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This Pro r o F d e ir F r to ta CNN Commen h at the UN Palestine Speec

Pundit apologizes for using ‘River to the Sea’ phrase

Marc Lamon t Hill pens ap ology To Temple c ommunity VOL 97 // ISSUE 14 DECEMBER 4, 2018 temple-news.com @thetemplenews

NEWS, PAGE 6

Joshua Hupperterz rejected a plea deal and will continue to trial for the alleged murder of student Jenna Burleigh.

FEATURES, PAGE 13

A professor is raising money to publish his book on how employers can better lead employees with disabilities.

SPORTS, PAGE 24

Football will play Duke University for the first time in program history at the Independence Bowl on Dec. 27.

THE ESSAYIST Read more on Page 9.


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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

THE TEMPLE NEWS A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. Gillian McGoldrick Editor in Chief Kelly Brennan Managing Editor Julie Christie Digital Managing Editor Evan Easterling Chief Copy Editor Greta Anderson News Editor Grace Shallow Deputy Investigations Editor Alyssa Biederman Deputy Campus Editor Will Bleier Deputy City Editor Jayna Schaffer Opinion Editor Laura Smythe Features Editor Zari Tarazona Deputy Features Editor Michael Zingrone Co-Sports Editor Sam Neumann Co-Sports Editor Claire Wolters Intersection Editor Shefa Ahsan Multimedia Editor Maria Ribeiro Director of Engagement Siani Colon Asst. Director of Engagement Dylan Long Co-Photography Editor Luke Smith Co-Photography Editor Madison Seitchik Web Editor Ian Walker Visuals Editor Myra Mirza Visuals Specialist Claire Halloran Design Editor Jeremiah Reardon Designer Phuong Tran Advertising Manager Kelsey McGill Advertising Manager Daniel Magras Business Manager

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content represents the opinion of The Temple News. Adjacent commentary is reflective of their authors, not The Temple News. Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

ON THE COVER CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

CORRECTIONS In the story “Website verifies shoes’ authenticity for collectors,” which ran on Page 15 on Nov. 27, the story incorrectly stated the professor who teaches Corona’s digital marketing class. Marketing and supply chain management professor Susan Mudambi teaches the class. It also incorrectly stated the number of students Mudambi assigned to help Corona actualize Plug. Four students were assigned to help Corona. Accuracy is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it as soon as possible. Anyone with inquiries about content in this newspaper can contact Editor in Chief Gillian McGoldrick at editor@temple-news.com or 215-204-6736.

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

POLITICS

Midterm turnout increases near Main Campus Wards near Main Campus recorded at least a 10 percent turnout hike compared to 2014. BY HAL CONTE For The Temple News Voter turnout increased by at least 10 percent in each of the five political wards near Main Campus for the 2018 midterm elections in November. The number of registered voters who cast ballots in 2018 in wards 16, 20, 32, 37 and 47 increased significantly from the 2014 midterm elections, according to data provided to The Temple News by City Commissioner Al Schmidt’s office. Turnout also increased throughout Philadelphia compared to the 2014 midterms, when the city recorded turnout slightly above the national average. This year, the turnout in Philadelphia was more than 53 percent of registered voters, compared to the national average of 49.7 percent, according to Schmidt’s office and the United States Elections Project. Still, the five wards encompassing Main Campus recorded lower turnout than the city’s average. Ward turnout ranged from 40 percent in Ward 37 to 46 percent in Ward 32. There are more registered voters in the state who are 34 or younger than voters ages 65 and older, the Inquirer reported last month. Voters were more aware of current events and issues for this year’s midterms, said Renee McNair, the Democratic leader of Ward 20, which saw a turnout increase of 19 points. “There was a huge rise because people are more aware of what is going on,” she said. “In the past, a lot of people had other things to do. This year, people were more educated. I believe that we as a country don’t like the division.” Shirreefa Fletcher, who lives on Oxford Street near 18th in Ward 47 and is a Temple food service employee, said she turned out to vote in the midterms.

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ZARI TARAZONA / FILE PHOTO Scott Vassa, a junior art therapy major, accepts a local candidate’s flyer on his way into Amos Recreation Center to cast his first-ever vote in the midterm elections on Nov. 6.

Ward 47 recorded 45 percent turnout. “When I went in, I was in and out,” Fletcher said. “That’s what happens most years. I think a lot more people will come out and vote in 2020.” Increased turnout could be a positive sign for the political system, said Terry Starks, Ward 20’s Republican leader. The party was defeated by margins of more than 90 percent in races around Main Campus, including state Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta, who won more than 95 percent of the 181st district vote. Democratic leaders were elected in all races on the ballot for voters in the areas near Main Campus. Despite his party’s defeat, Starks said he was happy to see the public participating in the electoral system and credited it to candidate promises and divisions in the current political climate. “It’s waking people up who didn’t

care about politics,” Starks said. “It’s a gift and a curse for us. The Democrats wanted it more. They use the rappers, the singers and the comedians to drive voters.” “They did a good job winning the House,” he added. The Democratic party gained 39 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives in the 2018 midterms and now have the majority over Republicans, who hold 198 seats, the New York Times reported. Both Starks and McNair said they are anticipating high turnout for the 2020 presidential election because presidential contests historically attract more voters to the polls. The youth turnout, voters between the ages of 18 and 29, was up from 21 percent in 2014 to 31 percent in the 2018 midterms, according to exit poll projections from The Center For Information & Research on Civic Learning and En-

gagement, a Tufts University youth civic research group. Turnout increased this year due to public and youth engagement on key issues like climate change and immigration, said Cyé Jacobs, a sophomore biology major and member of the youth steering committee of #VoteThatJawn, a citywide voter registration effort aimed toward college students and young people. “A lot of young people, especially in our age range, were very involved with the issues on the ballot,” Jacobs said. “The intensity of partisanship drove people to want their side to make the decisions. ...Voices on both sides have gone through the roof.” Jacobs attributed low turnout in the five wards around Main Campus to the community having a lack of educational resources, low income and being discouraged from voting. The 2020 presidential election is likely to continue citywide growth in voter participation, she said. About 69 percent of people with incomes less than $29,999 did not vote during the 2014 midterms, according to a 2015 U.S. Census Bureau report. In 2018, the Center for American Progress warned that low-income voters were suppressed from voting for various reasons. To vote, Wesley Midgett, a freshman fine arts major who lives on Berks Street near 17th, returned home to South Philadelphia, where turnout was about 10 points higher than in areas near Main Campus. Midgett attributed increased turnout to social media influence. “There was a line [at the polls],” Midgett said. “Definitely with social media, these days people find it important to share their news and what they believe in. Voting is so easy, and now the social media generation is old enough where we can vote.” hal.conte@temple.edu

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

COVER STORY

Temple to investigate if it will reprimand Hill The professor and former CNN commentator is in the midst of a national controversy about his comments at the U.N. BY GRETA ANDERSON News Editor Temple University is considering reprimanding Marc Lamont Hill, the media studies and production and urban education professor whose anti-Israel, pro-Palestine remarks in a United Nations speech spurred a national controversy. In his speech last week, Hill used the phrase “free Palestine from the river to the sea,” a slogan used by Palestinian solidarity movements and sometimes by the Islamic extremist and Palestinian nationalist group Hamas. Jewish groups across the country said through this phrase, Hill was anti-Semitic and that he was suggesting the destruction of Israel, which Hill has refuted. Board of Trustees Chairman Patrick O’Connor requested Temple’s legal department determine if it can reprimand Hill, wrote Cornelius Pratt, the president of the Temple Faculty Senate, in an email to The Temple News. Temple declined to comment multiple times on its considerations of Hill’s employment. As of now, Hill is still a tenured professor. CNN has suspended his contract. With tens of thousands of tweets sent about the controversy, people across the country and on Main Campus have weighed in. Some are calling for Temple to take a stand for academic freedom. Others are calling for the university to stand up to hate — and fire him. With the world’s eyes on Temple’s next move, here’s what happened — and what could happen next.

AN APOLOGY

Hill apologized for the reaction his remarks provoked in an open letter to the Temple community in The Temple News on Saturday. In the letter, Hill deNews Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

fended his political stance — which is for a free state for the Palestinian people — and said his comments were not intended to advocate harm against Israeli Jews. “I believed that these demands sufficiently reflected my belief in radical political reform within Israel, not a desire for its destruction,” Hill wrote. “Clearly, they did not.” “Everyone deserves to live with peace, safety, and security,” he continued. “My vision of justice for Palestinians absolutely does not come at the expense of justice for Jews anywhere in the world.” In his speech on the U.N.’s International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People, Hill said the state of Israel is committing injustices against Palestinians and called to “free Palestine from the river to the sea.” These injustices are the Israeli government’s actions toward Palestinian protesters in the Gaza Strip while include imprisoning, injuring or killing the protesters. In an effort to make amends at Temple, Hill said in his open letter that he wants to engage in “healthy public and private dialogues” with university ad-

ministrators, students and community groups about their differences in opinion.

ACADEMIC FREEDOM

Hill, a 2000 alumnus and Germantown native, began teaching at Temple in 2005 as an education professor. He left the university for several years and returned in 2017, after being named the first endowed Steve Charles Chair in Media, Cities and Solutions at the Lew Klein College of Media and Communication and also teaches in the urban education program in the College of Education. On Friday, O’Connor criticized Hill’s remarks, calling them “lamentable” and “disgusting,” the Inquirer reported. Some at the university wanted to fire Hill right away and are looking into reprimanding him, O’Connor said. “Free speech is one thing. Hate speech is entirely different,” O’Connor told the Inquirer. The United States Supreme Court held up protections of hate and disparaging speech against a racial or ethnic group under the First Amendment’s free

speech clause in the 2017 decision in Matal v. Tam. Hate speech is also defended in other Supreme Court decisions, argued Associate Justice Samuel Alito. “Speech that demeans on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, age, disability, or any other similar ground is hateful; but the proudest boast of our free speech jurisprudence is that we protect the freedom to express ‘the thought that we hate,’” Alito wrote in the Supreme Court’s unanimous decision. Hill is a tenured faculty member, according to the Temple Association of University Professionals. This gives Hill enhanced academic freedom and protection from discipline by the university, said Steven Newman, TAUP’s president. No formal proceedings to take action against Hill have been initiated as of Monday, but O’Connor’s comment suggest officials are posturing to do so, Newman said. Under the legally binding 2014-18 faculty contract, there is a specific investigation and hearing process the university must conduct with tenured faculty members. In an email to the Temple community on Friday, President Richard Englert affirmed that Hill’s comments, while protected under the First Amendment, did not reflect the views of the university, which condemns anti-Semitic and racist language. “The university, in the best interest of its community, will take necessary and proper action to protect these values when they are threatened,” he continued. “At the same time, we pride ourselves on our diversity, in all its forms. We will always be a place where divergent points of view will find a home. These are the values the Temple community embraces.” TAUP released a statement on Saturday criticizing O’Connor’s comments and Englert’s failure to mention Hill’s academic freedom protections in his Friday message. The statement was intended to remind O’Connor of the procedure the university must follow to reprimand Hill, Newman said. temple-news.com


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Per his university contract, Hill has the First Amendment rights of a private citizen when speaking publicly. As a tenured professor, he has even greater protections for academic freedom than other faculty, said Jennie Shanker, the vice president of TAUP. Hill can only be removed from his position or reprimanded for “just cause,” which includes “dereliction of duties, professional incompetence, grave misconduct or academic dishonesty or continued patterns of misconduct in cases of dismissal.” If just cause is found, under the current contract, the university may issue a letter of reprimand, make a professor ineligible for sabbatical and “professional development funds,” or may suspend a professor without pay for varying lengths of time. “They have rights to speech that, it’s controversial, because that’s a necessity in order for us to move forward as a culture, both in the arts in the sciences and all of our fields,” Shanker told The Temple News. “Oftentimes new territory, new knowledge, might contradict things that people hold dear. And in academia, we have to value that work and those voices.” Hillel at Temple encourages university officials to “review the potential impact Professor Hill’s comments may have

Freedom to teach and freedom to learn are inseparable facets of academic freedom. The freedom to learn depends upon appropriate opportunities and conditions in the classroom, on the campus, and in the larger community. - Temple University Policies and Procedures Manual on Jewish students on campus,” Rabbi Daniel Levitt, the executive director of the on-campus Jewish organization. “We stand ready to engage in dialogue and discussion to ensure that students are provided with a complete understanding of these complex and challenging issues,” Levitt added. In May, The Temple News reported that a social media account registered to the Temple email address of Klein professor Francesca Viola posted anti-Muslim and anti-immigrant comments on alt-right and national news sites. The account called Muslim people “scum” and posted “They hate us. Get rid of them,” on an article on The Gateway Pundit. Viola admitted to writing some of the comments, but denied using the derogatory terms about Muslims, Klein College Dean David Boardman wrote in a statement at the time. “We are troubled by the content of some of the other cited posts but acknowledge that those in the Temple community are entitled to exercise free speech within constitutional parame-

Professor Hill’s right to express his opinion is protected by the Constitution to the same extent as any other private citizen RICHARD ENGLERT

PRESIDENT OF TEMPLE UNIVERSIT Y

ters,” Boardman wrote. Viola remained a journalism professor in Klein for the Fall 2018 semester. Journalism professor Lori Tharps, who has been at the university since 2009, said she is confused about the strength of Englert’s statement and O’Connor’s comments on Hill. “I’m particularly confused by the response of Temple administration given how many people, particularly in the recent past from our own journalism department, have also been caught spewing language that is offensive to multiple people, without the same level of outrage,” she said.

CRITICISM SIDES

FROM

Some contend whether Hill’s remarks were anti-Semitic, or hate speech. Several national Jewish advocacy groups praised CNN for firing Hill as a contributor to the news organization on Thursday. Then, they called on Temple to follow suit. Jewish groups, like the Nation-

I think that we should listen to how he explains what he meant. He’s explained it in a way that makes clear that he did not have the intention, or does not have the intention, of being anti-Semitic. LILA CORWIN BERMAN

JEWISH STUDIES PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF THE FEINSTEIN CENTER FOR AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORY

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ALL

al Council of Young Israel, B’nai B’rith International and the Anti-Defamation League, criticized Hill for not referencing the violent attacks the Palestinian government has launched against Israel, and for not calling for peace, or a “twostate solution,” which promotes ceasefire and coexistence of the two sides. Other Jewish groups said the language in Hill’s speech was anti-Semitic and similar to language used by Hamas. They said Hill called for the destruction of Israel. The NCYI called on Temple again on Friday to fire Hill. The organization of 25,000 Jewish families and 135 synagogues in the United States, Canada and Israel wrote in a statement to The Temple News that Hill invoked violence against the Israeli state and has a history of making anti-Semitic comments. “The reality is that Dr. Hill is a member of Temple’s faculty, and he, therefore, does indeed represent Temple as a result, despite the university’s perplexing assertions to the contrary,” wrote Aaron Troodler, an NCYI spokesperson. “If he is a Temple professor, his hatefilled diatribe is a reflection of the university, and the administration should do the right thing by severing its ties with him,” he added. B’nai B’rith International, a human rights and Israel advocacy CONTROVERSY | PAGE 6

While I agree that not all criticism of Israel can and should be considered anti-Semitism, I would be interested in knowing if in his mind it is possible for criticism of Israel to cross the line into antisemitism and what that line is. RABBI DANIEL LEVITT

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF HILLEL AT TEMPLE

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


NEWS PAGE 6

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

CRIME

Hupperterz rejects plea deal in alleged murder Hupperterz will face a life plea deal over the weekend, ultimately 2017 to report banging sounds she heard also found 10 to 15 pillow case-sized sentence if found guilty of first- deciding to proceed to trial. Hupperterz from the apartment’s backyard. Her sec- bags of marijuana and $20,000 in cash, or second-degree murder at trial. maintains he did not kill Burleigh, said ond call was prompted by screams com- the Inquirer reported. BY WILL BLEIER Deputy City Editor Joshua Hupperterz appeared in court Monday and rejected prosecutors’ deal to plead guilty to the murder of junior film and media arts major Jenna Burleigh in August 2017. Hupperterz, who is accused of killing Burleigh in his off-campus apartment, was offered a third-degree murder plea deal for 30 to 60 years in prison, compared to the life sentence he will face if found guilty of first- or second-degree murder at trial, the Inquirer reported. Hupperterz told Court of Common Pleas Judge Glenn Bronson he would proceed to trial, which is scheduled to begin Jan. 7. Prosecutors offered the plea deal on Friday, and the defense considered the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 CONTROVERSY

group, echoed this notion. Hundreds of pro-Palestine organizations, including several chapters of Students for Justice in Palestine, university professors and more than 400 students nationwide signed a letter criticizing Englert’s message to the Temple community and calling CNN’s decision “unjust.” “We cannot pretend that painting Hill as a threat that Temple University must remove is fueled by anything other than racism,” the letter reads. “Policing black voices in academia and in public spaces is part of a much larger history of anti-Blackness.” “CNN and Temple University should have celebrated Hill’s call for justice and equality, but instead used it as an opportunity to silence and intimidate those who criticise the state of Israel,” the letter continues. “The racist nature of this incident should not be overlooked News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

David Nenner, his defense attorney. Nenner could not immediately be reached for comment. Burleigh was a first-week transfer student from Montgomery County Community College. She went out with friends to Pub Webb, a bar on Cecil B. Moore Avenue near 16th Street, the night of Aug. 30, 2017. Police obtained security footage from Pub Webb and businesses on Cecil B. Moore Avenue showing Burleigh leaving the bar with Hupperterz around 2 a.m. on Aug. 31, 2017, heading in the direction of his apartment on 16th Street near Cecil B. Moore Avenue. Noelle Sterling, a graduate student in the Lewis Katz School of Medicine who lived above Hupperterz’s first-floor rear apartment, testified during a preliminary hearing on Nov. 29, 2017 that she made two calls to Temple Police in the early morning hours of Aug. 31,

ing from the backyard. “It was like a horror movie, but worse,” she said. Temple Police responded to both calls and conducted searches of the apartment building hallways and backyard area “in accordance with accepted police practice,” a university spokesperson told The Temple News in December 2017. Burleigh’s father reported her missing to Temple and Lower Salford Township police later that evening. 6abc reported Hupperterz’s roommate told police on Sept. 1, 2017 that the roommate returned home to cleaning products, and it appeared like someone had attempted to clean up blood. Police then obtained a search warrant for the apartment. Police found blood near the kitchen sink, the apartment’s rear door and on a trash can lid. In the apartment, police

Police first made contact with Hupperterz by phone, then decided to take him into custody for questioning. Hupperterz was found at his grandmother’s house in Wayne County, Pennsylvania, where Burleigh’s body would later be found, but police maintain Burleigh was killed in Hupperterz’s apartment. Hupperterz is accused of moving Burleigh’s body twice. Once, in a storage bin to his mother’s home in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania, where it remained overnight, then transferred by Lyft, a ride-sharing service, to his grandmother’s house on Sept. 2, 2017. While in custody, Hupperterz admitted to “elements of the crime,” said Philadelphia Police Capt. John Ryan in a press conference on Sept. 2, 2017.

nor can it be excused.” Eight members of the Temple community signed the letter as of Monday night. Another letter by the Scholars for Black Lives, a nationwide collective for improving African-Americans’ material conditions, voiced its support for Hill and academic freedom. The letter condemned O’Connor’s comments. Eleven members of the Temple community signed the letter. “Indeed, Dr. Hill’s speech before the United Nations regarding Palestinian freedom demonstrates critical judgment and his independent search for truth,” the letter reads. “Therefore, instead of distancing itself from Dr. Hill, Temple University should embrace and applaud him for courageously exemplifying its espoused ideals.” Hill’s apology should be believed, said Lila Corwin Berman, a Jewish studies professor and the director of the Feinstein Center for American Jewish

History in the College of Liberal Arts. She said Hill did not use the “river to the sea” phrase in an anti-Semitic way. “It certainly is a phrase that has been used by groups that have anti-Semitism as part of their agenda,” Berman said. “I don’t think there is a dispute about that. The question as to whether Hill intended it to be an anti-Semitic statement, I think he has answered.” “I don’t know why he chose that phrase, what it means to him or what it meant to him when he said it, but I think that we should listen to how he explains what he meant,” she added. “He’s explained it in a way that makes clear that he did not have the intention, or does not have the intention, of being anti-Semitic.” Still, any anti-Israel speech that suggests the elimination of the state of Israel can be considered anti-Semitic, Rabbi Levitt said. And the way in which Hill expressed his support of Palestine could make Jewish students feel targeted or si-

lenced on campus or in Hill’s classes. “I would like to believe he’s unaware of how his anti-Israel stance makes Jews uncomfortable,” Levitt said on Friday. “But I don’t think we should ignore the potential threat.” “He is a role model to many student activists, and I believe he has a responsibility to his students and this community to do better in the future,” he added.

william.bleier@temple.edu @will_bleier

greta.anderson@temple.edu gretanderson Editors Note: Greta Anderson is a current student of Lori Tharps. She did not interview Tharps for this story, Grace Shallow contributed reporting.

EXPLORE THE WHOLE CONFLICT ONLINE AT TEMPLE-NEWS.COM temple-news.com


NEWS PAGE 7

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

CITY

Temple to be part of $530 million city investment Temple and Temple Health System joined a coalition that will invest $530 million in Philadelphia. BY WILL BLEIER Deputy City Editor Temple University and Temple Health will be part of a coalition of 13 Philadelphia universities and hospitals that will invest about $530 million into local business organizations. The Philadelphia Anchors for Growth and Equity program will discuss how to invest more in the city within the next eight to 10 years and create at least 5,000 jobs through finding products from local sources. Temple, Temple Health, The University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University, and the Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania are among the 13 founding members of the PAGE program. According to a report from the Economy League, who is running PAGE, the city’s anchor institutions spend $5.3 billion on goods and services each year, and about half is spent outside of Philadelphia. Anchor institutions are institutions like universities and hospitals rooted in their local communities by location, invested capital, or relationships with customers, employees and vendors. “It really went from an idea to a very tangible plan,” said Mariya Khandros, who is the director of shared solutions at the Economy League, and oversees the PAGE program. The PAGE program first identifies an institution’s needs for goods and services, then works with local businesses to create jobs and produce products or services that meet those needs, Khandros said. The program was inspired by similar

@TheTempleNews

The city’s major institutions invest into local jobs More than 34 universities and hospitals in Philadelphia spend a total of $5.3 billion each year on goods and services.

Half of that money is actually spent outside of the city. About $530 million of that could be spent in Philadelphia. Just 25 percent of the $530 million could create 5,250 manufacturing and indirect jobs.

Source: “PHILADELPHIA ANCHORS FOR GROWTH AND EQUITY,” The Economy League

initiatives in other U.S. cities, like New York, to create more job opportunities in Philadelphia, Khandros said. The city’s commerce director, Harold Epps, worked with Jeff Hornstein, the executive director of the Economy League, to develop PAGE. Epps met Hornstein when he was director of financial and policy analysis for the Office of the City Controller Alan Butkovitz. Under the City Controller, Hornstein conducted initial studies on the purchasing power of the city’s anchor institutions and what products and contracts could be bought locally. He then brought the project to the Economy League when he came on at the beginning of this year.

“Some of the ZIP codes that are directly geographically attached to Temple’s campus have some of the higher levels of unemployment and poverty in the city and some of the categories that we are trying to combine demand for,” Epps added. Local sourcing of goods and services can increase employment and investment in North Philadelphia, said Donna Schweibenz, Temple’s director of purchasing. “What we’re doing is going out within the community and looking for opportunities with smaller businesses, minority- and women-owned businesses, to see the potential to provide goods and services to Temple University,” she said.

JULIE CHRISTIE / THE TEMPLE NEWS

“The Economy League provides by pulling all these universities together,” she added. “We’re able to share in best practices in promoting or encouraging the use of local suppliers.” Temple cannot discuss its specific investment plans, a university financial official told The Temple News. Moving forward, the focus will be finding ways to connect institutions with local entrepreneurs, Khandros said. “Having all of our institutions growing in the same direction is really going to make this work greater than [the sum] of its individual parts,” she added. william.bleier@temple.edu @will_bleier

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 8

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

EDITORIAL

Right or wrong, Hill should stay Last Wednesday, Temple University media studies and production professor Marc Lamont Hill made controversial pro-Palestine remarks during a speech at the United Nations. As a result of comments many have called anti-Semitic, CNN dropped Hill as a commentator and many Jewish organizations and individuals have been demanding Temple do the same. The ensuing debate is a necessary and deeply complicated one. That’s why the Editorial Board decided to not take a stance on the meaning of Hill’s comments. We are made up of non-Jewish, non-Palestinian students and don’t believe we have the authority to speak on behalf of either group. We don’t have the history or personal connections to those issues to present a thoughtful or personal opinion for our readers. What we can write about with sincerity and knowledge is Hill’s First Amendment right — a right that is the epitome of what we do. We believe he had the right to deliver his speech and is protected by that right as a professor at Temple. Patrick O’Connor, the chairman of the Board of Trustees and a staunch defender of convicted comedian Bill Cosby, criticized Hill’s comments as statements that “blackens” Temple’s name. “Free speech is one thing,” O’Connor told the Philadelphia Inquirer. “Hate speech is entirely different.” But that’s not true — hate speech is directly protected by the First Amendment, as the Supreme Court has ruled on multiple occasions, most recently in 2017. The Editorial Board is glad that Temple didn’t take any rash or immediate action with Hill, like CNN did, because Hill’s speech is protected and he should not be fired from Temple. This protection applies to every single critic or supporter of his, too.

letters@temple-news.com

At The Temple News, we hope to provide a platform for everyone: Hill, his defenders and his critics. We want to foster productive discussions that help the Temple community to learn and grow so we can continue this debate with thoughtfulness and information. In Spring 2018, The Temple News reported a Disqus account registered to journalism professor Francesca Viola posted anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant sentiments and fake news conspiracies on media websites. Viola admitted making some of the comments but denied writing the anti-Muslim one. Viola is still a professor in Klein and is teaching in Temple Rome this semester. We don’t believe she should be removed for her alleged comments, although we condemn them. And Hill should not be fired, either. In his letter to the Temple community, Hill wrote he wants to hold “healthy public and private dialogues with board members, administrators, faculty, students, and community groups.” We want to be in attendance at each of these conversations. It’s our job to make sure those discussions, both public and private, are ones the entire Temple community can access and participate in. That kind of platform is the core of our mission as a student paper. So let’s take this opportunity as a community to learn from different experiences and realities so we can better understand the world around us. Editor’s Note: News Editor Greta Anderson, who reported the News story on Marc Lamont Hill’s comment, is a member of the Editorial Board. She took no part in the writing of this editorial. Editor in Chief Gillian McGoldrick is a current student of Hill. This played no role in the opinions of the Editorial Board.

A LETTER TO THE EDITOR Marc Lamont Hill addresses the recent controversy surrounding remarks about the conflict between Israel and Palestine. To the Temple University Community: I am writing this letter to directly address the controversy that emerged in the aftermath of my speech at the United Nations last week. As President Englert has indicated, the speech has sparked strong responses, particularly from my sisters and brothers within the Jewish community. For that reason I would like to address this issue directly. Let me begin by saying that I unequivocally reject anti-Semitism in any form or fashion. As I have articulated in previous writing and speeches, I am keenly aware of the threats faced by Jewish people around the world. Threats of physical violence against Jews are animated and compounded by ugly anti-Semitic images, stereotypes, conspiracy theories, and mythologies. These realities are not only historically persistent, but intensifying in numerous places around world. As an activist and scholar, I have done my best to point out these realities and challenge them whenever possible. Simply put, there is no space for anti-Semitism in the world. At the conclusion of my speech, I used a phrase (“Free Palestine, from the River to the Sea”) that some have interpreted as anti-Semitic. Specifically, they believe that the phrase signified a call to physically destroy the state of Israel, or otherwise do harm to Jewish people. To be clear, this was not my intention at all. Indeed, I was genuinely saddened that my comments produced such an interpretation. Throughout my speech, I spoke explicitly about the need for Israeli political reform, specifically as it per-

tains to Arab citizens of Israel. I also called for a redrawing of borders to the pre-1967 lines, as well as a greater attention to human rights for those living in the West Bank and Gaza. I believed that these demands sufficiently reflected my belief in radical political reform within Israel, not a desire for its destruction. Clearly, they did not. While I stand behind my political beliefs, I have learned that my use of language produced interpretations, feelings, and responses that I did not intend. For that, I am deeply sorry. Everyone deserves to live with peace, safety, and security. My vision of justice for Palestinians absolutely does not come at the expense of justice for Jews anywhere in the world. To anyone who felt that my comments suggested otherwise, I apologize. I would also like to acknowledge the Temple University faculty and staff whose professional and personal lives have been interrupted by these recent events. I can only imagine how challenging the past few days have been. I apologize. In the coming weeks and months, I hope to engage in healthy public and private dialogues with board members, administrators, faculty, students, and community groups. We will likely disagree on key issues. Such disagreement is central to healthy and functional democratic spaces. But I can promise that any dialogue in which I engage will begin from a place of respect, trust, and a fundamental belief in safety, security, and self-determination for everyone. Marc Lamont Hill is an urban studies and media studies and production professor at Temple University. He can be reached at marclamonthill@temple.edu.

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OPINION

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018



     

Keeping a last name that’s a difficult reminder A student’s name represents ily when I was only weeks old, leaving make a difficult choice: to change my last in her footsteps. I decided to keep my last name and more than the family history my mother to care for two boys on her name to match my mother’s new one or keep the one I was given. have since continued living my life as behind it, but it’s still an important own. Since then, we’ve heard very little I had to take some time to question Tyler Perez. part of his identity. BY TYLER PEREZ Lead Columnist

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y name is perhaps the most important part of my identity. For me, my name represents the title to a filing cabinet that possesses everything I am. In that way, it makes me incredibly unique. It feels as if I am the only Tyler Perez, or at least the only one to think, act, speak and exist in the exact way I do. As a child, I never questioned my name, where it comes from or how it became so inextricably attached to my identity. I simply accepted it as such, and if somebody were to finally explain the history and background of my name to me, it might have felt like an attack on my identity. This is how I felt when I learned in elementary school that the man who raised me all my life is actually my stepfather and my last name is actually a relic of my biological father. Over time, I’ve learned about my biological father’s negative past with our family, making my last name feel more and more like a bad tattoo, an unerasable memory of a dark time. The man who shares my last name abandoned our fam-

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from him, but my last name is a constant reminder of his awful betrayal of our family. My mother is the strongest person I’ve ever known, and she cared for my brother and me on her own while working steady jobs at a young age. She met my stepfather, who raised me since I was barely a year old and who I refer to as my dad. They married when I was in middle school, which was around the time I started to understand the difference between my father and my biological father. It was around this time I had to

the nature of my identity. How important was my last name in the fabric of my identity? If I changed my last name to my father’s, would I be a new person? Was my life really that contingent on the five letters that follow my first name? At the same time, I knew how much my name meant to me. It defines me, even if it includes a part of the past I would like erased. When my mother got remarried almost a decade ago, she took my stepfather’s name, and the question was whether my brother and I would follow

CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

I could never change such a critical part of my identity. My name has become emblematic of who I am, and I wasn’t going to change it merely because someone else ruined it for me. I couldn’t allow someone else’s mistakes to permanently change my identity, even though I can see why others might choose to do so. My name for all of my life has been Tyler Perez, and it will continue to be until I die. It’s not because I feel some emotional attachment to the person who gave me the name, but because I feel an emotional attachment to every experience I’ve had while holding that name. From creative writing awards to college acceptance letters, so much of my life has occurred with the name Tyler Perez, and I see something too special to change about that. The story of my life has for so long been penned by Tyler Perez. To suddenly change the name of the author feels like a threat to my identity. Regardless of the history behind the five letters of my last name, it will continue to be a beautiful label plastered to everything I have done and will do. tyler.perez@temple.edu @perezodent

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OPINION

PAGE 10

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

How to gracefully carry an unusual name

Bill

A student reflects on growing up with a name unfamiliar to most people she encountered. BY BASIA WILSON For The Temple News

BASI

peer closer to the paper and say, “I know I’m going to mess this one up.” I’m reminded of the poem “On Listening to Your Teacher Take Attendance” by Aimee Nezhukumatathil, a poet who is definitely familiar with this name game. She reflects on the quintessential childhood experience endured by any person with a unique name. She writes, “Your teacher means well, / even if he butchers your name like // he has a bloody sausage casing stuck / between his teeth, handprints // on his white, sloppy apron.” I would always cut the rookies some slack. But there were some instances when I gave too much slack, like letting an instructor pronounce my name incorrectly for a whole school year when it became too late or embarrassing to correct them in front of my classmates. I would get

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letters@temple-news.com

a h

I have five things in common with a world-renowned Polish superstar: each letter of our first name. Many people, like the optometrist who took down my name to book an exam in July, offer this tidbit of information when I introduce myself. “Have you heard of that singer?” he asked. “She’s great!” I find this commonality kind of impressive, even if the singer pronounces her name differently than I do mine. I don’t know of many other people who share my name. I have come across many Asias and Dasias, but no Basias — unless you count fictional characters. I first saw my name in a book while reading the sequel of the “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants” by Ann Brashares. On her extended vacation in Greece, one of the story’s protagonists, Lena, gets a summer job at a clothing store called Basia’s Boutique. I remember sitting on the floor of my mom’s apartment, reading my name in print, gasping, then rereading the sentence again. I was so excited, I bolted to show my mom immediately. I don’t know how Brashares intended for the name to be pronounced, but the voice inside my head narrating the story decided in my favor. As a child on family vacations, I began to notice how my name was always absent from the seas of keychains and refrigerator magnets for Andy or Theresa or Hunter or Mia. I got used to this. I also got used to flustering new or substitute teachers in elementary school. They’d perform roll call swimmingly, gliding down the list. “Melissa? Victoria? Ryan? Shannon?” I could always sense it coming, the way the teacher would suddenly pause,

tired of interrupting the lesson, drawing extra attention to myself and feeling my peers shift their eyes toward me. I try not to let situations like that happen anymore, establishing the rules of pronunciation right away, or even beforehand if possible. At a recent open mic event, I wrote my name along with the usual pronunciation tip — “rhymes with Asia” — to assist the host in saying my name properly. He shared his appreciation for this as he announced me. I saved both of us some embarrassment. At this point though, I wouldn’t have been all that angry or frustrated if he got my name wrong. He would’ve meant well. My mom meant well when she changed her mind about naming me Mikayla, after my dad and eldest brother, and named me Basia instead, a Hebrew

A ALI GRAULTY / THE TEMPLE NEWS

name that translates to “daughter of God.” And my classmates didn’t mean to be rude when the weight of their gazes shifted to me as I corrected teachers who botched my name. I reflect back to Nezhukumatathil’s poem again. I admire how she reminds us of the human, harmless intentions of others, despite flaws. “And when / all those necks start to crane, try not to forget // someone once lathered their bodies, once patted them / dry with a fluffy towel after a bath, set out their clothes // for the first day of school.” basia.serafina.wilson@temple.edu

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OPINION

PAGE 11

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

Finding strength of a wolf in my first name

I know at times life isn’t going to be A student explains the to lead and carry on the duties of myself gone through situations where I wasn’t significance of his first name and those who are close to me regardless sure how to handle them or how I would kind to me. To quote the great Rocky of the circumstances. escape them. In May 2017, my father Balboa, “The world ain’t all sunshine and which means “strong wolf.�

BY CONALL SMITH For The Temple News Considering my common last name “Smith,� having the unique first name “Conall� makes my identity unique. I always tell people who seem a bit skeptical of my first name, “complicated first name, easy last name.� To me, my name signifies who I am. A stranger more than likely won’t be able to pronounce or spell my name correctly (you get used to it) or know its meaning. In Gaelic, the name Conall means “strong wolf.� I believe I was given the name Conall because I have the strength of a wolf

The meaning of my name is a huge part of my character. During my life, I’ve

 

CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

passed away after a long battle with depression and anxiety. After his passing, I became “the man of the house.� And as a 19-year-old college student, this was not how I envisioned my master plan of life. It’s been a long and difficult road to get where I am now since his passing. Throughout my life, I have been able to embody the meaning of my name. From the passing of my father to making a monumental decision to leave my comfortable nest at Bloomsburg University and transfer to bustling Temple University, I’ve taken on huge challenges. A strong wolf is who I am and who I always hope I can be.

rainbows ...It will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it.� Anxiety and depression are common in my family. And in a world where mental health is tragically misunderstood, strength may sound cliche. But it takes massive strength for a person to deal with that type of burden on a day-to-day basis. Names play a huge role in the development of a person’s character, and I’m proud of my character and the significance of my name. conall.smith@temple.edu @Smith_Conall

Embracing the name ‘Zari’ without being sorry

A student writes why she likes name in mind, especially because the having an uncommon name, doctor couldn’t determine my sex. A nurse gave my parents a baby despite confusion from others. BY ZARI TARAZONA Deputy Features Editor I’ve had the same conversation with at least 100 people throughout my life. “I’m Zari.� “It’s OK.� “No, my name is Zari.� It isn’t a name you hear every day. I always laugh it off when people think I’m randomly saying “sorry� to them. I’ve grown to embrace and love my first name, even with the initial confusion from some people, because it helps me stand out right away. The name Zari catches people’s attention, and since I’m a writer, that comes in handy. My parents found my first and middle name in a baby book at a hospital in Takoma Park, Maryland, after I was born. My older sister, Martha, was named in memory of my dad’s late mom. My parents didn’t have another girl’s

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book to help them decide on a name. After flipping through the book for about an hour, they chose Zari Gabrielle Tarazona. My dad, Segundo Tarazona, liked the name Zari because he thought it meant “in God is my power.� He said I was a great blessing from God. My mom, Ruth Tarazona, also liked the religious meaning and the way my first and middle name sounded together. Much to my surprise, I later found out that in Hebrew the male version of my middle name, Gabriel, means “God’s power.� The name Zari has several different meanings, but after searching online for almost an hour I couldn’t find any that related to God. I told my mom over FaceTime and she laughed for a long time and then just shrugged her shoulders. My parents got it mixed up, but I

CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

think it’s sweet how happy they were that they chose a name with such an emotional meaning. There was so much I didn’t know about the process they went through choosing my name until I asked them about it last week. If I decide to have a kid, I want to pick an uncommon name that means something to me and whoever I’m with, like my parents did when they read that baby book together. I wasn’t always an advocate for my name. It was difficult to handle when I was younger because I was so shy and hated correcting people when they completely butchered my name or thought I was apologizing.

My Twitter handle is my witty way of embracing the confusion. Now that I’m older, I love that people aren’t as familiar with my name. I’m graduating in Spring 2019 and am in the midst of applying to journalism internships, fellowships and jobs. I hope my name sticks out among the thousands of resumes and cover letters. My goal is for more people to become familiar with my name, even if they don’t know what to make of it at first. zari.tarazona@temple.edu @sorryzari

letters@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 12

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

New club slashes gender bias in skateboarding A freshman started a women’s skateboarding club to create a space for her peers to feel comfortable learning to skate. BY GREG PROBST For The Temple News

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rom coasting down 13th Street to practicing kickflips at the skate spot at Broad Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue, many student skateboarders treat Main Campus as their skate park. But freshman environmental science major Grace Krueger noticed something similar about these skateboarders. “[There are] a lot of guys,” Krueger said of Columbia Plaza, the unofficial skate park of Main Campus. “I don’t think I’ve seen one girl there.” Krueger set out to change that dynamic by bringing a women’s skateboarding club to Main Campus. Skate Kitchen is a collective space for cisgender, transgender and nonbinary women to practice skateboarding together both on campus and throughout the city streets. “If you don’t feel comfortable with the skate community that is mostly male, I want this to be a place for you,” Krueger said. “Skate Kitchen is for people that feel alienated or not welcome, or who just want to start skating to meet people.” The club allows women to band together in a male-dominated sport. Less than 24 percent of skateboarders are female, according to skateboarding blog Skate Review. More women are starting to participate in the sport, but professional female skaters experience substantial inequalities in pay and sponsorship opportunities compared to male professional skateboarders, Vice Sports reported in April 2017. The term “skate kitchen” originates from the title of a 2018 feature film about a women’s skateboarding crew of the same name. Nina Moran, a member of the crew, said the group coined the phrase by spinning a sexist joke about “the woman’s place is in the kitchen, so we skate in the kitchen,” during a December 2017 TEDx Teen talk. “Once you have another girl in the features@temple-news.com

skate park with you, however, it changes the whole dynamic,” Moran also said in the talk. “It feels like you have back up.” “It’s kind of groovy,” Krueger said of the term. “We’re whipping up recipes. We’re creating while skating.” Krueger started posting flyers for the club in October and said she was shocked at the immediate response from students. Carolyn Frank, a freshman Tyler School of Art student, saw the flyer and texted Krueger, “Teach me how to skate.” Frank said she has little skating experience but is excited to practice with the club. Other Skate Kitchen members are new to skateboarding, including Krueger, who started skateboarding last June. Sophomore public health major Sarah McHugh got back into skateboarding last July after attending a skateboard camp as a kid. “I won an award because I was the only girl there,” McHugh said. “My prize was a record with a man painted on it saying, ‘You go, girl.’” But what these women lack in experience, they make up for with grit — even when collecting wounds filled with gravel along the way. During the first Skate Kitchen meeting last month, participants compared their skateboarding injuries. Krueger had a scraped knee that kept splitting open, and McHugh told a story of driving herself to a drug store to bandage up her bleeding hand. Club members don’t let the injuries deter them from skateboarding, though. “It’s very freeing,” Krueger said. “When I’m skating downtown, tiny little girls look at me, and it’s like I’m planting the seed in their mind that they can do it too, that it’s not just for boys. That makes me happy.” For Krueger, Temple’s Skate Kitchen is a place to inspire women to connect and skate. “It’s good to meet other skaters,” she said. “It’s also to bring together a community of people that might not feel comfortable, or just who are looking for people who are more like themselves.” gregory.probst@temple.edu

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Freshman undeclared major Olivia Chiaravalli, freshman environmental science major Grace Krueger and sophomore public health major Sarah McHugh (left to right) are members of “Skate Kitchen,” a women-only skateboarding club on campus.

ALEX PATERSON-JONES / THE TEMPLE NEWS Skate Kitchen is a new all-women skateboarding club at Temple University. The club skates in Temple’s unofficial skate park, Columbia Plaza, and throughout the city.

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

DIVERSITY

Book helps people with disabilities excel at work The guide helps employers better lead employees with neurological and developmental disabilities. BY MADISON KARAS For The Temple News Tom Edwards wondered why his son, who has autism, often had difficulties with his boss at his retail job. “He’s risen to every challenge successfully, except for employment,” Edwards said. “He hasn’t quite cracked that barrier yet.” “It finally occurs to me that the way he is being supervised is wrong,” he added. Edwards, the director of Temple University’s Engineering Management Program, aims to educate business managers and supervisors on empowering employees with developmental and neurological disorders and disabilities including autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and Tourette syndrome. He wrote “Leading Team Members with Super Powers,” a book detailing how to apply effective leadership and management strategies to employees with disabilities. Approximately one in 59 children in the United States have autism, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, less than 22 percent of people with disabilities participate in the labor force. While researching for his book, Edwards learned many neurodiverse employees struggle with attention to detail and social cognition, which can hinder them in the workplace. Examples include employees becoming frustrated when tasks change, or not understanding how their role benefits a company’s larger goal. “They’ve got these deep specific skills which can be valuable to a business, but they don’t get the social gist of what goes

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MADISON KARAS / THE TEMPLE NEWS Tom Edwards, the director of Temple’s engineering management program, launched a Kickstarter to crowdsource the publishing costs for his book, “Leading Team Members with Super Powers.”

on around them,” Edwards said. Neurodiversities include variations in neurological function caused by disorders like autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to the Autism Awareness Centre Inc. The book hasn’t yet published, and Edwards has raised about $400 toward his $3,500 goal to cover the self-publishing costs with an online Kickstarter crowdsourcing campaign. In 2014, Edwards piloted a leadership workshop at Via of the Lehigh Valley, a nonprofit service for people with disabilities, that focused on leadership skills like inspiring, motivating, delegating and taking responsibility. But Edwards decided he wanted to make a larger impact and started focusing on his book to appeal to a broader audience. In the book, Edwards encourages managers to change leadership approaches to better connect with employ-

ees with neurodiversities. He said these employees can experience anxiety or reduced commitment levels when employers present future goals to accomplish. Instead, Edwards encourages businesses to coach and help people with disabilities work through individual challenges. Aaron Spector, the director of Disability Resources and Services, said these strategies help employees with neurodiversities succeed through on-the-job individualized training and achievable workflow modifications. “If it’s something that’s acknowledged, a good job may be able to be restructured and the expectation reframed a little bit so that it’s not too much of an obstacle,” Spector said. Jonathon Atiencia, a freshman film and media arts major, identifies as a person with a learning disability, and said it affects his writing. Atiencia works as a coach at Temple’s Leadership & Career

Studies certificate program in the Institute on Disabilities. He said he’s achieved success by working closely with his managers and discussing difficulties he faces at work, and these practices could help other employees with disabilities. “If [employers] give them a second chance, it would help them with their disabilities, and with their lives,” Atiencia added. For Spector, success for employees with neurodiversities comes from employers valuing the diversity these workers bring to the workplace. Edwards also teaches graduate students about these topics and techniques, and said they show high interest in wanting to better understand their peers who have disabilities. Pradipti Pal, a 2017 computer science master’s alumna, took Edwards’s engineering management course in Fall 2017. She uses management strategies she learned from Edwards, like emphasizing communication, in her work as a cloud engineer at San Francisco-based human resources company SAP SuccessFactors. She started with the company as an autism-at-work program mentor. Pal said she often sees people tiptoe around discussing neurodiversity inclusion in the workplace, and that it’s difficult to see talented people with disabilities go unemployed. “If you can understand how they bring a competitive advantage to your team, it’s better not just for your employees, but for your manager as well,” Pal said. Edwards said his book is for anyone interested in becoming a leader. “‘Neurodiverse’ and ‘neurotypical’ don’t really matter,” Edwards said. “A leader’s job is to find a way for everybody to contribute and fit in.” madisonkaras@temple.edu @madraekaras

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FEATURES PAGE 14

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

SAMANTHA SPRECHMAN Freshman biochemistry major

VOICES

What do you think of professor Marc Lamont Hill’s comments at the UN?

It’s extremely controversial about who the land actually belongs to. It’s a huge conflict just in general, and for him to say that he had to know that he was getting himself into something much deeper and bigger than him.

ABENI MUSSA Freshman film and media arts major

He can have his own opinions, but picking a side either way is going to exclude somebody from feeling the way that they feel about the situation. Maybe he should have just kept it to himself, especially in the setting of the [United Nations.]

AHMAD CHOUDHRY Freshman health professions major Being pro-Palestinian doesn’t necessarily mean anti-Semitic, to me at least. It’s not as bad as I thought it was.

MOHAB ABOU-ELALLA Senior media studies and production major In the end, I believe Marc Lamont [Hill] has the right to state his opinion without fearing losing his job over it because we live in a country [where] free speech is protected by the Constitution.

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FEATURES PAGE 15

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Co-op makes creative space for artists of color The SONKU writer’s co-op hopes to publish an annual literary magazine, with its first in April. BY PAVLINA CERNA For The Temple News Taylar Enlow and Doriana Diaz instantly bonded over a love for poetry and a mutual understanding of a lack of space for writers of color on Main Campus. They met this fall through The Side by Side Collective, an organization Diaz co-founded that helps women of color make friends and practice self-care. The group inspired the two to create SONKU, a co-op that allows writers and artists of color to collaborate on creative projects. Their goal is to create an annual both digital and print literary magazine consisting of members’ creative poetry submissions in all genres. “This is what people of color created, and a slice of their vulnerability,” said Diaz, a junior gender, sexuality and women’s studies major. The co-op had its first meeting in October and meetings take place every other Thursday, Diaz said. Writers can submit their work on SONKU’s website until January to be considered for the literary magazine, which the organization hopes to publish in April. “The overall theme of the magazine is vulnerability, and it will be broken into five stages of grief,” Diaz said. The co-op is focused on its community and involvement of its members, Enlow said. All club members will participate in selecting material for the print product. “We want for people of color to feel recognized and championed,” added Enlow, a sophomore Africology and African-American Studies major. Black female writer, poet and activist Sonia Sanchez, who worked and taught at Temple from 1977-99 and serves as

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LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Doriana Diaz, a junior gender, sexuality, and women’s studies major and co-founder of SONKU, responds to a writing prompt during a club meeting on Nov. 29 at Paley Library.

the university’s poet-in-residence, inspires both Enlow and Diaz. The duo named the co-op after Sanchez’s writing style. Sonku is Sanchez’s loose personal adaptation of the Haiku, a traditional form of Japanese poetry consisting of three lines following a 5-7-5 syllable format. Sonku refers to four-line poems written in lines of either 4–3–4–3 or 6–3–6–3 syllables. Enlow said Sanchez helped shape her own identity and made her feel seen and heard through her poetry, while Diaz’s favorite book is Sanchez’s “Shake Loose My Skin” poetry collection. The two hope to collaborate with Sanchez in the future with the co-op and facilitate a meeting or workshop. Sanchez could not be reached for comment. While SONKU is not yet an official student organization recognized by the

university, Diaz and Enlow hope it will soon be Temple affiliated so the co-op can continue after they graduate. Members pay a $10 dollar membership fee per semester, and the funds go toward publishing the print magazine, Diaz said. For Diaz, poetry is a tool to cope with pain. She views it as a deep, powerful language. “You can learn so much about yourself through poetry,” Diaz said. “Writing for me is a conversation with myself, something bigger than me and the page.” Zoe Dixon, a sophomore film and media arts major, attended the first SONKU meeting and plans to submit two pieces for the print magazine. “There are amazing writers in this co-op,” she said. “I have grown as a writer. Seeing my peers’ work has had a great impact on me.” Dynas Johnson, a junior English

major who participates in the club, said SONKU is her home base and she gets to work among other writers with a similar identity to her own. “I am very happy with SONKU,” she added. “It is very empowering to be in the midst of your own.” The group aims to create a safe space for artists of color to create a community and grow socially and artistically, Enlow said. “At the end of the day, that is the most important,” she added. “Relationships with other artists, but also relationships with ourselves.” pavlina.cerna@temple.edu Editor’s note: Taylar Enlow is a freelance writer for The Temple News. She had no role in the reporting or editing of this story.

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FEATURES PAGE 16

LIVE

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

IN PHILLY

Mascots for a Cure takes over Christmas Village Mascots for a Cure, a nonprofit committed to supporting children battling cancer and other serious illnesses, partnered with Christmas Village in Philadelphia to host its first-ever parade. Nearly 20 mascots from local colleges, high schools and businesses attended Saturday’s event. The mascots paraded around City Hall and Dilworth and LOVE parks, before returning to Christmas Village at LOVE Park at 15th and Arch streets. The costumed characters interrupted the village’s events to pose for photos with attendees. The mascots, including Hooter the Owl, then went on stage to compete in a dance-off. Audience members voted for the winner by donating to the organization. Volunteers from Mascots for a Cure walked around with buckets to collect money from the crowd. “The more money we raise, the more kids and families we can help,” said Christopher Bruce, the brand development director for Mascots for a Cure. “So having this group of people and mascots and everybody come together is such an awesome thing, especially on the holidays.”

features@temple-news.com

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 17

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

HOLIDAY CROSSWORD

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1. A celebration of African heritage

2. A time for resolutions

4. Four-sided top

3. Day after Christmas

6. A candle stand with six branches

5. A horned creature that punishes naughty children and rewards nice ones

8. A common Hanukkah potato dish

7. Holds seven candles representing the Seven Principles of Kwanzaa

9. Eight-day festival of lights 10. A red-nosed reindeer

11. Brings children presents or coal

12. A secular holiday celebrated on Dec. 23

13. Home of Father Christmas

14. An archaic term for Christmas

15. A feast that occurs on the sixth day of Kwanzaa

Answers from Tuesday, November 27: 1. Africa, 2. Russia, 3. Arabian Peninsula, 4. Vatican City, 5. Amazon Rainforest, 6. Arctic Ocean, 7. Plateau, 8. Mason Dixon Line, 9. New Jersey, 10. Nile River, 11. Antarctica, 12. Desert, 13. Equator

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INTERSECTION PAGE 18

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

THE ESSAYIST

Despite any differences, I am still Latina

I live in Jackson Heights, Queens, A student discusses how New York City, which is one of the most colorism affects how people diverse areas in the United States. Peoperceive her Latina identity.

BY STEPHAIE AGUIRRE For The Temple News

I

am Latina. I grew up surrounded by the Spanish language. I heard it at my house, my friends’ houses, in stores, when walking through my neighborhood, yet I am not fluent in Spanish. My Latina identity comes from how I was raised and the culture I embraced as an individual. But for some, my fair skin and lack of fluency in Spanish make me white, not Latina. People have told me that I’m “fake Hispanic” or “such a white girl.” The number of times I have heard these judgments is ridiculous. They come from strangers and some of my friends who think it’s funny. Not fully knowing Spanish does not make me white, or not Latina. To fight the negativity, I repeat this to others because I know who I am and where my roots are from: I don’t speak Spanish fluently, but I am still Latina. My family, my culture and my upbringing make me Latina, and that’s that. Growing up, I was somewhat ashamed of my physical characteristics. My mom has fair skin, while my dad is darker. My skin is even lighter than my mom’s. My mom is fluent in both English and Spanish, but when she orders food from the corner bakery or asks where grocery items are in the supermarket, employees speak to her in English. They assume English is her first language because of her fair skin, green eyes and light brown hair, even when she responds in Spanish. Witnessing these interactions frustrated me. I never understood why others thought a person could not have fair skin and be Latinx. intersection@temple-news.com

ple in my neighborhood are from the Caribbean and Central and South America. We all have different skin colors and speak different levels of Spanish, Portuguese and English. Since I transferred to Temple, I have found some members of the community do not understand people of color or know where we come from. Most of their assumptions seem to come from ignorance, not criticism. But once, I heard a much more offensive comment. A student asked me where my parents were from and then followed up by asking, “Are they illegal?” At that moment, I was in disbelief. Never in my life had someone blatantly asked me that. I was baffled. I felt sorry for this young woman. She did not have the knowledge or culture to understand. My mother immigrated to Mexico from Cuba and then came to the U.S. when she was 11, flying away from Fidel Castro’s rising regime. She and my father, who immigrated from Peru when he was 17, brought their culture and knowledge to the U.S. My parents taught me to be hardworking, to know right from wrong and to value education. They taught me to believe in God, to dance bachata and cumbia, to make empanadas, lomo saltado — a popular Peruvian stir fry combined with strips of steak, onions, tomatoes and french fries — and arroz con pollo. Together we sing along to Héctor Lavoe, Celia Cruz, Shakira and Marc Anthony in our family car and in the house. This summer, we cheered on Peru, surrounded by Peruvians, in a Peruvian restaurant when the team played in the World Cup for the first time in 36 years. Together, my parents have shared stories about their upbringings in Peru and Cuba, what their dreams were, who my family is, where my family comes

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Stephanie Aguirre wrote about being Latina and her experiences growing up in New York City.

from and much more. We are all Latinx. Not based on our skin color or the amount of Spanish we spoke, but our shared culture. I inherited this culture and knowledge from my parents and both of my parents worked tremendously hard to

help me achieve in life. I am who my parents raised and the culture I inherited. Therefore, I am Latina. stephanie.aguirre@temple.edu

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INTERSECTION PAGE 19

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

ON CAMPUS

Women’s group discusses colorism, body image The Global Women’s Dialogue hosted its fall semester event Friday to explore colorism. BY HENRY SAVAGE For The Temple News Presenting the “paper bag test” to a packed room in Anderson Hall, Bisi Oyelola detailed how, a few decades ago, some people were denied employment if their complexions were darker than a paper bag. Oyelola, a senior political science major and president of the on-campus organization Hosting Our Own Talks, spoke about colorism, which dates as far back as slavery and colonization. She added the skin-lightening industry is worth $10 billion globally and skin-lightening cream is one of the top-selling products in Africa. Colorism, among many other topics, was discussed Friday night at “The Bodily Mind,” a conversation about how societal and interpersonal pressures can affect mental health and body image. Global Women’s Dialogue, a Temple group dedicated to creating safe spaces for students to discuss topics affecting the student body and women across the world, hosted the event. Donna-Marie Peters, a sociology professor, founded Global Women’s Dialogue in 2008 and has hosted an event every semester since. What started as a group for students of Middle Eastern backgrounds, primarily women, who were reluctant to open up about certain topics like race, expanded itself to all university students, Peters said. “Why don’t we have our own group?” Peters asked the women who joined her. “We can get together and discuss these topics without outsiders listening to us that we don’t know or people we feel don’t understand us criticizing us.”

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CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

Friday’s two-hour event combined poetry, educational lessons and intimate discussions, which were meant to “build bridges to understanding,” Peters said. “We don’t want to shut people down,” Peters said. “We want this space to be a brave, open and safe space to say whatever you want to say with our hearts open to each other, accepting different perspectives and acknowledging that we’re one large global Temple community of greater understanding.” In weekly discussions throughout the semester, Global Women’s Dialogue chooses topics like women in leadership, de-escalating microaggressions and intersectionality to discuss at bi-annual events on Main Campus. These events join students from varying racial, ethnic and religious back-

grounds. Students share poetry, teach and participate in educational lessons and break up into groups to exchange thoughts on the event’s theme. Juliana Amo, a senior social work major, has been going to Global Women’s Dialogue events for a year after being introduced to the organization by a friend. “Since I’ve been here, it’s been amazing,” Amo said. “There’s no restriction, and it’s an open space to talk about anything, whatever is on your mind.” During a past discussion on microaggressions, the group talked about how women have to be more on guard for offensive language or looks, she said. Gender-based microaggressions can include sexual objectification, restrictive gender roles and environmental invali-

dations like unequal pay. These can have negative effects on a person’s standard of living physical and psychological health — like body image and body dissatisfaction — according to a report by the University of New Hampshire. “To be here and talk to individuals who I work with or have class with about these issues is so important,” Oyelola said. “I get to see you in a different perspective, my peers in a different perspective and men in my class in a different perspective.” “Events like these on campus are so important and really crucial to the heartbeat of what Temple’s about,” Oyelola said. henry.savage@temple.edu @MediaByHenry

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INTERSECTION PAGE 20

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Temple Latinx program grows, celebrates culture AdEL raises awareness about the experiences of Latinx students at Temple. BY KATE NEWDECK For The Temple News

There are currently 54 official members of Asociación de Estudiantes Latinos, an organization that increases awareness of Latinx-specific issues and heritage at Temple. But when the group started in 1994, there were only five or six. Ronald Webb, a Latin American Studies professor and AdEL’s faculty adviser, said the organization was started by a few Latinx students who created a place to discuss their heritage and experiences. AdEL continues to celebrate Latinx culture and serves as a gateway for students who may not feel “Latino enough” to engage with the community. It enables students who might not consider themselves Latinx — because they have distant ancestry or do not speak Spanish — to reconnect with the community, Webb said. “I see students all the time who

sort of reconnect with their past when before, they didn’t necessarily consider themselves to be Latino, or maybe they’re mixed,” Webb said. Less than 7 percent of undergraduate students are Hispanic or Latinx, according to the 2017-18 Temple University Fact Book. The population is smaller than other minority groups, like African-American students, who make up 12.6 percent of that population, and Asian students, who account for 11.6 percent. “We have that community in this organization,” said Gail Vivar, a senior journalism major and AdEL’s director of external communication. “People feel that they’re welcome with people who look like us, understand our struggles and just want to help each other out.” The organization educates allies about Latinx heritage and issues surrounding the Latinx community. The organization typically meets on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. to discuss themes like being Latinx and mental health. Webb, who has been AdEL’s faculty adviser since 2006, said AdEL’s membership ebbs and flows. “There have been times where there

were only four or five active members,” he added. Jennylee Ramos was the president of AdEL in 2016 when she was a senior at Temple. She joined the organization as a freshman and worked her way up through the ranks as treasurer and vice president. Ramos is now a Temple employee and works as the assistant director for programs and marketing in the Office of Student Activities. In Fall 2012, Hispanic and Latinx students accounted for less than 5 percent of the university’s population. She said she thinks more Latinx students enrolled in the university after Temple stopped requiring students to submit standardized test scores, like the SAT and ACT, for students who enrolled in 2015. Nationally, more Hispanic and Latinx people are attaining postsecondary degrees. According to a May 2017 Department of Education report, 27 percent of Hispanic and Latinx Americans aged 25-29 have an associate degree or higher, up from 15 percent in 2000. Admissions created several Latinx-specific programs this year, Ramos said. Along with AdEL, students can

join Temple’s chapter of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers and Association of Latino Professionals for America. Jesus Alvarado, a senior neuroscience major and the current president of AdEL, said the cost of tuition is a barrier that can prevent some Latinx students from enrolling at Temple. AdEL is considering using money from fundraisers — like churro and quesadilla sales — toward a financial scholarship for a local Latinx student to attend Temple, Alvarado added. “Temple tries to do what it can for minorities and those who are looking for support on campus, but sometimes students just don’t know who to go to,” he added. “If they want to call themselves a diverse university, [Temple] should also take on the responsibility of helping students find this information. That is where diversity could really have a chance to grow.” kate.newdeck@temple.edu Editor’s note: Gail Vivar was a freelance reporter for The Temple News. She took no part in the reporting or editing of this story.

THE ESSAYIST

I am Afro-Latinx: you can’t shortern my identity

A person who is Hispanic has ances- food from my culture, used its products ed to be white. But even as a child, I unA student explains why she tors from a Spanish-speaking country and listened to its music. But I and many derstood that every detail of my heritage identifies as Afro-Latinx.

BY RHIANNON RIVAS For The Temple News I grew up in Brooklyn, New York, surrounded by second- and third-generation Latinxs. We danced merengue and used Spanish slang that didn’t have proper English translations. We spoke English, not Spanish, but nonetheless shared the culture our parents taught us. We were not Hispanics, but Latinx — members of an ethnic group from the Caribbean and Central and South America. intersection@temple-news.com

while a person who is Latinx has ancestors from Latin America, Bustle and YouTube personality Kat Lazo reported in 2015. Not every Hispanic person is Latinx, and not every Latinx person is Hispanic. This assumption is akin to calling every white person “English.” When I hear the word “Hispanic,” I feel I and other non-Spanish speaking people are being erased of our own ethnicities. Third-generation Latinxs like me live with a culture that has been encouraged not to speak Spanish to better adapt to America. In my Dominican household, I ate

of my friends were told not to learn Spanish because we would gain an accent and face harassment. Many people, myself included, have started identifying as Afro-Latinx. The suffix, “x,” is a non-binary alternative to Latina or Latino. I like to compare the pronunciation of Latinx to “The Matrix,” and call it “Latin-EX.” The “Afro” represents the Blackness in me. In my youth, I felt I had to deny this Blackness. Most of my family members claimed to be mostly native or white, despite physical features that gave away their African heritage. I remember crying in elementary school because I want-

was integral to my identity. I took on this prefix after moving to Philadelphia in 2016. People who did not know my ethnicity already perceived me as Black, so I decided to display this side of me publicly. I am third-generation Afro-Latinx and I’m proud of it. I find strength in it. I have pushed beyond what the mainstream told me to look and act like. To change or shorten this label would over-simplify who I am. rhiannon.rivas@temple.edu

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SPORTS PAGE 21

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

FOOTBALL

Power Five foe awaits Owls at Independence Bowl The Owls will face off against Petersburg, Florida. The Owls have won six of their past Duke University on Dec. 27 in seven games ahead of the Independence Shreveport, Louisiana. BY MICHAEL ZINGRONE Co-Sports Editor Coach Geoff Collins consistently refreshed his Twitter feed during his recruiting trip on Sunday. He and his Temple University football players anxiously awaited their bowl game and opponent, redshirt-senior fullback Rob Ritrovato said. At about 4:30 p.m., the Owls learned they will play Duke University in the Independence Bowl in Shreveport, Louisiana, on Dec. 27. The Independence Bowl will kick off at 1:30 p.m on ESPN. It will be the first matchup between Temple (8-4, 7-1 American Athletic Conference) and Duke (7-5, 3-5 Atlantic Coast Conference) in the history of the two schools. Temple is making its fourth straight bowl appearance and trying to win back-to-back bowls for the first time in program history. Last year, the Owls beat Florida International University in the Gasparilla

Bowl. Temple will start ramping up its preparation for Duke at the end of the week, Collins said after Temple’s bowl announcement on Sunday. Both teams clinched bowl eligibility in their tenth game, but the Blue Devils enter the postseason having been outscored 94-13 in their final two games. Five of Duke’s seven wins came against teams playing in bowl games. Duke finished the season placing sixth in the ACC Coastal division. Duke redshirt-junior quarterback Daniel Jones is “arguably one of the best quarterbacks in the country,” Collins added. Jones threw for 2,251 yards with 17 touchdowns and seven interceptions. He is also a threat running the ball. He has gained 325 yards rushing and scored twice on 98 attempts this season. The Blue Devils concede an average of 222.3 yards rushing per game. Temple senior running back Ryquell Armstead ranks 26nd in the Football Bowl Subdivision with 1,098 rush yards in 10 games.

The bowl will be a school-record fourth for graduate student defensive lineman Michael Dogbe and senior safety Delvon Randall. Dogbe and Randall will each play in their 54th games, the most of any player in program history. Dogbe said he hopes to have instilled a “standard” of going to a bowl game every year during his career at Temple, he said. “To go to four straight bowl games is a big testament to the hard work we’ve put in over the years,” Dogbe added. The Owls’ matchup with Duke will be their second bowl game against a Power Five school in that four-year span. The Owls lost to Wake Forest University, 34-26, at the Military Bowl in 2016. Before the Owls won their bowl game last year, the team lost focus at times during the lull between the regular season and postseason play, Armstead

said. In addition to playing in the Independence Bowl, players will participate in off-field activities, like a game-show style competition on Dec. 23. “Take advantage of the opportunities. It’s a whole month and a lot of people tend to lack off and not pay attention to the details,” Armstead added. “Take practice not as serious. My freshman year we were so excited to get there [that] half of it turned to a field day just having fun instead of locking in and perform at a high level.” Temple’s players want the underclassmen to appreciate the opportunity of playing in a bowl game. “You just gotta have your medium where you’re having a good time, but at the same time it’s a business trip and you have to get the job done,” Armstead said. michael.zingrone@temple.edu @mjzingrone

Bowl in St.

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Coach Geoff Collins celebrates after Temple’s 57-7 win against Connecticut on Nov. 24 at Rentschler Connecticut sophomore linebacker Omar Fortt attempts to tackle senior running back Ryquell Field. Armstead during Temple’s 57-7 win against Connecticut on Nov. 24 at Rentschler Field.

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SPORTS PAGE 22

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

DePaul hands Temple its fifth consecutive defeat Temple had its best shooting performance, but lost, 102-88, to DePaul in Chicago on Monday. BY MAURA RAZANAUSKAS

Women’s Basketball Beat Reporter Temple recorded season-highs in field-goal percentage and points during Monday’s game against DePaul University. But the Owls also allowed a season-high 102 points in Chicago in their 102-88 loss to the Blue Demons, the No. 20 team in the Associated Press Top 25 poll. Despite Temple’s fifth consecutive loss, coach Tonya Cardoza saw the improvements made by the team as something to be happy about. The Owls (2-5) shot 50.8 percent from the field, finishing higher than 50 percent for the first time this season and shooting more than 40 percent for the first time since their season opener. “I like our fight, I like the way we competed when we were down,” Cardoza said. “We have to do a better job in taking care of the basketball and limiting second-chance opportunities, and it’s a totally different ballgame if you do those two things.” DePaul’s largest lead in the first half was 23 points. DePaul (5-3) outscored Temple 29-17 in the first quarter behind 11 points from senior guard Ashton Millender, who finished with a team-high 23 points. Performances from key players and accurate shooting in the second half helped the Owls get back on track. The Owls shot at least 60 percent in both the second and the third quarters, helping to make up for their 38.9 clip in the first quarter. “We’ve been talking about it, how if we make shots, our record would be something completely different,” Cardoza said. “We’d be sitting here feeling

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good about ourselves, and so it was good to see shots go in for those guys.” Sophomore forward Mia Davis contributed 22 second-half points to trim the Owls’ deficit to seven points with five minutes, five seconds left in the fourth quarter. After that, DePaul closed the game on a 7-0 run. Davis shot 4-for-5 from beyond the arc, notching a new career-high in made 3-pointers. Davis’s team-high 11 rebounds also helped her achieve her fourth double-double of the season. Graduate student guard Alliya Butts, who scored 19 of her season-high 23 points in the second half, gave Temple a second-half boost. Butts shot 9-for-17 from the field but got off to a slow start by shooting 1-for-3 and turning the ball over twice in the first quarter. “The way Alliya started wasn’t good, but I told her after the game that she showed growth,” Cardoza said. “In the past, the way she started, she would’ve ended the same way, and we wouldn’t have gotten anything from her.” Temple’s bench contributed 31 points on Monday. Senior forward Lena Niang led the reserves with 12 points, while sophomore guard Desiree Oliver and freshman forward Alexa Williamson combined for 19 points. “Hopefully, that is a confidence booster for a lot of those guys because it’s going to be hard to win basketball games with just Alliya and Mia scoring,” Cardoza said. Temple’s downfall was its inability to grab offensive rebounds and secure the ball, Cardoza said. DePaul scored 22 second-chance points and 28 points off turnovers. Davis and Butts, the Owls’ leading scorers on Monday, combined for 10 turnovers. The Owls will try to end their losing streak on Thursday against Iona College in its first home game since Nov 6.

GENEVA HEFFERNAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS Sophomore guard Emani Mayo attempts a layup during the Owls’ 75-61 win against Delaware State on Nov. 6 at the Liacouras Center.

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maura.razanauskas@temple.edu @captainAMAURAca

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SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

PAGE 24

MEN’S BASKETBALL

BIG 5.

BIG TEST. PHOTO BY MICHAEL ZINGRONE DESIGN BY CLAIRE HALLORAN Senior guard Shizz Alston Jr. (center) drives the lane during Temple’s 77-70 win against Saint Joseph’s on Saturday at Hagan Arena.

“Knowing that it’s coach [Fran Dun- talented guys. They’re playing about the deficit to two with 15 seconds left. Temple has corrected its At Hagan Arena on Saturday, the mistakes from last season. Is phy]’s last year, we want to give him a same way they’ve always played.” Last year, the Wildcats blew out Owls trailed by eight points at halftime it enough to beat defending Big 5 title, and me being from Philly, I want a Big 5 title myself,” senior guard Temple at the Liacouras Center, but before a strong second-half comeback national champion Villanova?

W

ednesday will mark the six-year anniversary of the last time Temple University beat Villanova in men’s basketball. Temple (7-1, 2-0 Big 5) last defeated Villanova (6-2, 1-0 Big 5) on Dec. 5, 2012 at the Finneran Pavilion. Villanova hasn’t lost a Big 5 game since the Owls’ 76-61 win. SAM NEUMANN The Owls will CO-SPORTS EDITOR travel to the Finneran Pavilion on Wednesday to face the Wildcats in their biggest game this season. Temple will face the defending Division I champions, play their first game against a ranked team and potentially pave a path to win at least a share of its first Big 5 title since the 2012-13 season. If the Owls beat Villanova, they’d enter their Jan. 19 game against Penn undefeated against Big 5 schools. sports@temple-news.com

Shizz Alston Jr. said following Temple’s 77-70 road win against Saint Joseph’s on Saturday. “Just going in there with that on our minds, that’s one of our goals to check off the list this year.” This season, Villanova, who is ranked No. 21 in the Associated Press Poll, isn’t as formidable as the teams that won two of the past three national titles, making a win obtainable for Temple. Villanova’s two losses were both at home. The Wildcats lost to the University of Michigan by 27 points on Nov. 14 and suffered an eight-point overtime loss to Furman University in their next game. Michigan and Furman are ranked No. 5 and No. 21 in the AP Poll, respectively. Vegas oddsmakers largely predicted Villanova to win both games. On Saturday, the Wildcats trailed at halftime against a winless La Salle team before securing an 85-78 victory. “Not in their absolute style that they play, a lot of the same structure is in place,” Dunphy said Monday. “Obviously they have different players, but still very

most of their main contributors are on NBA rosters now. In the Villanova’s 8767 win on Dec. 13, 2017, Jalen Brunson, Omari Spellman and Donte DiVincenzo accounted for 70 points on 26-of-36 shooting from the field. Spellman, DiVincenzo and former Villanova forward Mikal Bridges were all selected in the first round of the 2018 draft, while Brunson went in the second. Temple can win because it has the ability to avoid the late-game pitfalls it succumbed to last year. Seven of Temple’s regular-season losses were decided by seven or fewer points. The Owls are 3-1 in such games this year, including their last two wins. “Hopefully, it shows that we have some grit,” Dunphy said. “It’s a toughness that hopefully we are gathering and can use as we go out the rest of the season, but I’m hoping that we are getting to being a pretty tough basketball team.” Temple defeated the University of Missouri on Nov. 27 after the Tigers trimmed their 12-point second-half

secured the victory against Saint Joseph’s. “If you said that you were going to have a really good record playing city games, then you are probably going to have a pretty big season,” Dunphy said. Dunphy is right. In 2012-13, including their win against Villanova, the Owls started 8-2. They shared the Big 5 title with La Salle and earned an NCAA Tournament bid before the season ended in the second round. The Owls’ 7-1 start this season is their best since the 2012-13 season. Beating Villanova on Wednesday could help put the Owls on a similar path. “[I am] just trying to do everything I came to college wanting to do now,” Alston said. “I haven’t got a Big 5 [title]. ...This year, I’m trying to check off all my goals and help my guys win as many games as possible.” sam.neumann@temple.edu @SamNeu_ Dante Collinelli contributed reporting.

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Profile for The Temple News

Vol. 97 Iss. 14  

Dec. 4, 2018

Vol. 97 Iss. 14  

Dec. 4, 2018

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