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THE TEMPLE NEWS

HISTORIC PROGRESS PLAZA TH CELEBRATES 50 YEAR THE FIRST BLACK-OWNED, OPERATED AND MANAGED COMPLEX IS CELEBRATING ITS ANNIVERSARY IN NORTH PHILADELPHIA. READ MORE ON PAGE 3.

VOL 97 // ISSUE 12 NOVEMBER 13, 2018 temple-news.com @thetemplenews

NEWS, PAGE 4

Temple Student Government’s Parliament has not proposed a resolution yet this semester.

OPINION, PAGE 11

A columnist argues there needs to be legislative action on gun control now.

FEATURES, PAGE 13

A journalism student started a Temple version of the widely known “Humans of New York” photo series.

SPORTS, PAGE 21

Field hockey will undergo a nationwide search for a head coach after Marybeth Freeman resigned last week.


NEWS PAGE 2

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

THE TEMPLE NEWS A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. Gillian McGoldrick Editor in Chief Kelly Brennan Managing Editor Julie Christie Digital Managing Editor Evan Easterling Chief Copy Editor Greta Anderson News Editor Grace Shallow Investigations Editor Alyssa Biederman Deputy Campus Editor Will Bleier Deputy City Editor Jayna Schaffer Opinion Editor Laura Smythe Features Editor Zari Tarazona Deputy Features Editor Khanya Brann Deputy Features Editor Michael Zingrone Co-Sports Editor Sam Neumann Co-Sports Editor Claire Wolters Intersection Editor Shefa Ahsan Multimedia Editor Maria Ribeiro Director of Engagement Siani Colon Asst. Director of Engagement Dylan Long Co-Photography Editor Luke Smith Co-Photography Editor Madison Seitchik Web Editor Ian Walker Visuals Editor Myra Mirza Visuals Specialist Claire Halloran Design Editor Jeremiah Reardon Designer Phuong Tran Advertising Manager Kelsey McGill Advertising Manager Daniel Magras Business Manager

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content represents the opinion of The Temple News. Adjacent commentary is reflective of their authors, not The Temple News. Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

ON THE COVER DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS

CORRECTIONS Accuracy is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it as soon as possible. Anyone with inquiries about content in this newspaper can contact Editor in Chief Gillian McGoldrick at editor@temple-news.com or 215-204-6736.

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

CRIME

Court date set for AEPi president Ari Goldstein, the fraternity’s former president, will return to court Dec. 11 on sexual assault-related charges. BY ALYSSA BIEDERMAN Deputy Campus Editor

A

ri Goldstein, the former president of Temple University’s suspended chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi, could begin trial for his first round of sexual assault-related charges as early as 2019, his attorney said. Goldstein will return to court on Dec. 11 for his third pretrial hearing, which is an opportunity for lawyers to make motions that would set boundaries for trial. The upcoming hearing comes after Goldstein’s defense attorney Perry de Marco Sr. asked Court of Common Pleas Judge Robert Coleman for more time for discovery, or the collection of evidence. Goldstein was arrested for one round of sexual assault-related charges on May 15. He was arrested again for separate sexual assault-related charges on Aug. 7, after a second alleged victim came forward. The two alleged victims testified in court that Goldstein attempted to force the women to perform oral sex on him. Goldstein is being held on seven charges for the first alleged incident, including indecent assault, attempted rape, attempted sexual assault, un-

lawful restraint, simple assault, false imprisonment and “refrain from report,” or obstructing a witness or victim’s ability to report a crime. He was charged with seven separate, but similar sexual assault-related charges in the second case. While there has not been a motion to consolidate the charges, de Marco said the defense would “strenuously oppose” consolidation because he wants each case looked at separately. The Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office could not be reached for comment. De Marco said the trial for the first set of charges could begin as soon as early 2019 or as late as a year from now. External factors like the judge’s schedule and any possible pre-trial motions, like consolidation, would delay the trial. “Time is always good for the defense,” de Marco said. “It gives us more time to prepare, more time to have a more organized strategy.” De Marco has indicated Goldstein will plead not guilty to the charges. “When [Goldstein] testifies at the trial, he’s going to give you the truth because he has nothing to hide because he did nothing wrong, there was no crime done,” de Marco told media on July 19. alyssa.biederman@temple.edu @BiedermanAlyssa

temple-news.com


NEWS

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

COVER STORY

Sullivan Progress Plaza commemorates 50 years The historic plaza was the first African American-owned, operated and managed shopping center in the United States. BY VALERIE DOWRET For The Temple News Sullivan Progress Plaza, the first shopping center in the United States developed, owned and managed by African-Americans, celebrated its 50th anniversary this year. The plaza on Broad Street near Oxford is a historic landmark for the North Philadelphia African-American community. It was established by the Zion Baptist Church congregation and its pastor, the center’s namesake, the late Rev. Leon Sullivan. The plaza was completed in 1968 and now has 12 commercial tenants. It has been an economic stronghold for the local community. “I remember when they cleared the grounds to build this place,” said Byron Nelson, 68, who was 17 years old and lived on Cecil B. Moore Avenue near 23rd Street when the plaza opened. He knew Sullivan personally. “It was our first Black-owned large business at the time, and it really meant something to us,” he added. Sullivan Progress Plaza was financed by Sullivan’s “10-36” plan. Members of the Zion Baptist Church donated $10 per month for 36 months toward the future shopping center’s development. About $200 of the donations went toward creating a for-profit stock corporation called Progress Investment Associates, Inc. PIA’s stock sales helped fund the construction of the plaza and it owns the shopping center today. Sullivan also started the Philadelphia Opportunities Industrialization Center, Inc. in 1964 and opened a job training center in North Philadelphia. Many graduates from the training program found jobs at Sullivan Progress Plaza when it opened. “You’re thinking about having jobs being created, a new atmosphere,” Nel@TheTempleNews

RYAN ENOCH / THE TEMPLE NEWS The Sullivan Progress Plaza on Broad Street near Oxford, which opened in 1968, is the namesake of civil rights icon the Rev. Leon Sullivan.

son said. “It gave us a lot of inspiration. Just what it said, ‘Progress Plaza.’ Progress. We were moving forward, moving up.” In 2008, The Temple News reported the plaza was renamed to Sullivan Progress Plaza during its renovation to honor Sullivan, who died in 2001. Former presidents like Richard Nixon and Barack Obama have visited the historic site. Wendell Whitlock, the president and CEO of Progress Trust, Inc. and PIA chairman, said the importance of the plaza is about more than its visitors. Progress Trust is a nonprofit corporation created in 1999 to receive funds from nonprofit and governmental organizations for the redevelopment of the plaza in 2009. “The most historical significance of the plaza? That it’s still there,” Whitlock said. “It still exists, it’s still operational, it’s still running.” In the 1960s, Whitlock participated in selective patronage, a series of 29 boycotts between 1959 and 1963, organized by Sullivan and 399 other Philadelphia ministers against companies that refused to hire African-Americans. The boycott

included Tasty Baking Co., Pepsi-Cola, Standard Oil and other petroleum companies. The group of ministers negotiated accommodations with these companies while African-American residents boycotted products until they agreed to carry out the demands. In 1969, Sullivan estimated that the boycott opened up more than 2,000 jobs. Since 2008, Sullivan Progress Plaza has housed many businesses, including the Fresh Grocer, Payless ShoeSource and Sunray Drugs. The United Bank of Philadelphia has been in the plaza since 1999, the longest of all current tenants. “I’m grateful and thankful that the market is close and convenient to where I live,” said Angela Starks, who lives near Allegheny Avenue and Broad Street. Jonathan Robinson, a branch manager at United Bank, said the shopping center has changed over the years, noting the development of Fresh Grocer. “We [saw] a new business come in,” he said. “I know the people in this area were, no pun intended, hungry for a supermarket, for quite some time and it was great that they finally got the supermarket they’d been so desiring.”

“The anniversary was great,” Robinson added. “Mr. Sullivan, his legacy lives on through the plaza, so I know he would have been proud. He envisioned a shopping center in this area, and it’s still thriving long after he passed.” North Philadelphia residents celebrated the Sullivan Progress Plaza 50th anniversary on Oct. 27 in a luncheon at the Philadelphia Electric Company building in Center City. The event honored those who kept Sullivan’s ideas alive and featured U.S. Rep. Dwight Evans as the keynote speaker. Whitlock was also honored at the luncheon. “I feel immense pride that it has thrived and flourished for 50 years,” Whitlock said. Although Sullivan Progress Plaza may have a long history, Progress Trust, Inc. is far from done with its work, Whitlock said. “We’re laying out some partnerships with builders, developers who are active in the area, and just looking to expand our influence in the area,” he said. valerie.dowret@temple.edu @VDowret

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


NEWS PAGE 4

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

TSG

Parliament ‘ineffective,’ must propose 15 acts With three meetings left in the semester, the body has not proposed any resolutions thus far. BY BLAKE NUTIS TSG Beat Reporter The Temple Student Government Ethics Board will require Parliament to propose at least 15 new resolutions by Dec. 18, after not passing a single one so far this semester. Members of Parliament and executive leadership complained to the Constitutionality Committee that the body was ineffective. Parliament members argue the requirement is unfair, because they had been spending most of their meetings trying to fill seats. Maddy Okkerse, a freshman class representative, appealed and will be heard by the Ethics Board on Thursday. Parliament members who do not help reach this goal set by the Ethics Board may face suspension, which can span anywhere between a few days to a few weeks. Parliament is TSG’s representative branch. Its primary responsibility is to pass resolutions that address the needs of students. Since the start of the semester, the body has not voted on or proposed any resolutions. Only three more meetings remain for members to meet the 15-proposal quota before their deadline. By November 2017, last year’s Parliament had proposed and passed two resolutions. Since its first meeting in January 2017, the body passed 15 resolutions in total. Parliament has struggled to recruit students each semester it has existed. Of its 36 seats, only 15 were filled during the Spring 2018 elections. Four of the seats — two freshmen, Residence Hall Association and Greek life — must be selected during the fall semester. Parliament members had spent the previous semester attempting to impeach one another, The Temple News News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS Phillip Smith, the director of Student Activities and faculty adviser to TSG, led a Parliament committee meeting on Monday about how resolutions should be proposed. The representative body was informed by the Ethics Board it must propose 15 resolutions by the end of the semester.

reported in November 2017. The discord ended in planned conflict-resolution training. The body gained 13 more representatives so far this semester, but seven seats remain vacant. “I know firsthand that you guys have so much more ability to make really great change on this campus,” Ethics Board Judge Jordan Laslett told Parliament members on Nov. 5. “If you just took more of a leadership position on policy aspects, it is possible for you all to do so much more than what you’re doing.” In the past, Parliament relied on executive branch-approved budgets to fund resolutions. IgniteTU, the winning campaign in Spring 2018, gave the branch shared funding with the Executive Branch as part of its platform. Parliament now receives an independent budget with an unidentified total to fund its resolutions.

TSG’s Treasurer Ryan Michener wrote in a statement that he does not think the memorandum will “at all impact” the budget for Parliament. “We want to make sure Parliament feels effective and that they can be autonomous,” Vice President of External Affairs Cameron Kaczor told The Temple News in August. Laslett said the Executive Branch might be open to helping new members of the body become acclimated to the environment, but in previous years, Parliament expressed the need for less executive oversight. Since the body struggling this year, the branch may have pulled back too much, he added. “Maybe you’re not getting as much as you require as new members,” he said to the body. “If that’s something that needs addressing, we need veteran [Parliament members] to come back in the future to help better train and see that

Parliament is being educated up.” Phillip Smith, the director of Student Activities and the faculty adviser of TSG, met with Parliament members on Monday during their scheduled committee meeting to guide the body toward proposing thorough resolutions. “A resolution needs to be thought out, researched,” he told the body. “You need to be able to come together, do research, vote on it and have it pushed forward. I don’t want a bunch of nonsense resolutions proposed just to have them proposed.” In the past, resolutions have varied from hosting a phone bank to lobby for state funding, to supporting refugee students, to training students to use naloxone in the form of Narcan, a nasal spray that reverses the effects of opioid overdose. Committee meetings usually give Parliament members time to plan and temple-news.com


NEWS

PAGE 5

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

How many resolutions has Parliament passed? Fall 2018 —

?

?

The Ethics Board mandated that Parliament pass 15 resolutions by the end of the semester

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

Parliament is working with fewer members

Spring 2018

There are still seven open seats on Parliament. When the semester started, there were a total 20 unfilled seats. At that rate, half of Parliament will have to research and propose a resolution in the next three weeks.

Fall 2017

Filled in Spring 2018

Spring 2017 —

= passed resolution

Filled in Fall 2018

Empty

Parliament’s first semester in session

? = required resolution proposal IAN WALKER & JULIE CHRISTIE / THE TEMPLE NEWS

SOURCE: Temple Student Government

write resolutions. Because of Smith’s meeting, members were not given that time. Boyer College of Music and Dance representative Judy Kang said the Ethics Board memorandum hinders the body’s ability to put out quality resolutions. “We’re trying to come out with resolutions that are more meaningful resolutions. ...They want a number of resolutions by a certain date rather than doing something that’s more meaningful or thought out,” Kang said. To present a resolution, Parliament members must draft their ideas and submit it to the Speaker of Parliament at least six days before the body’s meeting. Nancy Allen, the Parliament counselor on the Ethics Board, reminded members of the body of their right to appeal the memorandum when it was @TheTempleNews

issued. “If you don’t co-sponsor or write a resolution by the end of your term in Parliament, you can get suspended,” she said. “But if you think the memorandum is too much, you can appeal this. It’s not final.” “It takes time to put policy together,” said Emanuel Wilkerson, an at-large representative. “It takes time for us to get acclimated into the Parliament. ...We have to meet and do our due diligence before we can present any legislation.” Razin Karu, the Parliament speaker and transfer student representative, said the body has been ineffective because it is focusing on filling seats. “It shouldn’t be the responsibility of this body to spend two months of the fall semester filling up seats,” Karu said.

Salman Fayaz, one of the two freshman class representatives, said he doesn’t think the memorandum is a good use of the Ethics Board and Parliament’s time. “I’d rather have a guide,” Fayaz said. “Parliament is so inefficient because no one knows what to do.” Parliament members said two weeks ago they are working on some resolutions, like one to promote safety through Temple Police and another to make dining halls more sustainable. Alex Rosenberg, a junior class representative, told the Ethics Board that he submitted a resolution to build an on-campus dog park weeks ago that wasn’t voted on at the Nov. 5 meeting. Allen denied the motion to vote on his proposal because it wasn’t submitted properly. Allen said the memorandum’s intent

was not meant to be malicious. “I didn’t want to have to sit and make this memorandum on top of my five classes, internship and three other things,” she said. “But I did it because I care about you guys and I understand why you think I was coming from a bad place but trust me, I wasn’t.” “Whatever you want can be done, you just have to do it,” she added. blake.nutis@temple.edu @blakenutis

Carolyn Potts contributed reporting. Editor’s note: Alex Mark, TSG’s secretary, is a feelance reporter for The Temple News. He played no part in the reporting or editing of this story.

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


NEWS PAGE 6

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

DEVELOPMENT

Housing complex next to The View to open in 2019 Vantage apartments, developed by the owners of The View, will offer 984 beds in its new complex. BY ALYSSA BIEDERMAN Deputy Campus Editor Vantage, a new off-campus housing development on 12th Street near Cecil B. Moore Avenue, will open in Fall 2019. The apartment building will have 984 beds, luxury amenities like a 24-hour fitness center, an outdoor terrace, coffee bar and space for community use. The apartments will come fully furnished, and the facility will also reserve space for retail vendors. The complex will offer studio, two, three or four bedroom apartments, starting at $899 per month. The complex began leasing in October. Kevin Trapper, the senior vice president and development director for The Goldenberg Group, which owns Vantage and the adjacent housing complex The View at Montgomery, said the developers built the second complex to combat a lack of on-campus housing provided by Temple University. “We see the growth in the university year over year, especially as it transitions from what was a commuter campus to what has become an urban university,” he said. “We just saw the continued need for good, quality housing with great amenities.” On-campus housing provided 5,045 beds for 29,732 undergraduate students, according to the 2017-18 Temple University Fact Book and University Housing and Residential Life documents. Freshmen accounted for 6,551 of those students. Trapper said Vantage is comparable to residence hall prices like Morgan Hall, where beds range from about $5,600 to $7,000 per semester. Bianca Anastasio, a freshman communication studies major, went to an

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

THE GOLDENBERG GROUP / COURTESY Vantage, an off-campus apartment complex set to open next year, will feature luxury amenities like community spaces and a sky lounge.

open house for Vantage on Thursday. She and her future roommates — Jenna Mermelstein, a freshman psychology major, and Emily Young, a freshman Spanish major — currently live in 1300 Residence Hall. They said they are considering living at Vantage because of the price. Emma Bunker, a sophomore marketing major, currently lives at The View. She will not pursue a lease at The View or Vantage, she said, because she believes her rent is expensive. “It’s easy to live here when it comes with furniture, and it’s a good transition from dorms to an apartment,” she said. “The cost is a big factor for me. It’s a little too high because I’m paying for it fully furnished.” Tom Rice, a general manager for Asset Campus Housing, which manages Vantage and The View, said security

measures at Vantage will be the same as The View — 24-hour desk monitoring, roaming security patrol and key-fob door locks. The Temple News reported in September that a false active shooter incident at The View revealed security staff did not properly follow its procedure. “We don’t want it to feel like a prison,” Trapper added. “At the same time, our residents are very important.” Community organizations in North Philadelphia, like the Yorktown Community Development Corporation, Paul L. Dunbar Elementary School and Bright Hope Baptist Church lobbied The Goldenberg Group for space in Vantage. Trapper said part of the ground floor is reserved for community use, but specifics are yet to be determined. “Our approach is, we don’t want to assume what the community needs,” he

said. “We’re still working on formulating that plan.” The space could be used for daycare services or resources for senior citizens, but the group is letting the community make the decision, Trapper added. The Yorktown CDC could not be reached for comment. Trapper said The Goldenberg Group tries to incorporate community outreach into its projects, like a recent book drive and job readiness workshop for community residents. Anastasio said living in an apartment complex that is involved with the community is important to her. “It’s definitely a bonus,” she said. “I think that’s great.” alyssa.biederman@temple.edu @BiedermanAlyssa

temple-news.com


NEWS PAGE 7

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

HEALTH

Doctors, officials take stand against gun violence

Temple officials join in on a national push by medical officials to address gun violence through public health solutions. BY JACK TALLMAN & GRETA ANDERSON For The Temple News Health professionals, including a Temple University Hospital medical officer, are speaking out against gun violence. Last week, the National Rifle Association tweeted to tell health professionals, namely the American College of Physicians, the world’s largest medical-specialty society, to “stay in their lane,” after several authored a position paper in the Annals of Internal Medicine calling for the United States to address firearm violence with public health-minded solutions. The tweet came before another mass shooting in Thousand Oaks, California, which raised the 2018 total to 307 acts of mass gun violence so far this year, according to the Gun Violence Archive, an ongoing database for shootings in the U.S. Medical professionals from public health institutions across the country replied to the NRA’s tweet with photos of bloody scrubs and operating rooms, arguing that gun violence is a health issue that lies “in their lane.” Dr. Tony Reed, a TUH associate chief medical officer, had spoken out earlier against gun violence in public spaces, predating the #ThisIsMyLane hashtag used by medical professionals. He wrote an article in the medical publication Health Affairs in October, calling for greater security and safety protocols in school buildings after his son’s former school was attacked by a gunman. His son attended Great Mills High School in southern Maryland. The gunman, who was a student at the school, shot and injured two students before being stopped by the school’s resource officer. The gunman died on the scene.

@TheTempleNews

MARISSA HOWE / THE TEMPLE NEWS Dr. Tony Reed, an associate chief medical officer at Temple University Hospital whose son’s high school was attacked by a gunman in March, works in his office on Oct. 30. He said he lobbied U.S. Congress to improve security at schools.

His son, Anderson, has since changed schools due to the trauma of the shooting. Even before the shooting at his son’s former school, Reed wrote that he had previously lobbied members of Congress to increase gun safety and advocate for improved security in schools. The shooting did not change Reed’s support for the Second Amendment, but brought the topic of gun safety into his reality. “I haven’t seen anything done,” Reed said. “I say this in both directions, for those who are advocates and those who are non-advocates: I don’t see anyone moving in any direction. I hear a lot of people talking. I hear a lot of people on each end of the spectrum saying it must be this way, but I see no change.” Reed grew up in Hughesville, Pennsylvania and was a hunter and gun owner. He wrote in Health Affairs that he supports responsible gun use. “But I feel just as strongly that we must ban civilian-owned assault-style rifles that serve no purpose but to destroy human flesh,” Reed wrote in the Health

Affairs article. Reed also called for more civilian precautions, including increased security in public buildings and trainings for active assailant practices like the Department of Homeland Security’s Run, Hide, Fight, which university officials utilize to teach their employees. He also supports trainings for “Stop the Bleed,” a campaign that teaches hemorrhage prevention and instructs civilians how to prevent death from blood loss. There has been a push on Main Campus to increase student and faculty readiness for active assailant situations through trainings and protocol advertisements. “When you’re looking at gun safety or gun violence, it’s more than law enforcement, it’s more than just judges, more than legislation, it’s a whole community that needs to come together,” said Charlie Leone, the executive director of Campus Safety Services. “Everything from people who are possessing the gun and how they keep

themselves safe with the gun and how to store it, to looking at the laws on gun ownership and permits, it’s real important for us as a community to look at every aspect,” Leone added. Leone said emergency protocol and building safety for active assailant situations are a campus-wide effort to reduce the risks of gun violence. He said Temple Police encourages students that if they “see something, say something” and report suspicious activity to TUPD. Junior political science and economics major Benjamin Aitoumeziane, who is the vice president of external affairs for the Temple College Democrats, said there are more ways the U.S. can prevent gun violence. “We can do better in this country,” Aitoumeziane said. “We’ve done better. We’ve sent a man to the moon. We’re a great nation in many ways. This is something that we’re trying to keep track of. Internationally, people are looking at us like, ‘What is going on over there?’” news@temple-news.com

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 8

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

EDITORIAL

It’s time to end Parliament Parliament, Temple Student Government’s representative branch, has existed for nearly two and a half years. But the branch has little to show for it. Parliament has not brought a single resolution to vote this semester, and is now mandated to propose at least 15 resolutions by Dec. 18. That’s five resolutions for each of its remaining meetings, a requirement that will certainly lead to arbitrary proposals with no implementation or substantial change in sight. The branch was created to “pass resolutions that express the opinions of the General Assembly on behalf of the student body.” This mission to involve more students in TSG was a valiant effort — but it’s one that has fallen flat on its face. Since its inception in Spring 2017, the branch has only passed 15 total resolutions, most of which have not come to fruition. Each semester since, it has passed fewer and fewer resolutions. It’s time for TSG to dissolve Parliament. It was never structured to be an effective body with valuable power. Although several student leaders have tried to fix the issues that plague the branch, those solutions have not been successful. Parliament first proudly voted to expand Tuttleman Counseling Services in January 2017, when the university already planned on moving services to a bigger space and hiring more full-time counselors. Walk-in hours, which could not support the number of students seeking counseling, have remained the same since Spring 2017. In Spring 2018, Parliament was limited by the branch’s constant impeachment proceedings. It only had one resolution to push the university to provide Narcan training to students. Parliament consolidated the speaker position and created committees to letters@temple-news.com

guide meetings and streamline proposals into action by the Executive Branch. It secured a separate budget for the body this semester. Both of these actions were initiated to ideally give Parliament separate authority and improve the body’s disfunction. Yet Parliament has decreased its accomplishments semester by semester, reaching Fall 2018, when its only public resolution prospect is to create an on-campus dog park, which has not even been considered due to more miscommunication between body members. Meeting times are spent by these student leaders to attempt to fix internal issues rather than to create change that the student body wants to see. Parliament spent the majority of this semester struggling to fill its seats and teaching new members how the body operates, tasks which should have been completed in the spring. Despite this, Parliament has reached Fall Break with seven seats still vacant. The recent criticism from the body’s Ethics Board and Executive Branch is well-deserved. It’s clear that an incomplete, ineffective Parliament is evidence of an apathetic student body. However, Parliament remains general students’ only option to participate in TSG. The body holds TSG’s only meetings open to the public, which includes listening to the ideas of the Temple community. While Parliament as it currently stands needs serious overhaul, it is meant to provide insight and accountability to the Executive Branch. Without resolutions, TSG lacks a clear idea of what its goals should be. This renders the entire body ineffective. TSG must rethink Parliament’s structure, and turn it into a branch that does something. As it stands, it’s a waste of time and money.

A LETTER TO THE EDITOR A former Temple football player reflects on the Owls’ performance from their road win against Houston on Saturday. Lots of play-action on first down, QB keepers and mostly pinpoint passing kept Houston off balance. It was an aggressive Temple football team that immediately took charge against a very good Houston team. Quickly, the coaching staff found that Houston’s Achilles heel was their missing all-American defensive tackle, Ed Oliver. Ryquell Armstead went to work amassing 210 yards on 30 rushes behind outstanding blocking. Oh, I almost forgot, he scored six touchdowns, too. Along the way, Ventell Bryant broke the Temple all-time receiving record and now has 2,319 yards. Defensively, we contained the explosive Houston offense pretty well. Blitzes from the get-go, a blocked punt and an assertive man-to-man pass coverage kept award-winning Houston quarterback D’Eriq King as under control as possible. With 10 minutes, 22 seconds left in the game, we had a three-touchdown lead and it was time to relax, right? Not on your life. In previous weeks, we had great coaching for 30 minutes, last week for 45 minutes and last night for 50 minutes. We’re improving. Don’t get me wrong, it was a marvelous win — one that should get us some top-25 votes. If we win out, there’s a possibility we could end the season ranked. (It’s a hell of a long way from when I thought we might not win a game after losing to Buffalo and Villanova.) So there are 10 minutes left against Houston, and we’re up 21 points. On offense, there’s a dilemma. Do we run the ball and the clock, or do we maintain our aggressive play calling and do some

play-action on first down? Well, we did throw some, but it was our run calls that got too conservative. They were mostly just straight down Broad Street, and then we’re giving the ball right back to Houston. But it’s the defense I totally didn’t understand. Why in the world were we still playing man-to-man pass coverage? Our pass defenders were dog tired, and we lost one of our best to a dubious targeting call. (The penalties mostly evened out, though.) In that situation, we should be rushing four and playing various protective zones with the other seven guys, and there should always be a deep safety, last-resort guy. Instead, we got beat for two cheap touchdowns on 30-some yard passes. They should have been held to short-yardage gains, which would have exhausted the clock. Three other things as I nitpick. We still cover three wideouts with two pass defenders and a half of a linebacker who cheats that way. If I was throwing against that alignment, I’d go down the field with 10-yard passes. (Don’t let South Florida see this write up.) Our coverage on the onside kick was terrible, and we wasted timeouts on a field goal, punt and kickoff. (I’m so glad we didn’t need them.) However, we’re 6-4, with a chance to go 8-4. The growth of this team has been remarkable and noticed by everyone connected to college football. Tally-Ho! Dave “Fizzy” Weinraub is a 1961 Temple football player. He lives in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. He can be reached at dweinraub1@ comcast.net.

temple-news.com


OPINION

PAGE 9

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

HEALTH

Don’t let misinformation stop your vaccination A columnist argues that people during the 2017-18 flu season, the CDC should stay informed about the reported a record 172 flu-related deaths in children. About 80 percent of those health benefits of vaccines. Vaccines given to infants and children in the past 20 years will prevent 322 million illnesses and 732,000 deaths in their lifetimes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in 2014. Vaccines will have also saved more than $1.3 trillion in societal costs over that time, according to the CDC. You’d think it would make sense to listen to decades CHRISTINA of proven medical MITCHELL research that shows how effective vaccines are. But somehow it’s become a trend to question their safety and necessity. It’s important we communicate with our doctors to avoid misinformation and get our vaccines so we’re taking advantage of monumental medicine and keeping ourselves and others healthy. The lack of education and conspiracy theories from “anti-vaxxers” are taking us back about 200 years, and people are confusing fact with fiction. Those beliefs are also deadly —

who died were not vaccinated for that season. This September, the Mayo Clinic wrote that this year’s flu shot will protect against three to four of the influenza viruses circulating the 2018-19 flu season. One of the anti-vaxxers’ common misconceptions is that natural immunity is better than vaccine-acquired immunity. But the risks of natural infection are greater than the risks of immunization for all recommended vaccines, according to the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. If you want to become naturally immune to a disease, that can only happen if you get and survive the disease, according to the United States Department of Health and Human Services. This increases the risk that you could infect others. But with a vaccine, you get a relatively harmless version of the disease, and you don’t risk infecting others. This trains your body to fight off the real disease when it comes along. For example, the number of measles cases every year in the U.S. ranged from 300,000 to 800,000 from 1950-63, according to the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. A measles vaccine was licensed in 1963, and the number of

CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

annual cases dropped to 22,000 by 1968. While very few children get sick after vaccines, the anti-vaccination trend is egged on by parents who believe that a vaccine is the cause for some unrelated health problem their child has soon after immunization, said Stefan Keller, a Temple University social and behavioral sciences professor. And it’s important to know severe vaccine side effects are actually very rare, according to the Institute of Medicine.

“[A child is] diagnosed around the same time as a child is being consistently vaccinated, but this is just a coincidence, and the vaccines are not the cause for the disease,” Keller said. It’s easy to point fingers at doctors and the vaccines they administer, but unless you’re a medical professional, you can’t be certain what causes an illness. Keller added that fraudulent publications also contribute to misconceptions about vaccines. He pointed to a 1998 study that falsely linked vaccines and autism. “People only believed it because it was published in a high-quality medical journal,” Keller said. “They created conspiracy theories that the pharmaceutical companies were behind it and trying to earn a profit.” Ten of the 12 co-authors of that study soon retracted their data, and the original publisher fully retracted the study in 2010. Keller said he doesn’t know any experts in the field who believe you shouldn’t get vaccinated. Vaccines have helped the medical community reach milestones and saved hundreds of millions of lives. Without proper education, irrational fears can get in the way of everyone’s safety. christina.mitchell@temple.edu

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OPINION

PAGE 10

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

THE ESSAYIST

Brockhampton turned my story into songs A student reflects on his first concert and how the music helps him process his emotions. BY TYLER PEREZ Lead Columnist There’s something absolutely blissful about attending your first concert. Even among the pandemonium of mosh pits and the havoc of high-octane hip-hop songs, the euphoric feeling of that first experience is unmistakable. Those 90 minutes of felicity can’t be replicated, and I experienced that feeling when I saw Brockhampton last month with my best friend. I started listening to Brockhampton almost two years ago, and since then, I’ve been absolutely in love with the group. As a diverse collective of singers, rappers and producers from all walks of life, Brockhampton writes songs about the chaos of youth, the labyrinth of selfunderstanding and the dreamy danger of love — experiences that beautifully resonate with the turbulent ocean of emotions I feel every day. The precise ability of Brockhampton to channel my unique life experiences into a song is what made me beyond ecstatic to see them perform. I bought presale tickets months in advance the minute they were available and started counting down the days, impatiently awaiting the moment I’d finally see Brockhampton live on stage. Without a doubt, the wait was worth it. When the group’s frontman, Kevin Abstract, took the stage to perform the opening number, “WEIGHT,” while shrouded in dim lighting and backed by a gorgeous string section, I could already feel extreme elation come over me. The song is about the psychological pressures of young adulthood and Abstract’s struggle to come to terms with his sexuality. It was exhilarating for me

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EMMA STEVENS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

as someone who has gone through the same turmoil. When Brockhampton performed “BLEACH” and “TONYA,” I got the same feeling of comfort from hearing the members sing about their struggles with mental health, self-acceptance and broken relationships — narratives I’d been dealing with during the months leading up to the show. That experience of hearing your stories being told by your role model — singing your life story back to you — lets you know you are not alone in feeling those things. But for each moment of introspection, there was a mosh-pitinducing, high-octane rap song to match it. And it was during these songs that I

truly felt free. During uptempo tracks like “NEW ORLEANS,” “STAR” and “SWAMP,” I found myself dancing and singing along — two things I almost never do in public. It felt like Brockhampton was emancipating me from the chains of my social anxiety, restraints that had prevented me from enjoying myself in public places for years. And those moments of true liberation continued as I unapologetically danced and sang along to songs like “GOLD,” “SWEET” and “FABRIC” like no one was watching. The concert came to an end after “FABRIC.” The crowd roared asking for an encore, and I joined it. But as much as I wanted one last song, I didn’t need it. Those 90 minutes of bliss were

enough to make me feel whole at a time when my mental health was going downhill, at a time when listening to Brockhampton became my security blanket of familiarity and comfort. Those songs became the unofficial soundtrack to my life. Hearing my role models perform them before my eyes was truly unimaginable. During those 90 minutes, all of the stress in my life — worries about myself, my classes, my social anxiety and anything else that was weighing me down — had vanished. And replacing those anxieties were feelings of joy, belongingness and most importantly, bliss. tyler.perez@temple.edu @perezodent

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OPINION

PAGE 11

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

POLITICS

Leaders: Prevent heartache, regulate firearms It’s time that policymakers listen and enact gun control laws.

On Thursday, a gunman opened fire in a Southern California bar and country music venue, killing 12 people. He was found dead inside the bar, apparently from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, CBS News reported. Last month, a gunman killed 11 people and injured six others worshipping at a synagogue in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh. Since a gunman killed 26 children and adults at Sandy KERRY LYSTER Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012, nearly 2,000 more mass shootings have occurred in the United States in places like movie theaters, churches, schools and concerts, Vox reported. I can’t help but wonder why our policymakers aren’t doing anything to ensure the safety of the American people. Students, families and many others have been calling on our leaders for too long, asking for regulations on selling and owning firearms. It’s time for them to listen. The shooting in Southern California was the 307th mass shooting in America this year in 311 days. This means there’s almost an average of one horrific occurrence each day, USA Today reported. A mass shooting includes 3 or more shooting victims, not including the shooter, and is not related to gangs, drugs or organized crime, according to the Stanford Mass Shootings of America data project, which began in 2012. As a country, we can’t sit back and be OK with so much heartbreak. We need more thorough background checks and more restrictions on semiautomatic weapons and assault rifles. As the mass production of AR-15 style weapons increases, so will the death toll. Christina Borst, a junior strategic @TheTempleNews

This year’s deadliest mass shootings to date

Each circle represents a mass shooting that happened between Jan. 1 and Nov. 12, 2018 — the size indicates the number of people killed in each shooting. Trenton, New Jersey

The Gun Violence Archive defines a mass shooting as one with at least four people shot or killed, not including the shooter.

June 17, 2018 Killed: 1 Injured: 19 Thousand Oaks, California

Pompano Beach (Parkland), Flordia

Nov. 7, 2018 Killed: 13 Injured: 2

Feb. 14, 2018 Killed: 17 Injured: 17

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Oct. 27, 2018 Killed: 11 Injured: 7 Santa Fe, Texas May 18, 2018 Killed: 10 Injured: 13 Source: Gun Violence Archive Mass Shootings in 2018 Database

communication and political science major and the president of Temple College Democrats, said America desperately needs stricter gun laws. “Typically, when an issue arises in politics and in our social landscape… we’re supposed to implement change and make policies to try to improve upon that,” Borst added. “How many more mass shootings have to happen before something changes?” I wish we didn’t have to ask that. It seems like protecting our right to own guns and defending the Second Amendment is more important than keeping people safe. Even the president resorts to victim blaming and defending firearms. After the Pittsburgh shooting, President Donald Trump told reporters, “If there was an armed guard inside the temple, they would have been able to

stop him.” James Lammendola, a legal studies professor and former defense lawyer in Philadelphia, said Trump’s remarks were “an excuse not to make reasonable restrictions on firearm use.” “If a mad gunman with a plan is going to storm any building, I think it would be unlikely that even an armed guard would be able to stop a person that was using the element of surprise,” Lammendola said. Instead of pointing to what could’ve been done, our leaders should be coming up with ways to reduce firearm-related casualties. We are losing innocent lives, after all. British journalist Dan Hodges tweeted, “In retrospect, Sandy Hook marked the end of the U.S. gun control debate. Once America decided killing children was bearable, it was over.”

JULIE CHRISTIE / THE TEMPLE NEWS

Hodges tweeted this in 2015, two days after a gunman killed nine people in a Charleston, South Carolina, church. So far, he has been right about this. But it can’t be over. We have to keep advocating for reform by voting for candidates who actually care about our safety. We need to keep pushing lawmakers with walk-outs, protests and other activism until they realize we don’t want to keep living in fear of these random acts of terror. It’s sad that we live in a country where an issue that affects so many people is dismissed. I’d hate to see our country become the world leader in killings and hate crimes. And I can’t bear to see another dreadful headline. I’ll keep hoping for the U.S. to become a safer place to live, and I won’t be quiet until it happens. kerry.lyster@temple.edu

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OPINION PAGE 12

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

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TURKEY STUFFING CRANBERRY SAUCE MASHED POTATOES GRAVY SWEET POTATOES HAM PUMPKIN PIE GREEN BEANS CORN SQUASH

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8. Reaping what you sow

6. Hot apple _____

9. Pattern for lumberjacks and hipsters

7. Colorful foliage

10. Equal night and day 11. Tree tourism 12. Fruit fresh off the branch 13. Labyrinth of plants 14. Wizard of Oz and Batman character 15. A Starbucks favorite

Answers from Tuesday, November 6: 1. FIFA, 2. Super Bowl, 3. Golden State Warriors, 4. Home run, 5. Shuttlecock, 6. Michael Jordan, 7. Touchdown, 8. World Series, 9. David Beckham, 10. Heisman trophy, 11. Serena Williams, 12. Penalty Kick, 13. Mia Hamm, 14. Olympics, 15. Free throw

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FEATURES TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

PAGE 13

STUDENT LIFE

Instagram account showcases campus diversity The account tells students’ stories in a “Humans of New York” style. BY EMMA PADNER For The Temple News

E

very day students on campus buy lunch at The Wall, lounge in Founder’s Garden and socialize at the Bell Tower. But Jeremy Elvas wanted to know more about them. At the beginning of the school year, the freshman journalism major remembered a photography project he did in high school that was based off photographer Brandon Stanton’s “Humans of New York” enterprise. Stanton photographs and interviews ordinary people on the streets of New York City to share their often-emotional stories. “Doing that project in my high school really allowed me to understand people of different skin colors, different sexual orientations, different genders,” Elvas said. “Since Temple has a really diverse student body, I thought, ‘Why not continue it here?’” Elvas launched “Owls of Temple University,” an Instagram page where he shares photos of Temple students with quotations from them. “I just started going up to random strangers that I see,” he said. “I get scared at first, but then what I learned is you just have to go up to them, smile, introduce yourself and explain what the project is.” He usually approaches people sitting by themselves who don’t look too busy. People have generally been receptive to the project, and no one has rejected an interview yet, Elvas said. Elvas interviewed freshman architecture major Parker Goldberg last month. Goldberg, who attended Cheltenham High School in Montgomery County with Elvas, reached out to be featured on the page because they were

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LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Freshman journalism major Jeremy Elvas (right) interviews sophomore engineering technology major Alique Douglas at Founder’s Garden on Wednesday.

glad Elvas brought the project with him to college. Goldberg said the project shows the diversity of Temple’s campus and how anyone walking down the street can be an interesting person. “The photography is just incredible to me, how he can form a photo with just one person and really tell their story,” Goldberg added. Other students have made spin-offs of Stanton’s project in the past. In 2014, a student created a “Humans of Temple University” Facebook page featuring professors, students and former football coach Matt Rhule. It hasn’t been active since March 2017. Sophomore film and media arts major Alo Barrantes said the attention he

received from being featured in Elvas’ project connected him with people who saw the post. “I look for connections because I’m a film major,” he said. “I’ve had people follow me on Instagram and ask me about what I do because of this.” Jenna Lam, a senior film and media arts major, said “Owls of Temple University” creates a sense of community on Main Campus. “We get so caught up in our own schedules and our own departments, we don’t really branch out,” Lam said. “But with something like ‘Owls of Temple,’ it allows us to see people who are a different year, different major, different experience and just really see the humanity of it all, versus seeing the same people we

see every day.” Elvas hopes the page will continue to grow and bring students closer together. He said it’s easy to meet different kinds of people on Main Campus, where students come from other countries to convene in one of the most diverse cities on the East Coast. “I just want to capture that and showcase how special the students who go to Temple are,” Elvas added. emma.padner@temple.edu @emmapadner

Editor’s note: Jeremy Elvas is a freelance photographer for The Temple News. He had no role in the reporting or editing of this story.

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FEATURES PAGE 14

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

LIVE IN PHILLY

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS

Reading Terminal Market brings traditional Filipino dishes and music to Philly The second annual A Taste of the Philippines food and arts festival took place at Reading Terminal Market on 12th Street near Arch on Sunday. The Philippine American Chamber of Commerce of Pennsylvania and Southern New Jersey and the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival hosted the event. The festival featured films, traditional Filipino music and authentic Filipino cuisine. “We have coffee, dried mangos wrapped in chocolate and peanuts covered in a local chocolate called cacao,” said Susan del Mundo, the tourism attaché in the Philippine Tourism Center’s New York office. Filipino chef Yana Gilbuena hosted a private cooking demonstration, giving ticket holders an exclusive look into the preparation of Kulawo, a Filipino delicacy made with meat, vegetables and coconut milk. “Remember, you have to always taste as you go,” Gilbuena said, as she added Thai chilis to her pan of ingredients. Carmen Greenwood, a 2010 human resources management and 2016 sport business master’s alumna, has visited the Philippines and stopped by the event to revisit fond memories from her trip. “I really enjoyed the food when I was there,” she said. “I love food overall, and since this is a country I went to, I wanted to come out and be able to enjoy it again.” features@temple-news.com

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FEATURES PAGE 15

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

ALUMNI

Blind journalist awarded for horse therapy film The 2017 journalism master’s alumnus won the Inclusion Award at the CAMMY Awards for his film about horse therapy. BY MILLY MCKINNISH For The Temple News It started with an article in The New York Times. The piece was about goalball, a popular sport for people with blindness similar to soccer. Players stay on their hands and knees and aim to throw a basketball-sized ball with bells inside into the opposing team’s goal. After the 1990 article published, 2017 master’s of journalism alumnus David Block decided to start telling deeper stories in a more visual way by making documentaries — despite being blind. “I had done as much as I could with goalball, and now I wanted to make a film on it,” Block said. “That’s where everything got going.” Block is legally blind, which means he can see an object 20 feet away that a person with unimpaired vision can see at 200 feet away. Block, 55, was born with congenital cataracts, so his lenses were cloudy and had to be removed. But that hasn’t stopped him from pursuing a successful journalism career. Block has directed and produced eight documentaries and written more than 1,500 articles, covering everything from the Penn Relays to jazz musicians. His documentary “Gift Horses,” won the Inclusion Award at the CAMMY Awards last month. Run by PhillyCAM, a nonprofit community-run public access media organization that promotes creative expression, democratic values and civic participation, the CAMMY Awards recognize creatives whose content reflects these principles. “Winning the award for ‘Gift Horses’ made me feel better than my antidepressants,” Block said. In the documentary, Block shows how horse therapy can have positive

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physical and emotional effects for people with disabilities. According to the Ismael Pinto Equine Therapy Association, a nonprofit in Spain, horse therapy can increase muscle tone, self-esteem, attention span and social interactions. Block visited several Pennsylvania equestrian centers to interview horse owners and riders for the film, including Thorncroft Equestrian Center in Malvern, Pennsylvania, where he used to ride horses. One person in the documentary who has cerebral palsy learned to walk after horse therapy, while a person with autism spoke for the first time. Block said his blindness makes him more compassionate for other people with disabilities. “I have had similar experiences not being treated well, not getting along in society, feeling awkward,” Block said. “It gave me a special empathy for them that I may not have had if I weren’t disabled. It’s a special bond.” He doesn’t let his visual impairment affect his creative process and doesn’t use special equipment during the filmmaking process. He hires people to shoot and edit the footage while he reviews it and transcribes interviews. “I’ve been legally blind my entire life,” Block said. “I can’t compare it to seeing perfectly because I was never able to see perfectly.” Some of his former professors noted Block’s passion and dedication to reporting. “He always had a real interest in the ways which journalism and nonfiction storytelling can highlight undertold stories and stories that illuminated a broader human condition,” said journalism professor Brian Creech. Media studies production professor Clemencia Rodríguez taught Block in a class that focused on community-based media like PhillyCAM. “[Block] connected with the idea that community media are media technologies for people who have generally been marginalized from media produc-

tion,” Rodríguez said. “It was very interesting for him to explore and reflect on people with disabilities and their access to technology as media producers.” Before attending Temple, Block worked for more than 25 years as a journalist and interviewed celebrities like Caitlyn Jenner and Sammy Skobel, a legally blind roller derby player popular in the 1940s and 50s. Block said his piece on Skobel is his greatest career accomplishment. It was one of the four stories Block had published in The New York Times. Making the jump from print to multimedia journalism came naturally, he said. Block realized once people finish reading a newspaper, they forget what

they read five minutes later. “If you put the images on the screen, people will remember the images longer,” Block said. “It’s ironic that a halfblind guy would have that idea, but it makes sense. Seeing is believing.” Block now plans to focus on publishing two books, one explaining the 613 Mitzvot, or commandments of Judaism, and a collection of fictional short stories about people with blindness. “I’ve made eight documentaries to date,” Block said. “I have no children, but I would say those films are the closest things to children I have ever had.” melissamckinnish@temple.edu

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FEATURES PAGE 16

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

ALUMNI

Trailblazer, trustee pens memoir on law career Nelson Díaz, the first Latino to be admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar Association, wrote a memoir about his career. BY TYRA BROWN For The Temple News Judge Nelson Díaz wasn’t sure about his decision when he first enrolled at Temple University. He realized no Puerto Rican had ever graduated from Beasley School of Law and no Latino had been admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar Association. “That was a pretty shocking experience for me as I entered the law school,” said Díaz, a 1972 law alumnus who is Puerto Rican. The late former university president Peter Liacouras, a law professor at the time, contacted Díaz after noticing his participation in a New York City-based program for minorities interested in law school. He convinced Díaz that studying law at Temple was the right choice, and Díaz moved to Philadelphia. “He said that they had a wonderful Latino community in Philadelphia and that I would be a wonderful contribution to Philadelphia,” said Díaz, who served on the Court of Common Pleas until 1993. “He sold me a bill of goods, and I bought it.” Díaz, who serves on the Board of Trustees, wrote “Not from Here, Not from There/No Soy de Aquí ni de Allá,” an autobiography about his life, career milestones and advocacy work in Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia. Díaz became the first Latino to pass the Pennsylvania bar exam in 1972 and the first Latino judge in Pennsylvania history in 1981. Díaz’s success on the exam came after Liacouras, who served as dean of the Beasley School of Law from 1973-82 and later as university president, and other members of the Philadelphia Bar Association Special Committee on Pennsylvania Bar Admission Procedures concluded that the exam was discriminatory. They found the State Board of Law Examiners intentionally discriminatfeatures@temple-news.com

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS Trustee and 1972 law alumnus Nelson Diaz reads his recently released memoir at a conversation and book signing event at Shusterman Hall on Thursday.

ed against African-Americans, so they changed exam procedures to remove biases against minorities in 1971 and 1972. Díaz said he wants his book, which Temple University Press published in September, to teach people not to give up. At age 15, he couldn’t read or write proficiently in English and experienced poverty and violence in West Harlem. Díaz’s mother and his community helped him focus on school. His grades improved, and he got accepted to St. John’s University in Queens, New York, where he graduated with honors in 1969. “Education is the only equalizer for anyone,” he said. “If people can realize that at age 15, just because you have some difficulties, if you put your mind to something, there is nothing impossible for you to achieve.” Trustee Daniel Polett, who has known Díaz for about 30 years, said Díaz’s book is interesting because of his incredible background. “When reading, you get to learn about the challenges he faced and his

continuous persistence to overcome these challenges,” Polett said. Díaz, a partner at Philadelphia-based law firm Dilworth Paxson LLP, is known for his advocacy work in court reform, energy, housing and economic development. He is a founding member and officer at the Latino Corporate Directors Association, a Washington, D.C.-based organization that provides professional development to Latinos interested in joining corporate boards. “I personally cannot benefit from many things because of my age, but I can still strive to open doors that haven’t been opened in the past for individuals,” Díaz said. He added he tries to better the university, like encouraging Temple officials to admit students who don’t have high standardized test scores. “I would have never thought about law school because my SAT scores were terrible, so giving kids a chance who do not have the highest score but have the motivation to work is what we are looking for,” he added. “We want to give

these kids a chance that they will not get anywhere else.” Díaz has received several awards, like the Philadelphia Bar Association’s Justice Sonia Sotomayor Diversity Award in 2015. “He is a very compassionate man,” Polett said. “He is always trying to make sure that everything is fair and equal.” Stephen Levin, Díaz’s friend for 39 years and a former co-worker at the now-closed Philadelphia firm Wolf, Block, Schorr and Solis-Cohen, said Díaz has always inspired him. “I know how difficult it was for him to accomplish what he has and how he had to overcome these obstacles,” said Levin, a 1970 liberal arts alumnus. Díaz hopes to pass along the same kindness and support he received when he was a student and young professional. “There could be more people like me if someone goes after one person like Peter went after me,” Díaz said. tyra.brown@temple.edu

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FEATURES PAGE 17

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

ALUMNI

Educational children’s show diversifies cartoons

In a study of more than 1,500 ani- character who learned lessons like resistA 2007 theater alumnus children. Clark wrote “Prada Enchilada” is pitching a kids’ show to in 2012 and launched his company three mated children’s characters, only 5.6 ing peer pressure. While Cosby’s show percent were African-American, accord- centered on teaching kids about love, companies like Disney and PBS. years later.

BY KYRA MILLER For The Temple News When Davon Clark read his self-published children’s book at local schools, he was often asked which company sent him. But the 2007 Temple University theater alumnus made the visits on his own because of his passion for children’s education. Now, he’s pitching an educational children’s animated series to major television networks, like Disney, Nickelodeon and PBS Kids. “I used to teach in the school system, and I found a lack of kids wanting to learn, especially when it came to literacy,” said Clark, who has worked as a substitute teacher in Philadelphia and Camden, New Jersey. “I want kids to be able to comprehend and not just memorize.” Clark’s children’s book series, “The Adventures of Prada Enchilada,” inspired his children’s multimedia company ADC Kid, which aims to make educational content accessible and fun for

The main characters are the dog Prada Enchilada and the cat Mimi Tortellini, both of whom are 7 years old. Olli the Owl is an 8-year-old who always throws off Prada and Mimi by causing trouble. The characters go on many adventures like exploring the solar system, traveling the seven continents and going to the mall. Clark felt inspired to take his brainchild a step further and turn “Prada Enchilada” into an animated show after receiving positive feedback from kids and teachers at the schools. Geared toward children ages 3-6, the “Prada Enchilada” animated series aims to help viewers identify objects, learn basic math and fun facts. There are four episode scripts and one seven-minute, 40-second clip from the first episode that was released. Clark said he hopes to finish the rest of the pilot episode using an online crowdfunding campaign on Seed & Spark. “As an African-American, we see ourselves in animation, but behind the scenes, they weren’t created by us,” Clark said.

ing to the news outlet The Conversation. But Black people account for 13.4 percent of the population. To make “Prada Enchilada,” Clark reached out to his friends Marquiz Moore, a 2010 theater alumnus, and Marion Toro, a 2008 theater and English alumnus, about two years ago. Toro, who voices Mimi, said she was ready to jump right in when Clark reached out about the show. “I am proud to be a part of a project that is setting a new level and that someone took time and believed in me,” Toro said. “I get to be my authentic self. I love that [Mimi] helps me bring about joy, and I hope that I can bring about joy to someone else’s world.” Moore is equally pleased to voice his character. “[Prada] is always excited,” he said. “He is excited to learn, he loves making new friends, he loves showing people how to do things as well.” Clark said his show takes a different approach from Bill Cosby’s “Little Bill,” a kid’s show that ran from 1999-2004 and featured an African-American main

JOSH RUSZAS Sophomore marketing major

VOICES

What kid’s show did you learn the most from growing up and what did it teach you?

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‘Sesame Street’ because it taught me how to use my imagination and to share with others.

compassion and morality, Clark intends to focus more on math, fun facts and increasing literacy, Clark said. “While ‘Little Bill’ was an African-American show, it wasn’t focused on education,” Moore said. “To hit that milestone is a great thing and a blessing to do.” For Clark, it’s just as important to represent diversity behind the scenes as it is on screen. He said people of color need to know they can work in media fields. “It’s important for people to see themselves so that they know that they can do it too,” Clark added. “That’s the point of doing ‘Prada Enchilada.’” So far, ADC Kids raised more than $8,200 toward its $25,000 goal. The fundraiser ends on Nov. 23. “This is definitely going to be a great stepping stone for not just me, but for my other cast members as well,” Moore said. “Just to pursue our passions is amazing.” kyramariemiller@temple.edu @kyramariemiller

CECE GEORGE Freshman criminal justice major ‘Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood’ because Mr. Rogers was that man. What I learned the most was being neighborly. … It’s kindness, being nice, honesty.

NOZOMI HUNTER Freshman global studies major

MATAIA JORDAN Freshman criminal justice major

‘The Backyardigans.’ It taught me a lot of creativity because the characters were very adventurous each episode, and teamwork because they would always work together.

‘Barney and Friends’ because it taught me how to be friendly to others and share. It just taught me the necessary things I needed to know. features@temple-news.com


INTERSECTION PAGE 18

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

The deaf/hard of hearing edition JEREMIAH REARDON / THE TEMPLE NEWS

ACCESSIBILITY

Interpreters assist students in classes, meetings Temple’s Disability Resources and Services has seven interpreters for students. BY KATE NEWDECK For The Temple News Andrea Dressner was a teenager when she first taught herself American Sign Language. She developed slight hearing loss and decided to study the language in case the hearing loss grew worse. While Dressner’s hearing eventually stabilized, her pursuit of ASL only grew. “Many years later, I was at a religious convention and I saw someone signing and I found it really fascinating,” Dressner said. “Then, there was a girl at my congregation who needed someone to interpret for her, and her parents didn’t sign at all, so I did what I could to help and just fully immersed myself in the language.” Dressner is one of seven interpreters working at Temple’s Disability Resources and Services. Four students currently use their interpreting services. Dressner and the other interpreters accompany the students to classes, meetings and other events where ASL translation is needed. With the help of the interpreters, deaf students can take part in conversations or lectures that they cannot hear. The DRS Interpreters are provided to students for free for academic-related purposes, but students must submit their course schedules to DRS at least eight weeks before the start of the semester. If students need interpreters to intersection@temple-news.com

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS Janessa Carter, an Africology and African American Studies major, signs “I love Temple.” Carter, who is deaf, is a full-time behavioral support aid for children at the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf.

accompany them to an event or meeting, they must submit a request at least seven days before the event. Additionally, if a DRS interpreter is unavailable to translate at the requested time, DRS will find the student an outside interpreter for free. Susan Gottesman, who has been interpreting at Temple for 18 years and earned a bachelor’s degree in speech pathology from Rutgers University in 1986, said she, “just kind of fell in love with sign language.” She said becoming an interpreter required her to learn skills that went beyond the language itself. She added that there was a long time before ASL was recognized as a legitimate language at all, and not just a communication system. It is starting to be considered a foreign language in high schools and colleges, she said. A Modern Language Association

report from February found that ASL was the third-most popular language studied on college campuses in fall 2016. Gottesman said that while the ASL program expanded quickly, it is still not considered part of the College of Liberal Arts, which houses foreign languages. Students take ASL through the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders in the College of Public Health. Emily Donati is a freelance interpreter and interprets for DRS. She said her schedule is unpredictable when she is freelancing. “You don’t always know what your schedule is going to look like,” she said. “You kind of have to be flexible and ready to change your schedule pretty rapidly.” Donati added that when Temple students have an ongoing class request, her schedule can be more consistent. Donati has been an interpreter at

Temple since 2013 and forms bonds with students here. When she freelances, she sees so many people that she may not have a chance to form a connection. She added that while she enjoyed studying ASL, she didn’t initially think of it as a career path. “When I stopped studying it, I realized how much I missed it, so I went back to get a degree,” Donati said. Donati earned an associates degree in applied science in ASL and English Interpreting from the Community College of Philadelphia in 2011. The interpreters said they run into some language difficulties of their own. Dressner said interpreting complicated lesson plans is a big challenge she faces. “It’s difficult to sign information and terms that you don’t know,” Dressner said. “One of my greatest challenges is understanding some of the more complex source material.” Some professors explain the class material to her or give her access to the lesson beforehand. For classes that last for two or more hours, interpreters can rotate to give each other breaks. Dressner has now been interpreting for DRS for 18 years and loves her work. “I never looked back,” Dressner added. “I feel like I’m giving back to the community and am doing something unique that a lot of people don’t know how to do.” kate.newdeck@temple.edu

temple-news.com HANNAH BURNS / THE TEMPLE NEWS


INTERSECTION PAGE 19

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

ACCESSIBILITY

ASL professors explain Temple’s deaf community People who are deaf are proud of their identity and do not try to assimilate to hearing culture. BY CLAIRE WOLTERS Intersection Editor

All three American Sign Language instructors at Temple University are deaf. But that does not mean they are limited in their modes of communication. In the classroom and in their daily lives, Jonathan Hartmann, Melanie Drolsbaugh and Dana Zeuggin communicate through ASL, body language, lip reading, drawing, writing and assistive technology devices. People who are deaf or hard of hearing are labeled “disabled” under the Americans with Disabilities Act to receive accommodations, like ASL interpreters and protections against disability-based discrimination. “Culturally, we’re not disabled,” said Hartmann, the director of Temple’s ASL certificate program. “But from a medical perspective…we have to have that label, ‘disabled,’ even though we don’t want it.” “People who don’t know sign language, they’re disabled,” said Drolsbaugh, a professor in the ASL certificate program in the College of Public Health. Drolsbaugh described the deaf and hard of hearing community as a second culture or world. Rather than trying to assimilate into hearing culture, the professors said many deaf people are proud of their separate cultural identity. A 2007 article in The Chronicle Review found that in the past 30 years, deaf scholars and activists view deafness as people belonging to a “linguistic minority,” instead of people who are “hearing-impaired.” “We don’t like the term ‘hearingimpaired’ because that focuses on what the lack is,” Zeuggin, an ASL instructor, added. “There’s a lot of pride in using ‘deaf’ or ‘hard of hearing.’” Janessa Carter is a part-time Africology and African American Studies major who is deaf. She also works as a full-time behavioral support @TheTempleNews

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS Jonathan Hartmann (right) the director of the American Sign Language Certificate program at Temple, signs with ASL professor Dana Zeuggin. Hartmann and Zeuggin are both deaf.

aid for preschoolers at the Pennsylvania School for the deaf in Penn-Knox. To communicate with people who do not use ASL, Carter uses interpreters, emails, texting and other forms of communication. “I read lips, I can speak for myself. …I haven’t really had any problems,” Carter said. “Sometimes, I do wish I had more of that contact.” Carter falls in the minority of deaf individuals who are also born to deaf parents. Both her mother and father are deaf, which she said prepared her for the challenges she would later overcome in life. More than 90 percent of deaf children are born to hearing parents, according to the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders. If these children are not sufficiently taught ASL or receive cochlear implants, the professors said they may identify with the hearing community. Cochlear implants are electronic devices that provide sound signals to the brain, according to the NIDCD. Zueggin said there used to be a lot of controversy surrounding cochlear

implants, but they are more accepted now. The controversy comes from the idea that using a cochlear implant prohibits people from being fully immersed in either the deaf or hearing world. None of the professors use cochlear implants. They added that deaf people may choose not to wear the devices if they find them ineffective or are content without hearing. Emily Brown, a junior psychology major pursuing an ASL certificate, wrote a research paper on cochlear implants. “You think, if you’re hearing, ‘Why wouldn’t you want to hear?’” Brown said. She added that she sees things differently now. Learning ASL helps Brown interact with the deaf community. She had a lively interaction with a deaf family at the Philadelphia Eagles’ Super Bowl parade in February. The family was using ASL to mock Brown and her friends, signing that they thought the group was drunk. Brown said jumped right in, joking and signing that she was sober. “It’s easy to be more inclusive,” she added. A deaf culture has yet to come to

Temple, Drolsbaugh said, but a small community is growing. Students can get involved in clubs like Talking Hands, a student organization that silent dinners to practice ASL and discuss deaf culture. Drolsbaugh said that some CODAs — or Children of Deaf Adults — belong to Temple’s deaf community. These are students who can hear, but ASL is their first language and deafness is their first culture. Carter said that a common mistake hearing people make when interacting with someone who is deaf is talking loudly. She added that the louder someone speaks will not make it easier for her to hear them. She reiterated that deaf people are not different than those who can hear. “Deaf people, we’re just like hearing people,” Carter said. “We work hard, we have dreams, we work hard to make our dreams come true just like hearing people.” “We have a little more challenges in our lives, but we get through it,” she added. clairewolters@temple.edu @clairewolters

intersection@temple-news.com


INTERSECTION PAGE 20

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

ACCESSIBILITY

Students, professors discuss deaf accessibility Professors discuss how majority appropriate departments on campus deaf institutions compare to to remove the barrier or to find ways to accommodate individuals who are Main Campus. BY LAUREN REMY For The Temple News When reflecting on his time at both majority-hearing and majority-deaf institutions, Jonathan Hartmann said the ease and accessibility at majority-deaf institutions was an unrivaled experience. Hartmann, the director of the American Sign Language certificate program at Temple University, attended both Bucks County Community College and Gallaudet University as an undergraduate. Bucks is a majority-hearing college in the Philadelphia suburbs, while Gallaudet is a majority-deaf and hard-ofhearing university in Washington, D.C. “I could talk to everybody and I didn’t have to go through anybody with an interpreter,” Hartmann said about his time at Gallaudet University. “It was just direct contact with everybody.” Hearing students are accustomed to initiating or overhearing quick verbal exchanges and small talk, but deaf and hard-of-hearing students may be unable to engage in these things in all-hearing environments. “I really had to force myself to leave [Gallaudet] because it was so wonderful,” Hartmann said. At Bucks County Community College, he said there were few accommodations for deaf students, and he struggled to make friends. His professor was also his interpreter, and he had little conversational accessibility with the hearing students. Aaron Spector, the director of the Disability Resource and Services at Temple, wrote in an email to The Temple News that DRS works to accommodate deaf students and faculty. “If any member of the campus community makes us aware of a barrier to access, we will try to work with the intersection@temple-news.com

impacted by that barrier,” Spector wrote. “It’s a whole different quality of life to have that kind of accessibility and language and communication with everybody,” said Dana Zeuggin, an instructor in the ASL program. Zeuggin also attended a majoritydeaf and hard-of-hearing institution called the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, which is part of the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York. Both NTID and Gallaudet provide resources and technology to assist students and faculty outside of the realm of ASL, including videophones. A videophone is a phone that relays both audio and visual messages. These are used by the deaf community for phone calls and often utilize a relay service that acts as a mediator. The deaf caller signs to an interpreter, who then translates and relays an audio message back to the hearing recipient. Videophones and other assistive technology can be requested at Temple, and the federal government provides free videophone calling to deaf citizens. Safety alerts are another form of technology that may need to be altered to accommodate the deaf community. Last academic year, Hartmann’s fire alarm did not have a visual component, like a flashing light. If his students had not notified him of the alarm, he never would’ve had known it was going off. “I was in a classroom teaching, [and] the students were raising their hand, ‘There’s a fire alarm going off.’ I’m like, ‘Come on, I don’t see anything!’” Hartmann said. “There was no visual alarm.” Hartmann added that a visual alarm was later put in place. “In the case of a visual fire alarm not working, we would notify the Office of Emergency Management and the University Fire Marshall to see that the

ac·ces·si·ble

ALI GRAULTY / THE TEMPLE NEWS

concerns are addressed,” Spector wrote. He added that all fire alarms at Temple should have a visual signal, and that students and faculty should contact DRS or the Office of Emergency Management and the University Fire Marshall directly if they notice an alarm that does not have one. When it comes to services not covered by the government or university, Zueggin said being deaf takes a financial toll. “I have a special alarm clock that costs $120,” Zeuggin said. “I mean, that’s just my alarm.” Melanie Drolsbaugh, an ASL instructor in the College of Public Health who is also deaf, said one of the big changes was the switch from a Text Telephone to a videophone. Videophones are provided to deaf people for free, but she said the Text Telephone, which converts phone calls into text transcriptions, added an additional $200

to a phone bill. Maria Zonies, a senior speechlanguage-hearing major, is the president of Talking Hands, a student organization that holds events and meetings about deaf culture and ASL. “This community exists,” she added. “This language needs to be respected. I know other languages offer cultural insights, but ASL has had to battle for where it is now.” The professors added that although Temple’s deaf community is small — there are currently four students who use ASL interpreters — the university’s diverse student body makes it an overall deaf-friendly environment. “You expect diversity when you’re at Temple, so it seems more accepting,” Zeuggin said. “People don’t necessarily want everybody to be the same.” laremy@temple.edu

temple-news.com


SPORTS

PAGE 21

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

FIELD HOCKEY

Coach resigns after 4 consecutive losing seasons Marybeth Freeman posted a 2155 record during her tenure as the Owls’ coach. BY JAY NEEMEYER Field Hockey Beat Reporter Temple University field hockey coach Marybeth Freeman resigned, after four years with the program. Freeman resigned on Thursday, after the Owls’ fourth straight losing season and second consecutive year without a Big East Conference playoff appearance. With a 2-16 overall record this year, Temple also went winless in conference play for the second straight season. Athletic Director Patrick Kraft said in a university release the university will soon begin a nationwide search for a new coach. Assistant coach Ross Gilham-Jones will serve as head coach in the interim. Kraft declined to comment on the coaching search, due to the privacy of the search. Freeman could not be reached for comment. “I am grateful to have had the opportunity to work with such an amazing group of strong, driven and talented women and coaches,” Freeman said in the release. Freeman joined Temple in March 2015 after posting a 46-39 record in five years at Columbia University. She replaced Amanda Janney, who left for Indiana University Bloomington after 10 seasons at Temple. Janney’s teams made three appearances in conference finals. Freeman compiled a 21-55 record from 2015-18. She brought the Owls to the Big East Conference tournament in 2015 and 2016, extending the program’s streak of Atlantic 10 Conference and Big East tournament appearances to 14. The Owls’ streak of conference

@TTN_Sports @TheTempleNews

PAUL KLEIN / THE TEMPLE NEWS Marybeth Freeman instructs field hockey players during a practice on Aug. 26, 2016 at Howarth Field. Freeman stepped down on Thursday, after four seasons at Temple as coach.

tournament appearances ended in 2017. Temple won four games, matching 1998 as the worst season for the program since the team started playing at least 15 per season in 1977. This year, opponents outscored Temple 73-22, and the Owls won just two games. The Owls’ 2-16 record marked their lowest win total since they began to play more than 15 games per season. Freeman will still serve as president of the National Field Hockey Coaches Association, a role she assumed in Feb-

ruary. On Friday, Freeman worked as a color analyst for ESPN’s broadcast team for the NCAA Tournament. Freeman told the team and coaching staff about her decision in person on Thursday. Freeman was incredibly professional when speaking to the team about her decision to step down, Gilham-Jones said. Gilham-Jones joined the team in September as an assistant coach specializing in offensive tactics. He said in a phone interview Friday that he is interested in stepping into the role full-time.

“I’ve built up a really good relationship with the girls, and I feel that relationships are a lot in coaching,” Gilham-Jones said. “If you build a good trusting relationship between coach and player, that gives you the best opportunity to achieve. From my perspective, having tried to implement some of my structures and game plans already with Marybeth, I think the opportunity to take the team forward would be great for the program.” jay.neemeyer@temple.edu @neemeyer_j

sports@temple-news.com


SPORTS PAGE 22

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Early conference loss prepares underclassmen All but six of its players will class in that makes us a little deeper and return to the pitch in 2019. Their the players have continue to improve.” Temple needs to improve on ofearly loss in the post-season will fense if it is to be successful next season, prepare them to return next year. BY ALEX McGINLEY Women’s Soccer Beat Reporter The women’s soccer team packed three sets of practice uniforms, in hopes of a long stay at the American Athletic Conference tournament in Tampa, Florida. Temple (7-11-1, 3-5-1 The American) came prepared to stay the entire duration of the conference tournament, but a 3-0, first-round loss to Central Florida on Oct. 31 sent the Owls home early. Coach Seamus O’Connor said the Owls are disappointed they did not win, but he thinks the conference tournament appearance will motivate their 22 returning players to work harder during the offseason to be successful next year. “They now have a taste of wanting to do it again,” O’Connor said. “This offseason, they’re going to put the work in. They like to be on that stage and want to be there longer and bring home a championship.” Temple’s two biggest wins this season were against South Florida and the University of Maryland, O’Connor said. Temple defeated Maryland, 1-0, on Aug. 31 on a goal from sophomore forward Emma Wilkins. Temple defeated USF, 1-0, in double overtime on a goal from freshman forward Gabriela Johnson on Sept. 30. USF was ranked 19th in the United Soccer Coaches poll at the time of the match. The win marked the first time Temple defeated a ranked opponent since 1995. “We have to play like we did against USF and Maryland every single game,” O’Connor said. “That comes from having depth in the program. We just need to make sure we get a good recruiting

sports@temple-news.com

O’Connor said. The Owls ranked second to last in The American in goals. Temple only registered one goal in its last five games. In the conference tournament match, UCF outshot Temple 22-6. Six Temple players — defenders Kelcie Dolan and Kat McCoy, midfielders Sarah McGlinn and Juliet Esposito, forward Kerri McGinley and goalkeeper Jordan Nash — will graduate after this season. Dolan was one of five players to start all 19 games. McGinley tallied two goals and one assist this season. Temple’s returning players are the team’s “core group” and look to improve this offseason, junior goalkeeper Morgan Basileo said. “As soon as the season’s over, we get right back at it,” Basileo said. “We’re here not just to play in the fall. We’re here to get better the entire year. Our focus in the spring is to get fitter and focus on our game plan more to prepare for the fall.” But the Owls’ top four leaders in points –– Wilkins, Johnson and junior forwards Jules Blank and Morgan Morocco –– will all return. Wilkins led the team with six goals. Johnson scored five goals, Blank scored three and Morocco scored two. Johnson is a vital piece to the Owls’ future success, O’Connor added. Johnson was named to The American’s All-Rookie Team. Johnson played in all 19 games this season and scored game-winning goals against Houston and USF. O’Connor said opponents adjusted to Johnson’s game as the year progressed. She didn’t score and had just one point in her last five games. “[Johnson] has improved a lot,” O’Connor said. “It’s just getting her into positions to be successful. Unfortunately, as the season went on, our opponents knew about her. She has a good bit to

JUSTIN OAKES / THE TEMPLE NEWS Tulsa sophomore forward Neha Igwe (left) marks Temple sophomore defender Aisha Brown during the Owls’ 1-0 win on Oct. 18 at the Temple Sports Complex.

go. She wants to build on her freshman success.” O’Connor is excited about his team’s potential to excel on defense next season. In 2018, the Owls were ranked sixth in The American in goals allowed with 26. Last year, they allowed 29 goals. Temple also recorded six shutouts this season. Sophomore defender Aisha Brown, who started all 19 games this season, will return after The American named her First Team All-Conference. Brown became the first Owl to make a conference’s first team since Lori Brennan in 1999 and is a “huge part” of the Owls’ defense, O’Connor said. The Owls will also return Basileo, the conference leader in saves who started in all but two games and recorded 98 saves.

This season, Temple returned to the conference tournament for the first time since 2015 and fell to 0-4 in postseason play in The American. Before the Owls’ 2013 conference tournament appearance, they hadn’t played in the postseason since 1995. Next year, Temple looks to return to the conference tournament for the second straight season and make a run. “We don’t just want to return,” Basileo said. “We want to come home with the trophy and put Temple’s name on the map, in terms of women’s soccer. Hopefully, we’ll make the NCAA Tournament, which is our overall goal. That will really exciting.” alex.mcginley@temple.edu @mcginley_alex

temple-news.com


SPORTS PAGE 23

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Former player helps young roster as manager Mykia Jones will serve as a graduate manager as she earns her master’s degree. BY DANTE COLLINELLI For The Temple News Mykia Jones didn’t go far from Broad Street after graduation. After playing her final college season at Temple last year, Jones remains with the Owls as a graduate manager. When Jones transferred as a graduate student to Temple from Georgetown University, coach Tonya Cardoza knew Jones would need an extra year to earn her master’s degree in sport business. In her new leadership role, she has established herself as a bridge between the coaching staff and the players. She is a valuable part of the coaching staff because she can relate to players, many of whom she played with last season, Cardoza said. “She is still really good friends with some of the team, so she knows the position that they are in,” Cardoza added. “She can give them advice and calm them down.” Players like to go to Jones for advice during games because they know she understands their exact situation, said sophomore forward Mia Davis. “I’m someone that they can relate to, kind of like a big sister,” Jones said. “Whenever [Cardoza] wants something, I try to send the message the best way I can to the team. Whenever they are going through stuff or have questions about anything, I’m able to be the bridge or a big sister for them.” Jones played at Wake Forest University her first two years then transferred to Georgetown. At Georgetown, Jones played as a senior after sitting out her junior year due to NCAA transfer rules. Last season, Jones played 30 games for the Owls, starting seven of them. For five seasons, Jones was a part of Division I basketball programs.

@TheTempleNews @TTN_Sports

SYDNEY SCHAEFER / FILE PHOTO Then-graduate student guard Mykia Jones dribbles past half-court during the Owls’ 64-57 loss to Central Florida on Feb. 10, 2018. Jones now serves as the graduate manager for the Owls.

“She is a great person to get advice from when we are struggling in games,” Davis said. “She has tips because she played for four years of college basketball, so she helps us get through tough moments.” The transition from player to graduate manager was easier than expected, Jones said. Still, she is unsure if she wants to pursue a future in coaching. Jones is not the first women’s basketball player to make this transition.

Tyonna Williams, the director of basketball operations, graduated with a criminal justice degree in 2015, then stayed with the program as a graduate manager for the 2015-16 season. She was later promoted in 2016 to her current role. Jones is unsure what the future holds and is going to keep an open mind about possibly coaching in the future. She is making a positive impact on both the coaching staff and the players through her prior experiences, even

though coaching may not be part of her future, she said. “I am in a good place right now,” Jones added. “I love it here at Temple and I just love the players. They are all like my little sisters, so they make it a lot easier for me and they have fun and a good relationship with the coaches.” dante.collinelli@temple.edu @DanteCollinelli

sports@temple-news.com


SPORTS PAGE 24

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

MEN’S BASKETBALL

FRESH OFF THE BENCH COLLEEN CLAGGETT / THE TEMPLE NEWS Junior guard Alani Moore II surveys the court during the Owls’ 75-67 win against La Salle on Nov. 6 at the Liacouras Center.

With Brown graduated and guards keep them engaged and cheering. On the his first 3-pointer. Once a starter, Alani Moore II In the last six minutes, eight secadjusts to his role as the Owls’ like sophomore Nate Pierre-Louis and court, Moore helps his teammates run senior Shizz Alston, Jr. set in the starting the right plays and be in the right posi- onds of Friday’s game, Dunphy swapped first guard off the bench.

BY MICHAEL ZINGRONE Co-Sports Editor

A

lani Moore II experienced a decrease in nearly every statistical category in his sophomore

year. The junior guard started 23 games, averaged 6.5 points per game, played 25.8 minutes per game and made 46 3-pointers as a freshman. Last season, Moore came off the bench in 27 of Temple’s 33 games, made 15 3-pointers and averaged 3.1 points per game. Moore played significant minutes as a freshman, due to an Achilles tendon injury that limited former guard Josh Brown to only five games. When Brown returned the following season, Moore’s role on the court dwindled. “I had my ups and down [last season],” Moore said. “But I stuck through and stayed confident, stuck to my role. ... Mentally, I had to stay strong. Physically I had to stay strong.” sports@temple-news.com

lineup, Moore will be the “first guard off the bench,” coach Fran Dunphy said. He will play between 15 and 25 minutes per game this season. Moore is expected to consistently make his shots and be a “hound” on defense, Dunphy added. Coming into this season, Moore wanted to become a leader for the Owls’ six underclassmen, he said. Moore believes he can be helpful because of his two seasons of experience and familiarity with the coaching staff. “[Moore has] done a good job of taking on the responsibility of running a team,” said assistant coach Shawn Trice. “He is a psychiatrist on the court. He is learning how to make his teammates better. Knowing what buttons to push, knowing what words to say.” Brown always told Moore to “be the loudest one on the court” during his freshman year, which he continues to do on the court today. When he isn’t in the game, Moore talks to his teammates on the bench to

tion by being vocal. “I make sure all the young guys are speaking and talking,” Moore said. “That’s the big thing right now, the young guys don’t talk. We, the older guys, try to harp on them all the time to make sure you communicate because that is how we win games.” In both games this season, Moore was the first player to enter the game off the bench. He played 18 minutes in the team’s season opener against La Salle on Nov. 6, and 16 minutes against the University of Detroit Mercy on Friday. Moore scored five points on 1-of-4 shooting against La Salle, which Temple beat 75-67. He made 3-of-4 shots from the free-throw line and grabbed four rebounds. He also scored six “crucial” points on two first-half 3-point shots in the Owls’ 83-67 their victory against Detroit Mercy, Dunphy said. He finished the night by making 2-of-4 shots, all from 3-point range. The Owls only made two of their previous seven shots before Moore sank

Moore and Alston on four occasions because he wanted to protect Alston from sinking deeper into foul trouble on the defensive end. Alston told The Temple News earlier this month that Moore is a key piece for the Owls. If he has a good season, it will “greatly” increase the Owls’ chances for success. As a freshman, Moore shot 41.4 percent from 3-point range and led Temple in scoring with 26 points in a win against Yale University. He also scored 18 points in a win against nationally ranked West Virginia University. “My mindset is always to come into the game and impact the game in a positive way,” Moore said. “Making sure everyone is doing their job and the bench is cheering. Listen to what to coaches are saying and relay that to the rest of the players. And make sure everyone is together.” michael.zingrone@temple.edu @mjzingrone

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Profile for The Temple News

Vol. 97 Iss. 12  

Nov. 13, 2018

Vol. 97 Iss. 12  

Nov. 13, 2018

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