy’ ■ Review, 10

‘The Campaign’

HHH(R for language, partial nudity, sexual content.) Will Ferrell and Zach Galifianakis have come together to take a shot at politics. Ferrell plays ineffective North Carolina Congressman Cam Brady, who appears headed toward another unopposed term until Marty Huggins (Galifianakis) throws his knitted sweater into the ring. The two actors certainly believe in freedom of speech. Ferrell typically resorts to a barrage of profanity when there’s no good joke. In one scene, Brady attends a service with snake handlers to prove he’s a religious man. When the visit goes wrong, Ferrell fires off a barrage of curse words. There’s no punchline. That approach is funny one or two times,

Disney

Cameron “CJ” Adams, right, and Jennifer Garner are seen in a scene from “The Odd Life Of Timothy Green.” but repeatedly going back to it just shows comedy laziness. There are some uncomfortable moments when Huggins’ children admit transgressions that might come out during the campaign. It’s a cheap laugh to have children talk in such an adult way, and it proves this is anything but high-brow humor. The film’s two biggest laughs come from pure slapstick. In one scene Brady attempts to attack Huggins but ends up punching a baby and the dog from “The Artist.” This is the area where Ferrell seems the most comfortable.

The appearance of Wolf Blitzer, Pierce Morgan, Chris Matthews and Joe Scarborough give “The Campaign” a dose of reality that is a comedy contrast to the absurdity of the rest of the film. Dylan McDermott also delivers some solid laughs as a ninja-like campaign manager. It’s a 180degree change from what he normally does and proves funny. Galifianakis delivers a warm and funny performance. But Ferrell gives a watered-down version of the George W. Bush impersonation he’s done for years.


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goo movies ‘Hope Springs’

HHH (PG-13 for mature

thematic content involving sexuality.) It will make you want to go home and have sex with your spouse afterward. Or at least share a longer hug or a more passionate kiss. You don’t have to be married for 31 years like the stuck-in-arut couple Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones play to feel inspired by the film’s message about the importance of keeping your relationship alive. Despite television ads that look alternately wacky and mawkish and suggest pat, glossy superficiality, “Hope Springs” unearths some quiet and often uncomfortable truths. The film explores the complicated dynamics that develop over a longterm relationship with great honesty and little judgment. What looks like a standard rom-com turns into something akin to a contemporary Ingmar Bergman film. The performances from Streep and Jones go a long way toward elevating the rather straightforward direction from David Frankel, which includes some painfully literal musical selections and a few hokey comic situations. Their characters, Kay and Arnold, live a sexless life in a comfortable suburb of Omaha, Neb. When Kay finally decides she’s sick of their complacent routine, she insists Arnold join her for a week of intensive couples therapy with a renowned psychologist (Steve Carell).

‘The Dark Knight Rises’

HHHH (PG-13, vulgar language, violence, sexual situations, adult themes.) With “The Dark Knight Rises,” Christopher Nolan swings for the moon. He gives you something even grander and more fantastic than you expected. Opening eight years after the events of

“The Dark Knight,” Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) has become a recluse, his body battered and creaky, his alter-ego of Batman no longer needed in Gotham City, where Commissioner Jim Gordon (Gary Oldman) has exploited a lie to wage a successful war on organized crime. Then Bane (Tom Hardy), a terrorist thug with the build of a wrestler and a life-sustaining mask clamped to his face, emerges from the city’s sewers with an army of followers and a sinister intent. Bane is a warrior for the disenfranchised, the forgotten and the ignored. His methods are brutal and murderous, and his solution to social and economic disparity is of the scorchedearth variety. Wayne is a billionaire, which makes him a target for Selina Kyle (Anne Hathaway), a seductive cat burglar whose proclivity for crime is fueled by a sense of entitlement. Except the hero’s finances are waning: Even he is not immune from an economic downturn. But when Bane starts wreaking havoc in Gotham, Batman must rise to the challenge. For all its pomp and grandeur, though, “The Dark Knight Rises” is practically stolen outright by Joseph GordonLevitt as John Blake, a conscientious police officer who, like Wayne, grew up an orphan. The actor is in many ways the audience surrogate into this strange, complicated story: He’s not a hero, he’s not yet corrupted or world-weary, and he still believes, perhaps naively, in the infallibility of good.

‘Ice Age: Continental Drift’

HH½ (PG for mild rude humor and action/peril.) There’s considerably less drift in “Ice Age: Continental Drift,” the latest in a long

gainesvilletimes.com/getout | Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Columbia Pictures—Sony

Tommy Lee Jones as Arnold Soames, left, Meryl Streep as Kay Soames and Steve Carell as Dr. Bernard Feld, right, sit in a scene from “Hope Springs.”

line of lucrative cartoons from Blue Sky Studios and their friends at Fox. It’s all sight gags and action beats. And at a brisk 94 minutes, it’s less reliant on charmstarved chatter among its increasingly over-stuffed voice cast. Yes, there are even MORE big names doing the talking for the various Ice Age critters — pop stars Nicki Minaj and Jennifer Lopez join up, with Peter Dinklage, Wanda Sykes, Joy Behar, Nick Frost and Simon Pegg. The “Ice Age” movies are known for their sloppy science, and this one has the growing extended family of mammoths (Ray Romano, Queen Latifah and now “daughter” Keke Palmer) split up by the splitting of continents. Yeah, Scrat, that nut-obsessed saber-toothed squirrel, had something

to do with it. Manny the mammoth (Romano), Diego the saber-toothed tiger (Denis Leary), Sid, the innocent but accident-prone

sloth (John Leguizamo) and Sid’s Granny (Sykes) are adrift on an iceberg, wondering how to get back to the others. That’s

when they meet the pirates. Captain Gutt and his scurvy crew of rabbits, sea lions and blood-thirsty gulls has designs on Manny & Co.


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Thursday, August 16, 2012 | gainesvilletimes.com/getout

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Be environmentally smart Workshops teach wetland protection BY BRANDEE A. THOMAS

bthomas@gainesvilletimes.com Captain Planet may have been a cartoon character, but this weekend, Smithgall Woods State Park visitors will have the opportunity to walk in his environmental protection footsteps. From 7:30 to 10 p.m. Friday, the park will host an Amphibian Monitoring Workshop. Admission is $5 per person, plus a $5 parking fee. Preregistration is required. The workshop will be lead by Georgia Adopt-a-Stream staff. The group will review the natural history of amphibians, the reasons why they’re important and which species can be found in Georgia. They will also lead a amphibianfinding hike where participants will

learn various frog calls. The goal of the workshop is to develop “citizen scientists” to help monitor local frog and salamander species. On Saturday, Smithgall will host a Freshwater Wetland Workshop from 9 a.m. to noon. Admission for this class is also $5 per person plus a $5 parking fee. Adopt-a-Wetland will be on hand to teach participants about the importance of, and threats to, freshwater wetland systems. They will also teach how to identify hydric soils and plants. The goal of this particular workshop is to teach participants how to help collect data to promote the conservation and protection of freshwater wetlands.

Amphibian Monitoring Workshop When: 7:30 to 10 p.m. Friday Where: Smithgall Woods State Park, 61 Tsalaki Trail, Helen How much: $5 fee and $5 for parking Must preregister: 706-878-3087

Freshwater Wetland Workshop When: 9 a.m. to noon Saturday Where: Smithgall Woods State Park, 61 Tsalaki Trail, Helen How much: $5 fee and $5 for parking Contact: 706-8783087

Farm offers look at classic herb garden From staff reports Herbs, those mystical, magical, wild, exotic plants from around the world have been the currency of kings, the pharmacy of healers and the delight of cooks from the dawn of time. The Gwinnett Environmental & Heritage Center is introducing the More Herbs, Less Salt program at McDaniel Farm on Aug. 18 and Aug. 25 to learn more about these valuable plants. “Late summer is a great time to focus on garden herbs as they are at their peak for harvest,” said Catherine Long, history and culture program manager for the GEHC. “If you have not had a chance to visit the heritage herb garden at McDaniel Farm, the More Herbs, Less Salt program

will allow you to explore this local treasure.” Planted in the traditional style of yesterday’s herb gardens, the heritage herb garden showcases herbs from the medicinal, fragrant, decorative, and culinary categories. Grown from heritage seeds with no artificial fertilizers, the garden flourishes from early spring into late fall with favorites like soapwort, dill, comfrey, lavender, wooly thyme and basil. The More Herbs, Less Salt program will provide tours of the heritage herb garden and instruct guests on how to recognize common herbs and understand their many uses. The program will also showcase how consumers can identify and avoid salt in restaurant and pre-

packaged foods. “This is a great opportunity for guests and families to explore healthy seasoning options that are provided by nature and to learn a little about how our forefathers used herbs to resolve some basic needs,” said Long. Register for the class at www.gwinnettEHC.org or by phone at 770-814-4920.

More Herbs, Less Salt When: 10 am to noon Aug. 18 and 25. Where: McDaniel Farm, 3251 McDaniel Road, Duluth Cost: $5 per person. More info: www. gwinnettEHC.org.

outdoors events This week

Bike ride, Pendergrass. 9 a.m. Aug. 18. 50-plus mile ride from Pendergrass City Park on Church Street. Lunch at Salvador’s Italian Grill, on route, Old Jefferson Road. No ride in precipitation, or if high predicted to be above 92 degrees. Chicken City Cyclists 770-5347075, or unnoldl@charter.net.

Upcoming

Gold Fever, Helen. 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 25. Hear the history of local gold mining and geology. The morning begins with a presentation depicting cultural influences that lead up to the 1828 Georgia “gold rush.” A hike on the Martin Mine trail provides an opportunity to interpret the scars that gold mining efforts left on the landscape. $5 plus $5 parking. Smithgall Woods State Park. 706878-3087. Bike Ride, Gainesville. 9 a.m. Aug. 25. Hilly 40-plus mile North Hall ride leaves from Corinth Baptist Church side parking lot, Ga. 283 Mount Vernon Road, and Ga. 60, Thompson Bridge Road. No ride in precipitation, or if high predicted to be above 92 degrees. Chicken City Cyclists 770-534-7075, or unnoldl@charter.net. Holiday Gorge Floor Hike, Tallulah Falls. 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Aug. 31. This is a strenuous trek; include hiking down 531 stairs, a river crossing jumping from rock to rock, and climbing boulders along the side of the river to Bridal Veil Falls where you can swim. Total miles are 3.5. No pets; wear appropriate footwear; children must be 10 or older; bring food and water. $5 plus $5 parking. Tallulah Gorge State Park. 706-754-7981.


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goo music concert calendar This week

Audition Open Mic Night, Dahlonega. 7 p.m. Aug. 16. Free. The Crimson Moon Cafe, 24 N Park St., Dahlonega. 706-864-3982, www. thecrimsonmoon.com. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy. 8 p.m. Aug. 17. Delta Classic Chastain Park Amphitheater. www. deltaclassicchastain. com. The Donna Hopkins Band, Dahlonega. 8 p.m. Aug. 17. $14/$17. The Crimson Moon Cafe, 24 N Park St., Dahlonega. 706-864-3982, www. thecrimsonmoon.com. Summer concert featuring The K-Macks, Clarkesville. 7-9 p.m. Aug. 18. Pitts Park. Free. Kenney – Blackmon Band, Dahlonega. 8 p.m. Aug. 18. $12/$15. The Crimson Moon Cafe, 24 N Park St., Dahlonega. 706-864-3982, www. thecrimsonmoon.com. Sunset Jazz: Will Downing, Lalah Hathaway, David Sanborn, Brian Culbertson, Gerald Albright and Norman Brown. Aug. 18. www. deltaclassicchastain. com. S.E.B.A. Bluegrass Jam, Dahlonega. 2-5 p.m. Aug. 19. Free. The Crimson Moon Cafe, 24 N Park St., Dahlonega. 706-864-3982, www. sebabluegrass.org. Linkin Park and Incubus with MuteMath. 6:30 p.m. Aug. 19. Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre at Encore Park, 2200 Encore Parkway, Alpharetta. www.vzwamp.com Greybeard’s Acoustic Jam, Dahlonega. 7:30 p.m. Aug. 19. $5, free for jammers. The Crimson Moon Cafe, 24 N Park St., Dahlonega. 706-864-3982, www. thecrimsonmoon.com.

gainesvilletimes.com/getout | Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Does video kill the concert vibe? By Melissa Ruggieri The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

ATLANTA — Stacy Daxe entered Sting’s recent Atlanta concert as a fan and left irritated. Not at the singer/ bassist, who brought fans on a tight, two-hour romp through his historical career, but at the audience that ruined her experience. So aggravated was Daxe, of Smyrna, Ga., that she went home and quit Facebook. Why? “My enjoyment was marred by idiots filming the concert and posting links to their Facebook status,” Daxe said. “It was annoying, rude and quite ridiculous given the fact that the quality of those videos was so poor, even Batman wouldn’t have been able to see them.” It’s a common sight at concerts in the modern technology era. Smartphones, iPads, even a few antiquated cellphones are no longer merely an accessory to make a phone call or send a text. At concerts, they’re seemingly a necessity — a vessel to capture a few minutes of musical history for some or, for others, a reason to brag to friends on

social media, “Hey! Look where I am!” Some venues have always maintained policies that photo equipment with detachable lenses are prohibited. This season, they’ve added tablets to the list of forbidden items because of the high-quality video the devices are capable of taking and because their placemat-size screens are more than a bit obtrusive when positioned midair for optimal recording. In Atlanta, Aaron’s Amphitheatre at Lakewood — and about 30 other Live Nation amphitheaters nationwide — also have implemented a new outlet of customer service. Stickers on the backs of chairs provide a number for fans to text if someone around them is interfering with their concert experience. Still, what most concertgoers may not realize is that the twominute video they posted of Steven Tyler rocking “Dream On” might be breaking the law. The Copyright Act states that there is no statutory exemption for personal use in this context, so don’t assume that the law doesn’t apply to you. “In general, the person who owns the copyright in

the musical composition embodied in the video has the exclusive right to publicly perform it, reproduce it and distribute it,” said Margaret R. Marshall, shareholder and entertainment attorney at the Atlanta branch of Greenberg Traurig law firm. Different types of civil liabilities exist under the Copyright Act, including actual and statutory damages and attorneys’ fees. And, said Marshall, “Under the Copyright Act, it could be on a per

go o music

infringement basis.” Makes you think twice about all those Facebook posts, doesn’t it? But what about the artists? How do they feel when they look out from the stage and are greeted, not by people singing along to a hit song or interacting, but by the backs of thousands of smartphone camera lenses? “I find it very, very strange,” said Ed Robertson, lead singer of Barenaked Ladies. “I think people are far more engaged with

their gadgets than the place they’re in and the experience they could be having. I love the Foo Fighters and went to see them. Dave (Grohl) goes out on this long stage, and it’s just a sea of people holding up phones and cameras. Why don’t you make eye contact and not worry about tweeting about it? I hope the novelty of this connection and technology will wear out and people will realize that the authentic experience is so much more rewarding.”


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Get Out August 16 2012