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PASS ION ATE VOL 97 // ISSUE 11 NOVEMBER 6, 2018 temple-news.com @thetemplenews

NEWS, PAGE 7

The state passed legislation to make it easier for grandparents to become legal guardians of grandchildren.

OPINION, PAGE 10

A student argues that people should step away from modern technology and use typewriters.

FEATURES, PAGE 15

Tupac Shakur’s estate donated items to the Charles L. Blockson AfroAmerican Collection.

SPORTS, PAGE 23

The field hockey team tries to learn from its mistakes after its 2-16 season.


NEWS PAGE 2

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

THE TEMPLE NEWS A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. Gillian McGoldrick Editor in Chief Kelly Brennan Managing Editor Julie Christie Digital Managing Editor Evan Easterling Chief Copy Editor Greta Anderson News Editor Alyssa Biederman Deputy Campus Editor Will Bleier Deputy City Editor Jayna Schaffer Opinion Editor Laura Smythe Features Editor Zari Tarazona Deputy Features Editor Khanya Brann Deputy Features Editor Michael Zingrone Co-Sports Editor Sam Neumann Co-Sports Editor Claire Wolters Intersection Editor Shefa Ahsan Multimedia Editor Maria Ribeiro Director of Engagement Siani Colon Asst. Director of Engagement Hannah Burns Photography Editor Luke Smith Deputy Photography Editor Madison Seitchik Web Editor Ian Walker Visuals Editor Myra Mirza Visuals Specialist Claire Halloran Design Editor Jeremiah Reardon Designer Phuong Tran Advertising Manager Kelsey McGill Advertising Manager Daniel Magras Business Manager

Shooter rumor stems from isolated incident “Right now, he’s where he

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content represents the opinion of The Temple News. Adjacent commentary is reflective of their authors, not The Temple News. Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

ON THE COVER CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

CORRECTIONS Accuracy is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it as soon as possible. Anyone with inquiries about content in this newspaper can contact Editor in Chief Gillian McGoldrick at editor@temple-news.com or 215-204-6736.

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CRIME

A Thursday incident, involv- needs to be and he’s not going to be ing a suspended student, coming back here for a bit,” Leone was not a widespread threat. said. BY GRETA ANDERSON News Editor Temple University Police dispelled rumors Friday that an active assailant situation was occurring on Main Campus. Those false rumors stemmed from an incident in Annenberg Hall nearly 24 hours earlier that lasted less than three minutes, Charlie Leone, the executive director of Campus Safety Services, told The Temple News. At 3:20 p.m. on Thursday, a student who was suspended for “behavior that made people uncomfortable,” walked past Annenberg Hall security, showing his TUid on his phone, Leone said. TUPD was aware of the student’s behavior and told security not to let the student into the building, Leone said. The security officer at the desk recognized the student and called TUPD. The student exited the building and was apprehended. Because the student is currently engaged in ongoing student conduct proceedings, Leone could not identify the him nor explain the details of why others were concerned with his behavior. Leone said the CARE Team is involved with the student’s case. The CARE Team is a group of university representatives from organizations like TUPD, the Dean of Students and Tuttleman Counseling Services that conduct outreach for students of concern, but it is not for emergencies.

TUPD did not issue a TUalert about the incident on Thursday because those notifications are used to keep students safe when there is an ongoing threat to safety, Leone said. TUPD apprehended the student in less than three minutes. Leone added TUPD did not find a weapon on the student when they apprehended him. David Boardman, the dean of the Klein College of Media and Communication, sent an email to Klein students on Friday afternoon to dispel the active assailant rumor. “Unfortunately, these facts were twisted by some on social media, causing unnecessary concern today,” Boardman wrote. “Please rest assured that if you ever need to know about a potentially dangerous situation, Temple University will inform you immediately,” he added. The rumors began circulating around social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and GroupMe. “It becomes, to some people, the truth because now you have so many people putting it out there,” Leone said. “But it was never, never anything like that.” He said in its “after-action” meeting of the events, TUPD will look into how the Thursday incident transformed into rumors of an active assailant a day later. There will also be extra patrols near Annenberg Hall to “keep fear down and make sure campus is safe,” he added. greta.anderson@temple.edu @gretanderson

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NEWS PAGE 3

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

GREEK LIFE

Organizations work to combat sexual violence The free event, open to all students, health and relationships. Greek life chapters and campus will be held on Nov. 27 from 6-8 p.m. Patel added that she has correspondorganizations have the collective at The Reel in the Student Center. It is ed with Mat Greer, program coordinagoal to end sexual assault.

BY RAVEN BACOTE For The Temple News Temple University’s sorority chapters are taking a stand against sexual violence with educational and advocacy programs to bring together Greek life members and students. Maura Brody, a junior middle grades education major and the heritage chair for Temple’s chapter of Alpha Epsilon Phi, is one of several sorority members leading educational programs on consent, self-care, sexual assault prevention and healthy relationships. One of these events is a collaboration between Brody, It’s On Us TU, Hillel at Temple University and Temple Student Government to bring motivational speaker Scott Fried on campus later this month.

intended to educate students on sexual violence prevention, responsibility and consent. “I’m trying to get [Greek life] members involved, because they do have a strong influence on campus, men and women, because the cause is not exclusive to one group,” Brody said. “And really, trying to create a unified, safe place for students, definitely initiating more Greek unity, more campus unity as a whole, trying to make everything positive for everyone.” Fried is an award-winning speaker and HIV/AIDS educator. He has lectured millions of students for more than 25 years, traveling to countries like Israel, Holland and Honduras. Kajal Patel, the president of Temple’s chapter of Delta Kappa Delta, said her chapter hosted a workshop last year about how sexual assault affects mental

tor for fraternity and sorority life about a new student group committed to preventing sexual assault, and Greer has started to recruit members for a collective committee within Temple’s Greek life chapters. Patel said the group would also be a resource for survivors of sexual assault. Earlier this year, the Temple chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi’s former president Ari Goldstein was charged with two rounds of sexual assault-related charges. He will stand trial for the alleged incidents, with a trial for the first six charges beginning as early as 2019, his attorney Perry De Marco said. The fraternity has since been suspended from campus. The sexual violence prevention committee, comprised of interested fraternity and sorority members, will create programs, trainings and events to help educate the Temple community and is

in its initial stages, according to an email sent to Greek life members. Additionally, the Diamond Accreditation program, which scores Greek life chapters on various categories to maintain their affiliations with the university, requires leadership to sponsor or attend sessions on topics like sexual violence and bystander intervention. “Within that re-accreditation program, it has our students fill out different questions that help them to understand what a good and proper functioning fraternity or sorority should be accomplishing,” Greer said. Another upcoming event to educate about sexual violence is on Saturday. The Interfraternity Council will host a 5K walk with It’s On Us TU to have conversations about sexual violence and highlight ways to become involved as an active bystander, Greer said. Junior psychology and criminal justice major Shira Freiman, the president of It’s On Us TU, said she shares a common goal with Brody and other Greek life chapters to make Main Campus a more safe and comfortable environment for students. Freiman is partnering directly with Brody for Fried’s upcoming visit. Freiman became a member of Temple’s chapter of Alpha Xi Delta in Fall 2018, which allows her to more easily to connect with sororities to discuss preventative sexual violence education and supporting survivors. “I really hope that through this event, people will be able to see you can still go through all these horrible things, but you can still be successful and you can use,” Freiman said. “Your story, if you so choose to, to help empower and inspire other people.” raven.bacote@temple.edu

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Maura Brody, a junior middle grades education major and the heritage chair for Temple’s chapter of Alpha Epsilon Phi, organized an upcoming sexual violence education and advocacy event, featuring motivational speaker Scott Fried.

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NEWS PAGE 4

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

ANALYSIS

GOVERNOR’S RACE: HIGHER ED FACES CONFLICTS State schools are still recuperating from massive cuts. How do the two gubernatorial candidates plan to help students?

STATE AND STATE-RELATED SCHOOLS ACROSS PENNSYLVANIA

BY GILLIAN MCGOLDRICK Editor in Chief The past decade has been a tumultuous time for higher education in Pennsylvania. Still reeling from former Gov. Tom Corbett’s massive cuts and skyrocketing tuition costs, Pennsylvania was ranked the worst state for higher education in 2018 by U.S. News & World Report. The next governor will be chosen by voters on Tuesday. Whichever candidate wins — whether it’s Republican former state Sen. Scott Wagner or Democratic incumbent Gov. Tom Wolf — he’ll likely have to take on the massive challenges the state’s higher education system faces. Education is a top priority for both Wagner and Wolf. But neither outlined comprehensive plans to fund higher education in their campaign platforms or in requests from The Temple News. On top of ensuring that state-related schools receive funding, it’s likely the winner will need to address the hardships Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education, or PASSHE, is experiencing. PASSHE includes the 14 stateowned universities like West Chester University, Shippensburg University and Kutztown University. Some of these state schools are facing massive issues, like enrollment numbers dropping for the eighth consecutive year. Although Temple is not a part of the system, it’s included in conversations in the state Capitol about how to solve PASSHE’s issues. Temple is one of four state-related institutions alongside the University of Pittsburgh, Penn State and Lincoln University. These schools are

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= State System

IAN WALKER / THE TEMPLE NEWS

= State-related privately operated, but they receive state allocations. Pennsylvania’s higher education system — like the state itself — is diverse. These schools, including their satellite campuses, are spread across the state and serve rural areas like Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania, and urban parts of the state like North Philadelphia. The students who attend these schools are just as socioeconomically diverse.

FIXING PASSHE’S ISSUES

The state’s Legislative Budget and Finance Committee commissioned the

RAND Corporation to analyze the state education system’s problems and provide suggestions for handling them. The report, released in April, and an earlier one completed by the state system, combined to cost taxpayers $650,000 to complete. The nearly 100-page report outlines the challenges schools are currently facing and how those could get worse as Pennsylvania’s college-age population declines. It also attempts to outline the political and internal issues within the state system. Then, it provides five solutions the state could apply, which include con-

solidating PASSHE schools. This could include consolidating campuses under schools within the state system, closing low-performing schools or the one solution that would affect Temple the most: consolidating state schools under a state-related institution. The final solution gained some momentum in June among some General Assembly Republican leaders, like House Speaker Mike Turzai, who is also on the Board of Governors for the state system, TribLive reported. But Mark Price, the research director at the Pennsylvania Budget and

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NEWS PAGE 5

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

Policy Center, said this solution won’t fix Pennsylvania higher education’s core problem: costs are rising faster than people’s incomes. “The RAND report really struck me as the most expensive investigation that effectively had the worst possible recommendation,” Price said. “The pitch you want to make is if you close or consolidate, this problem will go away,” he added. “That’s a horrifically simple-minded approach.” No matter what the next governor decides to advocate for to his legislature, state education leaders oppose the RAND study in fear that it would limit desks in the most vulnerable areas of the state. “If the Commonwealth takes one of [RAND]’s suggestions, fewer students would be able to afford college, and even those who could, would have their opportunities severely reduced,” wrote Kenneth Mash, the president of the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties, in a release. The biggest relationship between state-related and state system schools is that these schools are competing for the same students, Price said. “Penn State competes with Pitt, Pitt competes with Temple and they all compete with schools in the state system… and all of the private [institutions],” he added. “One of the common themes among all schools is they’re all suffering right now because the population of students is decreasing, so they’re all competing from a smaller pool of students and it’s all affecting them in their own unique ways.” Private institutions must invest in more scholarships to increase student enrollment, Price said. State-related institutions must raise costs when the state doesn’t add to its yearly appropriation. State schools try to do the same, but because many of them serve poorer populations, the rising cost drives these students away from enrollment, Price said. If the RAND report receives more support in the legislature, it would “kick the ball down the field” to state-related

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universities, he added. “Temple University, serving a relatively diverse student population, both diverse racially and income-wise, it’s going to have the same problems if the tuition continues to rise in 10-15 years,” he said. “Doing the RAND approach does give [these schools] a few more years… but it doesn’t address the primary problem.”

THE FUTURE UNDER THE NEXT GOVERNOR

“How doomed are we? It’s a tough one,” Price said with a laugh. Both gubernatorial candidates touted their accomplishments or ideas to fix the K-12 system throughout this campaign season. But neither focused on the state’s higher education system. Karissa Hand, a spokesperson for Wolf, told The Temple News the governor would “continue to fight for more education funding at all levels, including higher education.” Wagner would re-evaluate each program at each institution to revamp them and “provide access for our aging workforce to retrain their skill set,” spokesperson Andrew Romeo wrote in an email. He’d also try to find misused funds to give to higher education by implementing zero-based budgeting, a system that reduces costs by evaluating expenses during each period, according to Forbes. But neither candidate will step up to make lowering tuition and repairing the state’s higher education system a priority, Price projected. Wagner, a Republican who opposes raising taxes, would be less likely to lead the state to the funding levels necessary to save state system and state-related institutions, Price said. Wolf would equally struggle, because the legislature will likely remain Republican-controlled after Tuesday’s elections. And Wolf hasn’t expressed enough interest in taking on the higher education beast. Other states have made strides toward decreasing or ending tuition for

Universities in PASSHE Bloomsburg University

Kutztown University

California University

Lock Haven University

Cheyney University

Mansfield University

Clarion University

Millersville University

East Stroudsburg University

Shippensburg University

Edinboro University

Slippery Rock University

Indiana University

West Chester University

students. In 2017, New York rolled out its Excelsior Scholarship program, which offers more than 940,000 middle-class families making up to $125,000 per year the opportunity to attend college tuition free at all of its City University of New York and the State University of New York campuses in the state. Rutgers University has a similar program for New Jersey residents. “Everywhere is doing a slightly better job than we are,” Price added. State Sen. Vincent Hughes, D-Philadelphia, introduced the PA Promise program this summer, which would cover tuition and fees for recent high school graduates in Pennsylvania whose families earn $110,000 or less. These students

could attend any of the state’s 14 staterun universities and state-related institutions. The proposal has a $1 billion price tag, and Hughes has not outlined a way to pay for it. Price said this method would be the answer to Pennsylvania’s higher education problems, despite that there is no feasible pathway to funding the program. “The state has not done its fair share to fund the state system or the state-related institutions,” Price said. “Dealing with the cost of higher education, you’ve got to make it a priority.” gillian@temple.edu @gill_mcgoldrick

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NEWS PAGE 6

COMMUNITY

PHA completes Phase II of Norris Apartments The new phase will provide improved affordable housing to 89 families in North Philadelphia. BY WILL BLEIER Deputy City Editor The Philadelphia Housing Authority, local community leaders and government officials celebrated the completion of Phase II of the Norris Apartments redevelopment on Norris Street near 9th on Monday. The second phase brings 89 new rental units, 26 of which will be set aside for seniors. A majority of the units will be three-bedroom residencies with washers and dryers, energy-efficient windows and open floor plans. “Phase II gives the residents the knowledge that they will return, and that the houses were built for them,” said Donna Richardson, who is the president of the Norris Community Resident Council. She has lived in the housing development for 30 years and will continue to do so once construction is completed in November 2019. “It cancels out all the rumors,” Richardson added. Many residents feared they would not be able to return to the Norris Apartments redevelopment after its demolition in April. Residents were relocated in the spring to begin the five-phase project. The public housing community was built in the 1950s and was home to 147 affordable housing units. It is bounded by 9th Street to the west, Diamond to the north, Marshall to the east and Berks to the south. All five phases of the Norris Apartments redevelopment will create 267

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

rental units and 30 homeownership units. “We worked closely with Temple and the community to make sure the needs are represented,” PHA President and CEO Kelvin Jeremiah told The Temple News. “Residents have been a key stakeholder in every aspect of the planning and development.” In June 2014, the Norris Apartments project was the beneficiary of a $30 million Choice Neighborhoods Implementation grant awarded to the city and PHA by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Mayor Jim Kenney participated in the ribbon-cutting and toured the development’s new units on Monday. “Anyone would be proud to live there, and I can’t imagine a happier child that wakes up in a beautiful bedroom in the morning, can use a beautiful bathroom and eat breakfast in a wonderful kitchen,” Kenney said. Shirley Moy, who became the executive director of Temple University’s North Philadelphia Workforce Initiative in July, told The Temple News she hopes her new office can help those in affordable housing, like the Norris Apartments, find employment opportunities. The NPWI, funded by a Lenfest Foundation grant, will provide both community and workforce development, and internship opportunities for high school students. “It’s also hearing from the community about what they want and then seeing how the university can respond in a partnership way,” Moy said. william.bleier@temple.edu @will_bleier

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NEWS PAGE 7

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

POLITICS

‘Grandfamilies’ laws assist Philadelphia families County, proposed the kinship navigator Gov. Tom Wolf signed legislation to work around the legal system to care Fetterman said. The laws are intended to eliminate program to help these “grandfamilies” to support grandparents who are for her. “My grandparents had to take me barriers kinship families face to access navigate governmental agencies and primary caregivers.

BY ISSALINA SAGAD For The Temple News Grandparents who have taken on the role of primary caregiver for their grandchildren will gain protections in cases of medical emergency and increased support from governmental programs. Gov. Tom Wolf approved Act 88 and Act 89 of 2018 on Oct. 23, which will allow a family member to become a child’s temporary guardian more easily and establish the Kinship Caregiver Navigator Program. This would provide resources for grandparents, living in “grandfamilies,” who are responsible as their grandchildrens’ primary caregivers. Family members can now become legal guardians in 90-day increments for up to one year in cases where parents suffer from substance use disorder, or other instances when parents cannot take care of their kids. The law will go into effect in early 2019. The kinship navigator program includes a website, toll-free hotline and a counselor to assist caregivers with the government services available to them. This system will be functioning by mid 2019. There are more than 17,000 grandfamilies in Philadelphia, according to the Supportive Older Women’s Network, a Philadelphia-based organization that provides resources to people age 50 and older. Kailyn Schneider, a freshman journalism major from Northeast Philadelphia, was raised by her two sets of grandparents. She said that through high school and college, her grandparents had

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through that,” she said. “It was two rounds of a lot of work. As I was getting older, it was difficult for them to get no support from my parents.” The Wolf administration received a nearly $500,000 grant last month for the navigator program from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families. The governor emphasized in a press release that the law could be used to provide alternative care for children whose parents are suffering from opioid use disorder. “This grant will help us increase our support for grandparents, other family members and especially the children affected by these crises,” he said in the release. Schneider’s mother helped raise her as an infant despite suffering from drug use. However, when her mother’s condition worsened, both her mother and grandparents agreed to transfer custody. “They would rather that I’m with them and not anyone else, and they tell me every day that they’re very glad the universe placed me with them,” Schneider said. Rep. Eddie Day Pashinski, D-Luzerne County, introduced the legislation that will give a family member temporary legal custody over a child in situations where their parent is medically incapacitated. Chris Fetterman, a research analyst for Pashinski’s office, said a “triggering event” is usually what is needed for guardians to enter into the agreement. If a parent overdoses and is in the hospital, the grandparent can petition a court for temporary emergency custody,

the resources they need. Both laws

They rather that I’m with them and not anyone else, and they tell me every day that they’re very glad the universe placed me with them KAYLIN SCHNEIDER

FRESHMAN JOURNALISM MAJOR

recognize the legal issues that may arise from dropped custody battles, like in Schneider’s case, and prioritize giving guardian rights, regardless of legal custody. “When you take in foster children, you get monthly payments from the foster care system,” Fetterman said. “But when a grandparent takes in a grandchild, whether they have temporary emergency custody or not, they don’t get anything.” Temporary guardianship allows a grandparent to do small but impactful tasks like enroll their grandchild in school or take them to the doctor. “The goal of it was to grant rights to grandparents so that if the parent cannot be making that decision if they’re in a coma or treatment, someone is still able to make legal decisions for the child,” Fetterman said. As part of the kinship navigator program, a professional who understands the government agencies that help families in these situations will help kinship caregivers access federal, state and local services. Rep. Katharine Watson, R-Bucks

access the resources they need. Jennifer Keaton, Watson’s communications manager, said the ultimate goal of the program is to connect families with additional resources. “What we envision for the website… is being an umbrella for a number of different programs and services,” Keaton said. “What we are finding is that some of the grandparents don’t really know what types of services are out there.” Schneider said she understands the difficulties grandparents face, because they have limited abilities as parents if they do not have legal custody. A resource provided for Philadelphia’s kinship population, Grand Central Inc., “didn’t do much” for Schneider and her family to recognize her as the legal child of her grandparents, she said. Schneider could not be listed as a dependent on her grandparents’ taxes. If she was listed as a dependent, her family would be eligible for tax deductions or government assistance. She said this prohibited her grandparents from accessing food stamps. Despite the financial drawbacks, Schneider said that she would not have her parental situation any other way. “I understand that it’s not very normal to be raised by your grandparents and it does hurt a little bit to think that you’re not like everyone else in the sense of growing up,” she said. “But it’s comforting to know that I have some type of support system behind me.” “I’d rather have that than parents that don’t care and aren’t invested,” she added. issalina.sagad@temple.edu


OPINION PAGE 8

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018 EDITORIAL

State: value higher education The state gubernatorial candidates in this year’s midterm elections said education is a top priority, but no candidate has a comprehensive plan to address the problems plaguing higher education in Pennsylvania. The past 10 years weren’t kind to higher education — in 2011 former Gov. Tom Corbett cut $1 billion from education funds across the state. He took away nearly 20 percent from the state’s funds to higher education. Several problems are affecting Pennsylvania’s higher education system. Since 2010, enrollment at Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education schools, like West Chester, Shippensburg and Millersville universities, has dropped 18 percent. Plus, the population of traditional college-aged students is expected to decrease in all but 10 counties by 2030, according to a report by the RAND Corporation. Allegheny County, the state’s second most populous county behind Philadelphia, will have a less than 1 percent increase. Only after several years of slight gains has Temple University come close to receiving the same funding it had before Corbett’s cuts. And now, our future is even shakier. The state’s Legislative Budget and Finance Committee commissioned the RAND Corporation to analyze and advise on the state’s education system. One of the report’s suggestions was to consolidate the schools in PASSHE under a state-related institution like Temple.

That’s assuming Temple and the other state-related schools are equipped to take on a combined enrollment of 107,000 students spread across 15 campuses. Maybe the University of Pittsburgh and Penn State could take on these schools; together they have more than $6.7 billion in their endowments. But Temple only has $620 million, and Lincoln University has $390 million in its endowment. But this solution would just delay the problem, not solve it, said Mark Price, the research director at the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center. The real issue is costs are rising faster than people’s incomes, he added. This is scary — and it should concern students as they head to the polls on Tuesday and after the elections are decided. Pennsylvania students graduate with an average $35,759 in student loan debt, the second-highest in the country, according to a report from CNBC. If the future of higher education is shaky, that means our futures are shaky, and that’s unacceptable. Pennsylvania lawmakers need to understand that students are the future, and lawmakers should act swiftly by finding viable solutions to issues with the state’s higher education system. EDITOR’S NOTE: Gillian McGoldrick, who reported on the state’s higher education challenges for this issue, did not contribute to the writing or editing of this editorial.

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THE ESSAYIST

My musical memories A student writes that music has the ability to bring him back to certain moments in time. BY JOSH VICTOR For The Temple News

I

was on one of my spontaneous treks downtown, with my earbuds in and the surrounding world asleep. It was late at night — or early in the morning — a time when my suburban roommate would tell me how crazy I am for walking fearlessly through the city alone. As I entered Center City, the “Rocky” theme song began playing on my Spotify shuffle as if by fate. I swiftly hastened into a jog, the adrenaline surged through my tired body. The music was no longer just notes, but an inspirational harmony urging me to keep moving. In that moment, I couldn’t help but wonder, “What is it about music that touches the soul?” Maybe it’s in the stories that lyrics bring to life. Perhaps it’s the memories we associate with certain melodies. For me, the power of music connects me to memories and emotions like nothing else can. I remember being a little boy and finally getting piano lessons after envying my older sisters’ musical talent for years. Learning to play my first song was a huge accomplishment. The piano of my childhood went to my sister’s house when I got older. But this year, I moved into my own house off campus — and the piano came along with me. Sometimes when I sit down to play the old piano, I flash back to memories of my younger self trying to impress guests at my house with the hardest songs I knew. I remember all the times I came down the stairs to hear Indian gospel

singer Freddy Joseph playing in the background. When my parents immigrated to America, they left parts of their Indian culture behind. But oftentimes when my mom cooked, she turned on the music of the singer whose lyrics are in Tamil, my parents’ native language, to bring her closer to home. I understood some words better than others, but that music will always remind me of home and happy evenings filled with Joseph’s unique voice, stirring melodies and intricate instrumentation. You can’t find Joseph’s music on Spotify, but every now and then I’ll go on YouTube and hear his songs just to experience some nostalgia and closeness to my family and culture. I remember when I first fell in love with musical scores, a passion that is still part of me today. When I heard the iconic “The Battle” from “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” as a child, I felt like hope would live on in even the most dire circumstances. I marveled at the enchanting beauty of “A Narnia Lullaby.” I awed at the solemnly subtle music in the “Raiders of the Lost Ark” map room scene and the haunting strains as Frodo Baggins marched the ring to Mordor. I am entranced by the beautiful violin solos found in the movies “Schindler’s List” and “The Village.” And as a Philadelphian, I get pumped to the epic “Rocky” theme songs, which breathe life into the story of the ultimate underdog. “Where words fail, music speaks,” 19th-century Danish author Hans Christian Andersen wrote. Music touches human emotions that are untouchable by language. It is truly universal. I hope I never stop uncovering its translations as I move through life. joshua.victor@temple.edu

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OPINION

PAGE 9

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

GRADUATE STUDENTS

Temple: Improve graduate student experience

The university should make the graduate school experience more welcoming. During my time at Temple University, I’ve realized about one-fourth of the student body experiences Main Campus in a different way. Graduate students make up this fourth. And I’ve noticed that for them, socializing, going to class and being involved with the university are all very different experiences than those of undergraduate stuMYRA MIRZA dents. VISUALS The graduate SPECIALIST student experience is sometimes difficult and different than what students expect. The university should be more involved with graduate students so their Temple experiences are exciting and welcoming. I hope to further my education as a graduate student someday. If I were to do that at Temple, I’d expect it to be more exciting like my undergraduate experience here. Santiago Canete Riaza, a first-year doctoral mechanical engineering student, said, with a laugh, there simply is no social aspect of graduate school. He said students mostly only interact with other students from their graduate programs. Departments arrange events, but they are geared toward networking than having fun, unlike residence hall movie nights for undergraduate students. Many graduate students relocated to Philadelphia to further their education. But unlike undergraduate students, they are not given the same platform to meet people in their new city. “Most of the people you interact with on a daily basis [while in graduate school] will be other students and faculty members within your department, to

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ALI GRAULTY / THE TEMPLE NEWS

the point where you may find yourself completely unfamiliar with faculty and practices in other departments at the same school,” the Inquiries Journal, an academic journal focusing on social sciences, arts and humanities, reported. Alex Gardner, a second-year doctoral chemistry student, moved to Philadelphia from his hometown of Scranton, Pennsylvania, to pursue his next degree. “I know a few people in this department now, and I have friends [at school],” Gardner said. “But I feel like it would be more helpful if I was able to make more connections. I think there should be fun graduate school social events.” The educational experience is also more restricted. Of course, it depends on the program, but Canete Riaza said there are generally fewer classes offered in graduate programs. Canete Riaza said he would love if his program offered more class options. While undergraduate programs allow and encourage students to take elective classes in many departments, Jess McLaughlin, a first-year doctoral science education student, said taking classes outside of your department or school when you’re a graduate student comes

with lots of paperwork. You also have to get authorization from professors. “It should just be part of the process, rather than something where you have to go out of your way to make happen,” McLaughlin said. Just because someone is in graduate school for a specific subject doesn’t mean they don’t still want to branch out and try other kinds of classes. Graduate students should have the same flexibility when choosing classes. Not to mention, you meet more people when you take classes outside of your concentration. The university has an altogether different approach to interacting with graduate students, which is a shame because many of these students might not have had their undergraduate experiences at this exciting university. Gardner said orientations are organized by the department of each program, and entrants are introduced to their new professors and classmates. “It was more like a job orientation,” Gardner said. “So it wasn’t that fun.” Education should be fun, especially for people who are choosing to take their schooling to the next level. The university should simply make

more of an effort to create a friendly environment for these students as they embark on these stressful educational programs. McLaughlin said individuals, rather than the university itself, have made efforts to make her feel welcome and comfortable at the university. “I don’t think that the institution has done it,” McLaughlin said. “Individuals really are what has kept me here and made me feel welcome.” Because Temple is a research university, graduate students are significant assets to Temple. They add value and growth to the university and contribute to its reputation in the research sphere. In 2016, Temple ranked at No. 18 on the list of global Google Scholar citations, above New York University, Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania. The university should expand social opportunities for graduate students, so they can create more connections for them and help them feel at home. Graduate students would thrive even more if they were given more support from the university. myramirza@temple.edu

letters@temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 10

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

TECHNOLOGY

Typewriters: Escape from modern technology

Students should utilize Oct. 13-28 organized by Philadelphia raised in Northeast Philadelphia but “This slows you way down and makes typewriters as a means to slow Contemporary, a nonprofit organization went to trade school in San Francisco, you consciously think about spelling, for the arts. It included interactive art where a professor encouraged him to get spacing, only hitting one letter at a time.” down and think. Naturally, my love for writing and my frequent aversion to technology has made me fascinated by typewriters. I love the way they look, especially because they lack a screen. I’ve seen these machines at antique shops and even contemplated buying one, but I never actually typed RAE BURACH on one until a few LEAD COLUMNIST weeks ago. My first hands-on typewriting experience took place at the Festival for the People, a three-weekend event from

installations throughout Cherry Street Pier, in Old City. One installation featured Philly Typewriter, a shop that sells and repairs typewriters in South Philly. The shop attempts to keep typewriters alive through its Public Typewriter Program, which aims to put 2,000 fully functioning typewriters in public locations by the end of 2020. I applaud this effort. Actor Tom Hanks even recently called this exact shop a “national resource,” the Inquirer reported. Preserving this classic form of communication helps us appreciate how things used to be. Bryan Kravitz, the owner and mechanic of Philly Typewriter, was

Jason Kopenitz

ALI GRAULTY / THE TEMPLE NEWS

letters@temple-news.com

involved with fixing typewriters. Kravitz has been fixing them since 1975, but opened his shop in 2017 to repair typewriters and teach others how to do the same through classes and apprenticeships. He created the Public Typewriter Program to bring the joy and historical perspective of typewriters to people who probably have no idea what they’re missing. “People don’t know what typewriters are,” Kravitz said. “You can just see the look on people’s faces when they have never used a typewriter before, and they sit down for the first time and hit those keys.” That’s exactly how I felt at the Festival for the People. The typewriter in front of me was more than just a dusty antique. It was a functional way of writing I had never experienced before. I didn’t realize how badly I wanted to type on a typewriter until I finally had the chance. Typewriters force you to slow down both physically and mentally because you can’t backspace like you can on smartphones and computers. The keys also require more pressure than a touchscreen or MacBook. You have to really think about what you’re typing. I challenge Temple University students to give it a try. These machines are expensive and can be fragile, so people at the public typewriter locations monitor use. At Festival for the People, the monitors were staff members of Philadelphia Contemporary. They handed out paper and helped people use them properly. Austin Burkey, 27, works at the Philadelphia Contemporary. Burkey said Kravitz worked with the staff and trained them on the proper way to use the machines. “It’s a really nice installation because people are always tapping on screens and…basically being instantly gratified one way or another,” Burkey said.

Burkey saw children and young people reacting to the installation. Most of them had never seen typewriters in real life. “They have no idea what it is and are fascinated with it or maybe even a little intimidated by it,” Burkey said. There’s no reason for a child to know what a typewriter is in today’s world, so without these public typewriters, they might never see one in real life, let alone get the chance to use one. It would be a shame to see these devices go extinct. But the excitement isn’t limited to children. People of all ages were getting into the installation. Jason Kopenitz, an adult festivalgoer, had never used a typewriter before. He said he enjoyed the tangibility of the typewriter. “I think the physical act of typing is more gratifying when you see what the machine is actually doing,” Kopenitz said. “With a computer, you’re just hitting keys. You don’t actually see the internal organs.” There’s something amazing about watching the “internal organs” as I type, knowing whatever I write can’t be deleted. It creates a sense of physicality and vulnerability in my writing process that I can’t get with a laptop. Kravitz’s shop is representative of this. It’s a beautiful space filled with typewriters of every size, shape and color. Everyone should have access to these machines, and by putting them in public spaces and welcoming anyone into his shop to give them a try, Kravitz is creating this opportunity. We’re always typing texts, emails and papers so quickly and trying to respond to people immediately. It’s nice to slow down every once in a while and appreciate how we used to communicate. rbur@temple.edu

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OPINION

PAGE 11

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

THE ESSAYIST

International student welcomed with ‘open arms’ A student reflects on what it felt like to come to Temple as an international student. BY PAVLINA CERNA For The Temple News After transferring to Temple University from a small community college, I started anew for the second time in the last couple of years. Being a transfer student and an international student from the Czech Republic seemed like a double disadvantage at first. My accent can be detected by the end of my first sentence, which makes me stand out even when I try to fit in. I lack the security of a family close by for weekend visits or high school friends to go out with when I want a break from college life. I wondered if I would feel comfortable at Temple and in Philadelphia. But when I walked into the Student Center and saw the international flags proudly displayed on the wall, I knew I would feel welcome at Temple. After a couple of months of settling in at my new school, I can say with confidence that the university truly cares about its international students. Unlike my previous college, which had only a few hundred foreigners, Temple is home to more than 3,000 international students. There are about 1,900 undergraduates and 1,200 higher degree-seeking students, said Leah Hetzell, the director of International Student Affairs. “We all share the same story,” said Ashwani Poonie, a senior actuarial science major from Mauritius and president of the International Student Association. “We took very long flights here, deal with homesickness.” Hetzell makes it her priority to ensure that international students feel at home at Temple. “Our main concern is students,” Hetzell said. “Everything else comes second to students’ wellbeing. We tell every student that our door is open, we are here.” Monday marked the start of Tem@TheTempleNews

NICOLE HWANG / THE TEMPLE NEWS

ple’s second You Are Welcome Here Week, which celebrates the university’s international student population with globally inspired activities. It’s comforting to be at a university that celebrates being a home to students from around the world. There are 45 flags displayed in the Student Center. And that doesn’t even do justice to Temple’s international student body, which comes from about 130 countries and regions, the Office of International Affairs reported in 2016. A flag representing the Czech Republic, my home country, is not on display there yet. “We put up [about] 40 new flags every year, so over the course of somebody’s four years of study, they will see their flag in the atrium,” said Jason Levy, the senior director of Student Center operations. He added that the flags from the U.S., Canada, China and India are permanently displayed. All the flags are arranged in alphabetical order, but the selection of flags is random. Levy said the display will undergo a

remake soon. This means new groups of students are about to see their flags advertised in the atrium. Martyn Miller, the assistant vice president of international programs, said he is, “insistent on as much international diversity as possible,” and the Fox School of Business enrolls the most international students of any college on Main Campus. But no matter what school or college an international student is enrolled in, they can get connected with other students like them by joining an organization like the International Student Association. This group invites international students to various events and encourages them to share their cultures and different affiliations around campus. “[At International Student Association] we target primarily international students, but everyone is welcome,” Poonie said. “If Americans go study abroad, they are international students as well. So anyone can be an international student and therefore part of the International Student Association.” While the International Student As-

sociation is the hub for all international student organizations, there are also organizations dedicated to specific countries and regions, like the Chinese Students & Scholars Association, the Saudi Students Association at Temple, the Temple University Korean Student Association and the South Asian Students Society of Temple University. Vanshika Shekhar, a sophomore psychology major from India and a member of the International Student Association, said she felt welcome at Temple from the very beginning. “My biggest fear was adjusting to a completely new country,” Shekhar said. “But I was excited to become independent.” This is a common fear for many international students, especially when they don’t know about the huge international family Temple has built. I’m glad I chose a university that welcomes diversity with open arms, and I hope to see my flag will on the wall before I graduate. pavlina.cerna@temple.edu

letters@temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 12

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

SPORTS WORD SEARCH BASEBALL BASKETBALL HOCKEY CURLING GYMNASTICS LACROSSE BADMINTON SOCCER FOOTBALL WATER POLO

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Answers from Tuesday, October 30: 1. Whitney Houston, 2. The Beatles, 3. Daft Punk, 4. Lady Gaga, 5. Kanye West, 6. Prince, 7. Lorde, 8. Elvis Presley, 9. Michael Jackson, 10. Kendrick Lamar, 11. Louis Armstrong, 12. Rihanna, 13. Beyonce, 14. The Roots

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TIPPING OFF A TURNAROUND

PAGE B4 Coach Tonya Cardoza has two starting-caliber point guards at her disposal this season.

PAGE B5 Coaches expect a junior transfer to provide energy and defense off the bench.

PAGE B6 Temple is looking to bounce back after winning just 12 games last year.

PAGE B7 The Owls want a spot in the NCAA Tournament for coach Fran Dunphy’s final year.


BASKETBALL PREVIEW PAGE B2

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Piece of city’s basketball ‘fabric’ enters last year Coach Fran Dunphy will begin his last season on Tuesday against La Salle. BY MICHAEL ZINGRONE Co-Sports Editor Judging Fran Dunphy by on-court accomplishments would sell him short. Dunphy is the winningest Big 5 coach of all-time, has won two coach of the year awards in both the Atlantic 10 Conference and American Athletic Conference and is a member of Penn’s Athletic Hall of Fame. On Nov. 1, Dunphy received the Dean Smith Award partly for his work off the court as the co-chair of the Coaches vs. Cancer Philly 6 chapter. After 30 seasons as a Division I coach — 17 with Penn and 13 with Temple — the 2018-19 season will be Dunphy’s last. Fittingly, Dunphy will start his final season Tuesday night against city rival and his alma mater La Salle at the Liacouras Center. The university announced associate head coach Aaron McKie will take over after this season following Temple’s 17-16 record last season. Regardless of Temple’s total wins in 2017-18, Dunphy said this year would have still been his last and added he was not pressured by Temple administration to make this decision. “You think about it from time to time when you are in this thing for a long time, ‘When is the right time to make the move,’” Dunphy said. “At the end of this past season, I thought to myself, ‘I would love to do this one more year, but this might be the time to make this transition.’” The Owls started last season with a 7-3 record, but they went 8-10 in the American Athletic Conference and lost four of their last five regular-season games to spoil their chances of making the NCAA Tournament. Dunphy hasn’t brought Temple to the tournament since the 2015-16 season. The last time Temple ended a sports@temple-news.com

season ranked in the Associated Press Top 25 Poll was 2009-10 when the Owls were in the midst of six straight NCAA Tournament appearances. Temple ended the season ranked No. 12, but lost in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. Dunphy has a 2-7 NCAA Tournament record at Temple, and the team has never advanced past the first weekend of the tournament during his tenure. “I wish we could have won more games,” Dunphy said. “But I am proud of our staff, our program for what they have done here at Temple. …I wish we could have won a national championship, but we weren’t able to get over the hump.” TAKING OVER FOR CHANEY In 2006, Temple hired Dunphy to succeed the winningest coach in school history, John Chaney. When Temple contacted Dunphy about the job, he told the administration he wanted to ask Chaney for his “blessing” first. The two talked over dinner at the now-closed Colleen’s Restaurant on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. “It was a very challenging opportunity, but one I was excited by,” Dunphy said. “I sat with him for two hours. ...In that two hour span, I talked for about two minutes. And I listened… as I should have.” “You never have to question if [Dunphy] cares,” Saint Joseph’s coach Phil Martelli said. “What other time besides getting married does one man ask another man permission to do something. ...That speaks to his character.” Replacing a Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame coach is a role that is “impossible,” said Martelli, who has coached against both Chaney and Dunphy. Under Chaney, Temple won 516 games, reached 17 NCAA Tournaments and made five Elite Eight appearances in 24 seasons.

The Owls have totaled 247 wins, appeared in seven NCAA tournaments and won three conference tournaments and three regular-season conference titles under Dunphy. If Dunphy were to keep his current pace of wins per season and Chaney’s match 24 years, he’d finish with only 22 fewer wins. Dunphy and Chaney have a different philosophy and demeanor. Chaney employed a signature zone defense, while Dunphy tends to favor man-toman. Chaney was known for being outspoken, while Dunphy is known as a “quiet, unassuming man,” McKie said. But on the inside, they aren’t that different. “Genuine” and “passionate” are words Martelli used to describe Dunphy while drawing comparisons to Chaney. “John Chaney was of the highest level in his time in coaching,” Martelli said. “And in his time of coaching, it could be very dictatorial, you know. Players did what coaches said. I think that Fran has taken that into an era now where we kind of, not negotiate, but we will listen and we’ll try to sense what a player needs. John Chaney decided what you needed. I think Fran Dunphy is the same, it’s just a different exterior. ...It’s a different volume level on the dial.” A TRANSITION TO MCKIE Temple still has 31 games to play before the postseason. Whether it is Dunphy’s final year or not, his goal is to earn a berth in the NCAA Tournament and the Owls’ players and coaches deserve his “undivided attention,” Dunphy said. Dunphy is looking forward to Tuesday and the start of the regular season, and the team sees Dunphy’s final year as an incentive to reach the tournament. “We are trying to [play] as far as we possibly can,” senior guard and cocaptain Shizz Alston Jr. said. “I know coach wants to get there too. Everybody wants to get there pretty bad.” The experience the Owls’

[Dunphy] has more class and integrity than any coach. ... Watch the way he acts in public, the way he coaches games and more importantly the way his players act. MICK CRONIN

UNIVERSIT Y OF CINNCINATTI HEAD COACH

“[Dunphy] had the ability to take players and let them see their futures. He held them accountable and he would not allow them to settle for second best. PHIL MARTELLI

SAINT JOESEPH’S UNIVERSIT Y HEAD COACH

Fran’s been a good friend for a long time, a great coach, a great mentor to a lot of young men, and I’ll be sorry to see him leave. JOHNNY DAWKINS

CENTRAL FLORIDA HEAD COACH

He’s one of the true gentleman in our game. There’s no shenanigans with him, he’s not gonna get in the muck. GREGG MARSHALL

WICHITA STATE HEAD COACH

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BASKETBALL PREVIEW PAGE B3

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

university after stepping down. He hopes to keep co-teaching Management, Theory & Practice: From the Locker Room to the Board Room in the Fox School of Business and be available to help McKie.

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Coach Fran Dunphy addresses the media before practice on Oct. 11 at Pearson Hall. Dunphy hopes to return to the NCAA Tournament in his final season.

underclassmen gained last year makes Dunphy confident he can achieve that goal in his final season. “The goals will be the same as my past 12 seasons,” Dunphy said. “We want to make it to the tournament and make some noise if we do.” The Owls’ four sophomores — guard Nate Pierre-Louis and forwards J.P. Moorman II, De’Vondre Perry and Justyn Hamilton — will play a significant role in achieving this year’s tournament aspirations and will be a big help for McKie for when he becomes the coach next season, Dunphy said. The biggest help for McKie will be Dunphy. This will be McKie’s first head coaching position, while Dunphy enters his 30th season. Dunphy thinks McKie is “a great fit” for the job. Dunphy said his assistant coaches have a lot of responsibility, and McKie has “some increased duties,” this season. Though McKie has taken charge of recruiting, Dunphy still helps. McKie’s experience playing and coaching basketball gives him an understanding of “exactly what is in store for him,” Dunphy said. “This is not [McKie’s] first rodeo,” Dunphy added. “What he has @TTN_Sports

accomplished as a college basketball player here was phenomenal.” McKie learns from Dunphy every day about the daily responsibilities of running a college program, which include making the schedule, worrying about players’ grades and off-court behavior and recruiting, he said. McKie will be the Owls’ fifth coach since 1952. McKie joined Temple’s coaching staff in 2014 as an assistant coach before receiving the promotion to associate head coach in April. He played for Temple from 1991-94 and is tied for 11th on the Owls’ all-time scoring list. “I’ve learned a great deal from him just being here at this program,” McKie said. “Just sitting and watching him work day to day. Everybody’s different as a coach and their approach is different.” McKie played in the NBA from 1994-2007. He won the NBA Sixth Man of the Year in 2001 and played in the NBA Finals with the Philadelphia 76ers. McKie then spent six seasons as an assistant coach with the 76ers from 2007-13. McKie said Dunphy will always be a “resource” for him after the season. Dunphy plans to still be involved with Temple basketball and the

PHILLY ROOTS After more than 32 seasons of playing or coaching in the Big 5, the Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania, native’s legacy as a “great Philadelphian” won’t be forgotten anytime soon, Martelli said. Dunphy played guard at La Salle from 1967-70 and coached in the Big 5 at Penn from 1989-2006 before going to Temple in 2006. With 557 wins, no coach has won more games in the Big 5 than Dunphy. When Dunphy began coaching at Penn, the other local coaches — Chaney, Villanova’s Rollie Massimino, Saint Joseph’s Jim Boyle, La Salle’s Speedy Morris and Drexel’s Eddie Burke — taught Dunphy lessons about basketball and life. Dunphy said they taught him how to be both competitive and respectful of the opponent. “That is one thing that happens when you become a head coach in the city of Philly, you instantaneously have great respect for all the other programs and all the other coaches and other people at these institutions,” Dunphy said. “Because basketball in Philly is very much a part of the fabric of this city, so you have all this opportunity to interact with great people.” Now, a different group of coaches — Martelli, Villanova’s Jay Wright, La Salle’s Ashley Howard, Penn’s Steve Donahue and Drexel’s Zach Spiker — lead the local teams in Dunphy’s last year. “Bottom line is you’re playing these other schools within the city and you want to win the game and beat the pants off whoever you are playing,” Dunphy said. “And yet at the end of the game you go back and let’s say we are all at an [Amateur Athletic Union] tourney in Vegas or Orlando or wherever, we are typically all sitting together.” Dunphy recorded 310 of his wins at Penn, where he is enshrined in the Hall of Fame. Being “one of the most respected

guys in the city of Philadelphia” helped Dunphy transition to Temple from Penn, said Shawn Trice, the Owls’ assistant coach. Trice, who played for Penn from 1991-95, said Dunphy was successful because players saw Dunphy as “a type of father figure.” Not only did Dunphy motivate players to be better on the court, but also he made them want to be better people. “I learned how to be a team guy and not put my personal goals ahead of the team’s,” Trice said. “Back when he coached me, [the team] all sacrificed for the greater good, and it has become a great part of who we are. That was the major push he wanted to get us to buy into.” Dunphy’s presence is more than his 10 Ivy League Championships with Penn or his run of six straight NCAA tournament appearances at Temple from 2007-13. For the past 23 years, Dunphy has been involved with the Coaches vs. Cancer initiative, which is a collaboration between the National Association of Basketball Coaches and the American Cancer Society to fundraise for cancer research. Dunphy spoke to legislators on Capitol Hill in 2008 to fight for more funding for cancer research. The lessons and impact he has left on every player, opposing coach and friend encompass his career’s legacy, Martelli said. “Fran Dunphy could fill the lower bowl of the Liacouras Center, and if the PA announcer said, ‘Will all of Fran Dunphy’s best friends stand up,’ that entire lower bowl would stand up,” Martelli said. “He has an outstanding ability to make a connection and to make a friendship and to make that friendship extraordinary.” “When I get home every night, I step back and have dinner or watch a basketball game and ask myself, ‘Did I do the best job I can do today?’” Dunphy said. “And most days I would say that I did my very best to try and make my players better in every aspect of life.” michael.zingrone@temple.edu @mjzingrone

sports@temple-news.com


BASKETBALL PREVIEW PAGE B4

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Key guards stronger after injury-plauged season The Owls lost their two starting point guards early last season. Both have returned and are looking to make an impact. BY TYLER SANDORA For The Temple News First Alliya Butts went down. Then two months later, Desiree Oliver followed. Graduate student Butts suffered a season-ending ACL injury less than one month before the season-opener in November. Eight games into the season, sophomore Oliver tore a ligament in her left thumb, forcing her to be sidelined for six weeks. “It was devastating,” coach Tonya Cardoza said. “[We lost] Alliya [Butts], and then to lose your next point guard, that was really really hard.” Butts and Oliver are both available to start the season. The two guards each played 29 minutes in the Owls’ 76-64 exhibition win against the University of the Sciences on Oct. 30. Butts started at point guard, while Oliver came in off the bench. Without Butts or Oliver last year, Temple turned to sophomore Emani Mayo, former guard Khadijah Berger and former guard and current graduate manager Mykia Jones. All three players, however, were not traditional point guards, Cardoza and Oliver said. “We were banking on [Oliver] to be our main ball-handler,” Butts said. “You need a point guard. It’s hard because [a point guard] is someone who controls the floor and sets things up. When you don’t have a point guard, you don’t have those pieces, so things can get chaotic.” Temple recorded 14.4 assists per

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game, which ranked second in the American Athletic Conference in 201617. With Butts missing the entire 201718 season and Oliver forced to sit out nine games, the Owls finished eighth in the conference with 13 assists per game. “It was the longest I had ever sat out,” Oliver said. “It was my first time spending that much time away from basketball. I didn’t really know how to feel, I was sad.” Oliver, who was ranked a top-100 prospect in the Class of 2017 by ESPN, played at least 18 minutes in seven of Temple’s first eight games coming off the bench. The Owls went 6-2 in those games. Before the Owls’ win against Hampton University, Oliver tore her ulnar collateral ligament in practice. The injury required surgery, and Oliver missed nine games. The Owls went 3-6 over that span. “[Oliver was] our point guard,” said sophomore Breanna Perry, who also took over point guard duties after Oliver’s injury. “You need somebody to lead us on the floor, so it was scary thinking about who would pick up that spot because Alliya was out, and then [Oliver].” Temple missed Butts’ scoring. She is first in program history in made 3-pointers and led the team in scoring as a freshman and sophomore. Oliver noticed how much the point guard position meant to the struggling Owls, who finished 12-19 last season. Because her injury didn’t prevent her from running, Oliver worked on her conditioning while she recovered. She ran on treadmills while going through her rehab process. She began to incorporate more hustle into her game and preach to herself the importance of being a leader and an instrumental piece on

HANNAH BURNS / THE TEMPLE NEWS Sophomore guard Desiree Oliver at McGonigle Hall on Oct. 25. Oliver believes her injury last year has improved her game mentally.

the team. In addition to taking in the game from the sideline, Oliver also worked on regaining strength in her thumb, which was “weak, skinny and ugly,” she said. Oliver brings energy and good defense to the team, in addition to her jumper and scoring abilities, Perry said. Butts and Oliver bring needed defensive help to the Owls. Temple allowed its opponents to score 72.7 points per game, which ranked last in the American Athletic Conference. In 2016-17, Butts was fifth in the conference with 2.1 steals per game. After Oliver returned on Jan. 21 against UConn, the Owls dropped 11 of their remaining 14 games, with 10 losses

coming in conference play. Oliver averaged 6.1 points in the 14 games after her injury. Oliver scored in double-figures in four of her 22 games, including an 18-point outing against Wagner College. But she also struggled at times, like when she shot 1-for-8 from the field and had four turnovers against the University of Mississippi. “With her, it’s about not trying to do too much too soon, and letting the game come to her,” Cardoza said. “She’s a great talent and she can change to the pace of the game.” Tyler.Sandora@temple.edu @tyler_sandora

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MEN’S BASKETBALL

Junior transfer: ‘I knew this was a good place for me’ Quentin Jackson, who transferred from Tallahassee Community College, gives the Owls guard depth. BY MICHAEL ZINGRONE Co-Sports Editor A familiar face approached Quentin Jackson Jr. while he visited Temple University. Sophomore forward J.P. Moorman II hopped in his car and drove from Delaware to greet the junior transfer during his official visit in May. Moorman and Jackson, who both went to high school in North Carolina, have known each other for 12 years. Jackson joined the roster in June

after playing his sophomore year at Tallahassee Community College, a junior college in Florida. During his freshman year, he played at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte at the Division I level. Moorman’s honesty convinced Jackson to commit to Temple. “[Moorman] just shot straight with me,” Jackson, a 6-foot-2-inch junior guard. “He told me this is what we do here, this is what we don’t do... Once I heard all of that, I knew this was a good place for me.” The coaching staff was transparent about what Jackson’s role would be on the team. This helped win over Jackson as well. “We had a need for a guy who could play a little bit of point guard and some additional perimeter depth,” assistant coach Shawn Trice said. “And that is what we told him.” Coaches told Jackson over the summer that a big part of his role this season will be on defense, Trice said. Last season, Temple allowed the fourthhighest opponent field goal percentage in the American Athletic Conference. Coach Fran Dunphy said he wants his team to be better defensively, and Jackson will help that goal. In his quest to return to the Division I level for his junior season, Jackson committed to Florida Gulf Coast University in November 2017. But in April, the Eagles underwent a coaching change, causing Jackson to reopen his recruitment. Trice and the rest of Temple’s coaching staff contacted Jackson right after he reopened his recruitment to gauge his interest in the program. The Owls’ impending transition from Dunphy to associate head coach Aaron McKie after the 2018-19 season didn’t dissuade Jackson. McKie made

EVAN EASTERLING / THE TEMPLE NEWS Junior guard Quentin Jackson Jr. attempts a layup during practice on Oct. 29 at Pearson Hall. Jackson joined Temple as a transfer from Talahassee Community College during the offseason.

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EVAN EASTERLING / THE TEMPLE NEWS Junior guard Quentin Jackson Jr. (left) and sophomore guard Nate Pierre-Louis high-five during practice on Oct. 29 at Pearson Hall.

him feel right at home. Jackson could potentially fill former guard Josh Brown’s responsibility of defending the opponent’s best player, Trice said. Last year, Brown was second on the team in minutes and steals and third on the team in blocks. “[Jackson] just brings the athleticism and energy that we need from that guard spot,” said Moorman, who played against Jackson in Amateur Athletic Union competitions. In practice, Jackson and sophomore guard Nate Pierre-Louis make “a great defensive duo” and they can play fullcourt defense when on the floor together, Moorman said. Jackson’s energy and growth as a person since arriving at Temple stands out to his coaches. Jackson transferred to Talahassee Community College due to “personal immaturity,” he said. At UNC Charlotte,

Jackson wasn’t working hard enough on his game to excel at the Division I level, he added. “He...has shown some leadership of whether it’s trying to motivate his teammates or doing the extra work,” Trice said. “He is really competitive in practice on the second unit, and it is something that really pushes the starters.” He sought to develop himself on and off the court and found Temple as the right place for him. “Everyone here seems like they are trying to work toward something bigger every single day,” Jackson said. “I just wanted to be around people that are going hard every day and not taking days off. ...And I felt that in the culture here.” michael.zingrone@temple.edu @mjzingrone

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Young team finds voice with high-scoring players Two sophomores will captain the Owls, who finished second to last in The American last season.

good team when we have three, four, five guys that can get double figures, and I think we’re back to that.” In the 2016-17 season, when Temple went 24-8 and earned its most recent NCAA Tournament berth, it had four scorers average at least 10 points per game. As the Owls seek to return to the tournament, they know integrating their new talent will take time and they’ll gain experience as the season progresses. “I still think we’re still trying to put it together, but eventually it’s going to all click once the season gets on,” Mayo said. “But right now, it feels good to be back.”

BY MAURA RAZANAUSKAS Women’s Basketball Beat Reporter The Owls were at their shootaround last week, preparing for their exhibition game, when coach Tonya Cardoza made an announcement that shocked Emani Mayo. Cardoza named the sophomore guard a team captain. Graduate student guard Alliya Butts and sophomore forward Mia Davis are the Owls’ two other captains. “I’m just going to step up and be a leader for my team,” Mayo said. “I’m going to be more vocal, talk more, keep the guys together, offensively and defensively. It’s so hard because I’m very shy, but I’m going to have to talk more.” Naming two sophomores in a trio of captains is a rather uncommon occurrence, but Temple’s team is atypical. Ten of the 14 Owls are underclassmen, and are each expected to play a big role throughout the season, Cardoza said. In Temple’s 76-64 exhibition win against the University of the Sciences, the team’s top five scorers were freshmen or sophomores. Freshman forward Alexa Williamson led the team with 19 points, while freshman guard Marissa Mackins recorded 13 points on 5-of-10 shooting. “[Williamson] has the ability to do what she did every single night,” Cardoza said. “Marissa can just flat out shoot the basketball, and she’s a great passer. Those two and [sophomore guard] Desiree [Oliver]... If they have good years, we’re going to have a good year.” Last season, the team went 12-19 and finished 11th in the American Athletic Conference. This season, the Owls are projected to finish sixth in the conference by The American’s preseason

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maura.razanauskas@temple.edu @CaptainAMAURAca HANNAH BURNS / THE TEMPLE NEWS Sophomore forward Mia Davis dribbles the ball at Pearson Hall on Oct. 25. She is one of two sophomores who will lead the team as captains, alongside graduate student Alliya Butts.

coaches poll. “We have an opportunity, if we come to practice every day and focus on getting better on the defensive side,” Cardoza said. “We have a really good shot of not finishing sixth, but finishing higher than that.” Butts will return from a season-ending ACL tear for her final year. She is the No. 8 scorer in program history, with 1,481 career points. She still isn’t 100 percent healthy but expects to be by December and will still likely play Tuesday. In each of her first two seasons as an Owl, Butts led the team in scoring. Her career average is 14.2 points per game, and she is Temple’s all-time leader in made 3-pointers with 236. “I’m excited to go out with a bang,” Butts said. “Just have a good, winning season [final] year and just pick up where I left off in my junior year. ...Every day is a small step for me.” “[Butts is] someone that has won for us, and she’s been one of the focal points

the last three years,” Cardoza said. “She’s capable of making big shots. So that also helps. Last year, we didn’t have a lot of 3-point shooters.” Last season, the Owls struggled to score. Temple scored 60 points or fewer in 12 of its games and averaged 66.2 points per game. Former guard Tanaya Atkinson led the Owls in scoring with 21.1 points per game. This accounted for nearly one-third of Temple’s scoring average. The addition of talented freshmen, Butts’s return and sophomore leadership has Cardoza making much higher expectations for the upcoming season. “Now, we have guys that can actually shoot the ball from the perimeter,” Cardoza said. “We have guys that can score in the post.” “We’ve never been a good team when we’ve relied on one or two people,” she added. “We’ve been a pretty HANNAH BURNS / THE TEMPLE NEWS Sophomore forward Breanna Perry practices at McGonigle Hall on Oct. 25.

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MEN’S BASKETBALL

Owls to lean on experience in quest for NCAA berth The team feels it is capable of a postseason run in coach Fran Dunphy’s final season. BY SAM NEUMANN Co-Sports Editor For a team that hasn’t made the NCAA Tournament in three years, they realize time is running out. In coach Fran Dunphy’s final season, Temple University hopes to return to March Madness for the first time since 2015-16. The season starts Tuesday night at the Liacouras Center against Big 5 rival La Salle, where Dunphy played and coached. After this season, Dunphy will step away and associate head coach Aaron McKie, who played at Temple from 1991-94 and coached with Dunphy since 2014, will take over. McKie and the Owls’ two senior captains — guard Shizz Alston Jr. and center Ernest Aflakpui — want to give the winningest coach in Big 5 history one last run at the tournament. “We definitely wanna make it sweet for him,” McKie said. “He deserves it. He’s a pillar at this university and in this community... That’s our goal, to send him out on top as a winner.” The Owls went 17-16 last season and qualified for the National Invitation Tournament for the postseason, after missing both the NCAA Tournament and NIT the year before. Penn State beat Temple, 63-57, in the first round of the NIT on March 14. The American preseason coaches poll predicted Temple to finish sixth this season after its 8-10 record and seventh-place result last year. In The American’s five years, 15 teams made the NCAA Tournament. None of those teams had more than 12 losses or finished lower than sixth in the regular-season standings. Temple will face seven teams that made the NCAA Tournament last year, including Houston, Wichita State, Uni-

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HANNAH BURNS / THE TEMPLE NEWS Senior center Ernest Aflakpui practices at Pearson Hall on Oct. 26. He is a senior captain this season.

versity of Missouri, Cincinnati, Penn, Davidson College and defending Division I champion Villanova. Temple needs to start winning close games and “beat the teams we are supposed to beat” to make the NCAA Tournament, Alston said. Seven of Temple’s regular-season losses last season came in games decided by seven or fewer points. Temple also fell to two schools — Tulane and Connecticut — that finished below them in the American Athletic Conference. Some of Temple’s late defeats were missed opportunities at wins that would

have bolstered its NCAA Tournament resume. On Feb. 15, Temple lost 93-86 to nationally ranked Wichita State, after leading by 14 points at halftime. The Owls also lost to Houston, Memphis and Cincinnati, each game by single digits. “In practice, we do end-of-game situations a lot more than we did last year,” Aflakpui said. “We want to win as many games as we can, and putting more focus on finishing games we think will help.” Temple will rely on its four sophomores — guard Nate Pierre-Louis and forwards J.P Moorman II, Justyn Hamilton and De’Vondre Perry — who gained

valuable playing experience in conference games, Dunphy said. Perry appeared in 31 out of 33 games, Moorman and Pierre-Louis each saw action in 27 games, and Hamilton came off the bench in 11 games. Pierre-Louis and Perry each started once. “Oftentimes, the best teams are the most experienced teams,” Dunphy said. “Their level of experience puts us in a great position.” “[The sophomores] have a taste of how it feels to win and how it feels to lose,” Aflakpui said. “I have seen people grow and mature from freshman year to sophomore year and so on, and they have definitely matured into this year.” Junior guard Quinton Rose was named to The American’s preseason all-conference first team. Rose is the type of player who can win games for the team on his individual efforts, Dunphy said. Rose declared for the NBA Draft after last season, but did not sign with an agent, which allowed him to return to Temple. “I have enjoyed watching [Rose] play and develop the past couple years,” said Johnny Dawkins, coach of Central Florida. “You don’t find many players of that caliber in the country, so he’s a unique player.” Alston said if junior guard Alani Moore II has a better season, it will increase the Owls’ chances for success. Moore shot 41.4 percent from the field in 32 games as a freshman, but his field goal percentage dropped to 31.9 percent in 27 games last year. “I want to get some team goals accomplished,” Alston said. “[I want to] make the tournament and make a deep run. “We are more than capable of doing that,” he added. sam.neumann@temple.edu @samneu_

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‘Stick to the game plan’ Sophomore Mia Davis is Temple’s leading returning scorer and one of the team’s three captains. What do you think the team’s ceiling is this year? Our goal is to have more wins than we did last year. We are trying to make it into the [NCAA] tournament, of course.

What did your freshman season teach you that could help you improve this year? My freshman season taught me to never give up, always work hard. So this year, I’m coming in with a better mindset.

What did you do to improve your game over the summer? More ball-handling, picking up extra shots and working on my 3-point shot.

How are you looking to improve the road record? We are looking to just settle down more, focus more and stick more to the game plan, play better defense. Because I think that is one of the things we struggled with last year, so we gotta come in this year with a better defensive mind.

Who is your favorite teammate to play oneon-one against? Why? [Sophomore guard] Emani Mayo. She will always give me a challenge. I feel as though both of us are competitive, only one of us can win. And we both want to win. dante.collinelli@temple.edu @DanteCollinelli

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

MEN’S BASKETBALL

McKie: ‘I still have a lot to learn’ Aaron McKie is learning from coach Fran Dunphy in his final season, before he transitions into the head-coach role. What are your expectations for this year? How do you get to the NCAA Tournament? Obviously, you want to win a national title, that’s the ultimate goal. But you have to take baby steps within that, and our first baby step will be to win our conference. I think anytime that you win your conference, you position yourself well for the NCAA Tournament.

You’re in a weird position. It’s not every time you are going to be a head coach when there is a head coach in place. Do you think about that? Well, I’m faced with it every day. The reality of it is, I will concentrate on that more next year. I get the opportunity, a great opportunity, to continue to learn as an assistant, to transition into being a head coach, just sitting and watching. At the same time being involved because I will be in the head seat next year. I still have a lot to learn, this will be my first opportunity to run my own program. ... And I’m looking forward to it.

Have you always wanted to be a head coach of a program, or is it just an opportunity that presented itself?

something that was a natural transition for most players. Now if you look at it, you either go into coaching or you go into broadcasting. Coaching is for me, because I enjoy being around the game of basketball and sharing the game. College coaching never really crossed my mind, but it was an opportunity that presented itself years ago and here I am.

Do you think next season you’ll hope to rely on Coach Dunphy as a mentor? Absolutely. I think he’s always going to be a resource for me. He’s a hall-of-fame coach. I’ve learned a great deal from him, just being here at this program, just sitting and watching him work day-to-day. Everybody’s different as a coach and their approach is different. Everybody looks at coach Dunphy as this quiet, unassuming man. But any time they get the opportunity to come to practice and watch him, coach, they’re taken aback by how he is in practice. He’s a fiery guy, he’s competitive and he wants to win. sam.neumann@temple.edu @samneu_

I never thought about being a coach, period. I was playing professional basketball. It never even crossed my mind. It was just

DESIGN BY CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

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STUDENT LIFE

Club unites students interested in Korean music Students launched Temple’s first cause of its diversity. “No one, depending on their race, K-pop club as the music trend gender, ethnicity, was frowned upon for gains popularity worldwide. BY MICHELE MENDEZ For The Temple News As K-pop songs started topping the international music charts, Joy Best noticed the music genre wasn’t celebrated on campus. “It was a bit disappointing because I heard of other schools having [clubs],” said Best, a sophomore undeclared major in university studies. To connect students interested in K-pop, Best and freshman computer science major Stephanie Minnis started K-Pop Club, Temple’s first student organization dedicated to South Korean pop music. K-pop is a form of South Korean pop music influenced by musical styles from around the world. Students from South Korea represented 6 percent of Temple’s international student body and the third largest international population on campus, according to the 201718 Temple University Fact Book. The K-Pop Club learns about South Korean culture through K-pop dance workshops, visit Korean restaurants and play games from Korean entertainment variety shows, like lip reading and telepathy. They also discuss topics relating to K-pop, like its politics and the beauty standards in South Korean culture. Best said she hopes students can make friends through the club, especially because some students are still “pretty closeted” about liking K-pop. “Back in middle school or high school, people didn’t get it, so I was bullied pretty hard for it and stopped listening,” she added. Sophomore global studies major Aniya Arrington said she struggled to find other students who are K-pop fans. “Being a Black woman and liking K-pop is so looked down upon and it seemed like no one was interested in the genre,” she said. “When I found out Temple finally created a K-pop club, I was so happy.” She added she enjoys the club be@TheTempleNews

liking K-pop,” she said. American college students studying Korean increased by nearly 14 percent from 2013-16, according to a report by the Modern Language Association, and K-pop’s popularity is a major reason for that. Popular K-pop group BTS has topped the Billboard 200 chart twice with two different albums. Last month, the South Korean government awarded the group’s seven members Hwagwan Orders of Cultural Merit, an honor given to exceptional individuals who promote South Korean culture and language internationally. A few days after the K-Pop Club met for the first time in October, the Diamond Marching Band performed “IDOL” by BTS at Temple’s homecoming football game. “For BTS to become so mainstream and popular that a marching band plays them at a football game is just really cool to see,” Best said. Matthew Brunner, the director of the Diamond Marching Band, said he first heard of BTS when he watched the group’s summer 2018 performance at the Billboard Music Awards on TV. “Every time they showed them on screen, the people went completely nuts,” Brunner said. “You just heard the screams, and it was like Elvis Presley and The Beatles together, times 10.” A YouTube video of the marching band’s performance received 1 million views in five days, which was a new a record, Brunner said. Asian Studies instructor Katie Lee, who teaches Korean classes, also credits BTS for making K-pop known worldwide, especially with the group’s appearance at the United Nations in September. Lee lived in South Korea before moving to the United States in 1998 and said she has seen K-pop’s international popularity grow. “When I started [teaching], what I would hear more is, ‘I love Korean dramas,’” Lee said. “Few people said they loved Korean music. But nowadays, I hear more people are interested in Kore-

KATHY CHAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS Aniya Arrington (left), a sophomore global studies major, dances at a meeting for the new K-Pop Club in the Student Center last month.

KATHY CHAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS The K-Pop Club, the first Temple University student organization dedicated to Korean pop music, held a meeting at the Student Center last month.

an music compared to seven years ago.” Since the genre is still new for many people, some students have expressed concerns about being judged for listening to it, Minnis said. “Because many people often get discriminated for enjoying K-pop, I hope

that the K-Pop Club can be a place where all fans can feel comfortable and safe when expressing their love for Korean music,” she added. . michelemendez@temple.edu @michmendezmedia

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

LIVE IN PHILLY

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS

Dozens compete in Fall Cornhole Tournament at XFINITY Live! on Sunday The Philadelphia, Conshy, Delaware and West Chester sports leagues hosted a Fall Cornhole Tournament at XFINITY Live! on Sunday in South Philadelphia. The four-hour competition featured competitive and recreational divisions consisting of 20 two-player teams. Nick Herceg, the assistant league manager of Philadelphia Sports Leagues, coordinated the event. “Usually we do one in Wildwood, [New Jersey] every year, but this was just for Sunday fun day,” said Anthony Orlando, 34, a New Jersey resident who made the trip downtown with his teammate Joe McGuigan. Each team was guaranteed a minimum of three matches for the $50 tournament buy-in. Each division winner scored prizes like trophies, shirts and cash. “We work together and saw this event, and figured why not?” said Michael Peters, 35, standing next to his coworker, Javier Feliciano, 33. “We’re 2-1 right now, so we’re moving on now to play the ‘Bags of Fury.’” features@temple-news.com

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS A portrait of the late rapper Tupac Shakur is on display at the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection in Sullivan Hall.

EXHIBIT

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS The Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection unveiled Thursday handwritten lyrics by Tupac Shakur, who was killed in 1994, to the public.

Blockson Collection houses Tupac’s belongings Items from the late rapper’s it from a 1994 shooting and handwritten singer Paul Robeson. Some artifacts date lyrics for several of his songs, like “I Ain’t back to 1581. estate were unveiled last week. BY CARLEE CUNNINGHAM For The Temple News Diane Turner wanted to see more hip-hop artifacts in the Blockson Collection, so the donation of items formerly belonging to Tupac Shakur came at the perfect time. New Jersey-based company Goldin Auctions donated several of the late rapper’s possessions to Temple University’s Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, which Turner curates. The items were unveiled Thursday to the public on the first floor of Sullivan Hall, which houses the collection of more than 500,000 pieces of African-American literature and artifacts. Between acting and recording both gold and platinum albums, Tupac is widely recognized today as one of history’s most iconic rappers. The donation to the Blockson Collection includes the diamond earring Shakur wore on the cover of his popular 1996 album “All Eyez On Me,” a diamond and gold medallion with a bullet dent in @TheTempleNews

Mad at Cha” and “Only Fear of Death.” “Philadelphia is a music town,” said Turner, who is a 1994 doctorate of history alumna. “I’m overjoyed not only for the Blockson Collection but for the students because I know the students are really interested in Tupac and hip-hop.” Tupac was known for his influence on 1990s hip-hop culture and acted in movies like “Juice” and “Gang-Related.” He also fought African-American oppression by addressing racism in his songs, like “Trapped,” in which he raps about his experiences with police harassment. Shakur is widely known for “All Eyez on Me,” his fourth studio album which featured five hit singles. The same year it released, Shakur was killed in a drive-by shooting. The Blockson Collection is one of the largest collections of African-American artifacts in the country. Charles Blockson, an author and collector of African-American literature, originally donated his collection to Temple in 1984. It includes original works by poet Phillis Wheatley and sheet music by

Ken Goldin, the founder and CEO of Goldin Auctions and a Philadelphia native, said his company has previously handled several items from Shakur’s estate. He decided to donate to the Blockson Collection because of its prestige and nearby location, Goldin said. “Here’s an opportunity to give back to the community and allow something to be shown to the public display that ordinarily would not be,” he added. Goldin also chose to donate Shakur’s items to the university because of the course Tupac Shakur and the Hip-Hop Revolution, a three-credit class taught by Aaron X. Smith, an Africology and African American Studies professor. The College of Liberal Arts offers the course every spring through the Department of Africology and African American Studies. Students enrolled in the class examine historical happenings like lynchings, slavery, forced sterilization of African-Americans, the Black Panther movement and influential rappers. Smith, a self-proclaimed “hip-hop head” who is often called “The Rapping

Professor” by members of his department, said he was excited about the donation. He added the gift is important because it helps legitimize hip-hop culture in academia and society. “This is a day that we didn’t think would come, at least this soon, because just 40 years ago they were still calling [hip-hop music] a passing fad,” Smith said. “Just 20 years ago, they were saying it was a pariah in society, and here we have the legitimization from the academic community on the highest level.” “The Blockson Collection saying that this is worthy of academic study has contributed significantly to not only the history of African-Americans but the history of America,” Smith added. For Turner, the donated items illustrate the resiliency of the historical figures preserved in the Blockson Collection. “When we look at this history and we can find models that we can use today and see the things, struggles that people go through, there is still hope,” Turner said. “No matter how bad things seem, you can overcome them.” carlee.cunningham@temple.edu @carleeinthelab

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

JEREMIAH REARDON / THE TEMPLE NEWS

AROUND CAMPUS

Pop-up truck brings thrifted fashion to students The shop sells thrifted clothes curatRetro Rewind Vintage & Thrift comes to Temple to sell clothes ed from thrift and outlet stores around the Greater Philadelphia region by Whitfrom the 1980s and 90s.

BY MADISON KARAS For The Temple News Formerly a rundown breadtruck left on the side of the road, Retro Rewind can now be seen driving around the city boasting bright rainbow stripes. Inside, the mobile business is a fashion closet, decorated from floor to ceiling with shelves of footwear, clothes and accessories, and outfitted with a mini dressing room. Pop-up fashion truck Retro Rewind Vintage & Thrift tours Philadelphia’s festivals, flea markets, parks and university campuses. It typically appears on 13th Street near Norris outside the Tyler School of Art on Thursday evenings, but founder and owner Tia Whitfield is looking for a more high-traffic location on Main Campus. features@temple-news.com

field, a 2004 fashion merchandising and business administration alumna of Nova Southeastern University in Florida. She looks for styles and colors that mix 1980s and 1990s fashion in pieces like corduroy jackets, striped sweaters, band tees and checkered high heels. Most items cost less than $25. “I always had wanted to be a part of what makes people smile or what makes people happy,” Whitfield said. “I put love into these clothes.” Before launching Retro Rewind, Whitfield worked in high-end retail stores like Bloomingdale’s and Saks Fifth Avenue, but said she always wanted to open her own business. After struggling to find a permanent location in Northern Liberties, Whitfield decided to create a pop-up store after a friend suggested the idea to her. Margaux Meyer, a senior printmaking major who is an intern for Retro Re-

wind, said Whitfield goes beyond normal thrift shopping. “She’s always trying to help people,” Meyer said. “If you come in there and say, ‘I have a job interview,’ she’ll set up a whole outfit for you.” Meyer accepted the internship to fuel her creative side. She said learning to put together outfits with Whitfield is an opportunity to experiment with aesthetics, patterns and colors. “Fashion is art,” Meyer said. “It’s a lot of trial and error.” Whitfield started the business in June and quickly realized college students gravitate toward retro clothing just as much as she does. “I’m listening to my market, and my market is college students,” Whitfield added. “My market is a conscious, loving people that are thinking more about our environment and less about Gucci or Louis Vuitton.” If a student walks away empty-handed, Whitfield asks them what they wish they found in the shop to ensure there is

an item for them during their next visit. She said she often spends the entire next day finding the missing pieces to add to her truck. “I know if I definitely needed a specific thing, I’d ask her,” said Jackie Rosenzweig, a senior painting major also pursuing a teaching degree and frequent shopper at Retro Rewind. She added Whitfield remembers students’ fashion styles and gives them unique recommendations when they visit her truck. Through going to college, running a fashion blog and working in high-end retail, Whitfield always wanted to help make others look good, she said. With Retro Rewind, she wants to give students the opportunities she didn’t have as a fashion merchandising student. “I want to help people move along,” Whitfield said. “I want to help their dreams come true.” madison.karas@temple.edu @madraekaras

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

STUDENT ORGANIZATION

Magazine explores the Black student experience BSU executive board members are colThe Black Student Union an “empowerment” theme. “I felt BSU has the potential to have laborating with Hamilton on the pubwill publish its first issue of a campus-wide impact and have a preslication. They are also looking to hire a EMPOWERED this semester.

BY MYDIA ALONSO For The Temple News Spencer Hamilton noticed a lack of solidarity among Black creatives at Temple University. Hamilton, a senior psychology and Spanish major, felt a magazine for Black students to showcase different art forms and express themselves would leave an impression on the Temple community. “Art does something to uplift people in a very individualistic way, and art is a medium that I feel everybody can have an experience with,” Hamilton said. Hamilton is the founder and editor in chief of EMPOWERED, the Black Student Union’s new monthly online magazine that will provide a platform for Black students to showcase their art. The first issue, which Hamilton expects to publish by the end of the semester, has

VOICES

What impact have your grandparents had on you?

ence on campus that really empowers the Black students at Temple,” said Hamilton, who is also BSU’s newsletter chairperson. “The reality is we are at a [predominantly white institution] and for some people, it’s really hard to navigate that space when there’s so many racially charged factors that influence your experience.” He added he hopes contributors will explore racial identity, sexuality and politics through creative submissions like fiction, poetry, journalism, visual art and personal anecdotes about the Black student experience at Temple. The works can explore the positive and negative experiences faced by Black students at a predominantly white institution and how students have navigated being in that space, Hamilton said. Magazine contributors will attend workshops before the release of every issue for feedback on their work. Other

graphic designer. Lauren Smith, the president of BSU, said she was ecstatic to hear about the magazine when Hamilton first pitched the idea. She believes it communicates BSU’s overall message of community solidarity. “Our whole mission is just being a safe space for people to talk about issues in the Black community, so I think this just puts them on another outlet,” said Smith, a senior geography and urban studies and Africology and African American studies major. She added the magazine will allow BSU to branch out in ways it hasn’t before. The magazine will replace BSU’s newsletter, The Jamii, which means “community” in Swahili. Hamilton said the name of the newsletter was beautiful, but he thought the magazine needed a more unifying name to target students

mydia.alonso@temple.edu Zari Tarazona contributed reporting.

AVERY PINNOCK Freshman engineering major

ARIELLE HUNT Senior kinesiology major

I lived with my grandmother my whole life and I learned a lot about her past and how she was brought up from Jamaica and had to make a living when she moved to America. It just impacted me to work hard and never take things for granted.

My grandmother is very family oriented and is always trying to lead as an example for my family. She’s the type of grandmother I want to be when I grow up. She always looks out for all her grandkids and doesn’t forget anybody.

LAUREN SCHWARTZBARD Freshman film and media arts major My grandfather on my mom’s side sings in his church, and that really inspired me to start singing in my church. That’s something that we’ve always had together, the love of music, which is a really big part of my life now.

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outside of BSU. Kourtney Thompson, a senior advertising major and former BSU president, said she is proud of the magazine. “BSU is kind of known around the world as an organization who looks to empower Black people across the globe,” said Thompson, who is a current BSU member. She added that naming the magazine EMPOWERED is extremely fitting because part of BSU’s mission is to empower Black students on campus. For Hamilton, the new project represents his larger goals for the organization. “Being able to come together and have this sense of unity in the community, I feel like that’s what I really strive for,” Hamilton said. “I hope that I can do that with this magazine.”

NYKEITH JACOBS North Philadelphia resident I asked them what’s the biggest regret in their life, and they [were] like, ‘Not staying in school.’ So I stayed in school.

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INTERSECTION PAGE 18

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

EMMA STEVENS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

RELIGION

Wearing a hijab: ‘I’m proud to represent myself’ Several students and staff the United States who responded said discuss their encounters with discrimination, racism and prejudice were the most important problems bigotry and Islamophobia. facing modern Muslims in the nation BY MYKEL GREENE today. Ignorance and misconceptions For The Temple News of Islam were listed as second most ushra Ibrahim stayed home from class on April 3. The date was declared “Punish a Muslim Day,” after anonymous letters in March in East London. The letters encouraged citizens to abuse Muslim people and listed point-based rewards — like 10 points for verbal abuse or 2,500 points to “Nuke Mecca.” Ibrahim, a senior English major, said that although this campaign originated in England, she feared the implications it could have in the United States because of post-9/11 Islamophobia. “Years later, the effect of Islamophobia is still upon us,” Ibrahim said. “I do love the message of freedom and democracy the country promotes, but some do not act on it, so I have to deal with that.” In a 2017 study by the Pew Research Center, 23 percent of Muslims living in intersection@temple-news.com

important to this community. Ibrahim said she takes precautions to stay safe in certain environments. When walking, Ibrahim stays on main roads with her phone in her hand. In her academic and professional lives, she schedules classes and work during the day due to fear of walking by herself at night. Ibrahim said she avoids conversations about Islam, her lifestyle and commentary on politics or terrorism if she thinks her words could be misinterpreted. Leila Kammoun, a junior economics major, said she has also experienced Islamophobia. In middle school and high school in Media, Pennsylvania, Kammoun said she was outcasted by her classmates because of her hijab. As an adult, she has faced bigotry in public spaces.

For example, this happened once at a coffee shop in Atlanta. Kammoun lived there with her husband at the time, and said she visited the shop to study for a class. A man approached her and told her to “go back to where she was from” and to “free herself from her hijab.” The coffee shop was full, but nobody helped her, she said. “No one did anything until I left crying,” she said. “When I returned to get my things, everyone who didn’t say anything suddenly had something to say.” Kammoun added that she was comforted by a Muslim man who told her not to put any weight on the man’s words. Kammoun said she believes Philadelphians do not have as strong prejudices against Muslims as people in Atlanta or Media. She said being active in her Muslim community in Media, and traveling back and forth to Lebanon to visit her family, helped her to not internalize these stigmas. Tatiana Martin is an Allied Barton safety officer stationed at Beech

International on Cecil B. Moore Avenue near Sydenham Street and wears a hijab with her uniform. She said she feels safe on Main Campus. She said one of her worst experiences happened when a student accused her of thinking he was a terrorist. “I couldn’t understand why he would think that of me when I wear my hijab with my uniform,” Martin said. But to Ibrahim, seeing Muslim women in security positions gives her an additional layer of safety on campus. “The women always greet me with ‘As-Salaam-Alaikum,’ and it’s comforting to be met with the same generosity that I put forth,” Ibrahim said. “For a while, I constantly thought about why I wear my hijab,” Ibrahim added. “Over time, I understood that I wanted to wear it because it represents my beliefs and modesty. I’m proud to represent myself as a Muslim woman and, I don’t think I could ever stop wearing it. msjg@temple.edu

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INTERSECTION PAGE 19

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

RELIGION

Muslim men explain what hijab means to them Hijab is a concept that can be by the Quran for men to lower their gaze women to dress in hijab, Abdullah said, ican, Western European and Russian because traditional dress varies by cul- non-Muslims surveyed consider Musfollowed by both Muslim men in modesty. This is referenced in Chapter 24, ture and personal interpretation of the lims respectful toward women. and women. BY ALLEH NAQVI For The Temple News Hijab represents more than a Muslim woman’s headscarf. It is a philosophy of modest dress and behavior to be followed by both Muslim men and women. Quaiser D. Abdullah, a professor in Temple University’s College of Education and the faculty adviser for the Muslim Student Association at Temple, said Muslims who follow hijab wear clothing that creates a “barrier” of modesty. He added that not all types of clothing meet the minimum requirement for a barrier, which is to be covered from above the navel to below the knee. Coverings from above the navel to below the knee can also be defined as an ‘awra.’ He added that this concept extends from a headdress worn by women to a concept of modesty that extends to how all Muslim people may dress. “The hijab has been almost hijacked to refer to the headdress for women,” Abdullah said. If people wish to refer exclusively to a women’s headscarf, and not the entire concept of hijab, Abdullah said the proper name is “khimar.” Islamic jurisprudence, or Islamic law, also uses the Arabic word “satr” to refer to a covering instead of the “hijab.” In his book “The Islamic Modest Dress,” Iranian cleric, philosopher and politician, Ayatullah Murtadha Mutahhari, writes that “hijab” is what “appears behind a curtain.” There are other subtle ways to follow hijab. For example, “the hijab of the eye,” is a physical boundary established

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verse 30 of the Holy Quran: “Say to the believing men that: they should cast down their glances and guard their private parts (by being chaste). This is better for them.” Sheikh Bilal Hussain, a 2004 business administration alumnus who spent six years studying at the Islamic Seminary at Mashhad and Qom, Iran, said Islam mandates modesty for all Muslims, adding that modesty is to give dignity to a person. “When we talk about modesty and what that means, it varies from culture to culture,” Hussain said. “When we talk about, for example, the idea of modesty, we are talking about controlling a man’s

Quran. Like the hijab, Islam as a whole can be misinterpreted. “One of the criticisms that has been brought up about Islam is that it is abusive toward women,” Zaidi said. “Sometimes Muslim men are seen as the executors of that abuse.” A 2011 Pew Research Center study found that 22 percent of Amer-

“If there is a misogynist in the news who happens to call himself Muslim, that doesn’t mean Islam is misogynistic,” he added. “The name Islam has been abused to enact political agendas, so educate yourself about the religion. ...When you hear something about Islam, don’t take it at face value.” alleh.naqvi@temple.edu ADVERTISEMENT

The name Islam has been abused to enact political agendas, so educate yourself about the religion. ...When you hear something about Islam, don’t take it at face value. HASAN ZAIDI faculty of desire.” In some cases, a woman wearing a hijab headscarf, or khimar, can be considered more identifiably “Muslim” than a man dressed in the conceptual definition of hijab. “You can’t tell a guy is Muslim just by looking at him,” said Hasan Zaidi, a senior bioengineering major. There is no single way for men and

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INTERSECTION PAGE 20

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

RELIGION

Finding strenth in ‘personal choice’ to wear hijab “[Kuwaiti people] accept the idea of tant vice president of the Office of InstiMuslim women explain why they Muslims surveyed said the president makes them worried about their place in not all women wearing the hijab because tutional Diversity, Equity, Advocacy and wear the hijab and what their society and 75 percent said Muslims are it’s just a personal choice,” Bossalhah Leadership. “There are things like Isreligion means to them.

BY LAUREN REMY For The Temple News Hafeezat Bishi started wearing her hijab almost two years ago as an act of resistance to anti-Muslim rhetoric she heard during President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign. “The day after the inauguration, I saw how powerful women looked in the hijab,” said Bishi, a freshman communication and social influence major. “I was like, ‘I’m ready to do this.’” Now, Bishi said her choice to wear the hijab is more than a response to Islamophobia. It is a public display of identity. “Because I’m Black, people didn’t really recognize I was Muslim,” Bishi said. Her hijab visibly connects her to the Muslim community and allows her to express, “I exist in this space,” she added. In a 2017 study by the Pew Research Center, 68 percent of United States

discriminated against in the U.S. One definition for the “hijab” is “barrier” or “partition.” It is an Islamic principle that encapsulates behavioral and physical modesty, most often associated with a head covering worn by some Muslim women, according to the BBC. For Muslim women at Temple, wearing the hijab is a choice. “It is a personal choice for me,” said Albatoul Bossalhah, a freshman dentistry major who has worn the hijab since she was in sixth grade. “It’s not a choice for you. I won’t hurt you for wearing it, and I am not a weird person just because I am wearing the hijab. I’m just like you, it’s just my choice and I’m just an ordinary person.” Bossalhah is from Kuwait, where she said almost all women wear the hijab, though they are not required to by law. Bossalhah moved to the United States at the beginning of this semester as an international student.

said. “If you don’t wear it, it doesn’t mean you are a bad person. If you act good and show good values, then you are a good person. Not wearing a hijab doesn’t mean you’re a bad person.” In Iran, women are required to wear head coverings in public. An online social movement called “My Stealthy Freedom,” in which Muslim women share pictures of themselves uncovered by a hijab, began in 2014 to protest these laws in Iran. Bishi said that these forms of oppression from specific cultures can be misinterpreted as oppression from Islam. “There are some cultures that do oppress women, and they might have a Muslim-majority setting,” Bishi said. “People think it is a part of Islam, but it’s not.” “When people think of veiling in the U.S., it’s a different kind of circumstances than making the decision in a Muslim country,” said Tiffenia Archie, the assis-

lamophobia, concerns around jobs [and] harassment, but women who make the decision in the U.S. aren’t thinking about being arrested.” Archie, who wrote her dissertation on women who wear the hijab, said, “a lot of women felt it wasn’t a religious obligation [to wear the hijab] but something they felt Muslim women should do.” “They still felt like it was their decision,” she added. “A decision between them and God and nobody else.” Bossalhah said that although fewer women wear hijabs in North Philadelphia than in Kuwait, she feels comfortable at Temple. “I don’t face anybody here looking at me for it,” Bossalhah said. “They are friendly and they accept me. I haven’t heard misconceptions here, but I have only been here for a short time.” laremy@temple.edu

EMMA STEVENS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

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SPORTS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

PAGE 21

CROSS COUNTRY

Owls head to regional race off strong AAC meet The men’s and women’s teams are ranked in the top eight of their region. BY DONOVAN HUGEL Cross Country Beat Reporter

O

n most mornings, James Snyder blasts music from the cross country team’s equipment van and dances while his runners get ready for practice. On other mornings, Temple University’s cross country coach pushes his runners through a grueling workout. Snyder finds “the perfect balance” between being serious and being laid back, which guided the team to some of its best accomplishments in school history, junior Zach Seiger said. The third-year head coach helped both the men and women’s teams finish in the top three of the American Athletic Conference championships in the past two seasons. The Owls will race in the NCAA Mid-Atlantic Regional meet on Friday in State College, Pennsylvania. The most recent U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association poll ranked Temple’s men as the sixthbest team in the region, marking their highest ranking in program history. The women stand at No. 8, one spot higher than their preseason ranking. “He’s incredibly successful and knowledgeable, especially when you consider his age, how young he is,” Seiger said. “He’s able to utilize that in the recruiting process. When you’re at practice with him or you’re reading through your training with him, it seems like he’s been doing this for 30-40 years based on the skill that he has.” Snyder graduated from George Mason University in 2009 and is in his ninth year coaching cross country. From George Mason, he went to Appalachian State University, where he earned his master’s degree in exercise science and served as a graduate assistant from 201012. Before coming to Temple in 2013, @TTN_Sports @TheTempleNews

HANNAH BURNS / FILE PHOTO The women’s cross country team practices at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum in Southwest Philadelphia on Oct. 18.

Snyder spent one year at Florida State University as the operations assistant for the cross country and track and field programs. Snyder is a “goal-oriented” coach, Seiger said. He doesn’t hesitate to tell his runners what he expects of them. Usually, it’s a first-place finish. Before the conference championships, he told the Owls he expected them to win the entire meet. “It motivates us for sure,” senior Katie Leisher said. “We always say, ‘In Snyder we trust,’ because it’s his training. ...We trust his training because at the end of the day, everything that he gives us, it works out.” On the wall in Snyder’s office, there are two of his proudest accomplishments as a coach. Next to the conference championship rings he won at Appalachian State is a large trophy for Temple men’s cross country team’s Intercollegiate Association of Amateur Athletes of America Championship win last November, the first time in program history.

Snyder’s experience and winning past motivated the team to strive for a championship win, Seiger said. In his first season as coach, one of the Owls biggest goals was to beat two teams –– St. Joseph’s and La Salle –– at the regional meet, junior Kevin Lapsansky said. This season they expect to beat all 27 men’s teams and 31 women’s teams on Friday. Snyder was promoted to head coach before the 2016 season after three seasons as the assistant coach. Snyder strictly worked with the distance runners before 2016, so the cross country team was used to his coaching style. “Snyder has recruited the right guys,” Lapsansky said. “The team’s work ethic and ability to work together is better than it has ever been. Him having the head coaching job over us clearly has helped us greatly if you look at how much better we have been getting.” Temple doesn’t have a men’s track and field team, and cross country recruits often choose other schools because they want to participate in both cross country

and track, Seiger said. Nevertheless, Snyder recruits well, Leisher said. “He has this special spark to him that really just grabs people and like potential athletes and he knows how to sell the program to other people,” she said. “He just has this characteristic about him that pulls you in and you’re interested.” Snyder’s was in charge of recruiting databases at Florida State, which taught him how to recruit players at Temple. Because of the Owls’ recent performance, the team has been in recruiting battles with “big-time schools,” Snyder said. He experienced recruiting battles at Florida State, he added, but they haven’t happened until recently at Temple. “Now it’s about finding the right kids and getting into recruiting battles with schools [whose] programs are comparable to ours or better,” he said. donovan.hugel@temple.edu @dono_hugel Michael Zingrone contributed reporting

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

MEN’S LACROSSE

Alumni return to scrimmage current club team The men’s lacrosee team hosted its first annual alumni game at Geasey Field on Sunday. BY ADAM SLOATE For The Temple News Kevin Kulak never envisioned this program becoming the success it is today. From “beer league buddies” to a top five program in Division I of the National College Lacrosse League, Kulak said the program has come a long way since he was club president. To show how far the program has come since it was founded in 2010, the club team held its first annual alumni game at Geasey Field on Sunday. The team, which was founded in 2010, welcomed back more than 20 former players to compete against this year’s team on Sunday. The current players remained ahead for the first half, finishing the second quarter 5-2. The team defeated its alumni 11-6. The alumni players jokingly complained they were “already tired” during their pre-game warm-ups. Sunday was the first time the team played on Geasey Field after it was closed during Spring 2018 to replace the turf. Kulak, a 2014 finance alumnus, said the club was initially founded as a way to, “break a sweat and spend more time

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with friends.” As the program continued to grow, Kulak entered the club into the NCLL. “Lots of good players wanted to try out,” Kulak said. “We wanted to take it more seriously and get some results to show how good we really were.” The team won the NCLL Division II Championship in 2015, going undefeated throughout the entire season and finishing the season 21-0. The Owls defeated Binghamton University in the championship to win their first national title just one year after entering the NCLL. Ryan Brennan, a senior legal studies major and the club’s president, said Sunday’s game was important because he wanted to, “connect with the alumni to let them know what the program has done in their absence.” Coach Chris Berkelbach said the club has worked to put together an alumni game for the past “couple years.” The teams played aggressively, attempting to check each other on Sunday. Despite this, the players cheered each other on and chatted after the game. The team was ranked fourth in the NCLL Division I poll in 2018. This was the highest ranking in the program’s history. In that same season, the Owls went 13-3, breaking several school records. The list of accomplishments includes most wins in a season, most road

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Zach Scannapieco (left), a 2018 mechanical engineering alumnus, carries the ball past freshman defensive midfielder Marco Broccoli at the club’s first annual alumni game at Geasey Field on Sunday.

wins with 12 and six wins against ranked opponents. The team hosted their own playoff game and reached the elite eight to end the season.

The team’s 2019 schedule has yet to be announced. adam.sloate@temple.edu @MrAdster99

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SPORTS PAGE 23

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2018

FIELD HOCKEY

Underclassmen gain experience in losing season Ending with a 2-16 record, the co-captain Maris Stern for fourth most Owls recorded their lowest win on the team. Freshman midfielder Annie Judge total more than 40 years. BY JAY NEEMEYER Field Hockey Beat Reporter It’s been two years since the field hockey team won a conference game. Temple University finished this season with a 2-16 record. For the first time since 1977, the team recorded the fewest wins in a season in which they played 15 or more games. Temple lost 10 straight after its Sept. 23 victory against Towson University. That losing streak is the program’s longest since its eight-game skid in 2015, coach Marybeth Freeman’s first year at Temple. This season, conference opponents outscored the Owls 38-10, and Temple missed the postseason for the second straight year. The Owls played a tough schedule, facing five nationally ranked opponents, including three in conference play. The Owls’ young players, however, gained valuable experience, as three of the team’s seven true freshmen played at least 700 minutes. “I wanted to improve on my speed and everything as a player, and [Freeman] and the coaching staff really helped me with that,” said freshman midfielder and forward Tali Popinko, who scored two goals in 16 games. Freshman midfielder and forward Nienke Oerlemans scored one goal and added three assists in 14 games. Her first assist came in the first game of the season. Last month, Oerlemans missed four games near the end of the season due to a lower-body injury but returned for the final three games. Oerlemans led the freshman class with five points, matching redshirt-senior midfielder and

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and freshman back Claire Thomas each started 12 games. Thomas recorded two defensive saves and logged all 70 minutes in seven games. “She’s got a really good skill set,” senior goalkeeper Chloe Johnson said of Thomas. “She’s fast, she’s speedy, she’s one of the fastest backs I’ve ever had.” Temple will also return more experienced players to its defensive unit. Sophomore back Dani Batze recorded seven defensive saves, which is tied for third in Division I. Junior back Becky Gerhart was close behind, with six defensive saves, including two in the Owls’ final game. Johnson, who is graduating, played in 17 of Temple’s games in 2018 and led Temple’s three goalkeepers in save percentage. Sophomore Cristina Carotenuto and junior Maddie Lilliock look to replace Johnson as the team’s goalkeeper next season. Carotenuto started against Drexel and appeared in five games. In her first season of action, she recorded a .667 save percentage. Lilliock, who started 11 of the Owls’ games in 2017 and was the starter in 2016 as a freshman, was “unavailable” for most of the 2018 season, Freeman said. The Owls have received a commitment from high school goalkeeper Molly Frey, according to Max Field Hockey. Temple’s defense conceded many offensive opportunities. Temple goalkeepers made 9.17 saves per game, second-most in Division I behind the College of the Holy Cross. “The goalkeeping group that we have right now has been a really strong learning environment,” Johnson said. “We’re a really strong unit. ... It’s not about you, it’s about helping everybody

JAMIE COTTRELL / FILE PHOTO Freshman midfielder Annie Judge advances the ball in the Owls’ 3-2 loss against Providence College at Howarth Field on Sept. 25.

else.” In September, Temple hired assistant coach Ross Gilham-Jones, whose primary focus is on the team’s attacking players. Popinko said that adding Gilham-Jones was a positive part of her season. Temple won’t lose its top three leaders in points — junior midfielder and co-captain Kathryn Edgar and junior forwards Cristen Barnett and Lucy Reed — to graduation, so Gilham-Jones will have an opportunity to work with them for a full season. “[Gilham-Jones] provides a lot of valuable insight,” Freeman said. “The players have really, really attached them-

selves to him. And I think that he’s a great teacher.” Freeman said the Owls need to improve in both individual defense and shots on goal, Freeman said. Temple ranked last in the Big East in goals per game, assists, goals allowed and finished second to last in shots per game. “We’ll continue to look at our grit and our tenacity on both sides of the ball,” Freeman said. jay.neemeyer@temple.edu @neemeyer_j

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Profile for The Temple News

Vol. 97 Iss. 11  

Nov. 6, 2018

Vol. 97 Iss. 11  

Nov. 6, 2018

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