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THE TEMPLE NEWS

O’CONNOR REFLECTS ON TENURE AS CHAIRMAN Read more on Page 4 VOL 97 // ISSUE 8 OCTOBER 16, 2018 temple-news.com @thetemplenews

NEWS, PAGE 2 Temple University Hospital CEO joins nonprofit that wants to open the nation’s first safe injection site.

OPINION , PAGE 10 A columnist argues Pennsylvania should waive fees for state ID cards.

FEATURES, PAGE 12 An alumnus proposed to his girlfriend outside Paley Library in a photoshoot.

SPORTS, PAGE 24 The Owls recorded first comeback win of season to boost chances of winning the conference.


NEWS PAGE 2

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

THE TEMPLE NEWS A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. Gillian McGoldrick Editor in Chief Kelly Brennan Managing Editor Julie Christie Digital Managing Editor Evan Easterling Chief Copy Editor Lindsay Bowen News Editor Greta Anderson Deputy Investigations Editor Alyssa Biederman Deputy Campus Editor Will Bleier Deputy City Editor Jayna Schaffer Opinion Editor Laura Smythe Features Editor Zari Tarazona Deputy Features Editor Khanya Brann Deputy Features Editor Michael Zingrone Co-Sports Editor Sam Neumann Co-Sports Editor Claire Wolters Intersection Editor Shefa Ahsan Multimedia Editor Maria Ribeiro Director of Engagement Siani Colon Asst. Director of Engagement Hannah Burns Photography Editor Luke Smith Deputy Photography Editor Madison Seitchik Web Editor Ian Walker Visuals Editor Myra Mirza Visuals Specialist Claire Halloran Design Editor Jeremiah Reardon Designer Phuong Tran Advertising Manager Kelsey McGill Advertising Manager Daniel Magras Business Manager

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content represents the opinion of The Temple News. Adjacent commentary is reflective of their authors, not The Temple News. Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

ON THE COVER CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS PHOTO OF MITCHELL MORGAN (right) / COURTESTY OF JOSEPH V. LABOLITO

CORRECTIONS In the sport section teaser that ran on Page 1, it was stated that Temple football won over East Carolina University by 46 points. Temple won by 43 points. Accuracy is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it as soon as possible. Anyone with inquirues about content in this newspaper can contact Editor in Chief Gillian McGoldrick at editor@temple-news.com or 215-204-6736.

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

CITY

TUH executive joins Safehouse committee The organization received City Council approval to possibly develop the nation’s first safe injection site. BY DIANA CRISTANCHO For The Temple News

T

emple University Hospital’s top executive joined the advisory committee for the Philadelphia nonprofit attempting to open the city’s first comprehensive user engagement site, or a safe injection site. Temple University Health System President and CEO and Katz School of Medicine Dean Larry Kaiser joined the advisory board for Safehouse, a group of Philadelphia leaders that plan to develop the site, which aims to provide overdose prevention and treatment services and a safe place for people to use drugs medical supervision. A spokesperson from TUH did not respond to multiple requests to comment on Kaiser’s involvement in Safehouse’s advisory committee. Philadelphia health officials announced in January that they will allow the opening of a safe injection site, but they will not fund it, the Inquirer reported. Safehouse is backed by former Philadelphia mayor and Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, who once legalized the needle exchange program Prevention Point when he was the mayor in 1992. With backing from Rendell and the incorporation of the nonprofit, the organization can

take more concrete steps toward its plan to open the first safe injection site in the nation. Such sites are illegal under federal law. Safe injection sites have operated throughout Europe, Australia and Canada. Preventing overdoses and connecting people to treatment services are the main objectives of safe injection sites. Some who oppose the sites argue they will increase drug use, but a 2014 review of 75 studies refuted that claim. The Drug and Alcohol Dependence journal concluded safe injection sites help people obtain primary health services that can help them into long-term recovery from addiction. More than 1,200 people died from a drug-related overdose in Philadelphia in 2017, according to a release from the city’s Department of Public Health. Gov. Tom Wolf declared the opioid epidemic a disaster emergency in January 2018. “We believe that if we can provide a safe [injection site], where consumption can be supervised, we can prevent some of those fatalities,” said Ronda Goldfein, vice president of the board of directors for Safehouse. “Having eyes on a person is the best way to get them quick and efficient emergency attention,” Goldfein said. “What we are doing now is not working. If we can prevent fatalities, shouldn’t we try?” The first safe-injection site will most likely be in Kensington, the center of the city’s opioid epidemic and the area with the highest overdose death rate in Philadelphia,

SAFEHOUSE | PAGE 6 temple-news.com


NEWS

PAGE 3

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

ELECTION

@TheTempleNews

Lehigh Ave nue

Ward 32 had a 34 percent voter turnout rate. Ward 16 had a 35 percent voter turnout rate.

37

16 32

reet

Ward leaders near Main Campus hope more people come out to vote this midterm election after the area had turnout below the national average in the past two midterm elections. They’re hopeful, but not optimistic. The five North Philadelphia electoral wards on and around Main Campus recorded turnout ranging from 24 to 34 percent in the 2014 midterm election, according to City Commissioner Al Schmidt’s 2014 and 2016 reports. Wards 16, 20, 32, 37 and 47 all recorded turnout lower than the 37 percent citywide average and the 36.4 percent national average for the 2014 midterms. In the 2016 presidential election, turnout in the five wards ranged from 54 to 60 percent, and citywide turnout jumped to 66 percent. Two wards––16 and 32––had turnouts higher than the national average. The 2018 midterm election is on Nov. 6. Renee McNair is the Democratic leader of Ward 20, which had 25 percent voter turnout in the 2014 midterms, the seventh-lowest percentage among the city’s 66 wards. Ward 20, which is bounded by Master Street to the south, Susquehanna Avenue to the north, Broad Street to the west and 6th Street to the east, encompasses Main Campus. “I need to make sure the committee people let the people in their district know how important it is to vote,” McNair said. “I always feel like that [high turnout] should happen but that didn’t happen [in the 2014 midterms]. Some people don’t know who to vote for. They’re not aware of who there is on the ballot.” Terry Starks, the Republican leader of Ward 20, agreed that the Temple community, especially young voters, have limited knowledge about the

6th St

Five wards near Main Campus In the 2014 midterm reported 24 to 34 percent turn- elections... out in the 2014 midterm election. Ward 20 had a 26 percent voter turnout rate. BY HAL CONTE Ward 47 had a 26 percent For The Temple News voter turnout rate.

Broad Street

North Philly wards hopeful for high turnout in midterms

32

20

Ward 37 had a 31percent voter turnout rate.

16 47

37 20

47

Poplar Str ee

t

JULIE CHRISTIE & IAN WALKER / THE TEMPLE NEWS SOURCE: City of Philadelphia Voter Turnout General Election & Qualified Voter Registry 2014 General election

upcoming midterms. “We have to get more voter awareness to get voter turnout,” Starks said. “Around Temple… voters don’t know who the candidates are, and don’t know anything about the candidates.” Political science professor David Nickerson said the below-average turnout in 2014 is due to the area’s population of college students and the fact that North Philadelphia is experiencing poverty. “I imagine that Philadelphia, in general, might see a slight uptick in 2018, but it isn’t going to be a large departure from past elections,” Nickerson said. “Higher-income people tend to vote more often than low-income people. There is a lot of public housing around Temple.” “It’s not surprising that the areas around Temple have a lot lower turnout than average,” he added. According to a 2015 U.S. Census Bureau report, about 59 percent of people with incomes less than $29,999 did not vote in the 2014 midterm elections. Fifty-five percent of those who cannot vote, a group that includes people who have committed felonies and non-citizens, are people experiencing poverty, according to a 2013 Harvard University report. Midterm elections typically see a

dropoff in turnout from presidential elections, Nickerson said. National turnout, using voting-age population, for the 2014 midterms was 17.2 percent lower than the 2016 presidential election, according to the Pew Research Center. Nickerson said the dropoff from midterms to presidential elections is more significant in younger voters. According to the United States Election Project, about 16 percent of eligible voters between the ages of 18 and 29 voted in the 2014 elections, while about 43 percent voted in 2016. “It’s hard to predict [turnout], and on the one hand there are a lot of student activists and the students who care about politics are very engaged,” Nickerson said. “Whether it be the Parkland [, Florida] shooting or immigration, the environment, there’s a lot of issues where young people may not care about parties, but they care about the issues, and so they are organizing around issues,” he added. McNair said she’s seen a more active, young voter base than in the past, leading up to November’s election. “It’s up to them,” she said. “I’m looking forward to that. We all have to try to get it done.” Some North Philadelphia residents and Temple students are motivated

to vote, while others do not plan to vote, like Sherri Palmer, a 31-year-old staff member at the School District of Philadelphia who lives near Lehigh Avenue and Broad Street. “None of the candidates [are] reaching out to me,” Palmer said. “It’s the same thing every year. Nothing’s new.” Some students, like secondary education and mathematics major J.P. Fay, are not informed about the candidates running for local offices, leaving them unsure if they should stay home on Election Day. “I just haven’t really been following the news, [and] I don’t know too much about the candidates,” Fay said. “I’ll vote for anyone who’s against [President Donald] Trump… I’m not going to give my vote away to someone who I don’t know much about.” “I haven’t considered voting quite yet,” said Jason Block, a freshman environmental engineering major. “I haven’t done enough research. This is my first year I can vote.” Senior kinesiology major Synquetta Blackmon, however, is mobilized to vote in the midterms. “I’ve been voting since I could vote, and it’s the right thing to do,” she said. “At least I can say I tried.” hal.conte@temple.edu

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


NEWS PAGE 4

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

COVER STORY

O’CONNOR TO SERVE FINAL TERM AS CHAIR style. I think it’s important for a university to experience good change and to have good succession planning.” Morgan said he’s “certainly not in any way” looking to make major changes to university leadership. “Chairman O’Connor has done a great job, and I’m hoping just to continue with his legacies,” Morgan said. He said his decision was not affected by students from Feminist Alliance who called on him to step down from the Board last academic year. “As a matter of fact, probably it would have made me stay longer, frankly,” he added. “I don’t react to that kind of, what I consider to be, unreal pressure.”

Patrick O’Connor spoke with The Temple News about the accomplishments and controversies he faced as Board chair. BY GILLIAN MCGOLDRICK Editor in Chief Temple University Board of Trustees Chairman Patrick O’Connor will serve his final term and step down as chair on July 31, 2019. He will be replaced by trustee Mitchell Morgan, the namesake of Morgan Hall, the Board announced last Tuesday. O’Connor, who was appointed in 1971 as the youngest trustee in university history, will continue to serve on the Board as a trustee. During the last nine years of O’Connor’s time as chairman, the university grew in size, reached new heights in its endowment and began and completed an array of construction projects. It also reached national headlines for tragedies and scandals. The Temple News spoke to O’Connor about how the university has changed –– for better and for worse –– during his time at the helm including if he felt it was unethical to represent former trustee Bill Cosby, his thoughts on the proposed on-campus football stadium and why he’s decided to step down.

THE DECISION

Over the last year, O’Connor and his

O’Connor has led the Temple University Board of Trustees with integrity and distinction...Patrick’s energy, intelligence, vision, generosity and courage have made him a difference maker for Temple. PATRICK LARKIN

TRUSTEE SINCE 2004

COSBY EVAN EASTERLING / THE TEMPLE NEWS Former President Neil Theobald (left), Board of Trustrees Chairman Patrick O’Connor and Dean of Libraries Joe Lucia symbolically break ground at the contrustion site on April 26, 2016.

fellow trustees created a succession plan. “I felt very comfortable as chair,” he added. “I’ve enjoyed my 10 years as chair. I was under no pressure to resign, but I just think good governance mandates a succession plan.” O’Connor’s decision to wait until next year to step down but remain on the Board is purposeful: the university is undergoing several things he wants to see through, like the Fox School of Business rankings misreporting reviews and the restructuring of Temple University Health System.

He has dedicated himself to the university and its progress. Because of the force of his personality, because of his record of achievement, and because of the respect that I and others on the board have for him, he was always able to achieve unanimity. LEW GOULD

“I felt it unfair to step down in the midst of that,” he said. “I’m not one who would run away from a fight or an issue, and I didn’t want to leave the impression that a resignation earlier would be because of these daunting issues. I intend to see my term through as chair and hopefully... move forward and resolve these issues.” He added that he wants to ensure Morgan has time to prepare new committee chairs and for the role. “Mitchell is younger,” O’Connor said. “He had new ideas, new leadership

He allowed everybody to express their opinions. He was always thinking about what’s best for the university. MARINA KATS

TRUSTEE SINCE 2017

O’Connor is a trial lawyer and is the vice chairman of Cozen O’Connor, an international law firm based in Philadelphia. In 2015, O’Connor began receiving backlash for serving as Cosby’s defense attorney in a 2005 civil suit by former Temple employee Andrea Constand. Cosby was criminally charged in 2015 with three counts of aggravated indecent assault, for which he now is serving three to 10 years in prison. O’Connor said he has “never” regretted representing him. “Trial lawyers, and the great trial tradition of Philadelphia lawyers, to represent people in unpopular causes... doesn’t mean you embrace what the person was alleged to have done, it just

I can’t imagine that there’s anything in [O’Connor’s] life to which he has devoted more time, energy, worry, concern...I really do think he’s been a tremendous chairman. MICHAEL REED

TRUSTEE SINCE 2016

TRUSTEE SINCE 1985

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

temple-news.com


NEWS

PAGE 5

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

[O’Connor] was always a busy man. What you saw in public wasn’t always him, in private, he was very personable, very hilarious, and always interested in diving deeper into issues, which I appreciated.

I understand from a normal person sitting in that room or someone reading about what happens in that meeting, they think that it’s just a political show. That wasn’t the case. The trustees actively listen to what the students have to say.

ARON COWEN

2015-16 TSG PRESIDENT

2016-17 TSG PRESIDENT

means that in the great traditions of legal acumen lawyers serve their clients.” “It’s a chapter of my life I don’t regret,” O’Connor added. “I would do it again. Every person of whatever status in life deserves counsel of their choosing.” Cosby’s deposition and the settlement Constand received from the civil suit was a prominent part of Cosby’s criminal trial in April. O’Connor was listed as a potential defense witness, but the former trustees defense team did not call him to testify. “I’m saddened by what’s happened to Bill Cosby and his reputation because he was a great Temple [alumnus] when he was at Temple,” O’Connor said. “It saddens me that this has happened to him.” “At the same time, the jury believed he victimized people and because of the jury system which we all stand by and which we honor, he’s now serving time in jail,” he added. He said that at the time he agreed to defend Cosby in the civil suit, he did not know the comedian very well. He added if the assault occurred on a Temple University property or if the university was implicated in the case, he would not have represented him. “It’s a sad story, because he was a poor kid who got a great education at Temple, was a worldwide super celebrity,” O’Connor added. “Now, no longer. He’s a celebrity for different reasons.”

GROWTH AND SETBACKS

O’Connor joined the Board in 1971 at 28 years old and became the youngest trustee in university history. O’Connor left the Board in 1984 after he was not reappointed. In 2001, O’Connor returned to the Board after he was appointed by the speaker of the state House of @TheTempleNews

Representatives. He began his tenure as chairman of the Board in July 2009, replacing former chairman and current trustee Daniel Polett. Enrollment soared during O’Connor’s tenure as chairman. In 2009, when O’Connor stepped into the leading university role, the university’s enrollment totaled 38,956 students. Last year, the university recorded 40,240 students enrolled, according to the 201718 Temple University fact book. The university’s endowment has also grown exponentially since the start of O’Connor’s tenure as a result of donations from alumni and friends of the university. In June 2012, the university’s endowment was $262 million. The endowment surpassed $500 million in 2016, and it is now $581.9 million. The university also began construction projects like the $170 million Charles Library, which is set to be open to students and faculty in Fall 2019, and the 27-story Morgan Hall, which opened in Fall 2013. O’Connor, as Board chair, accepted a $5 million gift from Morgan and his wife Hilarie to name the on-campus housing complex on Broad Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue after them. O’Connor led the Board through several university leadership changes, like national searches to replace former presidents Ann Weaver Hart and Neil Theobald. Hart and Theobald could not be reached for comment. Hart served as president from May 2006 to June 2012. Theobald was president from 2012 to July 2016. He resigned weeks after the Board voted “no confidence” in Theobald’s leadership because of a $22 million deficit in the university’s financial aid budget and the

He was the chairman for a very long time and in that time we saw probably the biggest period of momentum, growth, and transformations of the university... He brought us through 10 very huge years in Temple’s history.

RYAN RINALDI

demotion of former Provost Hai-Lung Dai. This time period was “an unfortunate chapter in Temple’s history,” O’Connor said Monday. Under Theobald and O’Connor, the university began talks of an on-campus stadium which remains a controversial topic among students, faculty and community residents. In 2013, under O’Connor, the Board cut five varsity athletic sports after the university conducted a seven-month analysis of the university’s athletic budget. The analysis recommended the university cut non-revenue sports because of rising operating costs and the tightening of the university’s budget. More recently, the university has come under fire after an investigation found that the Fox School of Business falsified data for rankings sent to the U.S. News & World Report every year since 2014. Former Dean Moshe Porat was asked to resign and was replaced with interim dean Ron Anderson.

LOOKING BACK AND AHEAD

O’Connor reaffirmed on Monday that he believes a football stadium is the best thing for the university — and the community. “It would add value to their lives because we would…create jobs for our local citizens,” O’Connor said. “It was going to be a win-win for the university and the residents that surround it. For now, it’s on hold.” The university expected a decision from city officials on the 35,000-seat facility in June, but it’s since been delayed, The Temple News reported in June. He said that because it’s on hold, the university will approach the Eagles to negotiate a new contract so the football

DARIN BARTHOLOMEW 2013-14 TSG PRESIDENT

team has somewhere to play after the 2019 season. One of the accomplishments he’s most proud of during his tenure as chair is the success of the Fly in 4 program, the ever-growing student population and a “new energy” at the university that’s engaging alumni and prospective students. But that’s the irony of the Board, he said: trustees can’t take credit for what’s gone right, nor should they be blamed when things have gone wrong. “People row it, not us,” he added. O’Connor said in another 10 years, he still sees the university focused on its mission: an affordable, great institution serving a diverse student population. “I’m 75 years old, I’ve spent a lot of time on Temple matters because I love the school,” O’Connor said. “I love the students, I love what it stands for. It’s a pretty long time as chairman, I’m surprised I lasted that long.” O’Connor will leave his leading role next year with he and his wife Marie’s name honored at O’Connor Plaza. He’ll also continue to individually support student scholarships, he said. “Temple is a microcosm that America, as a country which is divided and torn, should emulate,” he said. “Temple is a place that proves that people of all status in life, learning in life, whatever their color is, whatever their nationality is, can work together in a harmonious way and make good things happen.” gillian@temple.edu @gill_mcgoldrick Lindsay Bowen, Greta Anderson, Alyssa Biederman and Will Bleier contributed reporting.

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


NEWS PAGE 6

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

CITY

Program helps employees live locally The Employee Home Ownership program gives grants to eligible university employees to encourage local homeownership. BY ISSALINA SAGAD For The Temple News Temple University revived the Employee Home Ownership program to assist its employees in purchasing houses in areas near Main Campus and the Health Sciences Campus in collaboration with the Philadelphia Home.Buy.Now program. The program allows any full-time, non-probationary university employee to receive a forgivable loan up to $5,000 from the university and matching grants up to $4,000 Philadelphia Home.Buy. Now program to go toward purchasing a home in eight North Philadelphia ZIP codes. Employees are able to receive up to $9,000 total from Temple’s program and the Urban Affairs Coalition. Due to lack of funds, the city had to freeze Philadelphia Home.Buy.Now at times, which is administered by the UAC, including in 2009 and 2010, said Jojy Varghese, the UAC’s director of community and economic development. The city unfroze the program most recently in January, Varghese said. Temple employees must buy a home within these ZIP codes, which include the Nicetown and Fairhill neighborhoods, with their own financial bank or realtor, said Gerry O’Kane, the university’s director of benefits. The goal of aiding Philadelphia employees in finding their homes in the same area as their jobs started with PHBN in 2004 with a collaboration between the UAC and the city. Temple first participated in the program in 2007, three years after the UAC originally asked about 50 employers to provide some type of monetary benefit to their workers, Varghese said. The funding for Philadelphia Home.Buy.Now News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

HANNAH BURNS / THE TEMPLE NEWS Jojy Varghese, the director of community and economic development for the Urban Affairs Coalition, said half of the grants the UAC gave were to people of color in eight ZIP codes near Main Campus.

comes from the city’s Division of Housing and Community Development, which allows employees to search for homes within the designated ZIP codes. “If you’re in North Philadelphia, Temple University has done a great job for providing many homeownership opportunities within the Temple North Philadelphia radius,” Varghese said. “Our first grant that we’ve given out a few weeks ago was nearby in Brewerytown, so really it’s a win-win for the city, it’s a win-win for the employer and it’s definitely a win-win for the employee knowing that this person doesn’t have to travel 20-30 minutes,” Varghese added. The UAC is a nonprofit that works to improve communities in Philadelphia. The UAC pushes for a diverse platform that allows employees of different backgrounds—including young workers, minorities who have faced setbacks and middle-income families—to buy homes. “I know more than half of the people that we’ve given this to have been people of color,” Varghese said. Philadelphia’s contract with the UAC consists of providing funds for managing the programs. It allows the UAC to run workshops and educate people on how

to purchase a home and provides other forms of housing counseling. The remainder of the funds come from the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency, which has a yearly grant cycle for which organizations similar to the UAC can apply. The Pennsylvania Housing Affordability and Rehabilitation Enhancement Fund grant provides match funding options, which is the source of the grants. Companies have no limits to the number of loans they give employees. “From this, employees receive a forgivable loan, and through the city, they apply for a matching grant based on their income,” O’Kane said. Flexibility allows the program to be more accessible, despite the fluctuating budget from distributing grants on a caseby-case basis. With the increase in funding from the city, Varghese said that the UAC wishes to also increase the number of employees benefiting from Philadelphia Home.Buy.Now. “[The program] really shows that people aren’t just buying a home, but they’re staying in their communities,” Varghese said. issalina.sagad@temple.edu

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 SAFEHOUSE the Inquirer reported. On Oct. 3, Mayor Jim Kenney signed an executive order that declared a disaster in Kensington. Apart from medical supervision and harm reduction, the site would decrease drug use in open areas, the Inquirer reported. People who might not have stable housing would have access to a safe space to use drugs without risking being seen by children. “The situation is a matter of emergency, and I know the opening of a safe-injection site is incredibly controversial,” said Gerald Stahler, a geography and urban studies professor and member of Temple’s Task Force on Opioid and Related Drug Addiction and Recovery Support. “The results of the research have been very consistent. It doesn’t seem to increase drug use. What happens is, a lot of users get access to medical care and end up going into treatment.” “The site will help address issues of people using in public spaces, and it will reduce sights of dirty needles laying on the streets, but the bottom line is that it will help to save lives,” he added. Safehouse will provide clean needles and equipment and fentanyl testing strips. Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid that is 50-100 times stronger than morphine found in contaminated heroin. Testing for fentanyl is a crucial precaution to prevent overdose. Safehouse staff would not provide drugs or aid in injection. “A few years ago, I’m not sure how I would have felt about a [safe injection site] in the city,” Stahler said. “But given what has been going on now, I’m proud of Philadelphia for trying to forge ahead with this establishment where lives can be saved.” diana.cristancho@temple.edu

temple-news.com


OPINION TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

PAGE 7 EDITORIAL

Support, legalize safe injection sites in Philadelphia Temple University Health System President and CEO Larry Kaiser is on the advisory committee of Safehouse, a nonprofit aiming to open the city’s and nation’s first comprehensive user engagement site, or safe injection site. The Editorial Board believes safe injection sites, while illegal under federal law, are a promising and necessary solution to the city’s opioid crisis. The site aims to prevent overdoses, connect people to treatment services and provide a safe place to use drugs under the supervision of medical staff. In Philadelphia, more than 1,200 people died in 2017 from drug-related overdoses, according to the city’s Department of Public Health. Earlier this month, Mayor Jim Kenney signed an executive order declaring a disaster in Kensington, which has the city’s highest overdose death rate, the Inquirer reported. The opioid crisis also extends outside the city and across the state, which prompted Gov. Tom Wolf to declare the epidemic a disaster emergency in January. “Having eyes on a person is the best way to get them quick and efficient emergency attention,” said Ronda Goldfein, vice president of the board of directors for Safehouse. “What [the city] is doing now is not working. If we can prevent fatalities, shouldn’t we try?”

@TheTempleNews

It is crucial we go beyond the programs and resources that are already in place and find better solutions for those struggling with substance use disorder. We commend Kaiser for joining Safehouse and Temple for continuing to provide resources to those struggling with substance use disorder. The Temple Recovery Using Scientific Treatments Clinic will expand treatment services to treat 300 patients. Similarly, the Temple/ Wedge Center of Excellence offers drug counseling, prenatal care and mental health services for pregnant women struggling with substance use disorder. The university also formed the Task Force on Opioid and Related Drug Addiction and Recovery Support in May to explore the university’s policies to help students in recovery. Overdose prevention and treatment must go hand in hand to ensure people don’t die from overdoses and can access recovery services. Safe injection sites have demonstrated their efficacy in Europe, Australia and Canada — it’s time the United States follows suit. We commend local officials for recognizing the opioid epidemic’s impact on Philadelphia and making strides to implement a solution we hope comes to fruition.

A LETTER TO THE EDITOR A student activist commends the mission of the Intersection. Dear Editor, I am writing to you to convey a heartfelt gratitude and tribute to The Temple News for implementing this new sphere of illustrative journalism known as Intersection. For many marginalized people, the concept of feeling “seen” and represented accurately in the media is highly valuable. We are more than humans: we are stories with a heartbeat, and often those stories are untold and systematically suppressed. When people use terms like “outrage culture,” “call-out culture” or “social justice warriors,” they are willingly overlooking the larger narrative. Our anger is not without virtue. Our emotions are a byproduct of oppression; our “call-outs” emerge from a demand for accountability in a society where human rights are not a priority. We are deliberately putting together our own table, instead of pulling up a chair at a party we were not invited to. We have a right to be seen, heard, understood, loved and fought for. When Intersection arrived in the pages of my campus newspaper, I felt like I could not only see myself in the pages, but I found myself envisioning a small shift in the way we define good journalism. I sense that Intersection is a space conducive to understanding and being understood. It is a brave space where contributors can tell their stories and readers can weed out their preconceived notions and enhance the scope of their empathy. Of everything published so far, my two favorite pieces were about mental health and bisexuality. The article titled “OMG I’m so OCD” resonated with me because I live with multiple mental illnesses, and I know the frustration with hearing people say things like, “This weather is so bipolar,” and, “Wow, she is such a psycho,” and “Dashboard Confessional makes music to cut your wrists to.” This is disheartening to me because living with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, social anxiety disorder and bipolar disorder has made a monumental impact on my life and hearing these things makes me feel both mis-

understood and invalidated. Another part of my identity that is often misunderstood and invalidated is my sexuality. I am bisexual. I am not gay nor am I straight. I am not confused nor am I experimenting, nor in a phase. I know exactly who I am. Yet, heteronormativity reigns supreme in our society, and bisexuality is not given a chance to be understood. I loved the poem titled “Are You Confused?” because it really spoke to my own struggles with being seen as I am, as opposed to what society wants to paint me as. I have written several poems that express those same emotions. At the core, humans just want to be loved, accepted, validated and understood. I think the toll oppression takes on a spirit is severely underestimated. Hopefully, Intersection will help connect readers to experiences they have never had, perspectives they would otherwise not see and stories they’ve never read because they weren’t given the space. As an activist, I think one of the central issues in this fight for equality is a lack of education and understanding. We need to break down stereotypes, humanize marginalized groups, tell their stories ethically and do our best to foster civil discourse that leads to real cultural change. True change doesn’t begin in politics; it begins in our minds and our hearts. We need to talk about race, we need to talk about sexuality and gender, and we need to talk about mental health, disability, class and religion. To quote late 19th and early 20th-century journalist Finley Peter Dunne, “The job of the newspaper is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.” Brittany Valentine, a senior journalism major, is a member of the Feminist Alliance at Temple University. She can be reached at brittany.leigh. valentine@temple.edu or at @recoveryspirit on Instagram.

letters@temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 8

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

BY JEREMIAH REARDON / THE TEMPLE NEWS

IMMIGRATION

Respect everyone, people are not ‘illegal’ from China or Hong Kong and 150,400

delay the process. It may take six months

substantial number of jobs that non-im-

Talking about human beings like this is wrong, and it’s important to acknowledge how much our country truly needs immigration. We should treat people with respect, especially those who risk their lives crossing the border, seeking a better life. Kevin Fandl, a legal studies professor and former senior counsel to the assistant secretary at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said calling people “illegal” is demeaning. “It’s likely to be used in a means to discriminate,” Fandl said. “The problem with [the term ‘illegal’] is it describes an action rather than a person. …It suggests that they’re a criminal.” Many people are not aware of this, though. Or maybe they’re just ignorant of it. We need to start looking beyond the headlines and our president’s tweets and do our own research about the immigration process. Generally, someone who wants to be a U.S. citizen must apply for a green card first, which means being considered a legal resident, then apply for naturalization, according to AllLaw, an online legal guide. This comes with several fees, and even a slight application error can

least five years after acquiring a green card or permanent residence, according to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. They must know the English language unless exempt, and some U.S. history. If they pass the citizenship test and interview, it can take another two years to take oath as a new citizen. Between application fees and background check costs reaching about $725, this process requires funds that many people seeking asylum do not have. The entire naturalization process takes at least five years, and in some situations it could be much longer. Rather than trying to send these people back, we should welcome them with open arms and encourage them to tell their stories. I was born in the U.S., but I know the country I call home was founded on immigration. Indigenous people make up less than two percent of the entire U.S. population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. So, many people expressing xenophobic opinions are likely descendants of European immigrants themselves. Joshua Klugman, a sociology and psychology professor, said the U.S. has a

need to be filled that aren’t being filled by native born Americans,” Klugman said. “So in some ways, it’s hypocritical because we’ve set up this system where we have these jobs that can only be filled by [undocumented immigrants], and yet we demonize them.” It’s time to stop demonizing and turning away people who are here to contribute to our society. By voting for representatives who take a pro-immigration stance, we can help to take the right steps toward welcoming new people into our country. Regardless of whether they came into this country the authorized way or not, it’s dehumanizing to refer to an immigrant as “illegal.” While their journey to the U.S. may have been unlawful, a human being is not a crime. The country we have now wouldn’t be enriched or diverse without immigration. We should try to walk a mile — or hundreds of miles — in an immigrant’s shoes before making assumptions about situations most of us couldn’t imagine.

Immigrants are vital to our came from Mexico. Many migrate to es- or more. migrants don’t want, which can be filled culture, and we shouldn’t have cape violence, poverty or persecution, To apply for citizenship, the appli- by people who have immigrated here. negative attitudes toward them. according to Global Citizen. cant must have lived in the U.S. for at “We have a lot of low-skill jobs that President Donald Trump held a rally in Kentucky on Saturday where he spoke about immigration — using his usual phrases like “criminal aliens” and “most vile, most vicious people on Earth” to refer to immigrants. This doesn’t come as a surprise, as he frequently uses this derogatory rhetoric at rallies, on social media and in interviews. Still, this makes me upset for immigrants seeking refuge the U.S. And I’m afraid that with the KERRY LYSTER constant negative attitude of our country’s leader comes more discrimination against them. The U.S. is “the top destination for international migrants since at least 1960,” according to the Migration Policy Institute, a nonprofit think tank based in Washington, D.C. Of the foreign-born people who moved into the U.S. in 2016, 175,100 of them came from India, 160,200 came

letters@temple-news.com

kerry.lyster@temple.edu

temple-news.com


OPINION

PAGE 9

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

THE ESSAYIST

Race, sexuality intersects at 13th and Locust Attending OutFest helped a lead columnist take pride in his bisexuality and Latinx roots.

About a month ago in my education class, we talked about the diversity of culture and identity within each of us. When my professor asked how the intersection of these identities cause conflict within us individually, I instantly thought about my bisexuality and my Latinx roots. The intersection of race and sexuality within me has always been a gray area, and one that I didn’t understand until recently. Being raised in a puertorriqueño household, my siblings and I were taught that machismo, or masculinity, defines a man. And from a young age I felt I could never live up to that standard. Even today, reaching this unattainable model of masculinity feels like a losing battle. And the emphasis on tradition in Latinx culture has caused me to feel like an outcast, like an anomaly within my own ethnicity. When I began coming out as bisexual, I felt like I was leaving one culture for another. That is, of course, until this month. The fact that National Coming Out Week coincided with the end of Latinx Heritage Month felt like an ode to my complex identity, an intersection of pride — or orgullo — that manifested itself on Oct. 7. OutFest in Philadelphia was the first LGBTQ event I had ever attended, and within minutes, it became one of the greatest days of my life. OutFest is the largest National Coming Out Day street festival in the world, taking place in Philadelphia’s own Gayborhood. On that Sunday, I marched through a parade of Pride flags set to the score of queer music and down streets filled with people celebrating their individuality. Like a rainbow of skin tones,

@TheTempleNews

BY CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

BY TYLER PEREZ Lead Columnist

the people around me were unapologetically proud of their identities that coincided with their ethnicities. For a few minutes, I even lost my friends in the crowd of colorful banners and flags. Over the course of a few hours, the stage became home to powerful speeches by community leaders, avant-garde performances by drag artists and memorable concerts by queer musicians. One performance, however, was incredibly memorable. About an hour after we arrived, a Latinx drag performer took the stage adorned in a beautiful dress and a golden sash that signified her champion status in the Philly drag community. She danced across the stage with unapologetic confidence and boldness — with true, unwavering pride — as she lip-synced a Spanish rendition of Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive.” By and large, she had the most entertaining performance at OutFest, but something about her steadfast pride struck a chord with me that no other performer did. Her unabashed embrace

of her Latinx culture while simultaneously disavowing the concept of machismo was absolutely inspiring and powerful for me, a Latinx bisexual man in the audience. Watching a Latinx drag queen perform a song in Spanish showed me Latinx men don’t have to be burdened by the chains of the masculinity that we’re taught from a young age. Sexuality and ethnicity aren’t mutually exclusive of one another, and there’s no partition between my two cultures. It might seem like something small that a drag queen of Hispanic descent performed a song in Spanish. But for a bisexual puertorriqueño boy who was never introduced to successful people who represent both his sexuality and his ethnicity, it was life changing. I had known of queer Latinx people before. Frida Kahlo, Princess Nokia and Sylvia Rivera are just three examples. But never had I seen someone like me with my own eyes. I wasn’t an anomaly. In the days since OutFest, I’ve

looked across the internet for the name of the inspiring Latinx drag queen who helped me realize the beauty in my complex identity — but with little luck. Not a single website, news article or social media post could name the person who, in five minutes, changed my perception of myself. And, at the end of the day, the anonymity of my newest role model is something I can live with. It could take decades of attending Philadelphia Pride events and OutFest celebrations, decades of encountering more and more LGBTQ people of Latinx descent, decades of being proud of my own identity before I get to say thank you to the person who helped foster my own self-understanding without even knowing it. But until then, I’m going to wave my Pride flag to the heavens, shouting “me amo” with every ounce of orgulloso in my veins. tyler.perez@temple.edu @perezodent

letters@temple-news.com


OPINION

PAGE 10

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

ELECTION

Free identification: a pathway to true democracy the Inquirer reported. They can be out

The cost of IDs and other docu- of reach for economically trying people. For this reason, people in disenments create significant barriers franchised strata are sometimes excludfor people in poverty. As Election Day draws closer, I can’t help but think about how important it is that everyone gets to vote, especially those who might not have easy access to this right. In Pennsylvania, people voting for the first time at their districts are required to RACHEL BERSON show identification, something that — while seemingly innocuous — can create significant problems for individuals who cannot obtain state-issued IDs or other forms because of financial barriers. Documents like birth certificates are required when applying for government ID cards and cost upwards of $50 each,

ed from voting simply because of their income. To maintain equal democratic representation, which includes the voices of people experiencing poverty, access to ID cards should be free. Last year, New Jersey adopted a policy that waives the fees for people experiencing homelessness to obtain non-driver state IDs and birth certificates. Pennsylvania should also make an effort to give people in poverty free IDs and fair access to their right to vote. Christina Borst, a junior strategic communications and political science major and the president of the Temple College Democrats, is in favor of this proposal. “A lot of people don’t understand the complications that come with voter registration,” Borst said. “Voting should be as easy as possible.” Borst said having access to free IDs

“will open up the voting pool even further” for people who usually are denied democratic representation based on their economic status. Patricia Amberg-Blyskal, a political science professor, said there is “a concern that people will lose their right to vote with voter ID laws.” Providing easier access to obtaining IDs would help mitigate that concern, she added. The benefits of having an ID aren’t limited to just voting. IDs are important for job hunting, getting a house and applying for government assistance and health care. The cost associated with acquiring an ID traps those who are poor within their circumstances. Without IDs, they aren’t able to apply for jobs and improve their financial situations. In a country with a significant class divide, it is important that the interests of people facing financial hardships are represented. We need these voices to be heard now more than ever. “Something we’re hearing a lot in this election is that our government

isn’t reflective of our population,” Amberg-Blyskal said. “People who govern us don’t come from experiences we relate to.” Because so many wealthy, privileged people are represented in government, it is increasingly important that those who are not wealthy also get to have political opinions. Otherwise, it’s unlikely they’ll benefit from policy and legislation. If Pennsylvania widens its voter pool by offering free ID access, local officials might be more inclined to adopt platforms that will be more beneficial to their diverse constituents. “In the smaller sphere, [politicians] might do outreach that might change some policies,” Amberg-Blyskal said. Charging people for IDs is a significant injustice, and it is the responsibility of our government to rectify it. Elections will not be fair if we ignore the fact that certain people are silenced. rachel.berson@temple.edu

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OPINION

PAGE 11

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

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The answers to this week’s puzzle will be in the Tuesday, Oct. 23 issue.

4. Drummer for The Roots 5. Stands on top of City Hall 7. Musical duo that produced the 1982 song “Maneater” 8. Convenience store chain founded in Pennsylvania in 1964 9. Whiz, American, or Provolone? 12. Philly’s main street 13. “Sleep with one eye open, bird.” 14. Wildwood, Ocean City, Atlantic City letters@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 12

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

ALUMNI

Alumnus pulls off surprise proposal on campus Ray Boyd proposed to his girlfriend, Jenna Nicolosi, outside Paley Library. BY MADISON KARAS For The Temple News Jenna Nicolosi thought she was being photographed for a Philadelphia Inquirer story about millennial dog owners. That was until her boyfriend Ray Boyd got down on one knee outside of Paley Library. Before accepting the proposal, Nicolosi asked Boyd, a 2013 journalism alumnus and the Inquirer’s audience engagement editor, if the article was fake. “I never questioned the validity of it for a minute,” said Nicolosi, a 2014 criminal justice alumna. “There was no better way to get me on board, excited about [it] and not question a story that would involve our dog.” The fake-photo-shoot-turned-surprise proposal featured the couple’s dog, Dexter, and occurred last month. Boyd said he chose to propose on Main Campus because the couple first met at Maxi’s, a bar and eatery on Liacouras Walk, while the two were students. “I wanted the place to have meaning to us,” Boyd said. “Since we met there, I felt there was no more significant location than that.” Boyd discussed with his colleague, Inquirer staff photographer Tim Tai, how to incorporate Dexter into the proposal. They decided to make up the article about the challenges millennial owners face as “pet parents” in the city. About a month before, Boyd said he asked Nicolosi if she wanted to be featured in the article’s photo gallery. “She bought that story right when I told it to her,” he added. “I first told it to her [in] late August or early September, and she bought it. So at that point, it was about layering on elements to that stofeatures@temple-news.com

JAMIE COTTRELL / THE TEMPLE NEWS Ray Boyd (left), a 2013 journalism alumnus, and Jenna Nicolosi (right), a 2014 criminal justice alumna, embrace outside Paley Library on Friday.

ry.”

Nicolosi was so intrigued by the article idea that she asked Boyd if she could be interviewed too. So he staged a phone interview with another colleague to make the story seem real. Nicolosi said the whole ruse was a rare instance in which she was truly surprised. “Nobody could have known me better than him, in order to pull this off,” she added. Nicolosi and Boyd have known each other for six years. They met at Maxi’s on Oct. 12, 2012, when Nicolosi was a junior and Boyd was a senior. Nicolosi had been invited to a get-together at Maxi’s by a roommate who worked with Boyd at WHIP, Temple’s student-run radio station. They said that night was the beginning of a friend group they both remain a part of, even after graduating and moving in and out of Philadelphia. “We were sort of what we needed

for each other, at the time in our lives that we needed it,” Boyd said. Boyd and Nicolosi made their relationship official on Oct. 12, 2015, exactly three years after they met. He added that at the time, he wanted a close-knit group of friends, but always felt closest to Nicolosi. In late 2014 into 2015, the two became closer, calling each other to share what was on their minds and talking constantly even when they didn’t see each other in person, Nicolosi said. They each debated whether to cross the friendship-to-romance line. Now, the two said they never saw the other as “just a friend.” “I just always assumed that, if the opportunity was there and the opportunity was right, there could definitely be something more,” Boyd said. In the engagement photos, Nicolosi stands holding Dexter and smiling down at Boyd, who is on one knee, holding an engagement ring and smiling back at her.

Tai said he felt excited and nervous to keep an eye out for the proposal during the shoot that transitioned from photographing a fake story to engagement pictures. “There were a couple times where I thought Ray was going to do it, and then I would kind of hint that he should go for it,” Tai added. Tai found Nicolosi’s initial disappointment over the fake story funny and was happy the couple made the proposal work in a spot special to them, he said. Looking back, Nicolosi said it’s interesting the way their relationship worked out. “I had no way of knowing that six years later I’d be engaged to the best person I’d ever met,” she added. “I didn’t know I’d meet the most amazing person I’ve ever met within the first eight weeks of being [at Temple].” madisonkaras@temple.edu @madraekaras

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

FEATURES

PAGE 13

LIVE IN PHILLY

HANNAH BURNS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

Organizations partner to host festival celebrating Cherry Street Pier opening

Philadelphia Contemporary, an art nonprofit, partnered with the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation to host the first weekend of Festival for the People, which started on Saturday at Cherry Street Pier. The multi-week festival will take place at Cherry Street Pier during the next two weekends. The theme last weekend was “The People’s Analog Culture,” which celebrated print materials and pre-digital times when people used items like typewriters and analog watches. Music, seesaws, interactive sculptures, art installations and trolley cars converted into food trucks drew people to Cherry Street Pier to celebrate its grand opening. “It’s a really cool modern space,” said 31-year-old Will McKinley, of Fairmount, on Saturday. “It’s been really enjoyable so far.” The festival featured an interactive poetry installation in which attendees could use typewriters, provided by the South Philadelphia business Philly Typewriter, to type their own poems. “It’s just a unique thing that you wouldn’t get to do anywhere,” said Danielle Weiss, 24, who went to the event while visiting Philadelphia from Atlanta. @TheTempleNews

features@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 14

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

RESEARCH

CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

Deep sea exploration examines new coral reefs Cordes’ voyage ended last month,

A biology professor participated but DEEP SEARCH will have other exin a submarine voyage to peditions in the future One of DEEP SEARCH’s founders, research seafloor ecosystems. BY ALEX MARK For The Temple News While the world is focused on space exploration, Erik Cordes is focused on uncovering the unknown in the deep sea. The biology professor was one of the lead scientists on a recent mission by the ongoing DEEP Sea Exploration to Advance Research on Coral/Canyon/ Cold seep Habitats program, or DEEP SEARCH. To build understanding of the ocean floor, the initiative samples and profiles ecosystems’ water columns, which are areas containing high levels of sea organisms. Cordes and the rest of his team found a previously undiscovered coral reef about 160 miles off the coast of Charleston, South Carolina in August. They discovered the reef while surveying the Atlantic Ocean aboard their submarine, Alvin. “This is probably the biggest find that I’ve been a part of in my career,” Cordes said. “It’s just a massive area. It’s 85 miles of reef habitat and probably even more than that.” features@temple-news.com

the United States Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, is responsible for leasing offshore regions for oil production and rigging. The goal of DEEP SEARCH is to make sure none of these areas will be exploited, Cordes said.. Alexis Weinnig, a doctoral biology student in Cordes’ on-campus lab, considers DEEP SEARCH a truly unique expedition. “DEEP SEARCH has this wide breadth of being able to look at multiple habitats that are very close to each other geographically, but also very different in their biology, geology, geochemistry,” Weinnig said. “It’s something that isn’t always the case.” Ryan Gasbarro, a doctoral biology student and DEEP SEARCH research associate, was shocked by the size of the reef they explored during the voyage. “Everywhere we went, it was just coral growing on dead coral,” Gasbarro said. “Just these massive kind of reef structures. It was really unexpected.” Cordes said the timing of the mission was critical. In January, President Donald Trump’s administration proposed lifting a moratorium on offshore drilling, the

New York Times reported. While DEEP SEARCH is a strictly scientific expedition, oceanic research and development often change based on policies. “Our job is not really to wade into politics too much,” Cordes said. “Our job is to get out there and ensure that the science is there for them to make the right decisions if they decide to open up.” Cordes has also investigated the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon spill on the deep ocean. The 2010 oil spill by the Transocean oil company in the Gulf of Mexico is considered the largest marine oil spill ever. Cordes said he hopes DEEP SEARCH can help avoid similar mistakes in the Atlantic Ocean. “If drilling happens there, it needs to be managed in such a way that it is set back from these kinds of habitats,” he added. “If or when another accident happens, it shouldn’t happen right on top of a coral reef.” Cordes added that offshore drilling may compromise the deep ocean’s vital mechanisms, like housing atmospheric carbon deposits, by destroying ecological habitats like the reef found on this expedition. “The more research we do, the more connections we find between the deep ocean and shallow waters,” he said. “As coral reefs disappear, the communities [they] support fall apart. Those kinds of

effects are taking a while to be noticed.” For Weinnig, oceans will need the public’s support to achieve widespread habitat preservation. “As we have more mainstream exposure, there will be more of an understanding of how beautiful and amazing these ecosystems are,” she said. “Unfortunately, it’s just not something that reached the general public as a whole yet.” Climate change, habitat destruction and overfishing accelerate the ocean’s deterioration, and Gasbarro agreed with Weinnig that these ecosystems are often undervalued. “The ocean is important for everything from our climate to fisheries to land,” Gasbarro said. “It’s just a matter of scientists communicating it well.” While DEEP SEARCH helped advance understanding of the Atlantic, Cordes is optimistic that interest in nautical research could expand with the public’s support. “We’ve mapped five percent of our ocean at the resolution of the maps of the moon or Mars,” Cordes said. “We’ve seen with our eyes about a tenth of 1 percent. Shouldn’t we have a map of our own planet?” alex.mark@temple.edu @alexmarkmywords

temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 15

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

ALUMNI

Neurosurgeon’s car collection recognized abroad Fred Simeone owns a Southwest Philly museum that displays more than 65 car models. BY MADISON KARAS For The Temple News Fred Simeone’s interest in cars traces back to Kensington in the 1940s, when he helped his father, a family doctor, at his general practice in an Allegheny Avenue rowhouse. “After house calls, we would go to junkyards, and we would look at cars and figure out why this car or that car was important and what it had to offer,” said Simeone, an 82-year-old retired neurosurgeon and 1960 medical school alumnus. Simeone was dubbed the second-most significant car collector in the world by the Liechtenstein-based consulting agency Classic Car Trust in May. The organization examined 200 car collections from around the world to form The Classic Car Trust’s “Global Collector’s List.” Final rankings were based on a point system that measured a collection’s total estimated value and historical importance, quality and social value. Simeone’s collection is credited with including “the rarest and most significant race cars ever built,” according to Classic Car Trust. It earned an 84.84 ranking out of 100, placing higher than the car collections of fashion designer Ralph Lauren and former Walmart chairman S. Robson “Rob” Walton. It took more than a year for the trust to compile the data and select collections for international recognition. Simeone said he especially appreciates that the judges considered a collector’s social responsibility, awarding extra points to those who “recognize their wider responsibility by working to nurture and sustain the classic car community.”

@TheTempleNews

COURTESY / CHRISTOPHER LEAMON Fred Simeone sits in a 1938 Alfa Romeo car, his favorite automobile in his collection, for which received international recognition.

While collecting, the cars’ net values never affect Simeone’s interest in them. He said he purchases them out of interest, not historical preservation. In 2008, Simeone opened the nonprofit Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum to preserve his collection as “a gift to the public.” Located in Southwest Philadelphia, the museum displays Simeone’s col-

lection under the theme “The Spirit of Competition.” It includes more than 65 specialty model cars like Ferrari, Alfa Romeo, Bugatti, Mercedes, Jaguar, Porsche, Aston Martin, Corvette and Ford. “You come to the museum and you’re in front of the greatest sports cars in the world,” said Kevin Kelly, the museum’s curator. The museum hosts themed “Demo

Days” on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month to display the cars on its three-acre lot. Valle Schloesser, a retired real estate chief financial officer who lives in Chester, New Jersey, attended a Demo Day in April to see Simeone’s 1964 Shelby Cobra Daytona Coupe. “They don’t just have [the cars] sitting there where you can’t touch them,” he said. “They’re right there, driving them and you get to walk around and look inside.” Despite the cars’ current popularity, Simeone said his collection’s development resulted from being ahead of the times and recognizing the cars’ artistic and historical values before they became popular. He said the cars are increasingly being seen as high art, just like furniture. “Furniture was once where you kept your undies, and now you find furniture in all the great art museums,” Simeone added. As a medical student in the 1950s and 60s, Simeone was interested in studying the “history of progress” by reading about the winners of major racing events in any automobile and racecar literature he could find. Once he became a practicing neurosurgeon, he purchased cars and assembled his collection. He bought his first racecar in 1970. Simeone said it was a “standing joke” in his office that every once in a while he would step out to answer an important international call related to organizing car deals. He added that neuroscience and racing cars are similar in how competition in the industries has fueled progress. “You want to study the winners,” Simeone said. “It’s the winners that have the best stories to tell, and how they succeed, is always a part of the story.” madisonkaras@temple.edu @madraekaras

features@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 16

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

TECHNOLOGY

App connects property hunters, real estate agents Every licensed real estate agent in the

alumna, joined the team in July as the

The Jove team has an agreement

an agent accepts, the user receives a confirmation indicating the viewing is scheduled. Jove launched in 2017 and operates throughout Pennsylvania. Though the team also has property listings in New Jersey and Delaware, they do not have agents there yet, D’Agostino said. D’Agostino and Evans, a regional field sales manager at the tech company NCR Corporation, also enlisted the help of Jonathan Katz, a consultant at the Philadelphia branch of Slalom, a national consulting agency. When agents download the Jove Agent app, they undergo a thorough process of verifying their real estate licenses and a screening for any violations, D’Agostino said. He added there are currently about 250 users and 40 agents registered with Jove. D’Agostino and Evans hired Alex Garashchenko, a 2010 marketing alumnus, as an app developer and put him in charge of hiring. Doanh Nghiem, a 2010 political science and journalism

Nghiem to act as the “boss” because the three founding members hold equal positions. “She holds us all accountable,” he added. “We all have other jobs, too, and it is really hard to balance both.” Both apps are available on Apple’s App Store, while an Android version will be released in early 2019. The Jove team emphasizes privacy and safety, D’Agostino said. If a user doesn’t feel comfortable with an agent matched with their viewing, they can decline the match. It is free for both agents and users to sign up, but the future business plan is to charge agents a fee after they close a deal, D’Agostino said. The team plans for Jove Buyer to remain free for property hunters. D’Agostino said Jove is similar to Uber, in that it will soon have a review process so users can rate the app’s realtors, and realtors rate their customers. He added that the team has advertised the app through “word of mouth” so far.

percent of the properties shown on the real estate app Zillow and is working on listing the remaining locations, D’Agostino said. He added his time at Temple played a major role in developing the app. “The Innovation and Entrepreneurship Institute community was very supportive with formulating our business plan,” he said. “We got some free and good consulting from IEI. I am grateful to Temple.” IEI is a program in the Fox School of Business that helps students become entrepreneurs through hands-on classes and workshops, conferences and other events. The Jove team hopes to reach at least 1,600 users in the tri-state area before expanding to New York and throughout the East Coast. After that, the team hopes to make its way west. “We are not big enough to have a building named after us yet, but it is on the plan,” D’Agostino said.

The app, created and run by area who is registered on Jove receives a business manager and carries out its day- with TREND, a listing service that real alumni, streamlines property notification allowing them to accept or to-day operations. estate brokers use to see one another’s viewings for buyers. decline the viewing appointment. Once D’Agostino said the team hired property listings. Jove lists about 90 BY PAVLINA CERNA For The Temple News While looking to buy a property, Steve D’Agostino and his business partner, Josh Evans, missed out on a good deal because their realtor didn’t show up on time. “I said, ‘There should be an app that helps you go see a place instantly,’” said D’Agostino, a 2011 entrepreneurship alumnus and the founder of local real estate company DRG Philly. “Josh thought the idea for the app was great, and we went with it.” This inspired them to create Jove, an app that matches realtors with people looking for a property in minutes. Jove is separated into two apps, one called Jove Agent for independent real estate agents, and Jove Buyer, for people searching for a new home, apartment or business location. When a user opens the app, listings of available places appear on a map as small icons. After selecting a property to view, a user can schedule a time to see it.

VOICES

What’s the hardest part about finding an off-campus apartment?

features@temple-news.com

PHILIP WALKER Junior film and media arts major

For me, it was finding an affordable apartment that my parents can pay for and a good location.

pavlina.cerna@temple.edu

MELANIE McGEARY Freshman psychology and theater major It’s really hard to find something that’s reasonable, especially if you’re going into it with just one friend and you want to find the cheapest option.

SOPHIA FOTI Freshman health professions major

DANTA SIMMONS Sophomore accounting major

It’s hard to find a reliable website to...find housing because you don’t know if it’s valid or not. Finding a place that’s in a good area and walking distance is also hard.

I really don’t know what the best streets or places to live around here are. They don’t really talk about it much when you apply to a school. temple-news.com


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PAGE 17

THE ESSAYIST

Finding strength, pride in my learning disabilities A student reflects on overcoming the lifelong challenges of her learning disabilities.

I

BY EMILY MADARA For The Temple News

f given the option, would I take away my learning disabilities? No. I would not be the person I am today without them. They provide me with insight that everyone struggles, make me an empathetic leader and give me the power to control my future. I first became aware of my differences in first grade. I remember staring at the chalkboard, my eyes glazing over letter patterns that looked like jumbles to me. The vocabulary words on the board made sense to everyone but me. I felt stupid. I did not grasp the importance of this moment because I was only 6 years old, but it was the first indication of a struggle that still endures today. I ran home and told my parents. I cried and begged for help. I knew I was different from other kids, but what was wrong? After various tests, I was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, auditory processing disorder and visual processing disorder in second grade. ADHD affects my ability to pay attention, organize my thoughts, sit still and manage my time. Dyslexia affects my ability to read, decode words and process language. APD and VPD come along with my other learning disabilities. Before understanding my diagnosis, I was confused. I was given an individualized education program, as if I knew what that was at the time, and trans-

@TheTempleNews

JEREMIAH READERON / THE TEMPLE NEWS

ferred to a new school. The IEP provided me with specialized education to meet my needs. My 6-year-old self was scared. Was I a freak? Would my differences haunt me forever? I remember throwing myself onto my pink-patterned quilt that covered my bed and soaking the pillows with my tears, but later, I made a firm promise to myself to work hard in school and prove my learning disabilities would not hold me back. Within months, I was placed in fulltime learning support. The primary reds, blues and yellows that spread across the classroom walls turned to gray clouds of doubt. Would I ever read or solve math problems like everyone else? I questioned if this would end or get better. But I began to make friends with

other kids who also understood what being “different” was in the same way as I did. Once I reached seventh grade, with resilience and many late nights studying, my extra energy finally started to pay off. I worked harder than everyone else in the class to achieve the same results. I was taken out of my safe haven of learning support and given a new plan that put me on my own, called a 504. The 504 was a new plan to support my learning disabilities. It was a step down from IEP that protected me from discrimination. I felt scared but excited. I caught up to the same level as the other kids and even surpassed them at times due to the promise I made in first grade — to work hard and not let my learning disabilities hold me back. I understood my work and proved to myself I could

do well in school. Later, I was diagnosed with dysgraphia, a neurological condition that affects fine motor skills. I was close to giving up, but my promise did not disappear, and I knew that my first-grade self would be furious if I admitted defeat. Rest and occupational therapy rehabilitated me and placed me back on the road to success. Still, I continue to struggle. My disabilities have forced me to work harder than most people and affect my everyday life. Instead of viewing my disabilities as something that prevents me from succeeding, I view them as motivation. I am more than just my diagnoses, but I have no doubt they have helped shape who I am today. emily.madara@temple.edu

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

CLASSROOM

Understanding learning disabilities, differences the use of “learning disabilities” instead

with Disabilities Education Act, which

me,” he added. “Even though I can use

psychology major, labels her attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as a “learning difference.” “People would see [a disability] as something that is a weakness instead of a difference,” Kruidenier said. “I think the term ‘disability’ is used so that if you’re in certain settings, you may need accommodations.” In 2013, lawyer and special education consultant Jenifer Kasten defined the terms “difference,” “disability” and “disorder” in an article for the National Center for Learning Disabilities. She questioned if the term “learning difference” is derived “out of pity or a misguided sense of political correctness.” The term “disorder” is used as a medical term, she wrote, while “disability” is used in the Individuals

disability is professors may be less likely to offer students immediate help. “Since [my ADHD] is not visible, I have to prove it to every professor or with people I work with and it involves a lot of explaining, especially since very few people actually know just how much ADHD affects everything I do,” she said. Ross Whiting, an urban education instructor, said his own experience with dysgraphia, a neurological condition that affects fine motor skills, makes activities, like taking handwritten notes, more difficult. Dysgraphia does not impact his ability to type notes on a computer, however, so he uses one to his benefit in the classroom. “I still experience regular discrimination because people are unaware of how this disability affects

of a classroom setting, at places like the Department of Motor Vehicles, Whiting said people get impatient with him if he takes a long time, but despite this, he doesn’t think dysgraphia is a negative diagnosis. “I think of disability as a normal part of the human experience,” Whiting said. “It’s really just a different way of experiencing the world. It’s not a negative way. It doesn’t make things bad. It’s just different.” “Once we understand that it’s just different, instead of viewing it as something lacking, people can think of ways to make it so an individual can interact with general society,” he added.

Some students and instructors of “learning differences” to ensure people protects students’ rights. adaptive equipment, I am still doing discuss how their learning can receive any support to which they’re Valerie Levy, a freshman English something different that an authority major, said one problem with identifying figure hasn’t accounted for.” differences affect their legally entitled. Marisa Kruidenier, a junior with a learning difference instead of a When asked to fill out forms outside experiences in the classroom. BY REBEKAH HARDING For The Temple News

rebekah.harding@temple.edu @bae_kah

EMMA STEVENS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

Approximately one in five children in the United States have a learning and attention disability or difference, according to a 2017 report by the National Center for Learning Disabilities. But for some of these individuals, the term “learning difference” resonates more with them, because of the stigma surrounding the terms “disability” and “disorder.” Identifying with the term “learning difference,” can lessen this stigma, but is not protected by some disability protection legislation, according to the Learning Disabilities Association of New York State. The LDA of New York encourages

intersection@temple-news.com

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

This article is displayed in Dyslexie font. Studies show that this font may ease the reading experience for people with dyslexia. THE ESSAYIST

Proving people wrong, learning to love dyslexia A student writes about the hard work it took to overcome some of the challenges of dyslexia.

cookies, unaware of the hell I was about to unleash, and demanded she tell BY CAM FERRY me the truth. Was I was For The Temple News dyslexic? When I used to ask why I first discovered I was I left the classroom each dyslexic at 9 years old. day, my mom told me I A neighborhood friend “learned differently” than named Ally had just told the other kids. That day, I me a secret: Ally thought wondered why she hadn’t she had dyslexia. As Ally listed off the symptoms of told me more. I felt like she lied to me. My mother, dyslexia, it clicked. who is a saint, sat me Dyslexia explained the down and countered my struggles I had in school, anger and hostility with why things that seemed calmness and tranquility. like a breeze for my peers We had a long talk took me twice as long and about how I was dyslexic, why I left my classroom and that all the other kids for half of the day to see who left class with me also Mr. Koch, who was my special education teacher. had a learning difference. The only reason she didn’t He spent hours every tell me about my dyslexia day going over the same problems and was the first earlier was because she teacher who truly believed didn’t want me to use it as an excuse for why I I was smart. couldn’t do something. As soon as I made My mom told me a the connection to my secret of her own; she, too, schooling and dyslexia, I marched downstairs to my was dyslexic. The next few years of mother, who was making school seemed the same @TheTempleNews

— constantly playing catch-up with my other peers, praying to not get called on in class and feeling like I needed to hide my learning difference. My mom was my support system during this time. We spent hours at the kitchen table going over math problems and spelling words. Many teachers told me I wouldn’t major in English in college — if I even scored high enough on my SATs to get accepted to college. It became a joke between my teachers, but I didn’t find it funny. I began to hate English almost as much as I hated my dyslexia. It wasn’t until I transferred high schools that I truly began to flourish. I received a supportive individualized education program teacher who worked with me and talked to me like I was an adult. I separated

my identity from my disability. By the 11th grade, I enrolled in honors classes and AP English. After years of my former guidance counselors and teachers telling me college was a pipe dream, I received an acceptance letter to Temple University. I knew that the hours of hard work finally paid off. Now, I’m a sophomore secondary education and English major. I want to give back what my English teachers at my second high school gave to me — a passion for English and the ability to finally think I’m smart enough. I still can’t spell words most of the time and math still gives me more trouble than it does for my peers, but I have learned to love my dyslexia. It has made me the young woman I am today. cameron.ferry@temple.edu @cameronkateee

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

THE ESSAYIST

Is my diabetes a disease, disability or disruption? A student didn’t consider diabetes a disability until applying for DRS accommodations. BY MYKEL GREENE For The Temple News As a Type 1 diabetic, I never considered myself disabled. My pancreas gave up on me three months after I turned 16, impairing my body’s ability to produce insulin and requiring me to inject myself with insulin to monitor my glucose levels. From that moment to today, I do not identify as a person with a disability. But that’s not to say my diabetes hasn’t presented me with challenges. I now manually monitor my glucose levels so they do not get too high or low. This means I may need to take insulin injections in class if my glucose levels are too high, or crack open a bottle of juice or bust open a bag of crackers if they are too low. Being diabetic on Main Campus is not problematic because most professors don’t have an issue with people eating and drinking in class. I never considered myself to be disabled, so I did not register with Disability Resource and Services. This only became an issue when I studied abroad at Temple University Japan. There are important cultural differences that hindered to my diabetes management. In Japan, it is considered rude to both eat in class and leave class, even if to use the bathroom, because it is disruptive. I discovered this when someone was finishing the remnants of their lunch as class started and the professor asked the student to put their food away until after class. In preparation for studying abroad, I started using a continuous glucose monitoring system to check my glucose levels without finger pricks. It alerted me when my levels were dropping or rising

intersection@temple-news.com

BY EMMA STEVENS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

too fast. These alerts sound similar to a cell phone. During a Japanese language exam on my first day of classes, one of these alerts sounded. It was the only time I was afraid of being asked to leave class for being disruptive since I’ve never been kicked out of class in my entire life. I had just finished eating lunch before this class so my glucose levels were going to rise. The exam was important. It determined if I got to stay in Japanese Elements II. But as my levels rose, my sensor alerts kept sounding to tell me that my levels were too high. The CGM was new to me, so I didn’t know how to adjust the volume of the alerts or how to turn them off. Every time it went off, my professor’s head jerked up from her book to survey the room, as she told us to turn off our phones. It was extremely embarrassing because I had no idea how to fix it. After that class, I registered with DRS to ensure my professors could not

kick me out of class, frequently stop class if my alerts sounded or single me out for eating in class. Whenever I eat, I am supposed to take insulin to cover the carbohydrates that I consumed. In the event that I don’t finish a meal that I gave myself insulin for, I risk an accidental overdose which could result in the loss of consciousness, seizure, coma or death. Wouldn’t you say that any of those occurring in the middle of a class would be more disruptive than the crunch of crackers or fizziness of a soda? At the end of the day, diabetes management is not an exact science. I could have a regimen that works for me on a consistent basis, but then suddenly it no longer does. Things like stress, anxiety and fatigue can also impact my glucose levels even if my management is consistent. Any changes in diet or frequency of exercise will also impact the efficacy of my regiment. Temple offers resources to people

with diabetes, including DRS and the College Diabetes Network, which is an organization that connects people with Type 1 diabetes, provides a supportive community, disseminates helpful information on diabetes management and prepares students with diabetes for the transition to college and to life after college. The chapter on campus gathers people with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and helpful allies who do not have the condition. The friends I made through CDN during my freshman year are still my friends today. They also struggled to receive proper accommodations from professors. Through both of these resources, I’ve grown more comfortable being a diabetic in college and do not have to worry about my chronic illness getting in the way of getting my degree. msjg@temple.edu

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FOOTBALL

Receiver ties FBS record, catches game-winner Ventell Bryant caught his first touchdown in 680 days to lift Temple over Navy 24-17 on Saturday. BY MICHAEL ZINGRONE Co-Sports Editor ANNAPOLIS, MD. — Ventell Bryant celebrated scoring a touchdown on Saturday for the first time since Dec. 3, 2016, back when Temple University had a different coach and starting quarterback. His first score in 680 days came at the same stadium, against the same team, and in the same end zone as his last. The Temple (4-3, 3-0 American Athletic Conference) graduate student wide receiver caught a 62-yard, game-winning touchdown from redshirt sophomore quarterback Anthony Russo in Temple’s 24-17 win against Navy (2-4, 1-2 The American) at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. “It just felt so great [to get a touchdown], I had a great week of practice doing all the little things I needed to do,” Bryant said. “I just want to thank the Lord. I have been praying a lot, things haven’t been going my way. This week, we had chapel, and the message hit me in the heart.” With his performance, Bryant also moved into second place on Temple’s all-time receiving yards list. He is 175 yards away from tying Willie Marshall, who played from 1983-86. With his first catch — a 15-yard pass from Russo — Bryant recorded his 42nd straight game with a reception. He and California State University, Fresno senior wide receiver KeeSean Johnson remain tied for the Football Bowl Subdivision lead for the longest active stretch of games with a catch. “I just have to be detailed in what I am doing,” Bryant said. “Coaches believe in me, the players believe in me. So I just have to go out there and make a play, and that is what I strive to do every week.” Bryant said he “was asking the Lord, ‘Why me?’” after he suffered an arm injury in practice before last week’s game against East Carolina. He received limited playing time against the Pirates and couldn’t move his arm, he said. Bryant said he was 100 percent healthy for Saturday’s game. He had five catches for 118 yards in the second half. Bryant finished with eight catches for 147 yards, which were @TTN_Sports @TheTempleNews

both single-game team highs. He accounted for nearly half of Russo’s 300 yards passing. “[Bryant] has been due for one of these games,” offensive coordinator Dave Patenaude said. “He got a hot hand in the first half, made a couple of nice catches, and at halftime we said, ‘We are riding with the older guys, and let’s try and find him,’ and that is what we did.” Coach Geoff Collins said Bryant’s performance was important, not only because of the touchdown, but also the amount of “key catches” he made. Of his eight receptions, three of them gained a first down for Temple, and two others brought the Owls within 1 yard of a first down. The last time Bryant hauled in a touchdown before Saturday, he and former quarterback Phillip Walker connected on a 22-yard score in the first quarter of the 2016 American Athletic Conference championship, which Temple won, 34-10. Before this year’s game against the Midshipmen, Bryant said he thought he could have a big game against Navy’s secondary because of the soft coverage they play. Russo said they expected to get matchups against man coverage. “I thought we were going to have the [62yard touchdown] play all week while watching film,” Russo said. “We thought Ventell could run right past [the Navy secondary].” “We told [Patenaude] and told our coaches, ‘We have great receivers outside,’” Bryant said. “Anyone of us can make a play, and today was my day. When you have an opportunity to make a play, you have to step in and make that play. …I want to be the guy that steps up.” Russo said Bryant received extra treatment from the athletic trainers to be able to play against Navy. He recorded his first game with 100 or more yards receiving since the Owls’ loss to Wake Forest University in the 2016 Military Bowl. “[Playing the last two weeks] just goes to show you why he is wearing No. 1, why he is a single-digit guy,” Collins said. “Just the way he competes. Some things happened to him early, it got a little chippy out there, but I thought the way he focused and just made play after play, I think it speaks volumes about his character.” “Ventell had a breakout game today,” Russo said. “I think he needed that. We just have to keep building on it for him.”

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Navy senior quarterback Garret Lewis runs for a 1-yard touchdown in the second quarter of Temple’s 24-17 victory over Navy on Saturday at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland.

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Redshirt sophomore running back Tyliek Raynor scoring a 15-yard rushing touchdown in the second quarter of Temple’s 24-17 win over Navy on Saturday at Navy-Marine Crops Memorial Stadium.

michael.zingrone@temple.edu @mjzingrone

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24 DESTINY

that were too much to overcome. Against Villanova, junior kicker Aaron Boumerhi missed a 29-yard field goal. In the fourth quarter against Buffalo, junior defensive tackle Karamo Dioubate committed a roughing the passer penalty that would allow the Bulls to score the game-winning touchdown. In Massachusetts, redshirt-sophomore quarterback Anthony Russo threw interceptions on back-to-back drives in the second quarter. Those consecutive turnovers allowed Boston College to score 25 straight points and win. Unlike those games, the Owls won on Saturday in spite of their errors, they showed great improvement and gave themselves a great chance to reach their goal of winning the conference. On Temple’s opening drive, the Owls committed a penalty on second-

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

and-goal from the 1 and settled for a 26-yard field goal attempt, which redshirt-freshman kicker Will Mobley missed. Two plays later, redshirt junior linebacker Chapelle Russell recovered a fumble. Junior wide receiver Isaiah Wright then lost a fumble less than one minute later, erasing the Owls’ opportunity to take advantage of the turnover. The Midshipmen used 10 minutes, one second to drive down the field and take a 3-0 lead. After a 62-yard touchdown catch from graduate student wide receiver Ventell Bryant gave the Owls a 2417 lead in the fourth quarter, Temple forced a Navy three-and-out. The Owls ran off six minutes and seven seconds on their following drive before Russo threw an interception in the end zone to give Navy an opportunity to tie the game with two minutes and six seconds left. The Owls stopped Navy and left An-

napolis with a win. “We kept fighting like we always do but there was a big belief system that somebody was going to go out there and make the play,” Collins said on Monday’s coaches media call. “Keep executing the way we have been, and things will come together for us, and they did. … The cumulative experiences, and some of them have been negative which we learned from, we were able to apply in the second half of that game.” The Owls proved they can go toeto-toe with any member of The American. In every game this season, the Owls have been in it until the very end. Their record should be better than it is, but they were able to put themselves over .500 with a victory on Saturday. “I was trying to preach to all the guys at halftime, they weren’t stopping us, we were stopping ourselves with penalties, stupid mistakes,” Russo said. “I was just

trying to make sure everyone had laser focus, know your job on every play, execute it and on to the next one. Just some uncharacteristic penalties and mistakes that we had that we got to clean up.” Temple controls its own fate after winning its first game in which it trailed by 10 or more points. The Owls overcame mistakes that hurt them in the past. But before they can possibly win out and make the conference championship game, Temple must beat Cincinnati on Saturday at Lincoln Financial Field. “Whoever we are playing next week, we’re gonna come in on Sunday and watch the film and just get ready to play,” graduate student defensive tackle Michael Dogbe said. “We’re not looking ahead. ...We are focused on our next opponent and how to stop them.” sam.neumann@temple.edu @SamNeu_

MEN’S SOCCER

Temple’s last-ditch effort falls short against Pitt In the 88th minute, the Owls recorded three shots on goal in a 47-second span before losing, 3-2 to Pitt on Monday. BY MAURA RAZANAUSKAS Men’s Soccer Beat Reporter

Hermann Doerner threw his hands on his head and lowered them in frustration as Temple University fought to tie Monday’s game against the University of Pittsburgh in the 88th minute. The senior midfielder headed one of three Temple shots in a span of 47 seconds. A Pitt defender used his face to block Doerner’s header directed off a corner kick from junior forward Lukas Fernandes. Junior midfielder Nick Sarver followed the rebound, but he shot the ball over the net. Despite their comeback attempt, the Owls (4-7-3, 1-2-1 the American Athletic Conference) could not even the score in a 3-2 road loss to Pitt. “I’m disappointed that we weren’t able to find the equalizer,” coach Brian Rowland said. “The overriding thought is that our guys are really tough competitors, and they battled. I think the difsports@temple-news.com

ference in the game really was that Pitt took their chances very efficiently, and I think we probably wasted a few really good looks.” The Owls gave up three goals for the second consecutive game. The Owls lost to South Florida, 3-2, in overtime on Friday. In the past two games, junior goalkeeper Simon Lefebvre has allowed six goals on 13 shots on goal. Excluding those matches, Lefebvre gave up nine goals in 10 games, equaling 0.90 goals per game average for Temple opponents. His goals against average now stands at 1.22. “There’s room for improvement there,” Rowland said. “But I think it’s also in part that the teams we’ve played are very good and they create opportunities and make plays.” A Temple foul gave Pitt senior midfielder Javi Perez a penalty kick, which he converted in the 27th minute to give the Panthers a 1-0 lead. “I don’t think [Pitt] had really created a ton of opportunities up until [the penalty], so it certainly put us down,” Rowland said. “We fought back and showed that we can score goals, but I

think it certainly changed the game.” Pitt managed just four shots in the first half compared to Temple’s six. The Owls outshot the Panthers 16-11, but Pitt ended with one more shot on goal. Freshman forward Elias Hellgren Villegas scored his first goal this season on Temple’s first quality chance in the second half to tie the game in the 50th minute. Fernandes used a through ball to assist Hellgren Villegas’s goal. The Panthers minimized Temple’s momentum from its goal when Pitt scored in the 62nd minute and then again just 4:03 later to extend their lead to 3-1. Fernandes responded with a goal of his own in the 80th minute to keep the Owls’ comeback hopes alive. Temple’s leading goal-scorer tallied his fifth goal of the season and recorded his second game with at least one goal and assist. “[Fernandes] made plays and certainly gives us some dynamic play in the final third,” Rowland said. “He’s been a good bright spot, and we know what we can get from him on a game-to-game basis.” The Owls only have one remaining non-conference game on Oct. 23 against

Penn. Their next game is against conference opponent Connecticut (7-2-2, 2-02 The American) on Saturday. Connecticut and USF are tied with eight points atop The American, and the Huskies are undefeated in conference play. Temple has four points, which is tied with Memphis and three points behind Central Florida and Southern Methodist. The top six teams, a group that currently includes the Owls, qualify for the conference tournament. Though it wouldn’t have counted in The American’s standings, beating the Panthers would have given Temple its first victory since Oct. 3, instead of extending its winless streak to three games. “Wins can build momentum, so an out-of-conference win can get you feeling good going into a conference game, but certainly, the conference is the big decider, big factor,” Rowland said. “You’d like to get the win so that you can build some momentum, but I think playing a good opponent can do that as well. It can get us prepared to be successful just the same.” maura.razanauskas@temple.edu @captainaMAURAca

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WOMEN’S SOCCER

‘Tough’ South Jersey natives have chemistry on field South Jersey natives are deeply rooted in the foundation of the women’s soccer roster. BY ALEX MCGINLEY Women’s Soccer Beat Reporter Emma Wilkins and Gabriela Johnson both scored in Temple University women’s soccer 2-2 draw against Cincinnati on Thursday. They’re used to sharing the field, but not usually for the same team. Wilkins, a sophomore forward, and Johnson, a freshman forward, played against each other twice a year as high school rivals in South Jersey. Wilkins went to Absegami High School, while Johnson went to Oakcrest High School. This season for Temple, Wilkins and Johnson lead the team in points with 12 and 11, respectively, and Wilkins leads Temple (6-8-1, 2-3-1 The American) with six goals. These rivals are part of a larger theme on the team including South Jersey natives. Seven of the 18 Owls who played against East Carolina (8-5-2, 3-4 American Athletic Conference) are from South Jersey. Coach Seamus O’Connor said the South Jersey natives on the team have good chemistry. “They have a history of playing with and against each other,” O’Connor said. “They know where each other is going to be. … You got to be able to play good defense, but when you have the soccer ball, you got to be able to pass.” This chemistry resulted in a goal during the Owls’ fourth game of the season. Wilkins scored on a pass from Johnson in Temple’s game against the University of Maryland on Aug. 31. Wilkins’ goal made the difference, as Temple defeated Maryland, 1-0, and won its third consecutive match. Johnson said her high school matches against Absegami were always competitive because Wilkins was the team’s best scorer. @TheTempleNews @TTN_Sports

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Sophomore midfielder Julia Dolan (right) defends South Florida freshman forward Sydny Nasello during the Owls’ 1-0 double-overtime win against USF on Sept. 30 at the Temple Sports Complex.

“It was always one of the biggest matches of our season because they had Emma [Wilkins] and [sophomore midfielder] Julia [Dolan],” Johnson said. “We would always try to double-team them and they would do the same to me. It would always end up being 1-0 or in the last couple minutes of the game.” Dolan said her coach told her and her teammates at Absegami to keep an eye on Johnson whenever they played Oakcrest. “It’s definitely easier being on the field than playing against her because she’s a really good player,” Dolan said. “I like her scoring goals for us, instead of against me.” Johnson also played against freshman midfielder Hailey Gutowski before arriving at Temple. Gutowski’s high school, Cinnaminson High School, defeated Oakcrest, 4-0, in the quarterfinals of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association South Jersey Group 2 playoffs in November 2016. Gutowski

had three assists in the game. Despite attending different high schools, Johnson and Gutowski knew each other before their schools met in the playoffs. They played on the same club team, Player Development Academy South Pride, with freshman forward Kylie Anicic. Johnson and Gutowski met each other when Johnson joined the team at the beginning of her junior year of high school. “Gabby was [Oakcrest’s] best player,” Gutowski said. “It was funny playing against her because we both knew each other.” Gutowski and Anicic met each other when they played on the same Olympic Development Program when they were 13 years old. Gutowski joined PDA South Pride when she was in the sixth grade and Anicic joined years later at the beginning of her junior year in high school. They also played against each other during their junior years when Cin-

naminson beat Kingsway Regional High School, 2-0, in September 2016. Gutowski scored one of Cinnaminson’s goals. Anicic said playing with Gutowski and Johnson in the past helps her when they’re all on the field together. “It definitely helps with chemistry because now we know how each other plays,” Anicic said. “It’s easier and more comfortable to be on the field if we’re all together.” O’Connor said he recruits players from South Jersey because the coaches in the area teach “technical soccer” rather than focusing on scoring totals. “They’re getting taught the game properly,” O’Connor said. “We don’t have as much time to teach them the fundamentals. That’s why a lot of South Jersey kids have the attitude. They’re very tough. They’re really aggressive kids who aren’t going to quit.” alex.mcgliney@temple.edu @mcginley_alex

sports@temple-news.com


SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

PAGE 24

FOOTBALL

Win against Navy shows Owls can win AAC

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Graduate student wide receiver Ventell Bryant (right) and redshirt-sophomore running back Tyliek Raynor celebrate after Raynor’s 15-yard touchdown in the second quarter of Temple’s 24-17 win against Navy on Saturday at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.

For the first time this season, after a season-opening 19-17 loss to VilTemple can overcome mistakes lanova and a 36-29 loss to the University at Buffalo the following week. in it’s 24-17 win against Navy.

A

NNAPOLIS, MD. — During Temple University’s 24-17 win against Navy on Saturday, the team was up against similar obstacles that led them to lose in previous games this season. But this time, the Owls finally figured it out. Before the season, Temple players publicly stated their aspirations of winning the American Athletic Conference, a goal that no lonSAM NEUMANN ger seemed attainable sports@temple-news.com

It is in reach for Temple (4-3, 3-0 The American) winning its second conference title in a three-year span. By beating Navy, the Owls proved for the first time this season they can overcome challenges within a game. Navy received the second-half kickoff as it held a 10-7 lead. Navy sophomore fullback Nelson Smith had two carries for 57 yards on the ensuing possession, which he capped off with a 12yard touchdown run. Temple trailed by 10 or more points for the fourth time this season after Smith’s score. In their first three losses of the season, Temple lost to Villanova and Buffalo and fell 45-35 to Boston College

on Sept. 29. Instead of faltering, Temple changed the tide of the game and kept its season on track by scoring 17 consecutive points and holding Navy to 67 yards of offense to clinch its third straight conference victory. “We were down at halftime and I am just so amazingly proud of the way those guys fought back and stayed together,” coach Geoff Collins said following the Owls’ win. “They made play after play after play in an adverse situation, in a hostile environment.” Temple’s five remaining regular season games contain the toughest challenges it will face this season. If the Owls can win out, they will clinch a berth in the conference championship game. On Saturday, they will

host Cincinnati (6-0, 2-0 The American) on Oct. 20 for their homecoming game. The Bearcats are ranked No. 20 in the Associated Press Top 25 Poll. Then on Nov. 1, the following week, the Owls will travel to Central Florida (60, 3-0 The American), which has not lost a game since Dec. 17, 2016. Like Temple, No. 10 UCF bent but did not break on Saturday, eeking out a win against Memphis on the road, 31-30, after trailing for the first three quarters. Temple had its backs against the wall in the third quarter against Navy. Its defense spent 20 of the first 31 minutes on the field. It seemed like Saturday would follow the script of Temple’s three losses, which were plagued by turnovers, missed field goals and untimely penalties

DESTINY | PAGE 22 temple-news.com

Profile for The Temple News

Vol. 97 Iss. 8  

Oct. 16, 2018

Vol. 97 Iss. 8  

Oct. 16, 2018

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