__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

THE TEMPLE NEWS

FACING

FAFSA

Applying for financial aid can be a pathway or a barrier for Temple students. Read more on Page 10.

VOL 97 // ISSUE 16 JANUARY 22, 2019 temple-news.com @thetemplenews

NEWS, PAGE 2 Temple Rome Dean Hilary Link will leave to become the president of Allegheny College.

OPINION, PAGE 7 A columnist argues people should sympathize with Cyntoia Brown.

FEATURES, PAGE 12 Kalen Allen shares his experience after a year of working on The Ellen Degeneres Show.

SPORTS, PAGE 21 Temple field hockey welcomes a new coach after four losing seasons.


NEWS PAGE 2

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

THE TEMPLE NEWS A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. Gillian McGoldrick Editor in Chief Kelly Brennan Managing Editor Julie Christie Digital Managing Editor Evan Easterling Chief Copy Editor Greta Anderson News Editor Grace Shallow Deputy Investigations Editor Alyssa Biederman Deputy Campus Editor Will Bleier Deputy City Editor Jayna Schaffer Opinion Editor Laura Smythe Features Editor Zari Tarazona Deputy Features Editor Michaela Althouse Deputy Features Editor Michael Zingrone Co-Sports Editor Sam Neumann Co-Sports Editor Claire Wolters Intersection Editor Maria Ribeiro Director of Engagement Siani Colon Asst. Director of Engagement Dylan Long Co-Photography Editor Luke Smith Co-Photography Editor Madison Seitchik Web Editor Ian Walker Visuals Editor Myra Mirza Visuals Specialist Claire Halloran Design Editor Phuong Tran Advertising Manager Kelsey McGill Advertising Manager Daniel Magras Business Manager

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content represents the opinion of The Temple News. Adjacent commentary is reflective of their authors, not The Temple News. Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

ON THE COVER LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS

From top left to right: Madison Brown, Brandon Dolan, Brittney Flinn, Middle: Matthew Ladov, Solangel Dominguez, Bottom: Anthony Califano, Christopher Castaneda, Monet Gregory

CORRECTIONS In a story that ran on Page 6 on Jan. 15, “IgniteTU focused on internal issues in Fall 2018” misstated that Temple Student Government had not completed any initiatives to help students facing food or housing insecurity. TSG hosted a food donation drive and is sponsoring a scholarship that will subsidize food and housing costs for one or more students. Accuracy is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it as soon as possible. Anyone with inquiries about content in this newspaper can contact Editor in Chief Gillian McGoldrick at editor@temple-news.com or 215-204-6736.

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

ADMINISTRATION

Temple Rome dean to depart in summer 2019

Hilary Link will become the first woman president of Allegheny College. BY GRACE SHALLOW Investigations Editor Hilary Link, the dean of Temple University Rome, is leaving the university to become the first woman president of Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania. “Temple Rome is a true gem of Temple University,” Link said. “It is one of the longest-running, most historic, largest, most vibrant American campuses in Italy.” Link will assume her new role on July 1. The university will immediately begin its search for a new dean, a Temple spokesperson wrote in an email to The Temple News. Link’s “departure is a great loss for Temple,” Provost JoAnne Epps said in a statement. Link had led Temple Rome since 2013. Link wants to apply an interdisciplinary approach at Allegheny, she said. It’s an appropriate time for an institution to appoint a woman leader, she added, considering “everything going on in the cultural context in the [United States].” Prior to her position at Temple, Link worked at Barnard College of Columbia University for 11 years. “It feels really exciting and satisfying to be a role model for lots of young women,” Link said. “Whether you’re the first, or the 10th, or the 100th... there’s roles for women in leadership, and you don’t have to be sort of stepping into the spotlight.” During her five years in Rome, Link worked with schools on Main Campus to make studying abroad easier for students in the College of Science and Technology, the School of Sport,

Tourism and Hospitality Management and the Klein College of Media and Communication. Temple Rome started offering classes for engineering students during Link’s tenure. She was also involved in the establishment of the campus’ first Board of Visitors, which includes alumni and administrators from the university’s domestic and international campuses who provide counsel to the Temple Rome dean. Link “reinvigorated” Temple Rome, said Alistair Howard, the assistant vice president for international affairs for Education Abroad and Overseas Campuses. “She’s promoted growth in the student numbers and the curriculum is more diverse, which means it’s more attractive to more Temple students and non-Temple students as well,” said Howard, who talks to Link at least once a week. Link also initiated renovations at the Rome Campus. Before Temple Rome celebrated its 50th anniversary in June 2017, the university updated the basement of the campus’ main building, the Villa Caproni. It now has spaces for outside organizations to use. The campus unveiled an updated digital photo studio, classroom space and study space, Link said. Temple Rome is also preparing to renovate its library, which is housed in the Villa Caproni building, during Summer 2019, Link said. “I’m leaving an institution that has such great momentum and energy and is doing such great things,” Link said. “I personally feel whoever is selected will be stepping into an...opportunity to really take things in new directions.” grace.shallow@temple.edu @Grace_Shallow

temple-news.com


NEWS PAGE 3

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

CRIME

Hupperterz’s lawyer may appeal life sentence Joshua Hupperterz was found guilty on Thursday of murdering junior Jenna Burleigh in 2017. BY ALYSSA BIEDERMAN Deputy Campus Editor Joshua Hupperterz’s lawyer is looking into appealing the former student’s life sentence for killing Temple University junior Jenna Burleigh in August 2017, 6ABC reported. A Philadelphia judge sentenced Hupperterz to life in prison without parole, the maximum time allowed under Pennsylvania law, on Thursday. Defense Attorney David Nenner could not be reached for comment despite multiple attempts. It took the jury about two hours to convict Hupperterz of first-degree murder, possession of the instrument of crime, abuse of a corpse and tampering with evidence. “It was quite evident to anyone who listened to these proceedings that this was an outrageous and terrible crime,” Court of Common Pleas Judge Glenn Bronson said during sentencing. “The level of brutality was shocking even to me, a person who has been doing this for a long time.” “You just extinguished the life of a person who wanted to give back in this world,” Bronson told Hupperterz, looking him in the eyes. “Now, she never will.” Nenner maintained during the trial that Hupperterz’s roommate Jack Miley, intoxicated from alcohol and Xanax, an anti-anxiety medication, came upstairs in the roommates’ 16th Street apartment near Cecil B. Moore Avenue and strangled Burleigh to defend Hupperterz. “Jack Miley is the key to this case,” Nenner said during closing arguments on Thursday. “I never touched that woman,” Miley testified on Jan. 11. Assistant District Attorney Jason condemned the defense’s argument that Miley killed Burleigh.

@TheTempleNews

LUKE SMITH / FILE PHOTO Ed and Jaqui Burleigh leave the Juanita Kidd Stout Center for Criminal Justice on Thursday. After a nearly two-week trial, Joshua Hupperterz was found guilty of first-degree murder.

Miley, a senior kinesiology major, was never charged with crimes related to the murder. Miley and members of his family sat with Burleigh’s family, who read victim impact statements on Thursday. Burleigh’s friends and family said her life was dedicated to giving back to those in need. Her caring personality inspired her family to start the nonprofit, Jenna’s Blessing Bags Foundation, which collects personal care items and distributes them to people experiencing homelessness. “She was my sunshine,” said Ed Burleigh, Jenna Burleigh’s father. “She has done more in her short life than most people do in theirs.” Jenna Burleigh’s older sister, Janelle Burleigh, read an excerpt from Jenna Burleigh’s blog. “I don’t want to just go through the motions in life,” Jenna Burleigh wrote. “In the end, being a good person is what really counts.”

Jaqui Burleigh, Jenna Burleigh’s mother, told stories of her daughter’s kindness. While her daughter has made her a better person, a piece of the Burleigh family will always be missing, she said. “As a mom, you have dreams and images of what your child will be when they grow up,” Jaqui Burleigh said. “My dreams were shattered.” Jenna Burleigh was an activist and cared about causes like LGBTQ and women’s rights, said Shaylynn Nolan, a friend of hers. Nolan also read from Jenna’s blog. “I will be the one to make a change in this world, however small that is,” Jenna Burleigh wrote. “Our body is but a vessel that keeps us in this reality.” Outside the Juanita Kidd Stout Center for Criminal Justice after Thursday’s sentencing, Grenell praised the Burleigh family for their “strength and poise” during the trial. “This has been justice,” he said.

Although Nenner maintained Miley was involved in Jenna Burleigh’s death, video surveillance showed her and Hupperterz leaving Pub Webb, a bar on Cecil B. Moore Avenue near 16th Street around 2 a.m. on Aug. 31, 2017, and going into Hupperterz’s apartment. Jenna Burleigh was reported missing during the day on Aug. 31. Jenna Burleigh’s body was found on Sept. 2 in a blue plastic storage container on Hupperterz’s grandmother’s Wayne County, Pennsylvania property. Forensic analysts testified that they did not identify any of Miley’s DNA on Jenna Burleigh or in blood samples found in the apartment. “There is only one man responsible for her brutal murder,” Grenell said. “That was Joshua Hupperterz. Through his attempts to pin this crime on an innocent man, the jury saw through that.” alyssa.biederman@temple.edu @BiedermanAlyssa

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


NEWS PAGE 4

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

CITY

Cameras installed to stop illegal trash dumping It is unclear if the city will install cameras near Main Campus. BY JUSTINE IMBURGIO For The Temple News The city is installing surveillance cameras to curb illegal dumping in problem areas, university and city officials told The Temple News last week. No cameras are located within a one-mile radius of Main Campus, where residents often complain of student garbage dumping, and officials have not yet determined whether the program will include this area. Some residents and students hope the program is implemented nearby. The Philadelphia Streets Department and Philadelphia Police will install 50 surveillance cameras by this summer in areas with high rates of illegal dumping to reduce illegal dumping violations. Fifteen cameras are already installed throughout the city. The surveillance cameras ensure photo evidence of offenders can be used against them in court, and violators will be subject to fines of up to $5,000 or up to six months of incarceration. The Streets Department used “strategic placement” to determine the location of security cameras, said Carlton Williams, the department commissioner. Some of the city’s most affected areas are neighborhood lots, street corners, vacant properties or poorly lit areas, he added. It is unclear if the city will install cameras around Main Campus. Illegal dumping costs the city about $1.5 million annually in clean-up projects. According to the Zero Waste Litter Progress Report, North Central Philadelphia, which encompasses Main Campus, had the highest Litter Index Score in 2017. The area surrounding the university

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS Piles of garbage sit feet away from one of several newly installed surveillance cameras at 9th and Vernango streets, which is a part of city efforts to crack down on illegal dumping.

needs more dumping enforcement, said Evelina Verges, who lives on Diamond Street near 13th. “It should be implemented around here because a lot of students do dump their stuff everywhere, and it’s not heavily regulated,” Verges added. “It makes me so mad because it’s such a huge problem and it’s still going on, and it’s only gonna get worse.” The Streets Department’s illegal dumping program has been successful so far, Williams said, and many offenders are in the process of being prosecuted. Several of the camera locations are trash-

free and staying that way, he added. “You walk three blocks any direction off campus, you’re going to find illegal dumping,” said Jubilee Holland, a freshman biology major. The university has several initiatives to improve the area around Main Campus, like the Good Neighbor Initiative, which aims to mitigate the surrounding area’s large-scale garbage problem, control noise and foster relationships between students and community residents. North Philadelphia residents and students should take advantage of other

street clean-up programs, Williams said, including the recently launched PhilaCan program, which places a municipal trash can in front of homes upon request. “We need to start doing more for our community,” Verges said. “Especially off-campus, because [garbage] creates a huge problem for the people who have been living here for a really long time, and we need to respect that.” justineimburgio@temple.edu @JustineImburgio

temple-news.com


NEWS PAGE 5

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

TUH

TUH age discrimination lawsuit could go to trial Berkley Williams claims he was fired because he was close to receiving retirement benefits. BY COLIN EVANS For The Temple News

Temple University Hospital could go to trial for a 2017 ageism lawsuit after a longtime employee was fired for playing a video game on his phone at work. Berkley Williams, 64, who worked in the hospital’s linen department until January 2016, is suing TUH for age discrimination. TUH attempted to have the case dismissed in December 2018, but it was denied by Eastern District Court of Pennsylvania Judge Gerald A. McHugh, who wrote that there is enough evidence for Williams to argue his case. A summary judgment would have allowed McHugh to rule on the case without further deliberation, but Williams’ argument that “he was treated differently than other employees, is more persuasive,” McHugh wrote in a memorandum. Williams alleges that Joseph Julia, who managed the linen department and central distribution at the hospital, discriminated against him for his age. Williams was 61 at the time of his firing. Williams is asking for back pay and to be reinstated in his position, or to receive equivalent compensation, according to the initial complaint filed by Stephanie Mensing, his lawyer, in June 2017. McHugh denied summary judgment because there are no grounds to dismiss Williams’ case out of hand, said Jerome Hoffman, a retired attorney and law professor who has taught employment law for 15 years. “I believe a reasonable jury could infer discrimination. That’s what [McHugh] is saying,” said Hoffman, who worked for Dechert LLP, an international law firm. “What the judge in effect is saying

@TheTempleNews

SYDNEY SCHAEFER / FILE PHOTO A former Temple University Hospital employee’s ageism lawsuit against the hospital could go to trial after a Eastern District Court of Pennsylvania Judge denied a motion for dismissal.

is [Julia] knew [Williams] was going to retire anyhow, he’s talked about retirement and that could be construed to infer that his age played a role in the decision to discipline and terminate him,” Hoffman said. Williams received disciplinary violations for prior incidents but testified that Julia fired him because he was close to retiring and receiving additional employment benefits from the hospital when he turned 62, six months after he was fired, Mensing wrote in her complaint. Kay Kyungsun Yu, who represents TUH, declined to comment. Between 2013 and 2016, Williams was disciplined for violations before he was fired, like improper loading of equipment, failure to pick up dirty linens and leaving a linen cart empty. TUH follows a five-step disciplinary procedure that includes a discussion between worker and supervisor, two writ-

ten warnings and a one-day suspension before a worker is terminated, according to court documents. Williams received a one-day suspension, the final step before firing, in April 2015, less than a year before his firing. A TUH spokesperson declined to comment. Mensing argued that younger employees were not disciplined like Williams for similar incidents. “Younger, similarly situated individuals regularly use their cell phones and [TUH] computers for personal use, including watching videos, surfing the Internet and listening to music,” Mensing wrote in the complaint. In a memorandum written for the court on March 12, 2018, Yu wrote that TUH had disciplined other employees 52 times since January 2011 for inappropriate cell phone usage. Mensing wrote in an email that she

is pleased the case may go to trial, but added that age discrimination suits are often difficult to win. In July 2018, Ruth Briggs, a 13-year employee who worked in the Computer and Information Sciences Department, was awarded $850,000 from the university in an age discrimination lawsuit. A jury in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania found that Briggs was forced to resign after raising complaints about age discrimination, the Inquirer reported. Temple is appealing Briggs’ case to the U.S. 3rd Circuit of Appeals. “Regardless of the jury’s verdict in Mr. Williams’ case, we hope that the university will re-evaluate their employment practices to ensure that all university employees are treated fairly and in accordance with state and federal anti-discrimination laws,” Mensing wrote. colin.evans@temple.edu @colinpaulevans

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 6

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019 EDITORIAL

Help workers during shutdown

An annual Philadelphia tradition on Martin Luther King Jr. Day honors the civil rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner with a ceremony at the Liberty Bell. But this year, with the Liberty Bell Pavilion closed amid the federal government shutdown, the ceremony moved to 17th and Market streets instead. The shutdown, which changed the ceremony, has also deeply affected a group King advocated for — people experiencing poverty. The shutdown has left Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program benefits recipients unsure if they’ll have enough aid to last through February. More than half of Pennsylvania’s 2 million SNAP recipients live in Philadelphia, and nearly half of all SNAP recipients are children, according to Feeding America. As the longest shutdown in history continues, groups across the country have stepped up to provide help to the 800,000

furloughed government workers. Here in Philadelphia, there are about 45,000 federal workers, according to Philabundance, a hunger relief organization. Philabundance will hold an emergency food distribution market for furloughed workers every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. at Front and Tasker streets. Starting on Monday, Temple’s Kornberg School of Dentistry will offer free dental care for federal workers. For students who are food insecure, Cherry Pantry provides food every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. We’re proud to see prominent institutions like Temple help those affected by the shutdown, and we hope students who are in the position to donate their resources, time and money do so to help the tens of thousands of people in our city whose food and housing security are being affected by the shutdown.

EDITORIAL

Off campus should be a priority Philadelphia is implementing a new surveillance program to catch illegal dumping violators in the act and use photo evidence against them in court, enforcing fines of up to $5,000. The area surrounding Main Campus received the highest Litter Index Score in the city’s 2017-18 Zero Waste and Litter Progress Report. But there is not one camera installed within a one-mile radius of Main Campus, and it is unclear when any will be installed. At least one camera should be set up around Main Campus to monitor students’ wasteful tendencies and enforce violations. Longtime residents of the neighborhood have complained for years about student littering, which the university has attempted to address with talks of a Special Services District and efforts to reduce trash during the July to August move-out period when students dump unwanted contents from their off-campus apartletters@temple-news.com

ments into the streets and sidewalks. Student dumping has reduced residents’ quality of life and sends a message to neighbors that the university does not respect the place they call home. Temple is evidently an area where illegal dumping should be better enforced by the city. The Streets Department has installed 15 out of the 50 allotted surveillance cameras it plans to place by this summer, and the city has the opportunity to reduce dumping around Main Campus. In the meantime, we encourage students to be good neighbors and be accountable for their garbage. Students should reuse, recycle, donate or responsibly dispose of their unwanted items. Because even if there isn’t a camera to catch them in the act of dumping illegally, there is garbage in the streets for all neighbors to see.

ACADEMICS

A different kind of class For students with busy schedules, the AIDS and Society class is a great alternative to traditional courses. What if I told you there is a way to gain three credits a week before the semester even starts? As a full-time student with multiple jobs and an internship this semester, I have to build my schedule carefully to remain sane. And as a journalism major, I mostly have class PAVLINA CERNA INT’L STUDENT options that require COLUMNIST a traditional classroom setting and writing-intensive courses. Nevertheless, this semester I discovered a class called AIDS and Society, a course offered by the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the College of Public Health. It is a one-week course, rewarding students with three credits at the end of an intense 40-hour week. The class met five days during the week before the spring semester started. Each class was eight hours long with a break for lunch in the middle of the day and short breaks when the professor called them. Aside from freeing up my schedule and giving me more time to do yoga and other things I like, it was one of the best classes I’ve taken in college so far, thanks to the interesting and informational movies and special guests. During the rigorous week, I never felt bored. Chad Thomas, a social and behavioral sciences instructor and one of four professors who taught AIDS and Society this semester, said one week is

enough time for students to learn the basics about HIV, prevention and the effect HIV has on individuals and society. “It is encouraging to see how younger generations are actively supporting vulnerable populations who are at risk from public health threats,” said Thomas, who has been teaching the course at Temple since 2008. In Thomas’ class, we watched documentaries about the spread of HIV in the United States, which I had no knowledge of because it’s not really a huge problem in the Czech Republic, where I’m from. So for me, it was extremely valuable and educational. And I think it was just as compelling for non-international students. The guest speakers were informative and engaging. Sonia Habel, a junior public health major, said she expected AIDS and Society would be “dry and very informational.” But it exceeded her expectations. “I really enjoyed the guest speakers because they provided a more personal perspective than I have ever experienced,” she said. “It is so important to educate yourself and others about HIV and AIDS to reduce transmissions and stigma surrounding this virus.” Having in-class speakers who are either HIV positive or work with HIV-positive communities gave us amazing and powerful insight. I didn’t expect them to be so much fun to listen to since HIV is such a heavy topic. After being in class for eight hours each day, followed by homework for the next day, I felt overloaded with information but also very accomplished. With two semesters to go before I graduate, I hope to find a similar gold mine in the future. pavlina.cerna@temple.edu

temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 7

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

FEMINISM

Cyntoia Brown sees justice 15 years too late We should have sympathy for Cyntoia Brown, a victim of juvenile sex trafficking, and speak up for women of color. There are few times I can’t find the words to express myself. But as I sat on the floor with my friends, writing a letter to Cyntoia Brown, I felt nothing I could write would bring her any piece of mind. What do you write in a letter to a woman who was forced into sex trafficking when she was 16 years old and sentenced to life in BRITTANY VALENTINE prison for killing FEMINISM COLUMNIST her then 43-yearold abuser out of self-defense? Earlier this month, Brown, who is now 30 years old, was finally granted clemency. She will be released on Aug. 7 to supervised parole — exactly 15 years after her arrest. But her release doesn’t make up for the adolescence that was stolen from her. As an intersectional feminist, I can’t help but point to the role her race and gender played in her life sentence. Our society refuses to acknowledge women of color who survive horrible abuse. We should be advocating for silenced survivors and questioning the justice system because things aren’t always as just as they seem. “Women have been overlooked by the system,” said Tara Tripp, a Temple University criminal justice professor. “Women have always committed crimes, but because there were so few and the system is male-dominated, [Brown’s case] never made the news.” The mainstream media largely ignored Brown’s case when it emerged in 2006, even though the case against her was unfair from the start. Brown showed @TheTempleNews

“sexual abuse is abuse no matter who the victim is” signs of marijuana and cocaine intoxication during an interview with police and didn’t have an adult present when she was read her Miranda rights, Tripp said. There was no initial public outcry about the way she was treated, that she was a child or that the man she killed was a 43-year-old pedophile. Our individual values, experiences and identities play a role in how we interpret stories, especially heavy ones like Brown’s. And our justice system is no exception to these biases. “Race plays a vast role in our interpersonal feelings with one another,” Tripp said. “[People who] think that our criminal justice system is not affected by that are living in a world with rose-colored glasses.” In the United States, we have preconceived notions about who a victim is, and who a perpetrator is. I think it is often difficult to see women of color as victims. Shaeeda Mensah

PHILOSOPHY PROFESSOR

We don’t relate young Black women to innocence, and we instead treat them like adults and assume they’re guilty. By sharing Brown’s story, I don’t

ALI GRAULTY / THE TEMPLE NEWS

seek to persuade anyone that what she did was acceptable or legal or that it should be excused without respect for the law. I’m simply asking you to challenge your perceptions boldly and often. Brown, whose mother consumed up to a fifth of whiskey per day while pregnant with her, was born with fetal alcohol syndrome to a parent with several mental illnesses. She was put up for adoption. But she ran away from the home of her adoptive parents and was forced into sex trafficking by a man known as “Cut Throat.” None of this seemed to bring Brown any sympathy when she was sentenced in 2006. “The ideas of mental health, trauma and forced victimizations are not equally distributed,” said Shaeeda Mensah, a philosophy professor. “Some people lack access to the ability to make a claim about them.” Our country is so complicit when taking chances away from children who were never given chances to begin with. “In the United States, we have preconceived notions about who a victim is, and who a perpetrator is,” Mensah said. “I think it is often difficult to see women of color as victims.” And it makes it even harder for peo-

ple to sympathize with Brown because of her position as a sex worker. When the average person hears the word “prostitute,” plenty of images run through their minds. Many of us have a negative perception of sex work based on what we see on television and in movies. People of all genders thrive off of access to sex work, yet a culture of misogyny and rampant sexual abuse hinders us from humanizing these workers. If you type Brown’s name into Google, the words “teen prostitute” come up quite often. But by law, any person under 18 years old is actually a victim of trafficking. Brown killed a man, and that is inarguably a crime. But in practical applications of law, hardly anything is black and white. “All people deserve a right to be considered innocent until proven guilty, [and] sexual abuse is abuse regardless of who the victim is,” Mensah said. “We will never be able to give Cyntoia back the time that she has lost. So this is a victory, but we also need to make sure that we can prevent this and not just rectify it once it occurs.” brittany.leigh.valentine@temple.edu @recoveryspirit

letters@temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 8

MUSIC

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

Spotify, Apple Music: Mute R. Kelly

Music streaming services have a moral duty to remove R. Kelly’s music from their websites.

The music industry has managed to escape the influence of the #MeToo movement. Unlike other industries, musicians who are accused of sexual misconduct rarely face justice for their actions. They use their music as a tool to circumvent attention away from their alleged behavior and TYLER PEREZ proclaim their own LGBT COLUMNIST innocence. The case of R. Kelly is incredibly emblematic of this. Despite decades of accusations of domestic abuse, pedophilia and cult-like behavior, Kelly has been releasing Billboard Hot 100 records without any significant damage to his career. During a concert on Saturday, he received well wishes from Erykah Badu, and last year, Kendrick Lamar threatened to pull his music from Spotify entirely as a response to their decision to remove Kelly from its promoted playlists. Even as Kelly awaited trial his 2002 child pornography charges, Kelly released one of his most popular songs to date, “Ignition,” which distracted fans from the accusations. In the wake of this month’s Lifetime docudrama, “Surviving R. Kelly,” which shed light on Kelly’s vile behavior to a degree unseen before, the singer is actually increasing in popularity. His Spotify streams increased 16 percent immediately after the first part of the series aired earlier this month. His streams increased by 116 percent from Jan. 2, the day before the documentary aired, to Jan. 5, the final day the series aired, according to Nielsen Music. This is disturbing; despite the release of a six-part documentary with dozens of allegations of inexcusable, harmful actions, Kelly’s career is thriving. letters@temple-news.com

EMMA STEVENS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

To stop this horrible trend, music streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music should mute Kelly. Remove his music from the sites and decrease his relevance. Spotify took the first step in muting Kelly last May when it removed his music from its personally crafted promoted playlists in accordance with its new hateful conduct policy. This was a bold move. And on Monday, the streaming service added a “Don’t play this artist” option users can select for Kelly and other musicians’ songs to be skipped in libraries, radio stations and playlists. But still, his music is available to stream on both Spotify and Apple Music. The Kelly situation is nothing new, said Cheryl Squadrito, a media studies and production and communication and social influence instructor who covered the entertainment industry for the Inquirer in the 1990s. “There’s always been this thing in the music industry where high-end rockstars parade young girls in front of them, and those girls are interested, and it’s disgraceful,” Squadrito said. “It’s not new what R. Kelly is doing, and even

over all this time, young girls are treated as toys for older men.” For more than two decades, Kelly has been accused of everything from child molestation to forcing young women into a sex cult. But his career remains alive and well. Natalie Fiorini, a sophomore media studies and production major who has been following the Kelly story, said she is appalled his career has continued for so long despite the allegations against him. “It’s wrong that he still has a platform and that he’s been making music this whole time and that there are people who still support him,” Fiorini said. Streaming services that do not remove his music implicitly side with the alleged abuser. It is a sign the services are more concerned with the money than the lives of dozens of young Black women. If the radio industry can decrease radio spins of Kelly’s music by 85 percent from Jan. 3-7, a period that included the release of “Surviving R. Kelly,” then there is no excuse for streams to increase dramatically. Even Kelly’s record label, RCA Records, has decided to drop him entirely.

But Spotify still allows for nearly 6 million monthly listens to his music. Spotify and Apple Music are more than within their legal right to do this. Music streaming services are private enterprises with full control over which artists they want to support. “We live in a capitalist society and so there’s freedom for businesses to put artists on and take artists off,” Squadrito said. “But in my experience with the music business, it’s about the bottom line, commerce. It’s going to take a big groundswell of people speaking out against him for streaming services to do anything.” There is no reason why streaming services should continue to provide a platform for Kelly when they have knowledge of his actions, both past and present. But at the end of the day, the responsibility relies on us, music listeners. We ought to take a stand against Kelly and the streaming services that continue to support him. We need to mute R. Kelly. tyler.perez@temple.edu @perezodent

temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 9

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

TSG

TSG: A useful tool that nobody knows about Temple Student Government can involved in TSG if he knew more about bring in the voices of students, it, he said. “[TSG should] try to get seen by as but it needs to increase its many students as possible,” Broaster said. presence on campus first. Temple Student Government leaders are our direct link to the university administration. For TSG to serve as our collective voice, it is imperative that a diverse range of student perspectives are acknowledged, but right now that’s not possible. TSG introduced Parliament about JOSHUA VICTOR two and a half years TSG COLUMNIST ago with the goal of bringing in more voices and increasing its visibility on Main Campus. As a political science major, I’m aware of TSG because it’s in my best interest to keep up with its policies. Learning about politics is important to me, considering my curriculum. But it was interesting for me to discover many students still don’t know about TSG’s purpose or even that it exists. We need to spread awareness of our student government so we can fully utilize its power. TSG wrote in their weekly newsletter that student organizations are now required to attend one town hall per month to get their allocations, in an effort to improve engagement with the student body. This is admirable, but unfortunately, requiring one representative from each student organization won’t expand knowledge of TSG to students who aren’t involved in one. Elliott Broaster, a senior entrepreneurship and innovation management major, said he heard a little bit about TSG during his freshman year but nothing much since then. He would’ve gotten

@TheTempleNews

Student leaders reaching out to students in person would result in greater knowledge of TSG. It would also make it easy and comfortable for students to get to know their representatives. Cristopher Ruiz, a sophomore music performance major, was unaware of the existence of TSG. “I’m not even sure how many people know we have a student [government], but I feel like it’s one of those things that should be more well-known because it is really important,” Ruiz said. TSG has the potential to serve as an effective intermediary between students and the university. But to make that more than a theoretical idea, TSG leadership needs to tackle the lack of awareness of its existence within the student body. Tyler Rodriguez, a sophomore music therapy major, said TSG should be “transparent with all its people…something accessible to everyone.” And Student Body President Gadi Zimmerman agrees. “It’s important for us to be out there more and to make sure that we are having pop-up events on campus, that we’re showing our faces, making sure that students know what student government is and the resources that we have for students,” said Zimmerman, a senior financial planning major. “We are constantly listening to students, getting emails, answering emails and hearing what people have to say,” Zimmerman said. “Then we’re able to sit in on meetings with the administration to talk about concerns there are on campus.” It’s nice to know TSG is responding to student outreach and communicating

ALI GRAULTY / THE TEMPLE NEWS

with the administration. But I don’t see how everyone can possibly be heard if not everyone knows we have a student government. I’m glad IgniteTU, Zimmerman’s TSG administration, is working to broaden its scope. I just hope it starts paying off soon because it is important that students have the knowledge to hold student leaders accountable. TSG has the potential to be an im-

mensely useful tool, and I hope it reaches that potential. I want students to know how valuable TSG is for communicating with the university’s administration. If we increase its awareness, and if the students who are in TSG reach out to more students in person, more of us will be heard. joshua.victor@temple.edu @joshuajvictor7

letters@temple-news.com


FEATURES

PAGE 10

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

COVER STORY

THE FIGHT FOR FINANCIAL AID DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS Flinn, a freshman biology major, The FAFSA process can be a pathway or a barrier for students filled out the Free Application for Feder- college. I just asked that he fill out the way or a barrier for students to afford al Student Aid form for the first time last forms.” to afford college. college.

BY ZARI TARAZONA Deputy Features Editor

B

rittney Flinn used to live parttime with her father. Until she asked him to fill out her FAFSA form to attend Temple University. features@temple-news.com

year with the help of her mother TracyAnn Fleming in the kitchen of their Manchester, Maryland home. She had earlier approached her father to provide information for the form and received immediate pushback. “I never asked him for money,” Flinn said. “I never asked him for help with

Her father didn’t share his tax information for the form, even after she explained to him that he wouldn’t have to pay anything. This sparked a massive conflict between the two, and she hasn’t lived with him since. The FAFSA process can be a path-

Students who file independently or parents who aren’t familiar with the FAFSA process often have difficulty completing it. Some are frustrated that their eligibility for financial aid is closely tied to their parent’s finances, even if they don’t receive financial help from


FEATURES PAGE 11

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

them. For others, the process is a breeze when they have a lot of parental support. And at most times, the financial aid package determined by the FAFSA form doesn’t provide students with enough aid to cover the cost of college to make it affordable. Almost all Temple students have financial need. Of 23,818 undergraduate students who filed the 2017-18 FAFSA, Student Financial Services awarded aid to about 20,700 of those students. Temple had 26,642 full-time undergraduates enrolled in Fall 2017 — meaning only about 6,000 students did not receive a form of financial aid last academic year. For a university that is one of the highest recipients of Federal Pell Grants in Philadelphia, students have vastly different experiences when applying and receiving financial aid. How do students navigate the FAFSA, and how is the university trying to simplify an overwhelming process?

FAFSA REQUIREMENTS

Sydney Rosebrough, a sophomore sport and recreation management major, didn’t re-qualify for a Temple University Grant because she filed the FAFSA after Temple’s March 1 priority-filing deadline. This deadline is nearly four months earlier than the federal deadline to file by June 30. She lost a few thousand dollars from her financial aid package — money she had been counting on in her financial aid package. If a student’s FAFSA is completed after March 1, Student Financial Services can’t give them priority consideration since “all funding sources may not be available,” according to the Undergraduate Admissions website. Students with priority status are considered for six different types of financial aid including the Pell Grant, work-study funds and, if they’re a resident, the Pennsylvania State Grant. The FAFSA requires the about 20 million students who apply each year to report their parents’ names, date of birth, social security number and finances, like income and investments. Students must also provide their own personal and financial information. @TheTempleNews

Federal Student Aid uses the FAFSA and the Expected Family Contribution formula to calculate a student’s financial need, according to its website. Schools then use this to determine a student’s financial aid package.

THE PROCESS

For students like Christopher Castaneda, a freshman political science major, the process of filling out the FAFSA to receive financial aid is easy because his mother fills out the form. But this isn’t the case for everyone. Many of the 20 students The Temple News spoke with said their parents helped them fill out the FAFSA. And some described the process as “stressful” and “excruciating.” “It took a lot of planning and searching through things and just talking about what information we need,” said Bianca Van Cleef, a freshman early childhood-elementary education major. “Lots of stress and yelling on both sides from me and my parents.” There wasn’t a pay-off afterward because the money offered in her financial aid package wasn’t satisfying, she added. For other students, applying for financial aid is uncharted territory. Lauren Butler, a senior environmental studies major and first-generation college student, said it was a night-

It took a lot of planning and searching through things and just talking about what information we need. Lots of stress and yelling on both sides from me and my parents. BIANCA VAN CLEEF

FRESHMAN EARLY CHILDHOODELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR

mare filling out the FAFSA for the first time. “Not only was FAFSA hard because I had to sort of figure it out on my own, but I also had to explain it to my mother,” Butler said. First-generation students and their parents often face a learning curve when filing the FAFSA.

Most Temple students apply sucessfully for FAFSA

Temple has more than 26,600 undergraduate students, and nearly 90 percent of them filled out the FAFSA in the 2017-18 academic year. About 87 percent of the students who filled out the 2017-18 FAFSA received aid.

More than 23,800 students filled out the 2017-18 FAFSA. Thats more than 89 percent of all fulltime undergraduate students.

About 11 percent of all 26,642 full-time undergraduate students did not fill out the 2017-18 FAFSA. Source: Temple University Student Financial Services

Butler’s mother, Ulrike Geib, moved to the U.S. from Germany in her 20s and wasn’t familiar with FAFSA. The pair argued about which tax form to use and the financial questions, Butler said. In Fall 2016, about 15 percent of Temple’s incoming freshman and about 24 percent of transfer students had parents who didn’t attend college, according to the New Student Questionnaire. Corine White, a senior early childhood-elementary education major and first-generation college student, said the form contained a lot of jargon she had to interpret. And financial literacy classes weren’t offered at the Philadelphia High School for Creative and Performing Arts in South Philadelphia. White’s mother, Sharla White, suggested what to put down. But both of them were unsure what some questions meant, Corine White said.

JULIE CHRISTIE / THE TEMPLE NEWS

“I wasn’t sure how much FAFSA was actually going to help being that we didn’t know if we were filling out this information correctly or not,” Corine White added. Rachel Albert, a senior recreational therapy major and first-generation college student, said she never understood the form’s questions. “I just have so much trouble filling it out,” she said. “And then I think it’s done and Temple tells me it’s incomplete or filled it out wrong.” After all that work and stress, students aren’t guaranteed any or enough money to cover the costs of college. Student financial situations are becoming more complex, but funding for SFS meant to help students is limited, said Sara Goldrick-Rab, a higher educaFAFSA | PAGE 14 features@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 12

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

ALUMNI

Kalen Allen hits one-year milestone at ‘Ellen’ A year after moving to Los Angeles, Allen has his own webshow and will soon make his acting debut alongside Seth Rogen in a-yet-to-be-titled film. BY MADISON KARAS Campus Beat Reporter A year ago, Kalen Allen was the pinnacle of a busy Temple University senior. He was pursuing a double major, working five jobs and producing videos with his friends. Today, he’s a viral TV and internet star with his own webshow, a regular guest spot as a host and DJ on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show.” He has 3.8 million combined followers across his social media platforms and has been called the “next big thing” by the Hollywood Reporter. “I knew that my only job and all that I could do was to continue to follow my dream and work and see what happened from that,” said Allen, a 2018 theater and film and media arts alumnus. Marking his one-year anniversary working with Ellen DeGeneres, Allen appeared on the Jan. 7 episode of the comedian and talk show host’s program to reflect on his journey. DeGeneres surprised Allen by announcing he will cover New York Fashion Week 2019 and walk in one of the runway shows. Allen has covered events for the show like the 2018 MTV Video Music Awards and the 2018 Billboard Music Awards. Allen also discussed coming out as gay in the public eye and said he wants to do more outreach efforts for different communities, specifically the LGBTQ community. “I have a platform that I can really help and lift people up,” said Allen. “A way I would want to inspire people is to show them that anything is possible if you are just confident in it and believe in it and are your true self in that.” Allen will make his acting debut features@temple-news.com

VIA ELLENTUBE

alongside comedian and actor Seth Rogen in yet-to-be-titled Pickled comedy about a Jewish man, played by Rogen, who works at a pickle factory and is brined for 100 years after falling in a vat of pickles. Allen’s pathway through LA’s show business world began last January, when DeGeneres offered him a job producing video content after his comedic reaction videos critiquing cooking videos went viral. Allen now has his own series, “OMKalen,” on Ellentube, DeGeneres’ digital platform. Episodes garner millions of views and feature Allen giving tips to college students or traveling to Australia to react to local cuisine like Vegemite, an Australian spread used on toast. Allen said he hopes to expand his show to cover more experiences like these and make it more interactive. “People think reactions are limited to food videos, but I think my reactions can expand to anything, anything that is out of the ordinary for me,” he added. To actualize his dreams, Allen com-

pleted his last semester through the Los Angeles Study Away program after first appearing on DeGeneres’ show. “I had put all this work in, and all this time I had wanted my degrees,” Allen said. “It was important to me because I am a person who always believes in thinking ahead.” One of the most important things Temple gave Allen was his close friends and mentors from the theater department who he turned to for guidance during his move to Los Angeles, he added. “[Allen] really did make sure he had an end goal because he was not going to leave to LA without finishing his degree,” said Brandon McShaffrey, a theater and opera professor who worked with Allen in Temple Theaters. “He didn’t come to college not to finish, and he loved his time here.” Tyrell Mann-Barnes, a senior biology major, said he knew his best friend Allen was going to be famous since he met him in Fall 2014. “He already knew what his destiny

was and if anybody I felt had the power to manifest that, it was him,” MannBarnes said. Mann-Barnes and Allen have remained close friends despite living on different coasts. Allen said he is still adjusting to being on his own and finds people in LA have different interests than him, unlike what he experienced during his time at Temple. “College gives you accessibility to so many people,” he added. “I had surrounded myself with people that were hard-working and wanted to succeed in life as well, so it only pushed me to follow my dreams.” Allen has been willing to make his dream a reality, whether it was given to him or not, Mann-Barnes said. “It inspires people around him, not only to love him and admire him, but to also be bolder and to grow into who they truly are and to own who they truly are a little bit more unapologetically,” he added. . madison.karas@temple.edu @madraekaras

temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 13

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

SUSTAINABILITY

Greenhouse connects Temple, North Philadelphia Former students spent more than a year renovating a greenhouse to increase resident access to affordable produce. BY EMMA PADNER City Life Beat Reporter

Brett Riley biked past the same rundown greenhouse on Poplar Street every day during his commute to Temple University. He never thought twice about its torn, vandalized framework. When his senior design group needed a location for its proposed greenhouse, the 2018 mechanical engineering alumnus found himself recognizing the greenhouse’s potential. His mission changed: instead of building one, his group would help renovate it. “They happened to have a high tunnel greenhouse that was pretty beat up, and one thing led to another and we basically said, ‘Hey, we can help you out if you let us,’” Riley said. The greenhouse at the community garden on 8th and Poplar streets became the focus of Riley’s senior design project, a cumulative group assignment required by the College of Engineering. Riley’s team worked to renovate the high tunnel, which is an unheated, self-sustaining greenhouse that lengthens the growing season of the local community garden, which was founded in 2005. The high tunnel houses crops including heirloom tomatoes, lettuce, eggplants, basil, passionfruit, ginger and peppers. It allows the plants to grow in lower temperatures that would usually be too cold, increasing the garden’s production. Riley’s group spent one and a half years working on the project, and a new group will continue their efforts in Spring 2019. Marta Lynch, the farm manager and education director at the garden, said the renovation made the garden more functional and improved its ability to control plants’ environments. “We really had very minimal control before because of all the damages,” she @TheTempleNews

added. Riley and his team recognized the greenhouse would help the Poplar community access affordable produce and educate young students about urban farming. To keep costs down, the group focused on making the greenhouse self-sustainable. Riley’s groupmate and 2018 civil engineering alumna Gianna Makler has always been interested in sustainability. She focused on disconnecting the site’s irrigation system from municipal water by using a drip irrigation system that prevents water loss by capturing rainwater and sending it through the greenhouse via a solar-powered pump. “We thought, ‘OK, we’ll capture rainwater, we’ll use as much of it as we can and this way we don’t have to rely on the city water,’” Makler said. “‘They won’t have to pay those bills.’” Riley and Makler’s group had limited funding for the project, so they reached out to organizations, past senior design groups and OwlCrowd, Temple’s crowdfunding program, for support. The students received a solar panel and controller from a past group, donations from alumni and batteries from DECA, a tech and business nonprofit. Rouzbeh Tehrani, a civil and environmental engineering professor and 2013 civil and environmental engineering Ph.D. alumnus, worked closely with the group to renovate the garden. He was drawn to the project because of his own struggle accessing healthy, affordable food as a student, he said. “We do have a food desert issue [in North Philadelphia],” Tehrani said. “Even if you can afford it, it’s a serious commute to go to the grocery store. After that is the matter of affordability. Can you afford to have enough fruits and vegetables in your diet?” The Poplar community garden holds a farmers market on Wednesdays from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. from May to October. Riley, who lives in the area, buys most of his produce there, he said. The garden also provides educational opportunities for students ages 6-26.

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS A new group of students will continue to renovate the high tunnel at the community garden on 8th and Poplar streets, which will increase the amount of produce available to Poplar residents.

Lynch works closely with North Philadelphia schools and organizations, like the East Poplar Recreation Center, Philly Youth Network and PowerCorpsPHL to educate Philadelphians about urban gardening and healthy eating. “It’s definitely a space where a lot of love has gone into it from a lot of different people,” Lynch said. Both Makler and Tehrani hope the Poplar community garden can help bridge gaps between the North Philadel-

phia community and Temple. “The expansion of Temple into North Philadelphia has been gathering mixed feelings from the community,” Makler said. “I think we can all agree that these types of projects, where Temple students are getting involved with the community, brings that barrier down a little bit.” emma.padner@temple.edu @emmapadner

features@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 14

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

FAFSA CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

tion professor and founder of The Hope Center for College, Community and Justice. “We deserve more support from the state and from donors so that we can do this better,” she said. “... Financial aid officers essentially are being asked to act like social workers. You’re being asked to sit there and do this counseling about really complicated situations.” Jasmine McNeil, a junior psychology major, transferred to Temple in Fall 2018 from Rowan College at Burlington County, a New Jersey community college. It was her first time filing a FAFSA and the questions had her mind going in circles, she said. “I was putting down exactly what was on my mom’s tax return and it was saying things didn’t add up,” said McNeil, a first-generation college student. After receiving financial aid, McNeil owed about $5,000. She couldn’t get a loan, and couldn’t attend Temple this semester, she said. She plans to return in Fall 2019 after she saves up enough money. About 3.9 million students dropped out of college with federal student loan

debt in fiscal years 2015 and 2016, according to The Hechinger Report, a news outlet focusing on inequality in education. “If I knew what I know now, I would have saved probably $5,000 before I even went to school,” McNeil added.

INDEPENDENT STUDENTS

For students who do not receive any financial support from the parents, navigating the FAFSA can be a different and sometimes daunting task. A student’s dependency status determines whether or not their parent’s information is required to complete the FAFSA, according to the Federal Student Aid website. These questions help schools identify independent students. Emily Satifka, a 2014 political science alumna, said at first she wasn’t sure how to fill out her FAFSA because she was in the foster care system and emancipated from her parents. The Achieving Independence Center, a nonprofit in North Philadelphia that serves foster care youth, told Satifka about the dependency question for students who were in foster care. In the 2019-20 FAFSA, there are 10 dependency questions for students who are experiencing homelessness, emanci-

pated minors, veterans of the U.S. armed forces and more. Students who are 24 years old and up as of Dec. 31 are also considered independent. Students can request a change to their dependency status through their school’s financial aid office. Sandra Mejia, the associate director of SFS, leads a team that handles dependency override cases for students who can’t provide parent information. Estranged parents don’t qualify a student as independent, so those students can only receive unsubsidized loans from FAFSA that are not need-based, Mejia said. Goldrick-Rab said a number of students, especially LGBTQ students, don’t receive financial support from their parents. “If you have an assumption in the financial aid system that parents are paying for their so-called children, and they’re in fact not, then these are adults who are very much on their own when paying for school,” she said.

SEEKING HELP AND RESOURCES

Students commonly file incorrect tax information, don’t include the all necessary information or use the wrong income tax return, Mejia said. Income

ADAM GREWE Junior theater major

VOICES How do you pay for school?

features@temple-news.com

I actually don’t have a FAFSA because of a family situation, so I’m taking out student loans right now.

tax returns from 2017, the prior-prior year, are required for the 2019-20 FAFSA, which former President Barack Obama started in 2016. “The whole thought behind that is that we know in January people didn’t file their current tax returns. So right now, you could do your FAFSA because it’s based on an older tax return,” Mejia said. To reduce FAFSA filing woes, the form should be completed early to meet school and state deadlines, and students should start applying for scholarships now, Mejia added. Students can use iGrad, a financial resource located in TUportal’s Costs and Aid tab, to find scholarships and directions for filing the FAFSA. The SFS office is hosting a walkin workshop to help students file the 2019-20 FAFSA on Feb. 17 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Carnell Hall. But the office always allows students to walk in with questions, Mejia said. “It doesn’t matter what your question is,” Mejia said. “You can always come in and speak to somebody.” zari.tarazona@temple.edu @sorryzari

SOOHYUN KIM Freshman pharmaceutical sciences major I use FAFSA and I get some financial aid and my parents pay for it. I don’t work, sadly, but in the future, I guess I’ll pay my parents back.

JAGADEESH GUMMADI Freshman biology major

KATE SCHAEFER Sophomore recreational therapy major

My parents help me out and I have a scholarship here.

My parents saved up a lot of money, so they’re paying for half of it and I’m taking out loans for the other half. Grad school is on my plate, too. temple-news.com


FEATURES TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

PAGE 15

LIVE IN PHILLY

Music writer pens in-depth book on Jimi Hendrix

Acclaimed music writer and author Frank Moriarty celebrated the release of his 15th book “Modern Listener Guide: Jimi Hendrix” on Saturday at Tattooed Mom, a bar on South Street near 6th. The event featured an author conversation and Q&A session about his latest work. “I wanted to use my perspective as a musician and music writer to synthesize Hendrix’s technical approach in a way that people could understand,” Moriarty said. “Nothing beat the first time seeing him,” he told the fans who filled the upstairs of the popular dive bar. Before releasing the book, Moriarty spent about 10 years writing about rock and roll as a weekly columnist for the Philadelphia City Paper, which stopped publishing in 2015. Attendees debated about which was the best Hendrix performance of all time, and asked questions about Hendrix’s family life and how he and his band financed their instruments during their early days. @TheTempleNews

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS features@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 16

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

MLK CROSSWORD

WINTER WORD SEARCH F

U

L

Y

Q

N K

S

S

N

J

I

I

Y

L

O

T M N

F

E

M T G

R

B M F

L

E

M N M J

P

R

B

R

G

L

Y

O

I

M C

E

J

P

F

T

S

A

F

U

Y M L

E

C

L M T

I

N M K

A R

J

T

A D W A

I

H

F

N A

C

R

Y

T

E

R

E

A N O

A

Y

N

Z

S

E

K

E

Z O

E

N

I

E

C

L

O U

1

2

M L E

E

D

U M

A N A W U I

G

T

S

O

D

N U

C

C

D

I

Y

A

S

T O

E

I

E

R

N E

O

E

H

L

K

N

F

O

E

N

L

N C

S

S M Z

U

S

L

F

S

S

T

E

Z

I

S

A

T

E

I

T M O

I

R

H A

E

E

D

T

J O

I

V

H M X

C M

T

V

C

R

L

O

E

C

E

N U

U

E

I

B

Y

F

I

O

B

U

A

E

C

T

D

Y

U

N

D

P

N E

O M U M Z

R

Z

H R M

I

O

BLIZZARD HOT CHOCOLATE FIREPLACE CHIMNEY EARMUFFS SCARF MITTENS FLANNEL

3

BOOTS SNOW ICE SKATING SKIING SLEDDING JACK FROST SOLSTICE

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 11

U

12

DOWN: 1. Musician who wrote the song “Happy Birthday” in support of establishing a national Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday 5. President who signed a law making King’s birthday a federal holiday 6. From a jail cell in this city, King penned a letter criticizing white moderates 8. Government agency that extensively investigated King for possible Communist ties ACROSS: 2. King won this international award in 1964

4. Representative who first introduced legislation to establish a federal holiday honoring King 7. King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of this national monument 9. King protested with striking sanitation workers on the night before his assassination in this city 10. King’s home state 11. King was named this magazine’s Man of the Year in 1963 12. Woman who directed a film dramatizing King’s march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama

3. King stood behind President Lyndon B. Johnson as he signed this bill into law in 1964 Answers from Tuesday, January 15: 1. Liacouras Center, 2. Hall & Oates, 3. John Chaney, 4. Acres of Diamonds, 5. Ann Weaver Hart, 6. Peabody Hall, 7. Japan, 8. Bob Saget, 9. Sonia Sanchez, 10. Stella, 11. Founder’s Garden, 12. Baptist Temple, 13. Cecil B. Moore

features@temple-news.com

temple-news.com


INTERSECTION TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

POLITICS

PAGE 17

Dress like a Congresswoman

Along with Omar and Ocasio-CorStudents discuss if there is importance in the fashion tez, Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., representchoices made by female ed her culture by wearing a thobe, a traditional Palestinian gown. Deb Haapoliticians and leaders.

BY ALESIA BANI For The Temple News “Next time someone tells Bronx girls to take off their hoops, they can just say they’re dressing like a Congresswoman.” United States Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., tweeted that message on Jan. 4 after receiving attention for wearing hoop earrings and red lipstick at her swearing-in ceremony. Her outfit choices have met criticism from some conservatives — and heightened support from many others. Ocasio-Cortez said her all-white outfit was inspired by suffragettes and her hoops and lipstick came from Supreme Court Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who ignored advice from the Obama administration to avoid wearing bright-colored nail polish to her Supreme Court confirmation hearings in order to avoid scrutiny. Ocasio-Cortez is one of the record 131 women serving in the 116th Congress, which has more women of color than any other Congress. Several women sworn in earlier this month paid tribute to their roots during their swearing-in ceremonies. At Temple University, some students said these female politicians’ fashion choices sent a powerful message about culture and individuality. “How a woman dresses can be very powerful,” said Karin Naktin, a freshman chemistry major. “Especially in this day and age as more women are moving into a higher political standing.” Naktin follows political news and said Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., serves as a role model for young girls who wear headscarves. Omar is one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress and wears a hijab. @TheTempleNews

land, D-N.M., wore a traditional Native American dress. Haaland is a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe and is one of the first Native American women to be elected to Congress. While the women’s decisions to wear cultural dress was empowering, some students felt placing too much worth on what female politicians wear took away from the emphasis on their policies and actions. “Focusing on what a woman politician is wearing rather than their policies puts us back a few years,” freshman business and management major Addison Elizabeth Whittemore said. “Female politicians should wear whatever they deem fit as long as it is professional,” she added. Stylish women in politics hold a lot of power — and value — in the fashion industry. Michelle Obama generated $2.7 billion in value for brands she wore in the first year after former President Barack Obama’s election, Collective Culture Magazine reported. Additionally, Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton’s “Kate Effect,” the idea that if Kate Middleton wears it, everyone else will want to buy it, is estimated to be worth $1 billion Euros to the United Kingdom’s fashion industry, Newsweek reported. Focusing on women’s physical appearances is not wrong, but unbalanced, said Patricia Amberg-Blyskal, a political science professor. “Rather than saying it’s not something that should be discussed ever, perhaps [we should ask], ‘Why is it something that comes up with one gender and not the other gender?’” Amberg-Blyskal said. “Is that something that we should explore?” At the 2015 Women in the World Summit, Theresa May, the prime minis-

NICOLE HWANG / THE TEMPLE NEWS

ter of the United Kingdom, said women can be intelligent and like fashion at the same time. “I’m a woman, I like clothes,” May said. “One of the challenges for women in politics, in business, in all areas of working life, is to be ourselves, and to say you can be clever and like clothes.” It is important to prioritize the person’s politics and not to focus on someone’s physical traits or clothes, Amberg-Blyskal said.

“Although we might have commented on someone’s choice of lipstick or jewelry…we [should] move past it,” Amberg-Blyskal said. If politicians’ fashion choices get people engaged in political conversations, it could be beneficial, she added. “In some way, something caught their attention,” she said. alesia.bani@temple.edu

intersection@temple-news.com


INTERSECTION PAGE 18

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

FASHION

Students remove labels from gendered fashion Students discuss androgynous will think they can use she/her profashion and why they are not nouns,” Beadie said. “That’s definitely a struggle I’ve noticed in the gender nonconforming to gender rules. BY LAUREN REMY For The Temple News Some Temple University students are opting for gender-fluid wardrobes to defy stereotypes and allow room for self-expression. Most clothing lines are tailored to a gender binary. But this is changing on campus and across the country. A November 2018 GQ article declared that “gender fluid fashion is the future.” Brands like GFW Clothing, an English gender-marker free line, have begun to market clothing for the body rather than gender. Olivia Potter, a freshman graphic and interactive design major, said her androgynous style was judged in her hometown of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, but more accepted on Main Campus. “Sometimes, I would feel insecure for not being feminine enough for how I dress,” Potter added. “For women, that’s an expectation. But being in Philadelphia, I feel like there’s less pressure to be that way, but in the suburbs, there’s more of an expectation.” Potter wears clothes that showcase her personality rather than what groups to which she might identify with, like her gender, sexuality or political affiliation. “I like being different,” Potter said. “[Fashion] is a way to make me individual to myself rather than grouped together.” Carmen Beadie, a freshman theater major, said they’ve noticed pressure in the gender nonconforming community to wear androgynous clothing. Beadie identifies as nonbinary and shops in both the women’s and men’s sections of clothing stores. “I definitely am a bit nervous about dressing feminine because then people

intersection@temple-news.com

conforming community.” “Fashion is gendered but it shouldn’t be,” Beadie added. Dustin Kidd, a sociology professor at Temple, said the definition of gender can be influenced by the structures of different societal institutions. “Fashion is one of those institutions,” Kidd said. “Fashion tells women they can be better women and men that they can be more manly or demonstrate wealth and power.” The fashion industry often “doubles down” on gender binaries to sell products, he added. That means clothing is targeted toward men or women, not people who identify as nonbinary, to profit. “Fashion is committed to ideas about gender that makes us want to buy more things,” Kidd said. Thatcher Williams, a junior public relations major, also shops in both men’s and women’s sections of stores and prioritizes self-expression over conforming to rigid expectations for gender and sexuality. Williams became interested in fashion at a young age and drew inspiration from feminine styles in shows like “Sailor Moon.” “I’ve always been very interested in femininity and how fashion is so integral to expressing yourself,” he said. “Your gender does not mean you have to dress a certain way.” For Autumn Wallace, a 2018 painting and ceramics alumna, fashion is a tool to gain confidence in social environments. Her outfits are theatrical personas that help her act extroverted despite being introverted, she said. Sometimes, she will wear sequined pants or pair a gray wig with a ruffled Victorian shirt. Wallace does not deliberately reference gender with her clothing, but she likes to wear outfits that people may not

LAUREN REMY / THE TEMPLE NEWS

expect her to wear. As a person of color, she challenges these expectations by thinking about how she can defy media stereotypes in environments where there are no other people of color around, she said. “A lot of times, people will have assumptions,” Wallace said. “Just put-

ting on the outfit of the area without fitting into the look of the area or what people are used to [makes a statement]. Race and gender really are interesting things to play with.” laremy@temple.edu

temple-news.com


INTERSECTION PAGE 19

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

THE ESSAYIST

Fashion: My intercultural communication tool An international student from China writes about the fashion differences in China and the United States. BY SIYUN AI For The Temple News “I love your outfit. Where did you get it?” “China.” “Seriously?” This must be the perfect way to start a friendship in the United States, because I’ve participated in this conversation more than 20 times — on the street, the subway, in a shopping mall or even the women’s restroom — since coming here from China in 2017. At first, I didn’t know how to respond to these random compliments on my clothing. In China, girlfriends show peace and love to each other through teasing. My best friend from China never complimented my new dresses, but would instead joke about how I shouldn’t expose my “elephant legs” by wearing them. I have strong legs because I am a former sprinter and basketball player, but in China, a size-4 woman like me is considered fat. I took these comments to heart, and, for a long time, I hated my big legs. I seldom wore pants because I felt fat in them and I would start fights with my mom, blaming her for giving me “elephant legs.” As I encountered more and more compliments here, my perception of myself and my legs started to change. To my surprise, I am not fat at all in America. Instead, people tell me I have sexy legs and a beautiful shape. To better understand these oddbut-nice interactions, I started to ask my American friends if it was normal for Americans to compliment a stranger’s outfit. Some of my friends told me these compliments were genuine, some told me they were considered polite and others told me the person was most likely less interested in my outfit than they @TheTempleNews

Siyun Ai, a second-year media studies and production master’s student, in the Student Center on Monday.

were in me. Nonetheless, these beautiful encounters gave me valuable intercultural communication skills that would help me initiate conversations with strangers and interact with others in America. They also became useful tools to build my self-confidence. Fashion became a magic string to connect me with other people, and myself. I learned that by mimicking compliments as simple as “I like your pants,” I could brighten a stranger’s day on the morning subway, and they could brighten mine. I started to admire myself in mirrors and became grateful to my mom for giving me such powerful legs. I paid more attention to people’s outfits and became more aware of the differences between day-to-day Asian and American fashions. Women in China wear skirts and dresses more often than they wear pants.

I didn’t realize how frequently I now wear denim jeans and black pants until a friend from China pointed this out to me on social media. In America, or at least in Philadelphia, women tend to dress more sporty and casual. A common outfit is a hoody or dark-colored sweater with striped joggers or sweatpants. When I returned to China for winter break, it was the opposite. Women wore light pastel sweaters with skirts and pantyhose, trench coats and long boots for public outings. When it comes to business attire, Chinese and American professionals dress more similarly. But, Chinese people have a more conservative approach to their choice of tie and button-up shirts than Americans. When I was in middle school and high school in China, a lot of my teachers and professors wore navy blue or dark grey suits paired with stark-white shirts. Even students were required to

DYLAN LONG / THE TEMPLE NEWS

wear uniforms on weekdays — oversized blazers and slacks. Many of us disliked these uniforms, which may be the reason women in China love to wear skirts and dresses after they graduate from high school. Although some of my professors at Temple still wear a suit and tie for important occasions, I more often see them wearing business casual, but unrevealing outfits. On the other hand, Chinese people tend to dress more casually for informal occasions than Americans do. In any country, I’ve learned knowledge of fashion helps us create good first impressions and succeed professionally. Fashion is more than just a greeting skill. It is an introduction to show people who you really are. siyun.ai@temple.edu

intersection@temple-news.com


INTERSECTION PAGE 20

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

FASHION

Redefining fashion: ‘Fashion doesn’t fit into a box’ Several student fashion organizations center themselves around size and racial diversity. BY TARA DOLL For The Temple News In fashion, it’s easy to get swept up in bright colors and bold accessories. But when it comes to size and gender standards for runway models and clothing advertisements, some Temple University students said they noticed the fashion world can appear limiting. In an article by The Fashion Spot, the site evaluated demographics of 192 Fall 2018 fashion print ads. Out of the 530 models who starred in campaigns, 34.5 percent were non-white, an increase from 15.3 percent in fall 2015. But representation of plus-sized models hit a record low in 2018 with 1.3 percent represented. For Teresa Montoni, the founder and president of FETCH, the first fashion-focused student organization in the Klein College of Media and Communication, fashion needs to be redefined to be truly inclusive. First, people must remove society’s labels on how a person can express themself. “The fashion industry has been notorious for putting labels on gender and putting labels on gendered fashion,” Montoni said. “[True] Fashion doesn’t have a label and it doesn’t have a size,” she added. “Fashion doesn’t fit into a box.” Montoni does not want the industry’s standards to affect a person’s fashion choice, she added. “People wear all different types of styles in fashion,” Montoni said. “[Gender] shouldn’t have a label on the type of fashion that you see yourself as. I think that’s something that people think too much into as something that needs a

intersection@temple-news.com

type of restriction.” Montoni became aware of the lack of inclusivity in the fashion industry at a young age when she discovered that she had to shop at stores catered to plus-sized women and girls. She does not have a problem with this, because as long as her body-type is shown and respected, she is included in the fashion world. Taylor Zubkousky, the vice president of the Fashion and Business Club in the Fox School of Business said she noticed the fashion industry expanding their standards of beauty this year. “Everyone wants to see themselves represented and if you don’t see someone that looks like you on a product then you might not be as attracted to it,” Zubkousky said. She applauded fashion lines like Tommy Hilfiger’s “Tommy Adaptive” for marketing accessible clothing for

CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

people with disabilities. “That is something that was really awesome that’s going to continue to be something of conversation with other brands,” Zubkousky said. Spring 2019 runway shows proved to be the most racially diverse in fashion history. A total of 36.1 percent of models on the runway were models of color. This was spanned over 229 fashion shows and 7,431 model castings in New York, Paris, Milan and London, according to The Fashion Spot. “It’s gotten better, but it’s still not where it needs to be,” Garcia said. “If you look at the top paid models, rarely is there a person of color. I just don’t see that many, and when I do see people of color, it is mostly light-skinned people, not dark-skinned.”

Currently, the FETCH team is working to create a representative magazine by including ethnic styles, hair and backgrounds, attempting to embed more international cultures into its work. FETCH plans to bring light to those who are viewed as “out of the norm,” Montoni said. “Temple has a huge diverse campus,” Montoni said. “It would be a sin not to even explore that. That’s the way that we’re going into diversity is looking at those other fashion statements from other parts of the world, like Vogue India, Vogue Paris. There’s a lot more in fashion than U.S. fashion.” tara.doll@temple.edu

temple-news.com


SPORTS PAGE 21

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

FIELD HOCKEY

Newly hired coach strives for ‘winning culture’ Susan Ciufo will inherit a program that went 21-55 in four seasons under its former coach. BY JAY NEEMEYER Field Hockey Beat Reporter Susan Ciufo is tasked with turning around Temple University’s field hockey program that hasn’t had a winning season in four years. Ciufo will replace former coach Marybeth Freeman, who resigned on Nov. 8 after posting a 21-55 record in four seasons. Deputy Director of Athletics Craig Angelos hopes that Ciufo can help the team win more games, beat Big East Conference powerhouse Connecticut, win a conference title and go to the NCAA Tournament. Athletic director Patrick Kraft believes Ciufo — who led Division II Stonehill College to three NCAA Tournament appearances in four seasons — can “restore a culture of winning” to the field hockey program, he wrote in a press release on Thursday. “[Ciufo] set herself apart with her passion for coaching, desire to succeed and her emphasis on developing the student-athlete as a whole,” Kraft wrote. Ciufo is taking over a program that won two games last season and has not defeated a conference opponent since 2016. She is excited to change that, she told The Temple News on Friday. “Most people are a little afraid of transition and change,” Ciufo added. “But I’ve gone through it. If it’s done properly, it can be really, really positive.” Prior to her time at Stonehill, Ciufo served as an assistant coach for two seasons at Drexel, her alma mater. Ciufo played for the Dragons from 2007-10 and started every game in her career. She started her coaching career as an assistant and interim coach at Lehigh University during the 2011 and 2012 seasons. @TTN_Sports @TheTempleNews

Wins and Losses: Ciufo’s coaching career

Before coming to Temple, Ciufo served as the head coach for Stonehill College, earning a 54-27 record in four years. She previously worked as an assistant coach at Drexel and Lehigh University. Losses Wins 13 6

Lehigh University 2011-12

14 3 7 13

Drexel University 2013-14

8 10 7 14 6 14

Stonehill College 2015-2018

7 13 7 13

Source: Lehigh University Athletics, Drexel Athletics, Temple University Athletics

Having two coaching stops in Eastern Pennsylvania gives her familiarity with Temple’s recruiting area, which made Ciufo stand out in the coaching search, Angelos said. Ciufo’s experience as a head coach was appealing to Angelos. During her past four seasons in Massachusetts at Stonehill, Ciufo amassed a 54-27 record. “A lot of people think they can do a good job [as a head coach], and maybe they can, but they’ve never had the opportunity yet,” Angelos said. “We liked that aspect that she’d actually been a head coach and actually went, won, and ran a great program.” Ciufo told the team she wants to de-

velop close-knit relationships with every player, senior forward Lucy Reed said. Ciufo wants to set small goals in hopes of helping Temple achieve its first winning season since 2014, Reed added. “[Ciufo] came in with the perfect focus,” Reed said. “Seeing as our record is 2-16, she really knew that there’s a ton of room for improvement. Regardless of what happened with the coaching change, it was the accountability piece. And just these small goals, taking it game by game to just have a more improved season from this last season.” Ciufo will determine her coaching staff by mid-February. Angelos hopes Ross Gilham-Jones, who served as the

IAN WALKER / THE TEMPLE NEWS

interim coach and interviewed for the head coach position, will remain on Ciufo’s staff to gain more college coaching experience. “We’re considering anybody for our positions and making sure we’re meeting with the staff that’s here right now, giving them that opportunity,” Ciufo said. “So I’m really open, and making sure I just have the right people around me is key.” jay.neemeyer@temple.edu @neemeyer_jay

sports@temple-news.com


SPORTS PAGE 22

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

TRACK AND FIELD

Freshman’s performance is ‘ahead of the curve’

Great Dane Classic in Albany, New York typical outdoor tracks, Forde said. But Marissa White has finished in the other coaches I had spoken to.” Some of the best runners in the on Jan. 12, she finished third with a time White is still exceeding expectations detop-10 in eight of her nine events world hail from islands in the West In- of 57.72 seconds. She bested that time on spite never running indoors before. at the Owls’ first four meets.

BY DONOVAN HUGEL Track and Field Beat Reporter Once Bahamas native Marissa White found out Temple University track and field coach Elvis Forde was from Barbados, she knew she wanted to come to Temple. Forde, trying to widen the team’s international reach, recruited freshman sprinter White last summer. She is one of three freshman runners from the West Indies who committed to Temple. “I was largely influenced by the positive attitude I experienced in first speaking to coach Forde,” White added. “The way he went about the recruiting process was what set him apart from the

dies. As a freshman, White’s proved to be one of the best. This season, she’s finished in the top 10 in eight of her nine events at the first four meets. White’s main event is the 400-meter dash, and she has contributed to the Owls’ 4-x-400 relay team and the 300. After running the 400 in 58.65 seconds in the season opener, White has cut her time in each of her other two 400 races. “She’s making sure to do all of the small things that can help her get better,” Forde said. “I can’t ask for a better person. When she’s done, she continues to ask questions about how she can be better and what she needs to keep doing.” As one of Temple’s two freshmen competing at the Lehigh Season Opener last month White won the 400. At the

Saturday at the Penn 8-Team Select with a fifth-place finish in 57.29 seconds. At Lehigh, White ran the final leg of the 4-x-400 relay to help Temple earn a comeback victory. She also helped the 4-x-400 relay team finish third at the Seahawk Shootout in Staten Island, New York on Dec. 7, 2018 and 10th at the Great Dane Classic. White grabbed her second individual win of the year on Dec. 7 by running the 300 in 39.75 seconds. “It’s good to see what my results are, and I’m hoping to keep progressing in a good direction,” White said. Indoor track can be difficult for freshmen because of its “aggressive” nature as runners push for a position on a track that is a shorter distance than

“It can be very discouraging for an athlete, especially when they get pushed around,” Forde said. “Her being new to it and we try to teach her how to be able to push a little bit to kind of get position.” White will continue to race in the 400, Forde said, but will also compete in the 200 to improve her speed over time. “She’s very focused so she has some goals and expectations that she has for herself, which makes it easier for me because now my job is to help put her in that position to be extremely successful,” Forde added. “But she is, I would say, ahead of the curve at this time.” donovan.hugel@temple.edu @donohugel

ADVERTISEMENT

sports@temple-news.com

temple-news.com


SPORTS PAGE 23

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

FOOTBALL

Former lineman stands out among NFL prospects Michael Dogbe recorded two tackles in Saturday’s East-West Shrine Game college showcase. BY MICHAEL ZINGRONE Co-Sports Editor Michael Dogbe ended his Temple career by earning a single-digit number and leading the Owls in tackles for loss and sacks. Now, the former Temple defensive lineman is preparing to join the professional ranks. He and other NFL Draft prospects played in the annual EastWest Shrine Game on Saturday in St. Petersburg, Florida. In the week leading up to the game, players participated in drills to showcase their skills in front of NFL scouts and executives. Dogbe turned scouts’ heads in the week leading up to the game, holding his own against Power Five offensive lineman, an NFL scout who attended the game told The Temple News. Former Temple safety Delvon Randall also participated in practices, but he could not play in the game because of an injury. Dogbe garnered attention on Twitter during the week. He shedded former University of Georgia offensive lineman Lamont Gaillard and former University of Mississippi center Sean Rawlings’s blocks in a pass-rushing drill. He also recorded a tackle for loss from the defensive end position on Saturday during his first snap of the game. Dogbe finished the game Saturday with two tackles and a tackle for loss. “It’s all about getting recognition,” Dogbe told The Temple News Friday. “I just came down here to compete and have a good time, but people took notice. I wanted to show scouts what I can do on the football field and just to see some things trending on Twitter...it’s pretty cool.” In an article analyzing players’ per-

@TTN_Sports @TheTempleNews

GENEVA HEFFERNAN / FILE PHOTO Former defensive tackle Michael Dogbe strip sacks Cincinnati then-redshirt freshman quarterback Desmond Ridder during the Owls’ 24-17 win on Oct. 20, 2018 at Lincoln Financial Field.

formances during the week, Bleacher Report’s leading NFL Draft expert Matt Miller reported that Dogbe “had a dominant Shrine Game week.” “During practices, one area scout praised Dogbe’s motor and ability to beat big blockers with a bull rush,” Miller wrote. “His versatility as a defensive lineman and polished tools as a pass-rusher make him a solid selection — one who’s able to get onto an NFL field early.” Versatility is one of the traits that stood out while evaluating Dogbe, which makes him an intriguing prospect, the NFL scout said. At Temple, Dogbe mostly played defensive tackle and nose tackle, and he sometimes played defensive end.

At the Shrine Game practices, Dogbe played all over the defensive line. “It was good for me, just learning new techniques and receiving NFL coaching,” Dogbe said. Miller wrote that Dogbe’s experience playing on the edge on a three-man defensive line makes him versatile. Most years, Dogbe would be a lateround draft pick, but because of the high number of strong defensive line prospects in the 2019 NFL Draft, Dogbe could go anywhere from the fourthround to being undrafted, the NFL scout said. “I talked to just about every team down here a good amount,” Dogbe said. “They are all saying good things. They

like what I did my [final] year, and they told me to just keep doing what I’m doing and continue to be Michael.” Dogbe hopes to continue Temple’s three-year streak of having defensive players selected in the NFL draft. “Everyone’s gonna question, ‘You’re coming from Temple, can you go against the bigger schools, can you compete against those type of guys,’” Dogbe said. “I just wanted to show that us Temple guys can compete with anybody, anywhere.” michael.zingrone@temple.edu @mjzingrone Sam Neumann contributed reporting.

sports@temple-news.com


SPORTS PAGE 24

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

MEN’S BASKETBALL

EVERY

EVERY SINGLE NIGHT

POSSESION

PHOTOS BY SYDNEY SCHAEFER , COLLEEN CLAGGETT DESIGN BY CLAIRE HALORAN

Sophomore guard Nate PierreLouis’ all-around play has helped the Owls win 14 of its first 18 games. BY SAM NEUMANN Co-Sports Editor

N

ate Pierre-Louis is the most animated — and aggressive — player on the court. After last season, former Temple University point guard Josh Brown graduated, leaving a spot open in the Owls’ (14-4, 4-1 American Athletic Conference) backcourt. Pierre-Louis seized it. The sophomore guard has started all 18 games and is the team’s third-leading scorer with 14.1 points per game. During his freshman year, Pierre-Louis saw consistent minutes off the bench. He was named to The American’s 2018 All-Rookie Team and was the Owls’ third-leading scorer in conference games with 9.9 points per game. With an uptick in minutes this season, Pierre-Louis said he wants to be a more all-around player. He emulates NBA players like Avery Bradley, who has made the All-Defensive team twice and averages 12 points per game for sports@temple-news.com

He wants to do it himself and sometimes it’s gonna work for us, and other times it’s gonna hurt him a little bit, but I wouldn’t trade him for the world.

his career. In addition to his scoring, Pierre-Louis is second on the team with 1.9 steals per game. “I try to play as hard as I can every single night, every possession,” Pierre-Louis said. “Even if I’m having a bad shooting game, I want to keep going, just keep going downhill, keep attacking.” Even during his bad games, Pierre-Louis doesn’t quit. On Saturday against Penn, Pierre-Louis had four turnovers in the first half. But in the second half, he scored six straight points to cut the Owls’ deficit from 11 points down to five with less than two minutes to play in the Owls’ 77-70 loss. Pierre-Louis’ persistence on the of-

fensive end has paid off in Temple’s past seven games. FRAN DUNPHY In that span, HEAD COACH Pierre-Louis averaged 19 points per game and scored at least 20 points four times. In the first 11 games of the season, he averaged 11 points per game. Pierre-Louis earned league-wide and city recognition for his play during the seven-game stretch. On Jan. 14, he earned Player of the Week honors from The American and Big 5 following his performances against Houston and South Florida. He helped Temple upset nationally ranked and previously unbeaten Hous-

ton on Jan. 9 by scoring 18 points, making 9-of-10 free-throw attempts and grabbing four rebounds. He followed that performance with 22 points, including an 8-for-8 mark from the free-throw line, against USF. As part of being an assertive allaround player, Pierre-Louis focused on improving his rebounding. Pierre-Louis is second on the team with 105 rebounds behind senior center Ernest Aflakpui. Pierre-Louis pulled in a career-high 13 rebounds in both the season-opener against La Salle and the Owls’ win against Saint Joseph’s on Dec. 1. He has grabbed at least five boards in 10 games this season. While his aggressive approach on offense can result in turnovers, coach Fran Dunphy said his high-energy approach makes up for his mistakes. “[Pierre-Louis is] one of those guys who is trying to win every game,” Dunphy added. “He wants to do it himself and sometimes it’s gonna work for us, and other times it’s gonna hurt him a little bit, but I wouldn’t trade him for the world.” sam.neumann@temple.edu @SamNeu_

temple-news.com

Profile for The Temple News

Vol. 97 Iss. 16  

Jan. 22, 2019

Vol. 97 Iss. 16  

Jan. 22, 2019

Advertisement