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THE TEMPLE NEWS

MUMPS CASES CONFIRMED ON CAMPUS Read more on Page 6

VOL 97 // ISSUE 22 MARCH 12, 2019 temple-news.com @thetemplenews

NEWS, PAGE 5 The Fox School will open a small business development center at Ambler Campus.

OPINION, PAGE 10 A student argues it’s important to respect nonbinary in our language.

FEATURES, PAGE 13 An alumnus’ clothing line aims to destigmatize marijuana.

SPORTS, PAGE 24 Men’s basketball pushes for a strong postseason run in Fran Dunphy’s last season.


NEWS PAGE 2

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

THE TEMPLE NEWS A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. Gillian McGoldrick Editor in Chief Kelly Brennan Managing Editor Julie Christie Digital Managing Editor Evan Easterling Chief Copy Editor Greta Anderson News Editor Grace Shallow Investigations Editor Alyssa Biederman Deputy Campus Editor Will Bleier Deputy City Editor Jayna Schaffer Opinion Editor Laura Smythe Features Editor Zari Tarazona Deputy Features Editor Michaela Althouse Deputy Features Editor Michael Zingrone Co-Sports Editor Sam Neumann Co-Sports Editor Claire Wolters Intersection Editor Maria Ribeiro Director of Engagement Siani Colon Asst. Director of Engagement Dylan Long Co-Photography Editor Luke Smith Co-Photography Editor Madison Seitchik Web Editor Co-Multimedia Editor Jared Giovan Co-Multimedia Editor Ian Walker Visuals Editor Claire Halloran Design Editor Phuong Tran Advertising Manager Kelsey McGill Advertising Manager Daniel Magras Business Manager

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content represents the opinion of The Temple News. Adjacent commentary is reflective of their authors, not The Temple News. Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

ON THE COVER CLAIRE HALLORAN /THE TEMPLE NEWS

CORRECTIONS Accuracy is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it as soon as possible. Anyone with inquiries about content in this newspaper can contact Editor in Chief Gillian McGoldrick at editor@temple-news.com or 215-204-6736.

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CAMPUS

Task force suggests recovery housing Temple’s opioid task force stopped meeting and made recommendations in December. BY DIANA CRISTANCHO For The Temple News Temple University is reviewing recommendations from its Task Force on Opioid and Related Drug Addiction and Recovery Support, which completed a review of the university’s current policies for helping students with substance use disorder and those who are in recovery. The task force completed its objectives and stopped meeting twice each month in December 2018, said Stephanie Ives, the associate vice president and dean of students. It submitted a report to President Richard Englert and Provost JoAnne Epps, which suggests the university identify students with substance use disorder, and provide support groups and recovery housing on campus. “We want to ensure that the Temple environment is a place where students who are living in recovery would feel supported and confident that the resources are here,” Ives said. The task force first recommended the university identify students who are seeking recovery options and those recovering from substance use disorders, with the help of Tuttleman Counseling Services and the Wellness Resource Center. The task force also recommended Temple implement on-campus housing for students in recovery. Other recommendations suggested the university intervene when students have substance use disorder by helping them seek recovery, Ives said, and bring students into a strong recovery community at Temple. The recommendations would

require the university to hire at least one employee who would work with university support to address the needs of these students, Ives said. Once the university has hired someone in charge of the recovery program, it would then initiate a study to find the best way to provide for students with substance use disorders, said Jerry Stahler, a geography and urban studies professor who was a member of the task force. “Housing is a really important consideration and we need to do it right,” Stahler said. Penn State University, Rutgers and Drexel offer student recovery housing, The Temple News reported in September 2017, after Temple Student Government members passed a bill to explore recovery housing options. Most include live-in recovery staff, 12-step meetings and counseling services for students in recovery. Before Stahler joined the task force, he held a panel in his class, Drugs in Urban Society, where students asked questions and made suggestions on how to support students in recovery. Stahler collected the suggestions in and presented them to the task force. “The students came up with a really great list of ideas, some I hadn’t thought of, and nobody else had suggested,” Stahler said. “...Every idea that was suggested by the students was actually considered as part of the list of recommendations.” Englert is grateful for the work the task force has done, he wrote in a statement to The Temple News. “Their expertise and commitment to the health and well-being of our students are outstanding,” he wrote. “This issue is a highly complex one.” diana.cristancho@temple.edu

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NEWS PAGE 4

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

CRIME

Former student injured after being shot by police Officers were called to 49th Street and Hazel Avenue to respond to a report of a person with a weapon or a stabbing.

Belay worked as a busboy at Booker’s Restaurant & Bar on Baltimore Avenue between 50th and 51st streets.

WILL BLEIER / THE TEMPLE NEWS West Philadelphia residents meet at the Ethiopian Community Association of Greater Philadelphia on Sunday, following the police shooting of former graduate student Kaleb Belay.

Philadelphia Police released the name of the officer who shot former graduate student Kaleb Belay. BY COLIN EVANS Crime Beat Reporter A former Temple University graduate student is in critical condition after being shot in the chest by a Philadelphia Police officer. Kaleb Belay, a 25-year-old former Fox School of Business graduate student and Ethiopian immigrant, is in critical condition at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center as of Monday morning, according to police. He was enrolled at Temple for one semester in Fall 2018, a university spokesperson told The Temple News. Police identified the officer who shot Belay as Kevin Pfeifer, who has been an officer for the 18th District for four years. “We are actively conducting an inNews Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

vestigation to protect Kaleb’s interests… if we can find anything perhaps that can shine some additional light objectively on what actually happened that night,” said Simon Haileab, Belay’s attorney. He spoke to a crowd of more than 50 people gathered at a meeting on Sunday hosted by the Ethiopian Community Association of Greater Philadelphia on Chestnut Street near 44th. Attendees filled every seat of the community center, overflowed into the back of the room and crouched in aisles, questioning Haileab about Belay’s condition and sharing firsthand experiences with Belay, who many said mostly keeps to himself. Belay worked as a busboy at Booker’s Restaurant and Bar on Baltimore Avenue near 50th, said Saba Tedla, the restaurant’s owner. Belay began working at the restaurant after moving from Ethiopia to attend Temple in August 2018, Tedla said. “He’s introverted, soft-spoken and

IAN WALKER / THE TEMPLE NEWS

even-keeled, and so it’s surprising to me how threatening he would be physically to two police officers,” Tedla said while tearing up at Sunday’s meeting. “Why are we allowing our police to take such aggression in our community?” she added. Haileab said he was told by police that the officer involved was not wearing a body camera, and was not carrying a taser. Belay faces charges of aggravated assault, simple assault and possessing an instrument of crime, according to a police release. His hospital room in Penn Presbyterian is being guarded by police, Haileab said. “He’s been under arrest for an offense against the officer who shot him, which is a defensive approach that the police are taking, versus identifying him as a victim as the person who was shot,” Tedla said. “It’s important for us to understand as a community the difference between a victim and a criminal.” Pfeifer and another undisclosed officer responded to a 911 call that reported

a person with a weapon or a stabbing on Hazel Avenue near 49th, in the Cedar Park section of the city around 7 p.m. on Wednesday, according to the release. Belay emerged from a bush and did not heed officers’ calls to drop the knife, according to police. “Both officers initially retreated while both giving him warnings to drop the knife,” PPD Capt. Sekou Kinebrew told KYW Newsradio. “The male did not comply and continued to advance toward the officers.” Police are conducting an ongoing internal review of the shooting, which is part of procedure for officer involved shootings. The Ethiopian Community Center will collect funds for Belay’s medical and legal costs through a GoFundMe page and host a fundraiser next week at the center, Haileab said. colin.evans@temple.edu @colinpaulevans Will Bleier contributed reporting.

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NEWS PAGE 5

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

AMBLER

Fox small business center expanding to Ambler

The Small Business Development to help them transition from military to erty laws. Tim Bennett, a 2009 MBA alumnus, Center will open its second civilian life, Shenker said. “Many of the skills you learn in the worked at the center as an undergradulocation on March 20. BY WILL AMARI For The Temple News The Fox School of Business will open a second Small Business Development Center at the Ambler Campus on March 20. The center, which has provided entrepreneurial services to 532 North Philadelphia companies at its location on Cecil B. Moore Avenue near 15th Street since 1983, will expand to the Ambler Campus in honor of National Small Business and Development Centers Day, said Maura Shenker, the center’s director. The Ambler branch will feature the center’s first veteran-specific small business program, which will be free to those who served in the United States military, Shenker added. The program typically has a cost for non-veteran business owners. “Temple Ambler has graciously given us half the library building,” Shenker said. “...We’re going to work with veterans who have not yet started their business.” At the Ambler location, veterans will be given office space, technology, business planning advisement, writing classes and advice from business experts

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military are great entrepreneurship skills, like the self-discipline needed,” Shenker added. “We hope that by creating a community and walking them through the process of starting a business and being there, we can help them start their business.” Fox will host a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Ambler Campus library, where the new business development center will be housed, on March 20 at 3 p.m. to celebrate the second location’s opening. The center near Main Campus conducted 4,616 consulting hours in 2018, offering 67 different seminars and workshops, run by Fox faculty, Shenker said. Businesses in all stages are welcome to attend, including startups and ongoing businesses, and nearly 1,000 representatives attended sessions last year, she added. After the sessions, the center’s clients receive one-on-one management and business consulting, where Fox faculty look over client business plans and provide financial, marketing and growth strategies for each small business owner. Graduate students from several colleges also serve as volunteer consultants. Beasley School of Law students give free legal assistance to clients, including tax ramifications, contracts, partnership agreements, leases and intellectual prop-

ate in 2004 and later returned as a client with his own small business, Bennett Compost, a Philadelphia composting service. “I saw that they’re good at a lot of things that when you’re starting a business you need help with, and there are a lot of good services there,” Bennett said. “You can take advantage of that. You’re paying nominal fees for what you’re getting, which is invaluable.” North Philadelphia business owner Trina Worrell-Benjamin worked with the center in 2016 to launch her company TWB Cleaning Contractors, an industrial cleaning and floor maintenance service on Cecil B. Moore Avenue near 15th. The center helped Worrell-Benjamin develop her company handbook, policies and procedures, marketing and advertising efforts, she said. Law professors and students also gave her legal advice, business consulting and strategies to secure funding. The center has relationships with several community banks, Shenker said, and led entrepreneurs to access more than $3.1 million in 2018. “I didn’t want to just start a business, I wanted to build a company for longevity,” Worrell-Benjamin said. “...Not only did they help me start a business, they helped me grow my business as well.”

Worrell-Benjamin started her business with only one employee, she said, but because of the center’s services, she now employs six part-time workers from the North Philadelphia community. “Small business is what drives the economy here,” Shenker said. “A lot of those business are owned by immigrants, or a lot of them were owned by underestimated entrepreneurs, especially in our area around Main Campus.” “They may not have friends or family who can help them fund their business to begin with and they may not have the traditional assets,” she added. The center is also in the process of opening a global branch on Main Campus, where it will welcome small European companies interested in entering the American market, said Karl Kraus, the center’s senior business consultant. The branch will allow companies to learn and study American business practices, he added. Fox’s Main Campus center will host its first client from France later this month and two other European clients are set to visit this year. “We bring a lot of business knowledge, education and experience to companies in the community,” Kraus said. “... We can open those resources to our clients as well, which a lot of clients rave about.” will.amari@temple.edu @wileewillie

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NEWS PAGE 6

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

ON THE COVER

SHS continues response to mumps outbreak There are currently 10 confirmed and an additional five probable cases of the mumps. BY GRACE SHALLOW & KELLY BRENNAN For The Temple News

As classes resume, Temple University health officials are attempting to stop the spread of the mumps after an outbreak began before Spring Break. The university is now looking to require incoming students to receive the MMR vaccine before enrolling, Denys added. “This isn’t something to get panicked or very worried over, but it is something to be aware of,” said Mark Denys, the director of Student and Employee Health Services. There are 10 confirmed Temple-related mumps cases since Feb. 28, when Temple first alerted the university community about the outbreak. It is not clear whether the confirmed cases include faculty or staff members. Five of the other Temple-related cases are probable, and one case was found to be negative, university spokesperson Chris Vito wrote in an email to The Temple News on Monday. A case classifies as probable when the individual experiences swollen glands for at least two days and can be linked to another probable or determined case, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More cases off Main Campus may occur because students traveled during spring break, Denys said. Two probable mumps cases in Montgomery County were linked to Temple’s outbreak as of Friday. There are four other suspected cases, but it is unclear if these cases are linked to Temple, said John Corcoran, the director of Montgomery County’s communications office. Temple is looking to require the incoming freshman class to have the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, Denys said Monday. It protects against News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

WHAT TO DO IF YOU HAVE SYMPTOMS

PEOPLE AT GREATEST RISK OF INFECTION AND TRANSMISSION

According to a university release, there’s no treatment for mumps. But you can relieve symptoms with tactics including: Take medication like Tylenol or Motrin Rest Drink fluids

People who are pregnant People with illnesses that weaken their immune systems, like AIDS or any form of cancer Health care personnel International travelers People who did not receive two doses of the MMR vaccine as a child

the mumps, a contagious virus that is transmitted through the mouth, nose and throat. Symptoms include swelling in the face and jaw, fever, headache and loss of appetite. Denys said Temple has remained in contact with local public health departments to coordinate its response. All confirmed cases are automatically shared with the CDC, he added. He’s never seen an outbreak of an infectious disease at Temple during his 14 years here, before now. Most of his staff has never treated the mumps before. As of Feb. 28, 151 mumps cases were reported in the United States in 2019, according to the CDC. “Student Health is more adept in dealing with these things than most primary care doctors because we do see so many students and we have a more public health point of view than most urgent cares or even primary care doctors at home,” Denys said. “It’s just something we do.” Symptoms typically appear 16-18 days after someone is infected, according to the CDC. Someone with mumps is considered contagious two days before their face swells, through five after, according to a university release. It’s recommended that people with mumps isolate themselves so they’re less likely to infect other people. Student Health has not identified “patient zero,” or the individual who initially developed mumps and passed it on to others, Denys said.

Diseases have a high likelihood of spreading among close-knit groups like sports teams and Greek life organizations, according to the CDC. Denys said on Thursday some members of Temple’s Greek life community were affected by the mumps, but Temple has not yet found any patterns to suggest certain on-campus communities were particularly affected by the outbreak. “There are also many that have no connections to Greek life at all,” Denys added. These diseases can spread easily in environments that are high-contact, like college campuses, according to the CDC. The CDC reported 150 outbreaks, totaling 9,200 cases, in similar settings from January 2016 to June 2017. Hundreds of college students have been affected by mumps outbreaks on campuses across the country in the last few years. There were at least 51 confirmed cases of mumps at Syracuse University in 2017, and about 280 cases were confirmed or found probable at four universities in Indiana between February and April 2016. The university has not identified a case where the affected person didn’t receive their MMR vaccinations, Denys said. Most public K-12 schools require students to be vaccinated against diseases like mumps, but some religious exemptions exist. It’s widely recommended that people receive two shots of the MMR vaccine by the time they’re 6 years old, said LJ

WHERE YOU CAN GET A THIRD SHOT

Student Health Services Pharmacies like Walgreens, CVS and Rite Aid Most primary care physicians and urgent care clinics have the vaccine in stock, according to a university release sent on March 4.

Tan, the chief strategy officer of the Immunization Action Coalition. The IAC works with the CDC to educate health care professionals about vaccines and inform policy. Medical professionals recommend a third shot when outbreaks occur, Tan added. Over time, some people’s immunity decreases and this can make them more susceptible to mumps and other infectious diseases, although it’s unclear why this happens, he said. “[Vaccines] wouldn’t have prevented most of these because the students who have gotten the mumps have had the vaccine,” Denys added. “So it wouldn’t have changed.” Temple encouraged students, faculty and employees to get their third booster shot or vaccination if they’ve had close contact with someone with symptoms, in emails sent to the university community on Feb. 28 and March 4. Because of the MMR vaccine, “these outbreaks tend to be more controlled, tend to be limited in size and duration,” Tan said. Temple is prepared to set up vaccination clinics if more people are affected, Denys said. The clinics would be similar to its flu shot clinics held in the fall, which can reach thousands of people at the university, he added. “We already have a plan, and if we do have to do that and the demand is such, we can do that,” he added. news@temple-news.com @TheTempleNews

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NEWS PAGE 7

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

RESEARCH

Grant aids team’s traumatic brain injury research Lewis Katz School of Medicine said Sharon Ross, QED’s program manresearchers are developing a ager. “Dr. Ramirez’s technology checks all blood test to diagnose head of those boxes with the potential to suptrauma. BY CLAUDIA ESTRADA For The Temple News Researchers from the Lewis Katz School of Medicine and other medical professionals in Philadelphia institutions received a $700,000 grant to research traumatic brain injuries. Part of the grant from The Science Center, a nonprofit that supports technological advancement, was awarded to Servio Ramirez, a Temple University pathology and laboratory medicine professor, and his team of researchers from the Katz School of Medicine, who are developing ways to detect and diagnose TBI through the bloodstream. The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Delaware and the University of Pennsylvania will also receive part of the combined award. “We’re fortunate to be here right now, at Temple where we’re growing,” Ramirez said. “We have a lot of intellectual talent, [and] in order to grow scientifically, you need to have that fertile ground of other scientists providing feedback at an institution like Temple that supports you and wants to help you develop your ideas. That’s huge.” The grant is part of the Science Center’s QED program, named after the abbreviation for the Latin phrase, “proven as demonstrated.” The program, which is partially funded by the Pennsylvania Department of Health, provides mentorship and funding to academic researchers so they can advance early-stage life science and health care technology. The Science Center looks for ideas that have market potential and offer improvements to current standards of care,

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port health care providers as they diagnose, monitor recovery and even predict outcomes associated with brain injuries,” Ross said. Ramirez’s blood test evaluates extracellular vesicles, which the body’s cells release to transfer information to other cells and are released from injured vessels when the brain suffers trauma. The test will help medical professionals more effectively monitor patients’ recoveries and better predict TBI outcomes, according to a Science Center press release. External force on the brain causes TBI, which can be severe or mild. Severe TBI can lead to brain death, while concussions, a form of mild TBI, result in post-concussion syndrome symptoms like ongoing headaches and fatigue. While 75 percent of brain injuries are not life-threatening, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 5.3 million people in the United States have long-term TBI disabilities. There are not many ways to detect TBI, Ramirez said, even with computed tomography scans, which are cross-sectional X-rays of the brain. More than 90 percent of people with mild TBI who are CT scanned come back with normal results, according to the CDC, but with time, patients show TBI symptoms, Ramirez said. Temple Health is also hoping to conduct concussion research with the university’s football team, Temple Athletics announced in November 2018. Players would be equipped with helmet sensors that monitor impact, according to a press release. The Temple Athletics Helmet Sensor OwlCrowd campaign raised nearly $7,000 to fund the players’ gear.

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS James McHale, a 2017 criminal justice alumnus and former offensive tackle, has suffered from several concussions during his time playing football.

James McHale, a 2017 criminal justice alumnus who played on Temple’s offensive line from 2014-18, suffered seven concussions in his lifetime, three before coming to Temple and four more during his college career. McHale remembered one incident where he got hit during practice and suffered a concussion during the 2017 season. “There are tell-tale signs that you have to look out for,” McHale said. “You know if someone has a concussion if they’re acting funny. As players, we can learn to recognize it...and it happens a lot.” McHale said he lost consciousness and doesn’t remember getting up. His coach told McHale after he was hit unconscious he got up and began incoherently walking around the field.

He also made head-to-head contact with another player later that year, which caused another concussion. McHale began to experience headaches and nausea for the next week and did not play for about a month. Although McHale had multiple concussions, he was allowed to stay on the team. There’s hope for a breakthrough on TBI detection if fellow Katz School of Medicine researchers and outside institutions continue to support each other, Ramirez said. “We can continue to do the things we know and do [them] well, and this will take us to that next level,” he added. claudia.estrada@temple.edu @claudiak_est

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OPINION TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

PAGE 8 EDITORIALS

Get your mumps booster Temple University’s Student Health Services first reported a handful of students were diagnosed with mumps on Feb. 28, but now the number of Temple-related cases is 16, and it’s spreading outside of Main Campus. The virus can spread through coughing and sneezing, and people who are infected should stay isolated for at least five days, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If you’re affected, please visit Health Services and take the necessary time to recover and prevent others from being at risk. Though mumps outbreaks have happened within the past few years in Arkansas, at Syracuse University and elsewhere, the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine has been largely effective in preventing outbreaks like this. Two doses of MMR before age 6 is 88 percent effective against mumps, according to the CDC. And college students who received a third MMR vaccine during an outbreak at the University of Iowa had a 78 percent lower risk of contracting the virus than those who

only received two. If you’re able to, consider getting another booster. The university has not yet identified a case where the affected person didn’t receive their MMR vaccinations, said Mark Denys, director of Student and Employee Health Services. But to those who have not been vaccinated by this time in their life, why? The misconception that the MMR vaccine causes autism has been disproven and relying on natural immunity just poses an increased risk of death. Please protect yourself and others. The university is updating its policies to require first-year students to receive the MMR vaccine. We applaud this decision and hope it prevents future cases. In the meantime, be aware of potential symptoms and take the necessary steps to protect yourself and others. Editor’s Note: Managing Editor Kelly Brennan is a reporter on this news report. She played no role in the writing of this editorial.

Fund on-campus day care

This week in Intersection, student-parents discussed the hardships they face while taking care of their children, going to work and attending Temple University. We applaud student-parents who find a way to do handle these responsibilities at a school that lacks an on-campus day care facility. Many schools in the region, like Penn State, Rutgers University, the Community College of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania, provide day care facilities for the children of students. We think Temple should fund one, too. letters@temple-news.com

Student-parents wouldn’t risk being late to classes if they could drop their children off on-campus or nearby, and they wouldn’t need to find babysitters or caregivers on short notice. Also, students in the College of Education could receive internship hours at a facility like this, which would give them valuable, hands-on experience. Student-parents should not have to struggle to continue learning and support their children, and Temple should find ways to ease these burdens.

DIVERSITY

Harvard: Be transparent A recent lawsuit against the Ivy League university shows that the institution needs to drop its subjective admission requirements.

A

judge in a United States District Court recently heard the final arguments in Students for Fair Admissions Inc. v. Harvard College, a case many believe is destined for the Supreme Court. The suit argues Asian-American students are victims of Harvard’s allegedly unfair admissions practices. It claims Asians are given lower “personal ratings” based on intangible character JOSHUA VICTOR traits, in order to counTSG COLUMNIST terbalance a surplus of Asian students. Harvard evaluates academic achievement, extracurricular activities, strength of character and “personal” and “overall” ratings. These ratings are based on a scale of one to six, with positive or negative attachments, like 2+ or 3-. A negative rating deters prospective students from admission. But valuing strength of character ratings so highly is extremely subjective. If a community of Asian-Americans complain about perceived bias, Harvard can simply say applicants fell short on character and personality. Duke University economist Peter Arcidiacono studied six years of Harvard admissions data and found Asian-American males with a 25 percent chance of getting in would have a 35 percent chance if they were white and dramatically higher odds if they were Black or Latinx. Two-thirds of Black and roughly half of Hispanic Harvard students were admitted as result of racial preferences, Arcidiacono testified to the federal circuit court in Boston. Harvard combats this argument by claiming it looks for “holistic” criteria when evaluating prospective students. College admission, Ivy League or not, is a huge milestone for someone who has worked extremely hard to get there, espe-

cially for minorities. Let’s not make it more difficult. “If, in fact, the research shows that a white student, a white applicant, with the same exact record as an Asian applicant stands a better chance of getting in, there’s a problem with that system,” said Barbara Ferman, a Temple University political science professor. As a student, I’m concerned. Harvard is one of the top universities in the world. Establishing an equitable system here can set the tone for other schools. Harvard has a right to embrace racial diversity as part of its mission. But the prestigious university must be careful to not emphasize such goals at the expense of a fair admissions process. At Temple, the Office of Equal Opportunity Compliance ensures institution-wide equal access and affirmative action. But imagine how different our student body would be if it exchanged these policies for personality ratings. “In public universities where the state legislators said you can’t take race into account, we’ve seen that...the percentage of Asian-Americans goes up a lot,” said David Nickerson, a political science professor. “It really depends on what the mission of the university is. You have to think about the competing goals. It’s not obvious.” Harvard needs to address the partiality of its admissions process, said Baki Kahloan, a senior finance major who is Asian-American. “You don’t really know what they want from you,” Kahloan said. “Transparency is definitely the key and...informing people what they truly expect.” Transparency should be an expectation and a right for any student in the college admissions process. Harvard must do this and implement a clearer standard to ensure a selection process free from this false racial balancing. And I hope other universities know better than to adopt admissions practices like those at Harvard. joshua.victor@temple.edu @joshuajvictor7

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OPINION

PAGE 9

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

THE ESSAYIST

The white belt who never gave up

Karate quickly became more than A student reflects on her journey to a black belt and the lessons my hobby. It became my life. I made friends. I slowly started overcoming my she learned along the way.

BY BRITTANY VALENTINE Feminism Columnist There are many things about my adolescent years that I’d like to forget, like wearing the brands Tapout and Ed Hardy and using the word “sicknasty” unironically. The isolation I often felt in the hallways of my high school is another one of those things. But something I love about my adolescence is the three years I spent working toward a first-degree black belt in Kenpo karate, a martial arts form that focuses on self-defense. Right before my 16th birthday, I decided to take up martial arts, for no other reason besides thinking it would be cool. I had no idea at the time, the dojo — the studio for martial arts — and the people I met there would become so important to me. It was my second home during my sophomore year of high school until my freshman year of college. I definitely didn’t expect to find myself in a world where I’d be bowing on and off the mat, and to my senseis, all while saying a Japanese word that loosely translates to “respect.” I never thought I’d recite a chant vowing to live by the “Principles of Black Belt” on and off the mat, and I especially didn’t think I would take it seriously. I tried my best to live a life of “modesty, courtesy, integrity, self-control, perseverance and an indomitable spirit,” and I bought a bunch of books to learn about East Asian cultures and martial arts history. I even started teaching myself the Japanese language.

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shyness and anxiety. I became physically stronger and more confident, and I found a place where I felt comfortable being myself. One of my favorite parts about my journey was my senseis’ mentorship. I always had someone to talk to when I felt lost, lonely or depressed or I needed advice. They did more than teach me how to do roundhouse kicks and defend myself; they taught me life lessons and pushed me to be my best, even when I didn’t feel like it. Growing up, I never won any awards or trophies, and I always felt inferior when I compared myself to my friends who had entire shelves dedicated to their achievements. Karate gave me that sense of accomplishment I craved every time I passed the test to earn a new belt. Unlike any of the sports I played, karate had no season; it was all year round, and the only way I could lose was if I stopped going. Whenever I feel like quitting something, I remember when one of my senseis told me, “A black belt is just a white belt that never quit.” When it finally came time for me to dedicate myself toward the last few months of training and testing to receive my black belt, I was overwhelmed. I felt like I couldn’t possibly keep up with the schedule or the physical demands. I had to run two miles, even though I have exercise-induced asthma, and I had to come home from my university every weekend for practice runs and tests for the big black belt extravaganza. I was already struggling with mental health issues at the time, and I was falling behind in school, but no one knew.

ALEXA MINTZ / THE TEMPLE NEWS

I managed to make it through the runs — inhaler in hand — and I passed all the tests, even though my dramatic self was sure I wouldn’t survive. The week before the extravaganza, I had a breakdown and had to go home on medical leave. The excitement of getting my black belt was dissipating more and more. On the big day, I got my hair French braided, and my friend did my makeup. My anxiety was boiling up. I stress-ate an entire bag of candy

on the ride to the venue, and I had to hold back tears so I wouldn’t ruin my eye makeup. Even so, I performed my skills for a room full of people and was awarded my beautiful, prized black belt. When I went to bed that night, after posing for tons of photos and enjoying a well-deserved celebratory dinner, I realized I made it because I was a white belt who never gave up. brittany.leigh.valentine@temple.edu @recoveryspirit

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OPINION PAGE 10

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

LGBTQ

Be considerate, master correct pronoun usage Because gender is inescapable Temple University’s LGBTQ advocacy changing language, even if you’re not in our daily lives, tailor your a cappella group, said she knows people someone who identifies with it. language to fit others’ identities. who use they/them pronouns and while In September 2017, the honorifFrom the moment a doctor told your parents what biological sex you are until right now, you have lived an extremely gendered life, and you most likely never challenged the boxes you were placed into. But some people challenge those boxes daily. If the term “gender fluidity” is new to you, BRITTANY VALENTINE congratulations — FEMINISM COLUMNIST you’re not alone. Society is ever-changing, and so is language. But we have to adapt because gender is so evident in every part of our world, and respecting people by the way you talk to and about them is crucial. When someone is gender fluid, their gender expression can shift between masculine and feminine, CNN reported in 2016. People who are gender fluid often use the pronoun “they” to identify themselves. The American Dialect Society selected the pronoun “they” as its Word Of The Year for 2015 and defined it as a “gender-neutral singular pronoun for a known person, as a non-binary identifier.” “‘They’ is getting used as a pronoun that people take for themselves to express gender fluidity or transgender identity,” sociolinguist Ben Zimmer, the chairperson of the annual vote, told TIME in January 2016. “That’s relatively new or at least new in the public eye.” Adopting gender-neutral words like ‘they’ makes it a more comfortable world for those around you who don’t fit into the gendered boxes they were placed in at birth. Sydney Fowlkes, a junior journalism major and member of Pitch, Please,

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she adapted easily, she catches herself forgetting sometimes. “I always correct myself though, whether in the presence of the person or not,” Fowlkes said. It can be frustrating and even hurtful when you call someone by a pronoun they don’t identify as. The least we can all do for each other is be mindful. Hayley Goddard, a freshman architecture major who identifies as queer, said — like our gendered way of speaking — the world is full of strict gender norms. “We have different bathrooms, different clothing sections, different outfits on wedding days, different colors for gendered babies, different job expectations and different life expectations,” Goddard said. “Gender is everywhere.” She can’t imagine a world where “people can just be people without everyone else telling them who they should be,” she said. And in a world where everyone tells us who to be, let’s treat individuals with respect by listening when they tell you who they are. While using agender pronouns may be relatively “new” to the mainstream, gender-neutral language is certainly not new and neither are non-binary identities. People have been defying the gender binary throughout history. You may have even used the singular “they” without noticing. If you found a wallet in a coffee shop, you would probably tell an employee by saying, “Someone left their wallet on the table.” So, how hard can it be to work toward using these pronouns on purpose when it’s necessary? For non-binary people, people who don’t identify as either men or women, this pronoun detaches them from gendered pronouns. Additionally, many non-binary people also use “Mx.” as a title. It’s important to keep up with this

ic title “Mx.” was added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary. The titles Mr., Miss, Ms. and Mrs., besides revealing gender, reveal the marital status of a woman, which is arguably sexist and unnecessary. This is only one way to bring gender-neutral language into our everyday lives. For example, try saying “distinguished guests” instead of “ladies and gentlemen,” or “partner” in substitute of

“boyfriend” or “girlfriend.” You can also politely ask a person if they are comfortable with words like “dude” or “guys” before using them. Overall, always respect the pronouns and identities of those around you. I know it’s tricky and it won’t happen overnight, but I’m just asking that we all try a little harder to be sensitive of others’ identities when we speak to and about them. brittany.leigh.valentine@temple.edu @recoveryspirit

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OPINION PAGE 11

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

Content warning: This essay describes violence against women and rape.

THE ESSAYIST

Taking my body back after abusive relationships When I was almost 17 years old, I A student writes about how sexually abusive relationships was talking to boys on the regular, hooking up with them in parking lots or on influenced her self-image.

BY MADISON SEITCHIK Co-Multimedia Editor & Web Editor When I was 15 years old, I had my first kiss and fell in love for the first time with a man who was older than me. He made me feel loved one day, then the next he would turn around and make me feel nonexistent. This made me feel so bad about myself after he gave me my first sexual experiences, which I wasn’t ready for, but felt obligated to do for him. I snuck around my parents rebelling for love. But I was just a baby, still only with an image from movies of what love should feel like. We took a broadcast class together and almost always snuck into the studio during lunch when nobody else would be there. Some days we’d kiss and cuddle, others he’d play hard to get and ignore me. One warm spring day, I wore a dress to school because it was hot outside. This day was one of the days he decided he wanted to ignore me. I’d had enough of his games. I confronted him about his actions and told him I’d had enough. He then decided he wanted to “make me feel better.” He put his hand up my dress. My body froze. I kept telling him: No. Stop. Please. And yet he kept going, like I was supposed to like it. I saw the principal outside of the door but was too afraid to scream for help. He finally stopped after 30 seconds, but it felt like an eternity. I thought I was supposed to like it because I thought I loved him. I didn’t fully comprehend what happened, so I ignored it and tried to forget. @TheTempleNews

the side of some dirt road getting naked. But I never let them see me in the light. This did more damage to me when I should have been healing from my past dating violence and instance of sexual assault. Instead, I would again put my trust in these young men, and they’d leave. I began to think I had to be cooler, less bubbly and sexier to get their attention. Otherwise, boys would never look at me. I thought I was the problem. During this time in my life, I had never felt so disgusted and dirty. I would try to scrub myself skinless, and it still wouldn’t be enough. When I was 18, I finally understood I was surrounding myself with men who treated me like shit, because that’s how I thought love was supposed to feel. As I came to this revelation about my past abuses, I felt everything at once, like fireworks on the Fourth of July. My anxiety, depression, PTSD — everything was in front of me. When I ultimately felt clean, a boy who had been my best friend since my freshman year of high school helped me see that I’m attractive without makeup or tailoring myself to the likes of others. He showed me happiness is the greatest beauty of all. My freshman year of college, I dated a boy that at first, seemed like the guy I had been waiting for. The real deal. My future. But in a few months span, he went from a sweet, sensitive, loving guy to one telling me I shouldn’t wear such tight leggings if I didn’t want to get fucked. I felt pressured and coerced into sex with him, and it hurt me. My heart and vagina ached, and I couldn’t wait for each sexual encounter to be over. I was taken back to age 15, in love with a man

ALI GRAULTY / THE TEMPLE NEWS

who hurt me. But I loved him, right? That’s what I told myself. Since these abusive relationships began while I was in high school, I consistently had panic attacks — a familiar, fearful feeling that filled my body. I’d always had anxiety, but this was debilitating. I always wondered what it meant when I was having these attacks. What triggered them? Were they random? Was it my fault? I soon went to the doctor the following week for my annual check-up. I began to break down in front of my doctor during my first pelvic exam. As she walked through the door, everything I held inside spilled out; I hyperventilated while I was being penetrated, reliving one of the most painful feelings I’d ever experienced. She was worried, and I began to have yet another panic attack. This is one of many I’d had over the years. I assured her I was OK, even though I clearly wasn’t. I told her how I felt like the earth was moving so fast, and I couldn’t make it stop. This led her to

prescribe me anti-anxiety and depression medication. In just two weeks, I felt immense weight taken off my shoulders — I was finally off on my road to recovery. I’m slowly becoming the woman I was destined to be: a proud sister of a 13-year-old boy whom I will help raise into a respectful man and daughter to parents who always believed in me. For so long, I had blamed myself and fell into a cycle of suppression that so many other survivors of sexual violence face. It’s taken until recently for me to realize I was one in three adolescents in the United States that are victims of physial, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, according to Loveisrespect.org. Or that I’m one in six college women who has been sexually abused in a dating relationship. Now, I stand tall with an understanding of what love should feel like. I’m still coming to terms with my past abuse, and I’ll wear whatever I damn please. madison.seitchik@temple.edu @madd_chik

letters@temple-news.com


FEATURES

PAGE 12

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

FACULTY

Professor studies impact of nonprofit journalism A journalism professor wrote a news outlets to adopt for-profit models book suggesting nonprofits are that strayed from advertisement-focused repairing journalism’s business models. As the Internet gained popularity, model. BY MADISON KARAS Campus Beat Reporter

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hile working as a reporter at the Guelph Mercury during the height of its financial challenges, Magda Konieczna remembered the story of a fellow Ontario, Canada paper. After a group of eight bar-goers complained about their local newspaper in 1999, each chipped in $100 to start the Port Hope Town Crier, which ran for about 15 months before its founders stopped subsidizing it. “They had literally no business model,” said Konieczna, a Temple University journalism professor. “Knowing about that, and seeing the Mercury in trouble, I became aware that there were other ways to fund journalism besides advertising money.” Konieczna’s interest in financing journalism inspired her 2018 book “Journalism Without Profit: Making News When the Market Fails.” The book serves as an in-depth study of nonprofit journalism and examines the funding and influence of nonprofit news organizations. Konieczna gives talks on her book around the country and teaches some of its ideas in her Temple course, The Entrepreneurial Journalist. Nonprofit newsrooms that focus on public-service journalism are typically funded by grants and public support, while for-profit newsrooms are funded by advertisements and paid subscriptions, Konieczna said. The growing financial struggles in public-service journalism partially come from changing business models. Previously, advertisement revenue funded a newspaper’s operations. But the emergence of digital platforms prompted features@temple-news.com

many newsrooms experienced financial turmoil. From 2008-17 newsroom employment plummeted 23 percent and more than one-third of the United States’s largest newspapers had layoffs between January 2017 and April 2018, according to the Pew Research Center. In response, nonprofits like The Lenfest Institute for Journalism have emerged to help local news outlets implement sustainable business models. “The funding model where people are buying the newspaper or watching the newscast for a whole bunch of different reasons that include seeing the football score and doing the crossword and reading about Beyoncé, that model is like forms of subsidy for doing public-service journalism,” she said. Evolving digital platforms, like The New York Times’s crossword puzzle app, divide funding for different types of journalism, Konieczna said, and often removes funding for public-service journalism. The book stemmed from Konieczna’s dissertation study while earning her Ph.D. from 2009-14 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, after leaving the Guelph Mercury in 2009. Konieczna observed three local and national nonprofit news organizations for the study, including MinnPost, the Center for Public Integrity and the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, which is housed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Andy Hall, the executive director and co-founder of the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, decided to make the center’s content available for free to other news organizations when it opened in 2009. Hall thought the center’s content would reach people more easily that way. “Journalism is facing a series of pro-

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS Author and journalism professor Magda Konieczna wrote “Journalism Without Profit: Making News When the Market Fails,” a book about nonprofit journalism.

found problems,” Hall said. “How to generate reliable revenue is among the most urgent and among the issues that are worsening at the fastest rate.” The Wisconsin Center’s investigations are funded by grants from foundations like the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation. By providing the investigations to news organizations for free, it’s fixing journalism, Konieczna said. “These guys are not trying to blow up journalism,” she added. “They’re trying to fix it from inside by elevating the quality of journalism that exists.” Meredith Siegler, a junior journalism major, is interested in learning more about nonprofit journalism because of its potential to be less biased and focus more on truth-telling compared to larger, for-profit newspapers with sponsors, she said. “It’s important to have people more

aware of different forms of journalism,” Siegler added. “For me, going into the field, it’s important to learn about it because of different job opportunities.” Konieczna hopes her book spreads awareness about nonprofit newsrooms among both professional journalists and journalism students. “It’s hard to tell exactly what’s happening with journalism, but these news nonprofits are able to earn revenue directly from producing the kind of journalism that’s important for democracy,” she said. “They’re an important player in trying to continue to do that important journalistic work.” madison.karas@temple.edu @madraekaras Editor’s note: Features Editor Laura Smythe and Co-Photo Editor Dylan Long are both students in Koniecza’s Entrepreneurial Journalism class.

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FEATURES PAGE 13

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Cannabis-themed apparel addresses weed stigma “George pretty much [direct mesA business administration alumnus started the clothing line saged] me, like, ‘Send me out a hoodie after smoking pot helped him bro, I’ll rock it, I’ll spread the message,’” Voag said. “And then from then on, we through chemotherapy.

BY CARLEE CUNNINGHAM For The Temple News Chris Voag spent age 19 being treated for Stage 1 testicular cancer, along with the constant nausea that his treatment gave him. The top thing that helped him find relief? Smoking weed. “I never knew of any medicinal properties or believed any of that mattered until I did a month of chemo, about four months after my surgery,” Voag said. “It helped me very much through the anti-nausea properties. I actually never got sick.” Voag, a 2016 business administration alumnus, founded Sir and Lady Cannabis, a marijuana-themed apparel line. The online shop, which Voag operates out of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, formally launched this month after the pre-order period ended Feb. 24. The apparel features artwork of the two characters, Sir and Lady Cannabis, and includes T-shirts, sweatshirts, beanies and snapback hats. Voag hopes the clothing spreads awareness about the valuable uses of both medicinal and recreational marijuana, like reducing pain and alleviating anxiety, and destigmatizes people who use it. “I hope to accomplish highlighting the versatility of the cannabis plant and bringing a better image to cannabis use through our clothing by showing Sir Cannabis in an active, regular lifestyle,” he added. Actor George Lopez endorsed the line in December 2016 after Voag launched the brand’s Instagram account. Lopez originally contacted Voag through Instagram, when the clothing line’s account only had about 40 followers, and collaborated with Voag to create a sweatshirt and tee featuring his image.

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built a friendship.” While marijuana is still illegal under federal law, Gov. Tom Wolf legalized medical marijuana in Pennsylvania in April 2016. Last February, dispensaries began opening for people with qualifying medical conditions, like epilepsy, cancer and glaucoma. In addition to his own cancer, Voag watched his father receive treatment for stage 4 oral cancer in 2016. He, too, found relief from his treatment through cannabis. “When the radiation was ripping his throat apart, he couldn’t speak, not even for two seconds,” Voag said. “And when he drank the [THC] tea, he was able to communicate with me and tell me what he needed help with.” At this time, Voag was finishing his last semester at Temple University. Strategic management professor Dwight Carey encouraged him to market the THC tea his father was drinking. Instead, Voag decided to create his clothing company to de-stigmatize marijuana usage. “His idea in cannabis is just going to be able to spread from state to state like the legislation has spread over the last five or six years,” Carey said. “He’s in the right place at the right time, and it’s going to spread beyond clothing.” To create the Sir and Lady Cannabis characters, Voag enlisted the help of 2017 advertising alumnus Billy Mahoney, who had graphic design experience. “He basically told me [he] had this idea...to start this clothing company to debunk all the negative stereotypes of stoners,” Mahoney said. “I was all for it.” Voag continues to raise awareness through social media. The line’s weekly Instagram Cannabis Warrior Series highlights people with diseases, like cancer and the genetic disorder Hun-

COURTESY / CHRIS VOAG Chris Voag, a 2016 business administration alumnus, collaborated with actor George Lopez on his marijuana-themed apparel line, Sir and Lady Cannabis.

tington’s disease, who use marijuana to manage their symptoms. One of these “warriors” is 23-yearold Philadelphian Olivia Sullivan, who has had lupus since she was 17. Sullivan experiences flare-ups like rashes, join paint and memory problems. For six years, Sullivan has been on and off medications that caused stomach ulcers, painful muscle cramps and weight gain. Cannabis use allowed her to stop several of her medications, including a narcotic, Sullivan said. After obtaining her medical card through the Pennsylvania Medical Marijuana Program, dispensaries helped Sullivan find the right strains of cannabis for

her symptoms, she said. The OX strain helps treat her pain and muscle spasms, while Bloo’s Kloos alleviates stress and headaches. Voag wants his clothing line to help others benefit from cannabis the same way he, his father and his Cannabis Warriors have. “Cannabis doesn’t limit you in life,” Voag said. “Cannabis can help you in life, like it helped me get through cancer, and it helps many other people, from autism to PTSD. That’s what I’m just trying to highlight.” carlee.cunningham@temple.edu @carleeinthelab

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FEATURES PAGE 14

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

MUSIC

Students turn up to Latin music as trend grows In 2018, the Latin music market generated $135 million and was one of the most-consumed genres. BY BIBIANA CORREA Trend Beat Reporter

While growing up, weekend mornings at Kristine Aponte’s house started by blasting merengue and salsa music, signaling it was time to clean. The junior communication studies major constantly listened to Latin music and followed several artists who started out rapping on the streets during her childhood and adolescence. “It’s amazing to see people who were literally told their whole lives that they couldn’t make it, and now not only make it, but be successful in the American and worldwide markets,” Aponte said. Temple University students who grew up in Latinx and Hispanic households have listened to different styles of Latin music for years. But with the rise of Latin music popularity in the United States, both Spanish-speaking and non-Spanish speaking members of the

VOICES

Do you like to listen to music outside of your native language? Why or why not?

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Temple community are tuning in to the genre. Latin songs were ranked as the fifth most-consumed music genre in the U.S. over country music, according to a 2018 report from music data company BuzzAngle Music. The U.S. Latin music market produced $135 million, with 91 percent from streaming, according to the Recording Industry Association of America’s 2018 mid-year revenue report. In 2017, “Despacito” by Puerto Rican artists Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee became popular in the U.S and internationally. Last year, Cardi B’s “I Like It,” featuring Puerto Rican trap and reggaeton singer Bad Bunny and Colombian reggaeton singer J Balvin, went viral, alongside J Balvin’s “Mi Gente,” which featured Beyonce on the remix. Senior management information systems major Stephanie Cabrera said she struggles with mixing her Latinx and American identities. But reggaeton helps her retain her roots. “I just have a different kind of connection to it because everyone listens to Migos and 21 Savage, but Bad Bunny is

closer to home,” Cabrera said. Previously, Latinx artists had to write their songs in English or translate them to break into the U.S. market, said Rafael Logrono, a journalism instructor and graduate student. “Now, we see songs completely in Spanish resonating with non-Spanish speakers,” said Logrono, who is also a 2017 communication studies alumnus. “You even see artists who don’t speak Spanish performing in Spanish in hopes of entering a new market.” Latinx artists like Natti Natasha, Becky G, Maluma and Anuel AA are rising in the U.S. music scene. Gail Vivar, a senior journalism major, said Latin trap and reggaeton are universal genres “gaining traction” in the U.S. music market. “I have a lot of pride, and I think it’s about time that people appreciate it because it’s so common in our community,” Vivar said. “It’s finally great to see other communities enjoying it too.” Despite raising popularity, a language barrier still exists. Kat Muolo, a junior international business major, said people connect

CALEN McALPIN Freshman media studies and production major

Sometimes I listen to Spanish music. I’m trying to learn Spanish, so every few months I pick up on a little bit more.

FAHD KSARA Junior computer science major French is my native language, so I usually listen to English music a lot. Besides English, I also like listening to Spanish music. I like its style. The lyrics are fun.

more with songs when they understand the lyrics. Muolo was born in Vietnam, but learned to appreciate reggaeton by joining Latinx clubs and organizations growing up, she said. “People who don’t speak Spanish are slightly apprehensive because they just hear words and they don’t really connect with the songs or what they’re saying,” Muolo added. For Logrono, the musical representation is crucial for the Latinx community. “For too long, our community has been underrepresented or not represented at all in different key institutions,” he said. “I hope the popularity and influence of Latinx music continues to rise and become a strong force in the American music industry.” bibiana.correa@temple.edu Editor’s note: Gail Vivar is a former freelance reporter for The Temple News. She had no role in the reporting or editing of this story.

KERRI NORTON Sophomore psychology major I usually don’t, just because I like singing along or even in my head. But if I find a song I like, then I’ll just listen to it no matter what.

TIM LEE Junior computer information sciences major

Some of my favorite musics are [Chinese]. ...It gives me an appreciation for a different style of using words, because different languages have their own quirks when it comes to using words and expressing meaning. temple-news.com


FEATURES TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

PAGE 15

LIVE IN PHILLY

Philadelphians turn out for final week of flower show

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS

The annual Philadelphia Flower Show, organized by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, ended Sunday at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Thousands of visitors flooded the center throughout the week, which held various floral exhibits. Temple University’s Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture put together the gallery “Hip Haven: Hangin’ Loose at a Home Refuge” in honor of the show’s “Flower Power” theme. Michelle Armour, a junior landscape architecture major who helped curate the exhibit, was thrilled at the event’s high turnout. “You don’t realize how many people are walking through,” she said. “In three hours, we’re seeing 1,500 people.” Neoshie Giles, a 2016 tourism and hospitality management alumna, attended the show with her mother, Wanda Giles, and their hairstylist, Debbie Williams. Having attended the show in the past, Neoshie Giles said this year’s show was her favorite one yet. “I came out to see flowers, and this was really nice,” she added.

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FEATURES PAGE 16

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

STUDENT LIFE

Competition diversifies public relations industry

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS Public relations professor David Brown leads a group of Temple students entered in the Bateman Competition, in which public relations students organize a campaign to promote inclusivity in the field.

The annual Bateman Competition mented a diversity-focused PR campaign asked students nationwide to for the month-long, annual competition launch a campaign encouraging that ended Monday. Faisal, along with fellow senior PR inclusivity in the field. BY LILLIAN GERCZYK For The Temple News Lailumah Faisal regularly notices she is the only intern of color at her public relations internships — and sometimes the only person of color in the whole office. “There have been a lot of conversations of ‘We should,’ but no one knows where to start or where to find diverse students to recruit,” said Faisal, a senior public relations major of Pakistani descent. “It’s not that there’s a lack of [candidates]. It’s that employers don’t know.” Faisal’s experience inspired her to participate in the Bateman Competition, hosted by the Public Relations Student Society of America in partnership with the Public Relations Society of America. Students nationwide created and implefeatures@temple-news.com

majors Christina Borst, Erica DeAngelo, Rose McBride and Mary Kate O’Malley and their professor David Brown, held a series of lectures encouraging diversity in PR for Klein’s undergraduate Introduction to PR and PR Theory classes for the competition. O’Malley and Brown led the lectures, which the team hoped would reinforce the idea that successful, diverse professionals can enter the PR field, connecting future students of color with professionals to look up to. “The crux of our campaign has been centered around education, and a lot of it has also been about activating student allies because they hold power to create change for the future of this field,” McBride said. The PR field has a problem recruiting and retaining racially diverse candidates. Data from the Bureau of Labor

Statistics from 2018 found that nearly 87 percent of PR specialists are white, while 10 percent are Hispanic or Latinx, 7 percent are African-American and 5 percent are Asian. “When you teach about an off-topic, like diversity, it becomes more than a classroom lesson, it becomes a life lesson,” Brown added. “It’s about helping others find their voice, staying true to themselves and having their story told.” The team competed against more than 75 other student teams from across the country. The Temple teammates divided campaign responsibilities, like writing press releases, running social media and overseeing data collection, among themselves. While judging has not yet happened, teams will be evaluated on how well they researched, planned and executed their campaigns through portfolios submitted to the judges. In addition to the initial campaign, participating teams had to promote “Diverse Voices: Profiles in Leadership,” a book featuring interviews from more

than 30 diverse PR leaders. Temple University’s team created a book club, funded by accomplished Philadelphia PR professionals, for students to discuss the text. “It’s really the first of its kind because it starts that dialogue,” Faisal said. “The book allows opportunities to start a dialogue on this conversation that a lot of people don’t get the opportunity to have.” Faisal believes the voluntary nature of the competition shows the team’s dedication to the issue. “I really appreciate everyone on this team because of that fact that we don’t have to be here, we don’t have to be doing this, but because we care so much at this point it shows there’s hope for the future,” Faisal said. Though the campaign lasted a month, Brown and his students want to encourage its message year round. The team placed copies of “Diverse Voices” in Paley Library and held faculty presentations in Temple’s Office of Institutional Diversity, Equality, Advocacy and Leadership to instruct PR faculty on how to teach about and discuss diversity on campus. Despite Philadelphia’s diversity, Temple was the only university in the city to participate in the competition, which Brown calls “a blessing and a curse.” “The blessing is that we’re the only ones doing it,” he said. “But the curse is that a lot of colleges and universities haven’t had the courage to participate.” DeAngelo hopes the campaign can encourage continual discussions about diversity in the field. “We all bring something different to the table, but that sometimes means that our experiences and perspectives are limited,” DeAngelo said. “It’s important that we’re making sure people who come from these backgrounds and experiences have power and the ability to tell their stories.” lillian.rose.gerczyk@temple.edu

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FEATURES PAGE 17

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH CROSSWORD

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6. Journalist who investigated lynchings of Black Americans in the late 19th- and 20th-centuries

1. French fashion designer who introduced the “little black dress”

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7. Actress and 1950s pop culture icon

2. Home to the first women’s rights convention in the United States in 1848

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9. Constitutional Amendment that guaranteed equal rights to all Americans regardless of sex but was never ratified by the necessary 38 states

3. Former First Lady and advocate for nutrition and girls’ education 8. Former talk show host and TV network owner

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10. Women’s suffrage advocate who worked with Elizabeth Cady Stanton

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SAINT PATRICK’S DAY WORD SEARCH SHAMROCK CLOVER CELTIC EMERALD IRELAND

LEPRECHAUN PARADE CORNED BEEF CABBAGE PUB CRAWL

Answers from Tuesday, February 26: 1. Baja California, 2. Fort Lauderdale, 3. Daytona Beach, 4. Margarita, 5. Miami, 6. Bacchus, 7. Good Morning America, 8. James Franco, 9. Cancun, 10. Las Vegas

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4. Former member of Destiny’s Child and most nominated artist in history of Grammy Awards

11. Abolitionist who helped hundreds of people escape slavery on the Underground Railroad

5. Astronaut and first American woman to enter space

12. First woman to become Secretary of State

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INTERSECTION PAGE 18

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

PARENTING

Students discuss balancing parenting and classes Student-parents discuss the ery Early Learning Centers facility. The challenges they face balancing closest one is in Center City. The Department of Education issues the grant childcare with coursework. BY THOMAS NEMEC For The Temple News Life as a college student can be hectic, but for Imzadi Davis and Elisha Santiago, there is more than just homework to worry about. They have children. Davis, a junior media studies and production major is the mother to 4-year-old Zyla, who will start kindergarten next fall. Santiago, a junior media studies and production major who works full-time, is the mother to her 5-year-old son Ian. The women are among 13.6 million single-parents in America, according to a 2011 U.S. Department of Education report, but they continue to further their educational career at Temple University. Finding the funds for their education alongside the cost of raising a child is a challenge. “I don’t come from a wealthy family, so no one has money to help me with school,” Davis said. “I had to think not only about how this affected me but also my child.” “Timing is key” in balancing both parenthood and coursework and her job as co-host of “We Need to Talk,” TUTV’s first all-female talk show, Davis added. She also She chooses her classes around Zyla’s schedule, not her own. To ease the financial burdens on single parents, the U.S. Department of Education awards schools grants through the Child Care Access Means Parents In School program. Colleges can use the money to subsidize child care costs for students eligible for the Federal Pell Grant, provide child care through campus-based programs or outsource within the community. Temple received nearly $200,000 in 2018 to cover the costs of day care for award recipients. Temple sends children of students to Montgomintersection@temple-news.com

in four-year cycles, so the program could run at Temple through 2022. Eligible student-parents must have children 5 years old or younger. Students with children older than 5 years old cannot benefit from the program. Santiago prioritizes her job over school to fund her and her son’s livelihood. “Some people get to schedule their work schedule around their school schedule,” Santiago said. “I am the opposite of that.” Davis and Santiago met at the Community College of Philadelphia in 2014. Sharing a major and the responsibility of parenting, they became close friends. “She is someone I can relate to and vent to,” Santiago said. “We even have a class together this semester.” Santiago found out she was pregnant with Ian in 2012, the summer after she graduated high school. Her pregnancy changed her college plans. She originally intended to attend school in California, but decided to enroll at CCP instead. “I wasn’t going to stop,” Santiago said. “I’m still on that road. It’s just a lot harder, especially when you have a kid.” Santiago now lives in an apartment with Ian. She worked two jobs to pay the rent when she first moved. Davis found out she was pregnant with Zyla shortly after starting CCP and gave birth 10 days before her 19th birthday. “I didn’t quit,” Davis said. “I kept going and [it’s] the reason why I graduated.” CCP provides student-parents with a day care program that offers day care services for children up to 5 years old. Davis did not use CCP’s program because her mom was able to help her out with child care, but other student-parents told her positive things about it, she said.

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Imzadi Davis, a junior media studies and production major, sits on the steps of Annenberg Hall with her 4-year-old daughter Zyla on Sunday.

“What sets them apart is their dropin services,” Davis added. “If a parent really needed a sitter that day, they could drop their kid off.” Other universities, like the University of Pennsylvania, Penn State and Rutgers University, have on-campus day care programs for student-parents. Temple provided a grant-funded, on-campus day care facility in the 1970s but does not anymore. While at Temple, Davis’ and Santiago’s kids attend separate day care facilities that both provide bussing to and from the facilities. Santiago came to Temple in 2016 as part of the university’s dual admissions program with CCP and Davis transferred after earning an associate’s degree in mass media in Spring 2018. “Coming to Temple, I knew that

I would have to really be focused and work even harder between school and being a mother,” Davis added. Davis commutes to Temple from Mount Airy, which is about a 20-minute drive, after getting Zyla ready and dropped off at preschool. Aside from child care and academics, Davis stresses the importance of taking time for herself when she can find it. “A mom who doesn’t take care of herself is no good for her children,” Davis said. On these occasions, or if she is too busy, Davis’s mom helps her out. “My mom is my No. 1 supporter,” Davis said. “If my classes run late, she will pick her up from day care.” thomas.nemec@temple.edu

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INTERSECTION PAGE 19

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

THE ESSAYIST

The early mornings and long nights for my son A student writes about how she cares for her son while a full-time student at Temple. BY ELISHA SANTIAGO For The Temple News Single parenting is hard. Take all the advice you ever received and all the books you ever read and toss them out the window because they’re all BS. Ever get that bonus in your paycheck and a flat tire the same morning? Ever rearrange your living room and jam your foot in the couch? Or, as a single parent, ever plan out an entire day of fun with your kids, thinking, “This’ll be great,” but it spins into chaos and ends with a much-needed bottle of wine? I am currently a full-time student at Temple University, and I work a fulltime job at Philadelphia Federal Credit Union. On top of that, I am also a single mom. Just about every morning, I argue with my 5-year-old about why he must wear thin socks with his favorite sneakers or why I can’t spend 15 minutes boiling him an egg for breakfast because I have to make it on time to school, too. After getting Ian ready for school, I rush to my 8 a.m. classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays before switching gears and working from 9:30 to 5:15. I later return to campus to take night classes. I’m smiling but, on the inside, I’m laughing like a hyena because juggling my work and parenting responsibilities in college is challenging. I have to fit my class schedule around my work schedule and often choose my classes based on what nights I know I’ll have a sitter for the period of the semester. Ian is in kindergarten at The Philadelphia Charter School for Arts and Sciences, and I send him to daycare before and after classes. Sending him alone on

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the school bus worries me, but the daycare staff are great at communicating with me about the process. Everyone parents differently, and that’s the beauty of it — there’s no wrong way — but if I’ve learned anything, it’s to pick and choose my battles. For me, it’s long nights and early mornings. Single parents can face financial challenges, as well. Single mothers often spend more than half their incomes on housing expenses and a third on childcare, leaving them with less money for educational expenses, according to a 2015 United States Department of Agriculture report. My job at PFCU helps me pay for my apartment I live in with Ian. In 2017, about one-third of single

mothers graduated with a college degree, while 15.3 percent did not completed high school, according to Single Mother Guide, an online resource. Knowing those percentages has always been something that’s in the back of my mind. I do not want to be looked at as a statistic. Single mothers are capable of accomplishing great things, but we need to give ourselves the benefit of the doubt. Still, I’ll never let these statistics get in my way. Even so, I struggle to fit all my responsibilities into a day. Managing my work, studies and “mommy and son time,” while still needing to fit in time for myself is the most difficult. Have you ever heard the saying, “A

mom’s job is never done?” Well, I’d say that is definitely true. If I’m being honest, asking for help is the only way I’m getting through it. I look up to other single mothers like Amy Anderson. I read about Anderson in Parents Magazine and learned that she leaned on her family for support and used the computer skills she learned during her pregnancy to land a contracting job after the birth of her daughter. I do the best I can with what I have. I know that my blood, sweat and tears not only benefit me, but they also set the standard for a better future for my son. elisha.marie.santiago@temple.edu

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SPORTS PAGE 20

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Owls’ ‘disappointing’ season ends in AAC tourney

GENEVA HEFFERNAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS Graduate student guard Alliya Butts falls to the ground during Temple’s 78-70 win against Cincinnati on Feb. 17 at McGonigle Hall.

The Owls did not live up to their own expectations, finishing the year with an 11-19 record. BY MAURA RAZANAUSKAS Women’s Basketball Beat Reporter Coach Tonya Cardoza attributes Temple University women’s basketball’s losing season to a less technical skill — listening. “We talk all the time about how listening doesn’t take effort,” Cardoza said. “All it takes is you paying attention. And if we just paid attention and listened, this season could have been something completely different.” The Owls finished with an 11-19 record because players struggled with

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a seemingly basic, yet imperative skill, which led Cardoza to call this a “disappointing season.” The Owls went 7-9 in American Athletic Conference play and ended their season with a first-round loss in the conference tournament to Memphis on Friday in Connecticut. In that game, Temple held a 15-point lead at the start of the fourth quarter but allowed Memphis to come back. “Looking back at our season, we definitely under-achieved,” Cardoza said. “I felt like coming into this year, that our expectation was a lot greater than what we actually got accomplished. We didn’t live up to the potential that we actually had.” The Owls began this season hoping to bounce back from a 12-19 record in the 2017-18 season. Graduate student

guard Alliya Butts, who is the No. 2 scorer in Temple history, returned from an ACL injury that forced her to miss last season, and the Owls had freshmen guard Marissa Mackins and forward Alexa Williamson, both with scoring potential, Cardoza said. “At the beginning of the season, I think everybody wanted a winning season since we struggled a little last year,” sophomore forward Mia Davis said. “I feel as though it was a little similar because we were losing a lot of games, but toward the middle of it, when we picked up the pace and started winning, things started to turn around.” Temple had a 4-7 record before its seven-game losing streak from Jan. 2-23. The Owls found their groove down the stretch, going 7-4 in its final 11 games of the regular season.

In that span, Temple shot 40.4 percent from the field and 34.9 percent from beyond the arc. The Owls had a 37.7 shooting percentage prior to those 11 games. Cardoza credited the end-of-season success to improved shooting and following and listening to the game plan. “Honestly, our season, when we’re playing well, it’s because we’re making shots,” Cardoza said. “That’s just been who we are. We feed off of making shots instead of feeding off of getting stops.” Even with Butts back in the lineup, Davis ended the season as the Owls’ leading scorer with 18.9 points per game. She also was the Owls’ top rebounder, averaging 9.2 rebounds per game. Butts averaged 15.2 points per game and led the Owls in steals and assists. Butts is the only Owl set to leave the team, as senior forward Lena Niang will return as a graduate student. Temple focused on finishing games in the fourth quarter during summer workouts, sophomore guard and team captain Emani Mayo said. Still, the Owls struggled with closing games. The Owls dropped seven games decided by seven or fewer points, including their one-point loss to Memphis in the conference tournament. “We’re still losing close games, so we know that we can compete,” Mayo said. “We’ve just got to learn how to finish the game.” The key to an improvement next season will be team growth, particularly in listening and focus, things Cardoza did not see this season, she said. “There might be individuals, but as a team, as a whole, there was not a lot of growth,” Cardoza said. “It was a lot of the same, and that’s why we didn’t get better.” maura.razanauskas@temple.edu @captainAMAURAca

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SPORTS PAGE 21

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

CLUB BASEBALL

High school play helped pitcher find his ‘out-pitch’ Christian Dekker is 3-0 and leads the Chesapeake North Region in strikeouts. BY DONOVAN HUGEL For The Temple News Last season, Christian Dekker became the first pitcher in Temple University club baseball history to earn All-American honors. But the junior financial planning major might not be the pitcher he is today if it wasn’t for a bases-loaded jam during his sophomore year of high school. Dekker loaded the bases with no outs in the first inning of the 2014 Berks County Interscholastic Athletic Association championship game when playing for Berks Catholic High School. His coach, Tom Frees, went to the mound to settle Dekker down. Dekker ended the inning without allowing a run. That bases-loaded jam proved to be a growing moment for Dekker in his baseball career, Frees said. “I was nervous as hell going into that game,” Dekker said. “My catcher calmed me down, and I ended up throwing a really good game even though we lost. That definitely helped me grow.” Dekker, a shortstop and pitcher for the Owls, has established himself as one of the team’s best players since his freshman season. As the team’s top starting pitcher this year, he is 3-0 with no runs allowed in 18 innings pitched. On Nov. 7, after the last weekend of games during the fall portion of the season, Dekker was the conference’s pitcher of the week. At this point in the season, Dekker leads the Chesapeake Region North Conference in strikeouts. Dekker, however, would rather experience team success than earn individual accolades. “I just want to see the club continue to progress,” Dekker said. “I would love to just see the club continue to improve

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JUSTIN OAKES / THE TEMPLE NEWS Junior pitcher Christian Dekker holds his glove during practice on Feb. 28 at the Student Pavilion. Dekker is 3-0 and hasn’t alloweda run in 18 innings pitched as the Owls’ top pitcher this season.

and show that we can compete with whoever.” Dekker has played shortstop and pitched since he began playing baseball at the age of 5. Frees originally wanted Dekker to strictly play as a middle infielder in high school, but after he saw Dekker perform on the mound in games, Frees realized his potential as a pitcher. “He just kept working on location and by the time his senior year came around, nothing he threw was above the knee and everything was on corners,” Frees said. “He just knows how to pitch.” Dekker has natural movement on his three pitches — a two-seam fastball, curveball and circle changeup — because of his consistent arm angle, which makes it tough for hitters to adjust, senior catcher and club president Nick Delp said. Dekker’s changeup is his “out pitch” against left-handed batters, while his slid-

er is more effective against right-handed hitters, Delp added. “It’s three pitches coming at the same angle, and they all move differently,” Delp said. “So that’s why he’s so effective. I catch him and his stuff’s moving all over the place.” Toward the end of his senior year of high school, Dekker prioritized the development of his circle changeup because his dad always told him that a strong changeup could “make or break a pitcher,” Dekker said. A good changeup as his third pitch makes him less predictable on the mound and confuses the opposing hitters more, he added. “That’s probably the most important pitch someone can have, and it’s really shown for me,” Dekker said. “You’ve got guys throwing only fastballs and curveballs, and it’s really easy as a hitter to pick up on the repetitions of a pitcher. But, if

you mix in a changeup, it’s a lot harder to try and focus on three different pitches.” Dekker also wanted to play in the field and become a more versatile player. At Temple, he occasionally plays shortstop when he isn’t on the mound. In his only game at shortstop this season, Dekker went 2-for-4 and scored a run. Last season, he hit 7-for-22 with seven RBI. Even though Dekker lost in the 2014 championship game, it made him a better pitcher. Dekker will be on the mound when the Owls resume play with a double header at Neumann University on Sunday. donovan.hugel@temple.edu @donohugel

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SPORTS PAGE 23

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24 BASKETBALL

Conference tournament in Memphis, Tennessee. Temple University (23-8, 13-5 The American) will enter riding a three-game winning streak including its 67-62 win against ranked Central Florida on Saturday. The Owls are the No. 3 seed and have a first-round bye in the tournament. With a win against UCF and Wichita State’s win against Tulane on Saturday, Temple earned the No. 3 seed in the conference tournament. Temple will avoid potential matchups against Houston, The American’s regular-season champion, and Memphis, the tournament’s host, until the championship game. “We want to make the NCAA Tournament, but we want a conference championship as well,” junior guard Quinton Rose said. “That will keep up motivated going forward.” Temple has a 26.8 percent chance to make the conference championship game and an 8.6 percent chance to win it, according to sports analytics site Dratings.com. Houston is favored to win the conference tournament. They enter projected to make the NCAA Tournament with a chance to improve their seeding this weekend, beginning with a matchup against either Wichita State (17-13, 10-8 The American) or East Carolina (10-20, 3-15 The American) in the quarterfinals on Friday at 9 p.m. Senior guard Shizz Alston Jr. and the Owls want to send Dunphy off with Temple’s first NCAA Tournament appearance since the 2015-16 season. “If we get in, we are going to have a chance to make a great run,” Alston added after Saturday’s win. “Just how everything is lining up for us, how it’s lining up for my last year, [Dunphy’s] last year, how everything has been flowing, I think we have luck on our side right now.” The Owls improved their NCAA Tournament resume and their chances to succeed in the conference tournament with its win against UCF, which was @TTN_Sports @TheTempleNews

ranked No. 25 in the Associated Press poll entering the matchup. After the win against UCF, the Owls are a projected No. 11 seed by CBS Sports bracketologist Jerry Palm and ESPN bracketologist Joe Lunardi. To maintain its current projected spot in the tournament, the Owls need to win on Friday night, Dunphy said. The Owls have a 66.1 percent chance to win their quarterfinal matchup against Wichita State or ECU, who will play each other on Thursday, according to Dratings.com. Temple grabbed road wins against both Wichita State and ECU during the regular season in part due to Alston’s 20-plus-point performances. Alston scored 22 points in an overtime win against Wichita State on Jan. 6. Rose and sophomore guard Nate Pierre-Louis combined for 38 points against the Shockers. Wichita State senior forward Markis McDuffie and senior guard Samajae Haynes-Jones scored 24 and 22 points, respectively against the Owls. “We have a lot of very challenging games ahead of us,” Dunphy said. On Jan. 16, Alston scored 23 points and led Temple to an 11-point win against ECU. Rose tallied 19 points, while senior center Ernest Aflakpui recorded a double-double with 12 points and 12 rebounds. ECU freshman forward Jayden Gardner led the Pirates with 27 points and four assists in the loss. Alston led the Owls in both of those victories, but Dunphy believes the win against Wichita State was when Alston solidified himself as Temple’s leader, Dunphy said. Alston scored seven of Temple’s 11 overtime points and caught Dunphy’s eye with his 3-point shot that extended the Owls’ lead to four points with 47 seconds left in overtime. “When we play Friday night, we are going to need to win the game,” Dunphy said. “That’s the only thing we’re worried about.” michael.zingrone@temple.edu @mjzingrone

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS Coach Fran Dunphy fist-bumps a fan after coaching his last home game at the Liacouras Center on Saturday. The Owls defeated Central Florida, 67-62.

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS Junior guard Quinton Rose attempts a layup during the Owls’ 67-62 win against Central Florida at the Liacouras Center on Saturday.

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SPORTS TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

PAGE 24

THE SEND OFF In Fran Dunphy’s last season, the Owls are motivated to make a strong postseason push.

T

BY MICHAEL ZINGRONE Co-Sports Editor

he Liacouras Center crowd sent off coach Fran Dunphy with a standing ovation after his final home game on Saturday. His players want to send him off with a deep playoff run. Dunphy’s final postseason push will start on Friday in the quarterfinal round of the American Athletic CONTINUED ON PAGE 23 | BASKETBALL

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Profile for The Temple News

Vol. 97 Iss. 22  

Mar. 12, 2019

Vol. 97 Iss. 22  

Mar. 12, 2019

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