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LIVING A roaring marketing campaign is spreading Temple’s colors throughout campus and the city.

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temple-news.com VOL. 91 ISS. 3

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

PHILLY FASHION, p. 9 Fashion’s Night Out comes to Philadelphia for the first time.

CST dean hones in on faculty recruiting An interim dean took the helm after the former dean became interim provost. JOHN MORITZ Assistant News Editor There are two personal objects in Michael Klein’s office on the fourth floor of Conwell Hall. One, a convocation gown hanging on the back of the door in a dry-cleaning sleeve, is a remnant of Klein’s first official duty as the interim dean of the College of Science and Technology. The second, a plain looking office chair, was brought in after the former occupant of the space, former dean Hai-Lung Dai, took it with him when he left to take on his current position of interim provost. “As you can see, I haven’t had much time to unpack,” Klein said in an interview last week. Klein, who was hired in July to assume the role of interim dean of CST, has been spending the majority of the last two months leading his college through the construction of a research center, hiring more faculty, developing service programs and preparing for the start of a new semester with fresh faces. Klein, whose background comes in researching the way molecules behave, said that he was surprised when administrators first asked him to fill the role of interim dean. “I was kind of pleased that the provost had this confidence in me to fulfill the role,” Klein said. Dai and Klein worked together for more than 20 years at the University of Pennsylvania, where Dai was the chair of the chemistry department, sharing a relationship Klein described as “close personal friends.” Dai was appointed to the role of dean of CST in 2007, and was faced with the tasks of hiring new faculty, developing programs and beginning the design on a new facility for the college. “Dai, when he moved across here, really had in mind to improve the place on every level,” Klein said. “Being interim dean is really holding the steering wheel and not losing any of the momentum that was built up by now [Interim] Provost Dai.” Since 2007, CST has hired 42 tenured, or tenure-track faculty members, Preston Moretz, a staff writer for University Communications, said in an email. Between 2009 and 2012, 15 faculty members at CST have retired and an additional 12 are expected to retire during the current academic year. The hiring of new faculty will continue to be one of the focal points of his administration at CST, Klein said. “I think we need to hire at

UNPARALLELED MOMENT, p. 5

John Moritz reflects on 9/11 and how it shapes the past and future for Generation Y.

MAKING MISTAKES, p. 20

The football team turned the ball over five times in its 36-27 loss against Maryland.

Growing party scene invites unruly visitors As students move west of Main Campus, students from other schools flock to Temple. ALI WATKINS The Temple News

F

riday nights at Temple are fairly standard for a large university. The week’s final class is dismissed and homes that normally remain quiet during the week begin to awaken west of Main Campus. In just a few hours, kegs will be tapped, parties will start and stereos will be turned up. But this thriving Temple party scene is no longer a haven reserved for those taking classes in North Philadelphia. During the past three years, Campus Safety Services has seen a rise in the number of

non-Temple students coming up North Broad Street and getting in trouble, including one incident on Aug. 26, in which a student from another university was charged with disorderly conduct after a group near 18th and Arlington streets tried to flip a Temple shuttle bus. “It seems like every time we get groups of individuals, there’s always about a third [who are] non-students,” Deputy Director of CSS Charlie Leone said. “A lot of stuff is anecdotal…we’re trying to figure out how to get our hands on it.” With such a large school in one of the country’s biggest cities, the allure of Temple is tangible, according to

some students. “This is a totally different experience,” sophomore theater major Matt Zarley said. “[Other schools] have big parties and stuff, but it’s not the same as walking through [Philadelphia], and getting that feel, having the pulse of the city around you.” Although Temple is often considered synonymous with Philadelphia, Leone indicates an explosion in off-campus housing, particularly west of Main Campus, is most likely the culprit. “That west side has really developed. There were areas that a couple of years ago that were just open properties, and now they’re putting new buildings up,” Leone

said, indicating that the first noticeable increase in numbers occurred during 2009. “These last three years, it’s really started to take off.” The area off, but near, Main Campus houses approximately 7,000 students, according to university estimates. The density of student housing, combined with the benefits of city life, create a cocktail for college partying that Leone said is convenient for people from other universities. “You have access to a lot of transportation here, it’s a city. If you can’t get here by car, you can certainly get here by most public transportation,” Leone explained. “[You have] the density of

PARTIES PAGE 2

KATE McCANN TTN

Theobald lays out goals for first year Months before he takes office, Theobald meets with current Temple leaders. SEAN CARLIN News Editor A month after being approved by the Board of Trustees as Temple’s 10th president, Dr. Neil Theobald visited Main Campus last weekend in order to gain a handle on what needs to be done before he takes office in January. Theobald told The Temple News that his visit to Main Campus this weekend included meetings with business leaders, dinner with donors and meetings with the current cabinet at Temple about issues surrounding the university. Theobald said that among the issues at his new job, “item one has been financial aid.” He said he’s met so far with Interim Provost Hai-Lung Dai about financial aid and how to keep costs down, along with Senior Vice President for Institutional Advancement David Unruh, to discuss fundraising. While he said that financial aid is a top issue at Temple, Theobald noted that it’s a hot topic at most other universities and spoke about how to keep education affordable without lowering quality in the classroom. “It does no good to cut the cost, if you cut the quality,” Theobald said. “The way I think about that, is that cost containment that is farthest from the classroom is where we start first. We need top faculty, experienced faculty in the classroom.” Theobald spoke about ways

PRESIDENT PAGE 2

TSG hosts first meeting of year The new executive office led the first General Assembly meeting. LAURA DETTER The Temple News Temple Student Government held its initial meeting of the semester yesterday, Sept. 10, as TSG Student Body President David Lopez led the General Assembly proceedings for the first time. Lopez, alongside TSG Vice President of Services Julian Hamer and TSG Vice President of External Affairs Ofo Ezeugwu, welcomed student organizations and guests to a new year. “I want to see TSG accomplish everything students want to accomplish, within the realm of what we do,” Lopez said.

KLEIN PAGE 2

NEWS DESK 215-204-7419

In an effort to reduce the General Assembly meeting times, the officers held a 28-minute meeting that highlighted changes within the TSG structure. The main changes consisted of the addition of a director of governmental affairs, permanent positions within the communication team and the reorganization of the allocations committee. Lopez said he believes that the changes in the allocations committee, which include the elimination of paper applications and the addition of two co-chairs, will make it easier for student organizations to access information. “It was a big issue in the past and we think we’ve targeted those issues,” Lopez, who interned in the White House this summer, said. The attendees also voiced their opinions when it came to TSG Student Body President David Lopez speaks at the first General Assembly meeting yesterday. This was his first meeting as president.| ABI REIMOLD TTN

TSG PAGE 3

NEWS@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM


NEWS temple-news.com

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

Non-students offer new challenge to CSS Position in PARTIES PAGE 1 population of students living in these areas. If you have hundreds of houses where students are living, chances are you’re going to find a party any Thursday, Friday or Saturday night.” Some students agreed with Leone’s assessment of the availability of off-campus parties and said that Temple being in a city increases its off-campus prescence. “Since [Temple’s] in a city, there’s actual housing. You’re not having a party on campus,” freshman political science major Schuyler Nissly said. “[At other schools] you live on campus, and that’s the place you have a party. If you’re at Temple there’s a bunch of offcampus housing.” The trend brings with it a new set of complications for

Temple police, specifically regarding Temple’s Student Code of Conduct and amnesty policy that do not apply to nonstudents. Assistant Vice President of University Communications Ray Betzner said that students from other schools can be referred back to their home institutions if they are cited near Main Campus. “We work with the student affairs offices at other universities and the police departments at other universities,” Betzner said. “If their behavior is unacceptable and we have information on who they are, we will be in touch with their home schools to let them know.” “The idea that students from other institutions can come to North Philadelphia and misbehave and then go back home thinking it doesn’t mean

anything simply isn’t true,” Betzner added. Leone said that underage drinking citations require that officers contact the individual’s parents. However, procedure becomes ambiguous when it comes to the Student Code of Conduct’s amnesty policy. The policy is intended to encourage student safety. According to the Board of Trustees’ Policies and Procedures Manual, the policy is in place strictly for the protection of students. “The university strongly encourages students to call Campus Safety Services for medical assistance for themselves or for other individuals who are dangerously under the influence of drugs or alcohol,” the manual states. Both the intoxicated student and student

calling for help would be exempt from university discipline for violating the Student Code of Conduct, apart from participating in an alcohol and drug education course. This amnesty program, however, makes no concession for non-Temple students – a complication that, Leone said, most officers try to account for on their own. “The amnesty program only applies to the Student Code of Conduct, so non-students wouldn’t be part of our judicial process,” Leone said in a follow-up e-mail. “However, our police officers have discretion and usually focus on getting help for the person needing it. Most people that get cited have been uncooperative and exhibit aggressive behavior.” As CSS looks forward, the trend is not something that Le-

one said he sees disappearing any time soon. “[This] is an overarching, large issue that we have to deal with,” he said, adding that the balance of university growth and student behavior is something that can only be reached with time. “It’s part of the growth, the process…it’s not that we don’t want [non-students] to come and visit, but we want you to be responsible.” Betzner said that the process of letting other institutions know if their students are cited works both ways. Temple students cited at other universities, or anywhere outside of Main Campus, can still be subject to disciplinary action, he said. Ali Watkins can be reached at allison.watkins@temple.edu.

Financial aid among Theobald’s top priorities PRESIDENT PAGE 1 the administration cut costs at Indiana University, where he is currently the chief financial officer and senior vice president. At Indiana, Theobald said, the university would get together with administrators from Ohio State University and the University of Michigan and compare costs on a particular subject and see how each can operate more efficiently and set a benchmark for what to spend. “We’re all doing research administration. What should you spend on research administration?” Theobald said. “There isn’t any book you can pull off the shelf that says it ought to cost you this. This gives us data to compare to each other.” He said he’d bring this trait to Temple and compare the university’s expenditures to that of other Big East universities. Theobald will be back at Temple a few more times before he takes office on Jan. 1, 2013, and said that he’d be here about every three to four weeks including a stop during homecoming the first weekend of October. He also said he’ll be attending a Temple football game in Louisville, Ky., on Nov. 3, against the University of Louisville. While his last day at Indiana is Dec. 31, Theobald said he hopes to be working at Temple early in December. Currently, he is working with Indiana administrators to secure funding for the school from the state legislature. “Right after that, moving

Dr. Neil Theobald is congratulated by Acting President Englert as he was approved as Temple’s next president at a Board of Trustees meeting in August. Theobald will assume the presidency Jan. 1.| ABI REIMOLD TTN vans, and we should be out by the holidays,” Theobald said. “I will be here by January 1, absolutely. No way it goes beyond that, but I hope to be here by December 15.” He also spoke about some of the projects at Temple that excited him, including the proposed construction of a new library on Broad Street, which would replace Paley Library. “The ability to plan, from scratch, a new library, I can’t think of anything I’d rather do as someone who’s been a

professor most of my life,” Theobald said. “There is little at a university, especially a 21st century university, that is more important than a library, so I love the idea that it’s right on Broad [Street] and very visible.” Theobald also complimented Acting President Richard Englert on his handling of the transition and said that he “couldn’t ask for a better mentor [than Englert].” “I can’t be complimentary enough of President Englert,

he’s wonderful,” Theobald said. “He’s nice, but he’s also extremely competent, great judgment. He is a mentor of mine of how to do this job.” Theobald will move into a univeristy owned property in Rittenhouse Square in Center City where former presidents David Adamany and Ann Weaver Hart lived. Though he said he’s excited to tackle the issues currently facing Temple, he said he can’t wait to start his new position on Main Campus.

“The opportunities we have here at Temple to change people’s lives are just phenomenal,” Theobald said. “I am just thrilled with this job and can’t wait to get here and do it every day.” Sean Carlin can be reached at sean.carlin@temple.edu or on Twitter @SeanCarlin84.

Guest policy amended at residence halls More restrictions were placed on sign-in policies at residence halls. JOHN MORITZ Assistant News Editor University Housing and Residential Life amended the guest policy for all university residence halls beginning this semester, creating new restrictions for the number and age of guests that residents can sign in. The new policy allows residents to sign in three guests at a time between the hours of 8 a.m. and midnight, and only one guest from midnight to 8 a.m. Additionally, guests under the age of 18 who are not enrolled at the university are no longer permitted to stay between the hours of midnight and 8 a.m. All minors must

register with a security officer a parent of a student living in during the times that they are residence halls. allowed to be signed in, acLimiting the number of cording to an email sent out to overnight guests to one ensures students on Aug. 25. that fewer people will have to Residential Life amended be awakened to respond to a the guest policy during the fire or alarm, Higgins said. summer after “During meeting with the day it is asthe Office of sumed occuGeneral Counpants are awake sel, the Office and ready to of Risk Manrespond to a fire agement and alarm,” Higthe Office of the gins said. “That Fire Marshal, overnight peMichael Scales, riod is a critical associate vice time.” president for The decistudent affairs, sion to keep said in an email. minors from Nicole Rubin / University oversophomore speech, language staying Fire Marshal and hearing major night was made John Higgins as a result of a said changes in the number of university review of the Freeh overnight guests allowed came report, an independent report after he was contacted by the published by the law firm Freeh Philadelphia Fire Department Sporkin & Sullivan, LLP into regarding a complaint from the actions of Penn State fol-

“I think that it

is fair, but I [do] think that it is annoying that you can only have one guest overnight.

lowing the Jerry Sandusky child-abuse scandal. “The Freeh report raised many issues that all universities should be examining when it comes to the safety of minors on campus. We need to take the time need to examine this issue carefully. Our new guest policy allows us the time to do a thoughtful study of the issue, while ensuring the safety of minors on campus,” Scales said. Students returning to residence halls this semester were told of the change at floor meetings and from notices placed in the hallways. “I actually do not think it is fair at all,” Aubrey Kehs, a sophomore living in Temple Towers, said. “I think that you should be able to have the three, I don’t think they even told us the right reasons why they changed it.” “I think that it is fair, but I [do] think that it is annoying that you can only have one

guest overnight,” said Nicole Rubin, a sophomore speech, language and hearing major who also lives in Temple Towers. Neither student said they had experienced first-hand problems so far with the new rules, but expected them in the coming year. Scales said the transition to the new policy has gone “smoothly.” “While we have had some questions about the changes in the policy, once we explain the reasons for it, residents appreciate why the changes were necessary,” Scales said. John Moritz can be reached at john.moritz@temple.edu or on Twitter @JCMoritzTU.

question for dean in coming year KLEIN PAGE 1 least 30 stellar faculties,” Klein said, adding that he would also like to see a rise in SAT scores and competitiveness of undergraduate students. The plan for a new science building has developed into a new construction site along 12th Street, near Polett Walk, for the science, education and research center, expected to be completed in 2014. While Klein praised the new building, he said it is more important to focus on the people who will inhabit it. “It’s not just bricks and mortar,” Klein said. “The most inspiring thing I think is the vigorous undergraduate research program.” Klein also stressed the importance of offering career advising programs to students who find difficulties in their planned areas of study. “People get to universities and then there are other opportunities, so having built this infrastructure here for career guidance…to help market yourself, in the best possible sense of that word, is a fantastic resource,” Klein said. Klein added that CST is working to add research fellowships that are important to helping students get started on their career paths, as well as make the college more attractive to bright students. “It is what made me a scientist, doing research in my final year as an undergraduate,” Klein said. Klein will fill the role of interim dean until at least Dec. 31. At the start of the new year, Dr. Neil Theobald will become the university’s next president. There has been no word from the president’s office, or CST, as to whether Dai will take on the permanent position of provost, return to CST or take another post. “[If Theobald appoints a new dean] I will go back to being a scientist, publish more papers, raise more grant money, educate some more post documents…that’s what I do,” Klein said. For this semester, Klein said his biggest concerns are adding six to eight new faculty members, expanding research, overseeing construction of the research center and reaching out to students, which he did for the first time at his school’s convocation. “When I was their age, the transistor had been invented, the laser had been invented, the first NMR measurement had been invented, and the Russians put up a satellite. Think about in 50 years what has happened,” Klein said. “This is the message I gave to the young kids. You have to be technically savvy if you’re going to appreciate it.” John Moritz can be reached at john.moritz@temple.edu and on Twitter @JCMoritzTU.

CORRECTIONS

The Temple News strives to be a newspaper of record by printing factually correct and balanced articles. Accuracy is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it as soon as possible. Anyone with inquiries about content in this newspaper can contact Editor-in-Chief Angelo Fichera at editor@temple-news.com or 215.204.6737.


NEWS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

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Redesigned Owl Card distribution goes off without a hitch IDs were given out for two weeks leading up to their activation date yesterday. JOE GILBRIDE The Temple News Temple welcomed students back for the fall semester with new, redesigned Owl Cards, distributed by the Diamond Dollars Office during the first two weeks of school. The deadline to pick up the cards was set for yesterday, Sept. 10, though many students chose to retrieve their cards on the first day of classes, Aug. 27. Students crowded the second floor of the Student Center where the cards were being distributed. Scott Brannan, director of the Diamond Dollars Office, said he felt bad for the students who chose to brave the long lines and encouraged them to come later when he expected the wait to be shorter. “I don’t know why some students insisted on standing in line,” Brannan said. “We thought the message was received that students had until

Sept. 10 to get them.” “Students who failed to Brannan said the distri- pick up their cards by Sept. 10 bution of the new cards went will find that [their old ones smoothly in the days after- won’t] work,” Brannan said. ward as the stream of students “The Student Center will not thinned. Brannan said he ex- be available to pick up cards pected almost all after that date. students to reThose students ceive their cards will have to go on time and straight to the without hassle. Diamond DolThe Dialars Office.” mond Dollars The DiaOffice saw the mond Dollar second floor StuOffice has had dent Center as minimal comthe ideal location plaints from Taylor Caputo/ students, on Main Campus and senior metals and jewelry major for the distributhe changetion of the Owl over has gotten Cards. mostly positive “The lines on the first day feedback, especially on the ofof distribution would not have fice’s Facebook page, Brannan been contained better at any said. other location,” Brannan said. Brannan said many stu“I’m glad we secured the Stu- dents were eager to receive the dent Center. It’s a really good new cards, and the initial long place as it is the center for a lot lines on the first day did not give of activity. We can pull students rise to any significant problems. in from eating, from the bookTaylor Caputo and Colleen store and other activities. It just Costigan, both senior metals makes it easier for everyone.” and jewelry majors, agreed that The new cards activated on the Diamond Dollars Office did all of Temple’s campuses yes- a good job in distributing the terday. Places like the TECH new cards. Center, bookstore and cafeteria “They had flexible hours,” no longer accept the old cards. Caputo said. “We went in the

“They had

flexible hours. We went in the evening when no one was there.

Attendees voice concerns at first assembly meeting TSG PAGE 1 changes they wanted to see this defeated RUN Temple by 500 year. Those sugvotes in the gestions included April election. more attendance The execto music and art utive officers events, changes were formally to the Owl Loop inducted on shuttle bus and April 23. bridging the gap At the between students induction, former stuand administrabody tors. David Lopez / dent Lopez, fortsg student body president p r e s i d e n t Colin Saltry mer president of handed over a the Temple College Democrats, led Temple signed megaphone, referred to Advocating for Progress which as “Voice of the Students,” to

“I want to see

TSG accomplish everything students want to accomplish.

Lopez TSG is still looking to fill positions in the grounds and sustainability committee and allocations committee, and also hire a videographer. TSG can be contacted at TSG@temple.edu. Laura Detter can be reached at laura.detter@temple.edu.

Facilities management making due despite cuts Department saves $3.2 million in elimination of vacant positions. DOMINIQUE JOHNSON The Temple News Facilities management recently took the forefront in cost cutting as part of a universitywide elimination of previously vacant positions in order to tighten the institution’s budget. The Temple News reported in August that Temple cut 95 vacant positions across the university and an additional 85 faculty members retired, leading to $15 million in salary savings. Facilities management took the biggest chunk of the eliminated positions, with 67 slots being cut, saving $3.2 million. These were positions that were not fully utilized within the university and there were no positions that were currently being held that were eliminated. “No one was laid off,” James Creedon, senior vice president for construction, facilities and management, said. “The goal was to reach our budget’s goals without laying anyone off.” As part of its plan to keep the university’s base tuition level, the university had examined reducing costs throughout the budget, but a big chunk of that simply came from cutting positions that were already

vacant. The savings allowed vacancies.” Kaiser added that it has Temple to operate more effecbeen several years since the tively. “I think we are doing a positions cut had been filled, so good job at maintaining our fa- when the decision came to get cilities,” Creedon said. “We’re rid of them, facilities managegoing to have to do some things ment suffered no harm by it. “What we found was there more differently.” Some services that ex- were a number of positions that had been vacant for ist at the over a year and in university some cases more may be cut than two years,” in half. For Kaiser told The example, Temple News in a building August. might now Kaiser said be vacuthat by eliminatumed once ing the positions, or twice a week inJames Creedon / facilities managestead of senior vice president for ment was able to construction, facilities and operate much more every day. management efficiently. Creedon “These were also wanted to stress that campus security positions that were fully budreceived no cuts and that all of geted but not filled. By getting their positions are filled and re- rid of them we could absorb work and do things more effimain at their current levels. “We’ve invested more into ciently,” Kaiser previously told campus security,” Creedon The Temple News. “We have said. “Cutting positions is taken every opportunity to be something we wouldn’t even efficient.” consider.” “In terms of employees Ken Kaiser, senior vice having to take on more represident of the office of man- sponsibility,” Kaiser added. agement and budget, said that “Things are being done more because facilities management strategically now.” is the single largest non-acaDominique Johnson can be demic unit on Main Campus, reached at it housed the largest number of dominique.johnoson@temple.edu. cuts to vacant positions. “It wasn’t that the university came and said that we need to make these cuts, and facilities is going to be cut first,” Kaiser said. “Facilities chose to make these reductions by

“The goal was

to reach our budget’s goals without laying anyone off.

A staff member looks for a student’s new Owl Card. Students were advised that new identification cards would be put into service yesterday, Sept. 10. | KATE McCANN TTN evening when no one was there.” Costigan was also satisfied, but added that she didn’t think the office did a good job informing students about all of the new cards’ purposes.

“I heard the card had an expiration date for voting, but they didn’t tell us that,” Costigan said. The university plans to install new card readers to make using the Owl Cards for access

to some buildings and services quicker. Joe Gilbride can re reached at joseph.gilbride@temple.edu.

Towel service discontinued at TUF and IBC amid cuts Budget cuts lead to reduction in nonacademic hours at recreation centers. SEAN CARLIN KATE KELLY The Temple News As of Aug. 22, Campus Recreation no longer offers free towel service to students using the IBC Student Recreation Center and Temple University Fitness Center. In a letter to gym patrons, Director of Campus Recreation Steve Young explained various new measures the department will take to accommodate new economic restrictions. “Due to budget reductions and an allocation shortfall of six figures for 2012-13, the department of Campus Recreation is making specific cuts to numerous programs and services,” Young said in the letter. “We are disappointed to convey this news, but under the circumstances, the selected items were mostly, if not all, items that impacted a small minimum of our daily patrons and participants.” The cuts came as part of a $50,000 cut to Campus Recreation’s budget, Young said. In addition, Young said that the department had to account for

an additional $65,000 to pay for new student staff positions at Pearson and McGonigle halls. Young said that towels at TUF cost $5,200 a year. Towel costs at IBC were $19,000 per year, which included the towels, detergents and repairs. Previously, students were able to pick up a towel in IBC and TUF to use during their workout. The gyms provided hampers for the dirty towels. Young said the towels will be reused at Pearson and McGonigle halls. “There used to be towels and that would really help me because in the middle of my workouts I’m usually dripping,” said sophomore public relations major Max Cohen. “I just forget [my own towel]. It would be nice if they had towels again.” For other students, the new policy had less of an impact on their fitness routine. “I saw the sign and it said they’re trying to cut costs,” freshman kinesiology major Courtney Wieland said. “I don’t use towels too often so it’s not that big a deal. It’s not the end of the world.” In addition to the discontinuation of towel services, Campus Recreation will decrease hours during non-academic portions of the year. Students will have limited access to TUF and IBC during spring and winter

breaks, as well as during summer sessions. “During Christmas break, from December 15 to January 15, [2013] when we’re on a reduced schedule anyway, the schedule is going to be squeezed a little bit more,” Young said. Young said that he hears from people using the facilities that they should be open more, but because of the budget situation, he hasn’t been able to extend hours. “If anything, we get feedback that we should be open more. That’s what I take [to the administration], that we need more money,” Young said. “Well, that fell a little bit on deaf ears in the past couple years and thus we’re going the other direction.” Students and gym patrons are encouraged to give feedback on the changes in a variety of ways. Comment cards are available in TUF and IBC and students can also speak to facility staff. Sean Carlin and Kate Kelly can be reached at news@temple-news.com.

IBC and TUF stopped towel-lending services due to budget cuts.| AMANDA SHAFFERN TTN


OPINION

A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. Angelo Fichera, Editor-in-Chief Cara Stefchak, Managing Editor Sean Carlin, News Editor Zachary Scott, Opinion Editor

Luis Rodriguez, Living Editor Jenelle Janci, A&E Editor Joey Cranney, Sports Editor John Moritz, Asst. News Editor Ibrahim Jacobs, Asst. Sports Editor Lauren Hertzler, Chief Copy Editor Brandon Baker, Copy Editor Marisa Steinberg, Copy Editor Saba Aregai, Multimedia Editor Ryan Geffert, Multimedia Editor

temple-news.com

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Chris Montgomery, Web Editor Kate McCann, Photography Editor Abi Reimold, Asst. Photography Editor Joey Pasko, Designer Ana Tamaccio, Designer Darcy Stackhouse, Designer Laura Sutphen, Designer David Hamme, Advertising Manager Kathleen Smith, Business Manager Morgan Hutchinson, Marketing Manager

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

DRAWING CONCLUSIONS

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content represents the opinion of The Temple News. Adjacent commentary is reflective of their authors, not The Temple News. Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

EDITORIALS

Granting amnesty

T

he city of Philadelphia is home to several diverse universities. With so many in such close proximity, it is not surprising that there is a great deal of interaction between students from different campuses. But what is surprising is the frequency with which students from other local universities are approached by Campus Safety Services in conjunction with alcohol-related incidents. As Ali Watkins reports on Page 1, CSS estimates about one-third of incidents involve students from another campus. This raises several issues, most notably the application of codes of conduct depending on location. The Temple News applauds Philadelphia universities for communicating so effectively on such matters. But the universities should be doing a better job in communicating with the students. The fact that Temple can discipline students even if they’re outside of the 500-yard jurisdiction of the Student Code of Conduct is an important, but underpublicized fact. Additionally, fellow local universities should work together to devise some sort of consolidated rule base. One such example is Temple’s amnesty program. This policy, which prevents severe

E

Empty nest

ffective this semester, Temple has changed its policies for students signing in guests to residence halls. But the new policies, which are evidently rooted with good intentions, could prove to be overly restrictive on students. As John Moritz reports on Page 2, students can still sign in three guests between the hours of 8 a.m. and midnight, but can only have one guest in the overnight hours of midnight to 8 a.m. The previous policy allowed students to have three guests at all times, as long as the visitors were accompanied by the student-resident. The university should explore other ways to prevent overcrowding in rooms. A cap on total guests staying overnight in one room, rather than per individual resident, may be one alternative. Students’ lifestyles are far from an 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. schedule; they work on group projects and study past what a university might deem as normal hours. The new policy also states

Policies should encourage non-Temple students to call for help without hesitation. disciplinary action against Temple students seeking medical assistance for anything drugor alcohol-related as long as they go through an educational course, makes no mention of non-Temple students. The amnesty program should be updated and adopted by all Philadelphia universities so that all students are encouraged to seek medical help instead of risking their lives. The logo on a student ID should not cross a student’s mind when thinking about calling for help. All of that said, The Temple News also believes that students bear a considerable responsibility when inviting friends from another university to campus. In such scenarios, Temple students are acting as university ambassadors. They have an obligation to watch their guests and ensure safety. Failure to do so reflects a negative image of Temple to the visiting students and to the community. The Temple News stands by CSS for keeping its communication channels open with other local universities, but encourages it to try and adopt a broader amnesty program. Additionally, students must recognize that they are accountable for the actions of their guests as well as themselves.

JULIANA COPPA TTN

PHOTO COMMENT

Students who identified as Omar Samir, Matt Swayze and Ghilley, serve some rhymes and enjoy pizza with friends outside Maxi’s on Liacouras Walk on Sept. 5. | INDIRA JIMENEZ TTN

GOT SOMETHING TO SAY?

POLLING PEOPLE New guest policy in residence halls, while well intentioned, is too strict. that anyone under the age of 18 not enrolled in the university cannot stay at a residence hall between the hours of midnight and 8 a.m., as a result of the university’s examination of the Freeh report. The latter change could prohibit students’ younger siblings, friends and prospective freshmen from visiting for an extended stay. Temple’s policy should not allow children under a certain age to access residence halls unless accompanied by a parent or guardian. But the university should also consider allowing guests between the ages of 16 and 18 to stay overnight if a parent or guardian checks them in. The Temple News commends the university for treating the safety of minors on campus with seriousness. However, Temple needs to consider ways to guarantee minors’ safety, without infringing upon the freedoms of students, who pay a lofty price to live in the residence halls.

NOTABLE QUOTABLE

“[Springsteen] went in for

a normal hug, but I wasn’t having that. I just grabbed his waist. It’s been a long time coming.

Kristin Avallon / sophomore radiology major

Visit temple-news.com to take our online poll, or send your comments to letters@ temple-news.com.

If Temple were to require some sort of additional safety class, which of these would you prefer?

36% 19%

A one-credit course required in your freshman year.

16%

A bunch of seminars required during Welcome Week.

A lengthy lecture during orientation.

29%

I wouldn’t attend any required safety class.

Letters to the editor may regard any current issue but must include your full name, position and location. Students can give year and major. Submissions should be 350 words or fewer.

*Out of 75 votes.

CITY VIEW The racial diversity on Main Campus has been well-documented in sources such as the Princeton Review. Nearly 3 percent of Temple’s student body hails from another country, and another 19 percent is from out of state. Below, you can see how Temple’s population compares to that of the United States.

2%

12%

17%

4% 10%

60%

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

5%

63%

14%

Caucasian African American Asian Hispanic

13%

Other

UNITED STATES DARCY STACKHOUSE TTN Sources: The Princeton Review, U.S. Census Bureau, Temple University Fall 2011 Student Profile


COMMENTARY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

PAGE 5

Generation Y awakened by Sept. 11

I

JOHN MORITZ

Moritz urges the college-aged generation to learn from its unprecedented memories of 9/11.

can still remember the exact moment, the exact place I sat in my father’s car, late to school, when the news of an event in New York City broke on the radio waves. The next thing I can remember is being scolded by my third grade teacher for my lateness and overly imaginative mind that was surely the result “of reading too many comic books.” Many of us will spend this anniversary, 11 years later, looking back on these memories, glimpses, of the tragedy that unfolded and brought us hurtling into an adult world that was left reeling for the next decade and beyond. For us in the generation known as “Y,” we approach this day, 9/11, every year with a sense of profound memory. That, in itself, makes us no different from the hundreds of millions of Americans who woke up to have their lives changed that September morning. It is not what we remember, but what we experienced, that leaves this event so unprecedented in terms of its effect on

the whole generation of students now in their college years. The ‘90s, the decade in which most of us began our childhood, was one of the most booming periods in American history. The economy was up, people had jobs and America had been out of major international conflict for just under a decade. As young children, those in our generation had not lived through the days of uncertainty that preceded the collapse of the Soviet Union. We had not lived in times when our parents came home every day with hidden worries about financial, or to the more extreme, national security. The most nearly comparable event, the bombings on Pearl Harbor, had followed many months of international war in Europe, a decade of shattered economic conditions. The American public looked ahead with fear that the coming days loomed darkly. But on 9/11, the adults who awoke to blue skies that morning could not have foreseen the darkness that would be cast over the ensuing period as a result of that day. As the children who grew up

in that optimistic life, our experiences on 9/11 and ever since have been absolutely unprecedented. From my own recollection, I can remember trying hopelessly to understand the word “hijacking” as my father explained it to me. I remember taking out my globe, spinning it to the opposite side of the world and placing my finger on the oddly shaped purple space marked “Afghanistan.” These recollections, along with those of every student at this university, and in the country, represent a youth that was thrown into turmoil beyond comprehension. If the next 10 years defined maturation of our generation, the 9/11 was our first awakening. Now, 11 years later, we approach another anniversary. In the time in between, we have been eye witnesses to two global wars, rising gas and food prices, the collapse in the housing market and the bailout of companies once viewed as the workhorses of American manufacturing. The noughties were the shadowed decline following the peak

of prosperity in the ‘90s. With another major political season coming this fall, the time has come to reflect on the issues of the past, and hope for the future. Regardless of political opinion, this time grants Americans the opportunity to take a rare look at who we are as we move ahead. For college students, especially those who are defined by such a historic and calamitous event, it is our time to move past the last 10 years, and look forward to the next 10 as we, for the first time, have the opportunity to create our own decade. As you inevitably take the time today to look back on your own memories of where you were and what you saw on 9/11, also take the time to think about where the world was before and what it has become. It is time for us to take the events that built us and use our experiences to define us as the generation that built up from the ashes.

M

the end of the conversation, one Philadelphia homeless man had made $20. I’ll admit I unleashed a chuckle, or two, or three. I also had a thought; I began to wonder if this event could have been avoided if this young man was better educated about the environment in which he would spend his next four years. If Temple offered a safety general education course for freshmen, its students could be more prepared to deal with city life without nearly as many mishaps. At orientation, each student is slammed with buckets of information. How to be safe on Philadelphia’s city streets is just a pinch of all that they hear. Excuse me if I’m rushing to assumptions, but at orientation I was way too distracted by the prospect of college to even have the speeches on campus safety enter my ears. To be fair, the department of kinesiology offers a safety course that is available for students to take. This course is called Personal Defense for Women. It caps out at 25, only four are currently running this semester, and it ex-

cludes 48 percent of Temple’s population – the men. The problems with this as the only available safety course are vast. Essentially, excluding the freshmen orientation safety speech and a few open seminars here and there, in any given semester only 200 females out of Temple’s population of more than 37,000 individuals can get safety training. The class that I have in mind would offer safety tips for the new student body. Involving everything from how to decipher which strangers are safe and which are simply “strange,” how to keep your wallet safe, what to do when the subways stop running, what time the subways start running, how to never lose your ID and how to conduct yourself in your new environment. These are all tips that I wish someone had written down for me. I lost two IDs, $15 and got stranded in Center City twice my first year. Freshman university studies major Reddy Cypress agrees that maybe his class could use the assistance. “For some people, oh yes

OPINION

“The truth is, if you want a decent job that will lead to a decent life today you have to work harder, regularly reinvent yourself, obtain at least some form of postsecondary education, make sure that you’re engaged in lifelong learning and play by the rules. That’s not a bumper sticker, but we terribly mislead people by saying otherwise.”

Thomas L. Friedman, on nytimes.com in “New rules”

John Moritz can be reached at john.moritz@temple.edu or on Twitter @JCMoritzTU.

Safety course a must for underprepared students

ost upper class students are very much aware that Temple is not an entirely safe place. It requires a certain amount of common sense to navigate the local streets. So when new freshmen try to get accustomed to the area, it is only natural that more than a few mishaps will occur. Whilst on an evening trip to CINDY STANSBURY Soul Cucina, formerly Owl’s Nest, my eyes rested on one particular freshman participating in Stansbury argues a conversation with an apparent that the best way for homeless man. A big, naive smile was planted on his face. It was Temple to keep its a clear hint that this newbie was students safe is by totally unaware as to what would creating a mandatory happen at the end of their conversation. safety class. Inevitably, the man asked: “Excuse me man, can I have some cash?” Within a few minutes, two upperclassmen boys attempted to come to the freshman’s aid by pulling him away from the man. The freshman himself shot down their attempts. He seemed to have mistaken this man asking for money as his new friend. By

SOMEONE ELSE’S

this course would be very helpful,” he said. Cypress’s friend, freshmen psychology major Devan Spross, holds a similar opinion. “People just don’t seem to understand that some people out there are dangerous,” Spross said. If two freshmen can acknowledge that their classmates could use a little extra street prep, I say why not? The “do-it-yourselfers” out there have their objections. It is believed by some that the class of 2016 should learn by experience. Ask yourself: Do you think the freshman boy who lost $20 to the seemingly homeless man thought he learned a good lesson? Probably not. Safety tips are always more effective before an event occurs. Would you have liked a little extra help your freshman year? Or did the “figure it out” stance work for you? Let’s be proactive, Temple.

“The left insists on singling women out, pitting one against the other. After Ann Romney’s touching speech that brought many ladies to tears, Fox News’ leftof-center commentator Juan Williams took the opportunity to tell women that Mrs. Romney couldn’t possibly understand their real struggles because she was a ‘corporate wife.’ As though there is a difference in the way breast cancer attacks a woman’s body based on her husband’s job.”

Cindy Stansbury can be reached at cindy.stansbury@temple.edu.

Diversity’s not a black-and-white issue

D

iversity isn’t one dimensional. But when it comes to college, I can’t help feeling like it’s made to seem that way. So much emphasis is placed on racial diversity. Picture the glossy pages of any university catalogue, depicting students of different races sharing a blanket on the quad. Thankfully, reality is much different than those photoBRI BOSAK graphs – at least at Temple. Maybe it’s because I transBosak argues that ferred here from a school with a homogenous student body, Temple’s diversity is very but I happen to find the student more pervasive than body at Temple delightfully difa more simplified ferent. Subtle things stick out to me, that I fear others might take definition that some for granted. Little nuances, like may try to apply. that we don’t all drive similar cars, dress alike, live in the same set of apartments or go to the same couple of fraternity parties every weekend. I’m not exaggerating or making this up, either. I really went to such a place, and

it’s called the University of Richmond. Chris Sporik, a junior education major and a transfer student, shared similar thoughts. Reflecting upon the culture of Virginia Tech University, he said, “There were people from a lot of different cultures, but they only hung around with others like themselves. The cafeteria was segregated.” When he came to Temple, he said he noticed friendships between people of all walks of life. This isn’t meant to sound cheesy. Temple is the real deal. Look around the next time you’re strolling up Liacouras Walk. From one class to the next you’re likely to pass a boy from a different state than you, a girl who believes in a different god than you and multiple people dressed differently than you. When you get to class, the student to your right will be a little richer than you and the student to your left a

little poorer, and both are listening to bands you’ve never heard of. The boy two seats from you is deaf. The boy in front of you is texting his boyfriend. When class is finished, you might hold the door open for a girl who will vote differently than you in this upcoming election. The woman holding the door for you is 40, a mother of two, just getting the chance to go back to school to finish her degree. Now try to imagine what all of those people will be doing this weekend. We don’t hail from the same towns. Some of us don’t even come from towns, but from cities. Some come from the country. Some come from other countries. English is not all of our first languages. But the best part about being different at Temple, is that there is no normal. What comprises a typical Temple student? I don’t think there is a mold. That means no one is cast into a minority group,

made to feel alone among an army of clones. No standards to meet. No image to uphold. Nobody to impress. Temple gives me the freedom to express myself. And when I pass people who are different from me each day, I know Temple does the same for them. My experiences at Richmond were worthwhile, no doubt, most importantly because they helped me realize what I want. I want a culturally rich environment, in which I am free to grow, discover and learn. Temple not only provides us with one, but the university actively works to foster it. And if you appreciate nothing else, be grateful for this. I think it is our school’s most redeeming quality.

Abigail Wagner,

on washingtontimes.com in “Romney’s sex appeal”

“Since the public remains terrorized, it seems likely to continue uncritically to support extravagant counterterrorism expenditures, including incessant security checks, civil-liberties intrusions, expanded police powers, harassment at airports, and militarized forays overseas if they can convincingly be associated with the quest to stamp out terrorism.”

John Mueller, Bri Bosak can be reached at bribosak@temple.edu or on Twitter at @BriBosak.

on philly.com in “Never have so few been able to frighten so many”

VOICE OF THE PEOPLE

“Do you believe

Temple is as diverse as advertised?

“Absolutely. I’m from a very diverse high school, but Temple is even more. It is pretty exciting.”

AMANDA SHAFFERN TTN

OPINION DESK 215-204-7416

“I believe so, but even so, we live in Philadelphia. There [is] plenty of transportation and a city to explore diversity.”

“I believe Temple does a good job with advertising diversity. This school and Philadelphia overall seems more openminded.”

ERIN EDINGER-TUROFF

MAZLLUM ISLAMI

SAMANTHA SCHUETZ

FRESHMAN | JOURNALISM

SENIOR | BIOLOGY

FRESHMAN | ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

LETTERS@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM


PAGE 6

ADVERTISEMENT

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012


LIVING temple-news.com

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

PAGE 7

Campaign attempts to boost school pride Temple Made campaign aims to make the significance of Temple’s move to the Big East Conference more recognized by students.

MICHAEL CHAU The Temple News

U

nless students are too distracted by all the fresh faces and caramel-colored eye candy – still bronze from their summer tans – it’s hard to miss the signs and banners that are part of Temple’s newest marketing campaign, which made its debut at the beginning of move-in week. They’re all around Main Campus: in front of the Bell Tower, in the TECH Center and in the Student Center. They are spotted inside the Temple shuttle bus stop and across the wall that leads students to Anderson Hall. They’re the giant Temple Made banners of Temple students, with each face painted in the school’s colors. These blown-up, bodiless faces are seen with different expressions like a growl, a shout or a hoot. Alternating streaks of cherry and white are

layered across one girl’s face as she bares her teeth. Another student roars, while donning two “Temple T’s” on either side of his cheek – big, bad and screaming. Temple football has made its reentry into the Big East Conference, and the university wants the country to know. Temple aired its first Temple Made commercial on ESPN3 during Temple’s season opener against Villanova on Aug. 31. Nicole Naumoff, assistant vice president of advancement communications, said this first wave of the campaign, “Temple Made Game Face,” is “in specific support for athletics and our entry into the Big East...which is a really important step for the university.” In between Polett and Liacouras walks, on the side of Barton Hall, is the face of Julian Hamer, vice president of services of Temple Student Government. With Hamer’s face hidden by a crimson owl masquerade, the banner urges students to pick up

their tickets online. “It’s an exciting change to Temple,” Hamer said. Even though Hamer was chosen to participate in this project she was still surprised to see her face on Barton. “Someone called me at 8 a.m. and they told me to walk on [Polett] Walk. And I had no idea what they were saying. I don’t have class until [11 a.m.] so I was like, ‘What are you doing?’ But going there and seeing my face, I literally had to stop and say, ‘Oh my gosh.’ I really didn’t expect it,” Hamer said. But the marketing platform of Temple Made goes beyond just athletics. “The campaign is a much broader campaign than that,” Naumoff said. “[It’s] primarily to…garner participation and excitement and pride in the university.” Walking down Polett Walk, another banner reads: “Self Made. Philly Made. Temple Made.” The

university’s Twitter account shared that slogan late last month. “It got the best response [of any Temple tweet] other than an athletics tweet,” Naumoff said. “[The ‘Self Made. Philly Made. Temple Made.’ slogan] seems to be the one that people are retweeting the most, talking about the most. If I look online at the Instagrams, if I go through the photos, I see a lot of [that banner], I see a lot of the T-shirts [with that slogan].” The concept behind the slogan is that Temple Made students and graduates possess street credibility, toughness and experience associated with a large urban city like Philadelphia. That idea is coupled with the self-made work ethic of American individualism that someone’s own hard work will lead to success. The intertwining ideas seem to be an appealing dynamic. This fusion of self-starter and street-savvy that Temple is trying to tie to its brand is resonating with students. “It makes me really proud to be

a student here at Temple,” Scott Anderson, a sophomore criminal justice major, said. “I mean, I’ve already bought pretty much every T-shirt in the bookstore, just ‘cause I wanna be able to wear Temple and show my pride every day of the week.” But for others who don’t live on campus, there can be a stark difference in school pride. “I haven’t heard that much about it to tell you the truth,” Comfort Queh, a junior psychology major, said. “I don’t live on campus so I don’t know that much, I just come to school, and then just leave.” The excitement hasn’t taken off in all segments of the student body, but Temple is hoping to generate more buzz and bridge the enthusiasm gap with its new bottom-up marketing strategy. The university wants to break away from the traditional top-down ways in which schools market them-

MADE PAGE 16

Temple Made branded posters are now proudly hanging all around Main Campus. | HUA ZONG TTN ILLUSTRATION DARCY STACKHOUSE

On Track, p. 8

Hunger Scripts, p. 17

Jamila Janneh is one of the newest additions to Temple’s track team.

Audition season is like a real-life Hunger Games for theater students.

LIVING DESK 215-204-7416

LIVING@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

Vigil Honors, p. 17

Fraternity organizes a candlelight vigil and conspiracy theory discussion tonight.


LIVING

PAGE 8

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

Jamila Janneh, freshman track star, discusses how she looks forward to a very promising season. | ANDREW THAYER TTN

all the activities Temple has for us. I’m mostly looking forward to my track season. I feel like I have a lot going for me and I’m excited to see what happens.

TTN: What was your motivation in choosing Temple? JJ: Well, a girl named Maxine that I competed with told

me about it. She said I should look into Temple, so I came to visit. I really love the city aspect of it. Where I’m from, it’s a small town with a lot of farms. There’s nothing going on and so I wanted the complete opposite. Temple is just close enough and it’s not too far. I love the atmosphere of it. My major is criminal justice, I might pick up a minor in psychology but [not] sports management – every athlete usually does something with sports. I’ve always been interested in psychology and something within law and this had a good balance. Track hasn’t affected any of that, it’s just something else I’m interested in.

Jamila Janneh

Freshman track star shows promise.

TTN: How long have you been competing in track and what made you join? JJ: This will be my seventh year. Actually, the high school

JESSICA SMITH The Temple News Eighteen-year-old Jamila Janneh may have just completed her first week of track practice at Temple, but she’s no stranger to the world of athletics. She’s the current record holder for the high, long and triple jump at New Oxford High School in Hanover, Pa. She ranked third in Pennsylvania for the triple jump, and she’s only a freshman. “School and track are my life now,” Janneh said. “And I’m OK with that.” Dealing not only with the stressful shift from high school to college, but also with the added difficulties of being a student-athlete, Janneh has a lot on her plate as the track season approaches.

track coach came up to me at a middle school basketball game and was like, “Hey, you’re tall. You should do track.” So I was like, “All right.” I tried it and ended up loving it.

TTN: How do you feel so far about Temple’s track program? JJ: I really like the team. Everyone is so sweet, so nice, so

welcoming. I felt like I was already on the team when I went on my visit. They brought me in with open arms and everything. And the coaches are great. They were both athletes, too. It makes it so much better because that means they know what they’re doing. [Assistant] coach [Shameka] Marshall was competing at the Olympic trials. That tells you she did something right.

The Temple News: How are you adjusting to life at Temple? TTN: How did it feel finding out you were third in the state for Jamila Janneh: I’d say I’m adjusting pretty well. I mingle with a triple jump? What was your reaction? lot of people and my classes are going well. Practice just started [last JJ: Oh, God. That was awesome. I just remember as soon Monday] and that’s going good, too. A lot of good things are happening as of right now. I don’t live far from here – it’s a two-hour drive, tops. I can go home on a weekend and see my family. I hang out with my friends and most of my friends are on the track team. I definitely have a lot of time, which I like. And I’m excited for homecoming and

as I jumped my jump, I knew it was farther than what I had been doing. I pointed and looked at the board as they posted our standings and my coach [gave me the thumbs up]. It was so awesome. It was just a great feeling getting on the podium.

Honey Festival is all abuzz

Wagner Institute of Science hosts the third annual Honey Festival.

INDIRA JIMENEZ The Temple News The smells of honey and harmony were present at the third annual Honey Festival, hosted by the Philadelphia Beekeepers Guild, at the Wagner Free Institute of Science located on Montgomery Avenue near Main Campus. Kicking off on Friday, Sept. 7, the festival provided a chance for Philadelphians who have an interest in beekeeping and the process of producing honey, to attend events at the festival and learn the ins and outs of bees. “It really began about three years ago with the Philadelphia Beekeepers Guild – and it’s sort of the brainchild of Suzanne

Matlock, who is the vice president of the Guild – and its main goal is to inform people about beekeeping and help people understand how important bees are to pollinating and our food,” Abby Sullivan, program coordinator at the Wagner Institute and event organizer. “It’s about promoting bees and honey, to promote local beekeepers that are selling their honey,” Sullivan added. “There [are] actually a lot of benefits to eating local honey.” The festival provides opportunities for any type of individual, whether he or she is a professional beekeeper, a novice in the honey game or a student wanting to learn. Documentaries were shown

in the Wagner auditorium centered around beekeeping and its history. Discussions were held on the honey industry and workshops were provided for younger members of the community on bees and their ecosystem within the hive. Attendees could sample honey and learn how to make their own. The festival wasn’t limited to the Wagner Institute. On Sept. 8, the festival moved to the Wyck Historic House and Garden and closed at Bartram’s Garden on Sunday, Sept. 9. More historical lectures and honey demonstrations were held at these venues.

TTN: How does being an athlete compare with being a student? JJ: Track is something that motivates me, not only doing

well on the track, but it keeps me focused in school, too. I know if I don’t do well in school then I can’t compete or vice versa. You have to do well in school to be an athlete. Just because you’re an athlete doesn’t mean you get special privileges. Yeah, you have to go to tutoring and studying, but any other student could do that. They just want to make sure you get good grades. I like that push and I need that push to do well in the classroom.

TTN: Who or what is your main inspiration in pursuing your athletic dream? JJ: Well, my favorite U.S. track sprinter is Allyson Felix.

Even though she doesn’t jump, I just really like her. And I would say my main inspiration would have to be – and this is cheesy and everyone says it – my parents, just because they push me and my siblings so much. I have six other siblings, so we have a big family. The one thing my parents always said was, “Go to college. Make something of yourself.”

TTN: When was the moment you realized you were following the right path? JJ: My junior year of high school I broke all of my high

school’s jumping records. It made me realize how much better I could do, and then my senior year I did it again. I grew so much more each season it just made me keep going and keep doing more. It’s a great thing for me to do. I like staying fit and staying in shape and I love competition so it’s the two best things combined. I’m definitely not going to stop. Jessica Smith can be reached at jessica.smith0002@temple.edu.

Financial obstacles shouldn’t hinder internship opportunity

JOHN DAILEY Eternal Intern

The Honey Festival kicked off on Sept. 7 at the Wagner Institute.| INDIRA JIMENEZ TTN

Once I got up there, they were saying, “Jamila, Jamila, you got third place.” My parents were so happy. My mom was screaming. It was just such a great moment. I have other medals from other competitions, but when you get your state medal…It’s so much heavier, but it feels so much better. I loved it. I’m pretty sure I cried.

John Dailey discusses dealing with barriers while deciding which internships to take advantage of.

F

or college students, stress in managing an internship along with other responsibilities is obvious and inherent, but for some students the challenge begins before they even apply. Temple has a history of being a haven for commuter students on a budget. Numerous students rise each day and make the trek to school. And, despite yearly increases, Temple’s tuition is a bargain relative to other universities in the area, which attracts budget-minded students. It’s no great stretch to say that a good portion of Temple stuIndira Jimenez can be reached dents are fiscally conscious and/ at indira.jimenez@temple.edu. or live in their parents’ home,

striving to maintain a balance between college life and the demands imposed by their family. Temple has a hardworking community, but often, barriers to professional growth are present from both financial- and family-based pressures. To nab those sweet highpaying internships – if applicable to your major – you generally need a higher GPA. However, a stellar GPA can be difficult to maintain when you have to work 20-plus hours a week to pay rent, stave off the debt monster or are simply required to work by your family’s culture. If this is the case, your GPA may slip to a number that begins to weigh down your self-confidence, along with your shot at aforementioned sweet positions. If you are barely able to keep up with your coursework and current job, how are you supposed to devote time to an internship search or, quite possibly, accept an additional nonpaying position? Looking to the future that was once bright and full of opportunity, you see a darkening horizon and feel trapped in this cycle, at the mercy of forces beyond your control. I can relate to this because I’m the oldest sibling in my family and the first to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Having been employed in some capacity since I was 15, I felt that I had to work as a matter of pride and family pressures. It wasn’t really financial.

I lived in my parents’ home and I just knew that if I didn’t work, then there would be trouble in my house – to say the least. I held a position as a dietary aide – also known as a glorified and underpaid waiter – at a nursing home working back-to-back 10-hour weekend shifts and two weekdays. I thought about the microeconomic device called the production possibility frontier. It proves graphically that a firm, or individual, is best off focusing on producing the most valuable good and will sacrifice potential productivity if other goods are produced. Essentially, it’s why it makes sense for Tiger Woods to never mow his own lawn, but rather to practice golf. I figured that I was wasting my time making $7.50 an hour, while I could have been focusing on my professional development. Soon after, I landed my first internship at Back on My Feet, a nonprofit founded in Philly with a running-based, homelesscombating model. Initially, my parents balked at the idea of a position with no pay, but it was a better situation than no job at all. Now, I am in the process of looking for a job and feel confident as a result of my internship experience. My personal example isn’t the most extreme, but all too often I see friends and classmates

INTERN PAGE 16


LIVING

PAGE 8

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

Jamila Janneh, freshman track star, discusses how she looks forward to a very promising season. | ANDREW THAYER TTN

Jamila Janneh

Freshman track star shows promise. JESSICA SMITH The Temple News Eighteen-year-old Jamila Janneh may have just completed her first week of track practice at Temple, but she’s no stranger to the world of athletics. She’s the current record holder for the high, long and triple jump at New Oxford High School in Hanover, Pa. She ranked third in Pennsylvania for the triple jump, and she’s only a freshman. “School and track are my life now,” Janneh said. “And I’m OK with that.” Dealing not only with the stressful shift from high school to college, but also with the added difficulties of being a student-athlete, Janneh has a lot on her plate as the track season approaches. The Temple News: How are you adjusting to life at Temple? Jamila Janneh: I’d say I’m adjusting pretty well. I mingle with a lot of people and my classes are going well. Practice just started [last Monday] and that’s going good, too. A lot of good things are happening as of right now. I don’t live far from here – it’s a two-hour drive, tops. I can go home on a weekend and see my family. I hang out with my friends and most of my friends are on the track team. I definitely have a lot of time, which I like. And I’m excited for homecoming and

all the activities Temple has for us. I’m mostly looking forward to my track season. I feel like I have a lot going for me and I’m excited to see what happens. TTN: What was your motivation in choosing Temple? JJ: Well, a girl named Maxine that I competed with told me about it. She said I should look into Temple, so I came to visit. I really love the city aspect of it. Where I’m from, it’s a small town with a lot of farms. There’s nothing going on and so I wanted the complete opposite. Temple is just close enough and it’s not too far. I love the atmosphere of it. My major is criminal justice, I might pick up a minor in psychology but [not] sports management – every athlete usually does something with sports. I’ve always been interested in psychology and something within law and this had a good balance. Track hasn’t affected any of that, it’s just something else I’m interested in. TTN: How long have you been competing in track and what made you join? JJ: This will be my seventh year. Actually, the high school track coach came up to me at a middle school basketball game and was like, “Hey, you’re tall. You should do track.” So I was like, “All right.” I tried it and ended up loving it. TTN: How do you feel so far about Temple’s track program? JJ: I really like the team. Everyone is so sweet, so nice, so welcoming. I felt like I was already on the team when I went on my visit. They brought me in with open arms and everything. And the coaches are great. They were both athletes, too. It makes it so much better because that means they know what they’re doing. [Assistant] coach [Shameka] Marshall was competing at the Olympic trials. That tells you she did something right. TTN: How did it feel finding out you were third in the state for triple jump? What was your reaction? JJ: Oh, God. That was awesome. I just remember as soon as I jumped my jump, I knew it was farther than what I had been doing. I pointed and looked at the board as they posted our standings and my coach [gave me the thumbs up]. It was so awesome. It was just a great feeling getting on the podium. Once I got up there, they were saying, “Jamila, Jamila, you got

Honey Festival is all abuzz

Wagner Institute of Science hosts the third annual Honey Festival.

INDIRA JIMENEZ The Temple News The smells of honey and harmony were present at the third annual Honey Festival, hosted by the Philadelphia Beekeepers Guild, at the Wagner Free Institute of Science located on Montgomery Avenue near Main Campus. Kicking off on Friday, Sept. 7, the festival provided a chance for Philadelphians who have an interest in beekeeping and the process of producing honey, to attend events at the festival and learn the ins and outs of bees. “It really began about three years ago with the Philadelphia Beekeepers Guild – and it’s sort of the brainchild of Suzanne

Matlock, who is the vice president of the Guild – and its main goal is to inform people about beekeeping and help people understand how important bees are to pollinating and our food,” Abby Sullivan, program coordinator at the Wagner Institute and event organizer. “It’s about promoting bees and honey, to promote local beekeepers that are selling their honey,” Sullivan added. “There [are] actually a lot of benefits to eating local honey.” The festival provides opportunities for any type of individual, whether he or she is a professional beekeeper, a novice in the honey game or a student wanting to learn. Documentaries were shown

in the Wagner auditorium centered around beekeeping and its history. Discussions were held on the honey industry and workshops were provided for younger members of the community on bees and their ecosystem within the hive. Attendees could sample honey and learn how to make their own. The festival wasn’t limited to the Wagner Institute. On Sept. 8, the festival moved to the Wyck Historic House and Garden and closed at Bartram’s Garden on Sunday, Sept. 9. More historical lectures and honey demonstrations were held at these venues.

Jessica Smith can be reached at jessica.smith0002@temple.edu.

Financial obstacles shouldn’t hinder internship opportunity

JOHN DAILEY Eternal Intern

The Honey Festival kicked off on Sept. 7 at the Wagner Institute.| INDIRA JIMENEZ TTN

third place.” My parents were so happy. My mom was screaming. It was just such a great moment. I have other medals from other competitions, but when you get your state medal…It’s so much heavier, but it feels so much better. I loved it. I’m pretty sure I cried. TTN: How does being an athlete compare with being a student? JJ: Track is something that motivates me, not only doing well on the track, but it keeps me focused in school, too. I know if I don’t do well in school then I can’t compete or vice versa. You have to do well in school to be an athlete. Just because you’re an athlete doesn’t mean you get special privileges. Yeah, you have to go to tutoring and studying, but any other student could do that. They just want to make sure you get good grades. I like that push and I need that push to do well in the classroom. TTN: Who or what is your main inspiration in pursuing your athletic dream? JJ: Well, my favorite U.S. track sprinter is Allyson Felix. Even though she doesn’t jump, I just really like her. And I would say my main inspiration would have to be – and this is cheesy and everyone says it – my parents, just because they push me and my siblings so much. I have six other siblings, so we have a big family. The one thing my parents always said was, “Go to college. Make something of yourself.” TTN: When was the moment you realized you were following the right path? JJ: My junior year of high school I broke all of my high school’s jumping records. It made me realize how much better I could do, and then my senior year I did it again. I grew so much more each season it just made me keep going and keep doing more. It’s a great thing for me to do. I like staying fit and staying in shape and I love competition so it’s the two best things combined. I’m definitely not going to stop.

John Dailey discusses dealing with barriers while deciding which internships to take advantage of.

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or college students, stress in managing an internship along with other responsibilities is obvious and inherent, but for some students the challenge begins before they even apply. Temple has a history of being a haven for commuter students on a budget. Numerous students rise each day and make the trek to school. And, despite yearly increases, Temple’s tuition is a bargain relative to other universities in the area, which attracts budget-minded students. It’s no great stretch to say that a good portion of Temple stuIndira Jimenez can be reached dents are fiscally conscious and/ at indira.jimenez@temple.edu. or live in their parents’ home,

striving to maintain a balance between college life and the demands imposed by their family. Temple has a hardworking community, but often, barriers to professional growth are present from both financial- and family-based pressures. To nab those sweet highpaying internships – if applicable to your major – you generally need a higher GPA. However, a stellar GPA can be difficult to maintain when you have to work 20-plus hours a week to pay rent, stave off the debt monster or are simply required to work by your family’s culture. If this is the case, your GPA may slip to a number that begins to weigh down your self-confidence, along with your shot at aforementioned sweet positions. If you are barely able to keep up with your coursework and current job, how are you supposed to devote time to an internship search or, quite possibly, accept an additional nonpaying position? Looking to the future that was once bright and full of opportunity, you see a darkening horizon and feel trapped in this cycle, at the mercy of forces beyond your control. I can relate to this because I’m the oldest sibling in my family and the first to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Having been employed in some capacity since I was 15, I felt that I had to work as a matter of pride and family pressures. It wasn’t really financial.

I lived in my parents’ home and I just knew that if I didn’t work, then there would be trouble in my house – to say the least. I held a position as a dietary aide – also known as a glorified and underpaid waiter – at a nursing home working back-to-back 10-hour weekend shifts and two weekdays. I thought about the microeconomic device called the production possibility frontier. It proves graphically that a firm, or individual, is best off focusing on producing the most valuable good and will sacrifice potential productivity if other goods are produced. Essentially, it’s why it makes sense for Tiger Woods to never mow his own lawn, but rather to practice golf. I figured that I was wasting my time making $7.50 an hour, while I could have been focusing on my professional development. Soon after, I landed my first internship at Back on My Feet, a nonprofit founded in Philly with a running-based, homelesscombating model. Initially, my parents balked at the idea of a position with no pay, but it was a better situation than no job at all. Now, I am in the process of looking for a job and feel confident as a result of my internship experience. My personal example isn’t the most extreme, but all too often I see friends and classmates

INTERN PAGE 16


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT temple-news.com

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

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CENTER CITY COUTURE

Philadelphia hosted its first Fashion’s Night Out on Sept. 6 at Macy’s in Center City. TAYLOR FARNSWORTH The Temple News

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ashion’s Night Out, a one-night event, made its way to Philadelphia for the first time on Sept. 6, highlighting the growing fashion industry in Philadelphia with an array of events hosted throughout the city. From local boutiques, such as Kembrel, to large department stores like Macy’s, Philadelphia’s first Fashion’s Night Out showed how much room there is to grow in regards to fashion in Philadelphia. However, it also displayed the abundance of talent and opportunities present in the city.   “I think the Philly fashion scene is moving in a positive direction,” Autumn Kietponglert, the designer-in-residence for Heartless Revival and Philadelphia Fashion Incubator, said. “I think they’re really taking the steps to foster young design talent and show that design is a

priority and important in Philadelphia.” For Fashion’s Night Out at Macy’s, work from its Incubator’s program was displayed. This program was set up to promote upcoming designers from the city, put designers-in-residence’s work on display to the public and give a hint of what is to come from the program in the future – including a fashion show at Macy’s on Sept. 20 and the participation in couture day at Philadelphia Fashion Week.   Seeing that this is the first class of designers to go through the program, being able to participate in Fashion’s Night Out in Philadelphia shows the true expansion of the fashion industry. “Whenever we have something like this, I think it’s a great step in a positive direction and it’s a very exciting time to be in Philadelphia because it’s beginning, it’s growing,” Kietponglert said. “It’s the time where everyone will remember where it all happened.” Although the designers are

Springsteen fan gets her glory day on stage with “The Boss” “We booked it,” Avallon said. While Springsteen was playing, “10th Avenue FreezeOut,” Avallon be an to lose her grounding in the excitement of the crowd. JENELLE JANCI “I was getting pushed up,” A&E Editor Avallon said. “I wasn’t expecting that. [Springsteen] was baMost student athletes take sically on the third step [of the a shower or grab a bite to eat platform] and I was basically after practice. Kristin Avallon on someone’s shoulders. I was hugged Bruce Springsteen. hesitant, because I didn’t want As seen in a video now to impose on [Springsteen] and gone viral, Avallon, a sopho- kind of take him by surprise, more radiology major from like, ‘Oh, what’s this crazy girl Hatboro, Pa., made her way on doing?’ I was waving to him, stage to Springsteen at his Sept. and he kind of looked surprised. 3 show at Citizen’s Bank Park. I guess he wasn’t expecting Avallone, who also attended someone to be that high up. He the Sept. 2 performance, went put out his arm, and I grabbed straight to the concert from it and then I went up. I was cheerleading practice in her speechless.” Temple T-shirt, as seen in the However video. speechless, “On Sunday Avallon showed [Sept. 2] I was her admiration dressed all cute for Springsteen for the concert, with an enthuand [the] one siastic embrace. when I get on “He went stage I was gross in for a norand my hair was mal hug, but I a mess,” Avalwasn’t having lon said. “But that,” Avallon the Temple shirt said. “I just Kristin Avallon / apparently made his sophomore radiology major grabbed it.” waist. It’s been The stage a long time had three columns with plat- coming. My whole family are forms at the ends of each, and huge fanatics and never met Avallon and her family were him. That’s the closest my famseated near one, she said. Since ily ever was to him, and they’ve she had also attended the previ- been fans since before I was ous night’s performance, Aval- born.” lon knew when to approach the Avallon said her family platform to prepare for a possible Springsteen appearance. SPRINGSTEEN PAGE 10

A sophomore hugged Bruce Springsteen on stage, as seen in an online video.

“It was a once in a lifetime chance, and I’m glad I took advantage of it.

SLICE OF HEAVEN, p. 11

As of Sept. 7, Frankford Ave. is home to the world’s first pizza museum, Pizza Brain. A&E DESK 215-204-7416

A jewelry designer looks at her collection in Knit Wit Boutique during Fashion’s Night Out on Sept. 6. | MARISSA PINA TTN the main attraction in fashion, the celebrities who influence popular culture in style are important. At Macy’s, there were

not only designers, trunk shows and previews displayed, but also celebrity guests present. The event presented Janel

Parrish who plays “Mona” on the ABC Family show “Pretty Little Liars,” as well as Chris Manzo and Greg Bennett from

“The Real Housewives of New Jersey.”

FNO PAGE 10

Doo-wop festival supports veterans

The 7th annual Philadelphia DooWop Festival attracted crowds.

JOHN CORRIGAN The Temple News As an army nurse during the Vietnam War, Marsha Four developed a passion for aiding soldiers. Almost 40 years later, Four continues to nurse the men and women who have served in the military through The Philadelphia Veterans Multi-Service & Education Center. “We have a 32-year history of exclusively working with veterans in a very comprehensive and coordinated fashion,” executive director Four said. “We provide counseling, job training and homeless services to veterans,” Four said. “And all of it is free.”

An estimated 81,000 veterans live in Philadelphia, according to the 2010 U.S. Census. To raise money for veterans, volunteers put on the 7th Annual Philadelphia Doo-Wop Festival at Penn’s Landing. Despite competition from the Philadelphia Eagles’ season opener, a multi-generational crowd of about 200 people attended the free outdoor concert. “[Center job counselor] Bill [Diamond] called me and we organized some local bands to do something for the vets,” center volunteer Chuck Holloway said. “Between New York and Philly, this is where doo-wop was born. This city has a festival for every genre of music except doo-wop, so we wanted to change that,” Holloway said. Doo-wop is a derivative of rhythm and blues as well as jazz. Peaking in popularity dur- Two attendees of the Philadelphia Doo-Wop Festival were ing the ‘50s, doo-wop was the inspired by nostalgic sounds. | KATE McCANN TTN

DOO-WOP PAGE 10

WHYY fest not trumped by rain WHYY Connections Festival brought art to the waterfront despite dismal weather. JENINE PILLA The Temple News Despite an unfortunate forecast, WHYY’s Connections Festival attracted crowds to the Delaware River Waterfront on Sept. 8 and 9. WHYY, Greater Philadelphia’s public media provider, joined forces with the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation to spend the weekend celebrating

the arts through film screenings, musical performances and visual art displays. The festivities began on Thursday with a kickoff event complete with art presentations and performances inspired by NewsWorks’ Creative Connectors, a prestigious group of Philadelphia area art leaders. As the weekend continued, art lovers from all around visited the waterfront looking to educate themselves about art in the city and enjoyed the popular food trucks surrounding the events. On Friday, films about art, such as “The Barnes Collection,” were screened outdoors at Penn’s Landing while the sun

set and samples of cold brewed coffee from the La Colombe truck were sipped. In collaboration with Southern Pennsylvania Coast Day, a day devoted to show Pennsylvanians their connection to the coast through free boat tours and displays on how the water system operates, Saturday began with kid friendly events such as face painting and hangouts with Sid from the popular PBS Kids’s show “Sid the Science Kid.” Rosie Clark, a former intern for WHYY and present volunteer, is thankful that the Connections Festival joined forces with Coast Day because “it helps

POST GAMING, p. 11

Columnist Samantha Tighe discusses the releases from the 2012 PAX Prime game convention.

ARTSandENTERTAINMENT@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

bring out a crowd that would not normally attend these events or even know about them.” As kids sat patiently in chairs while whiskers were painted onto their cheeks, parents were able to wander to other booths that housed various Philadelphians promoting their involvement with the local art scene. The Association for Public Art, the nation’s first private, nonprofit civic organization established in 1872, was present and telling passers-by of their various interactive art programs throughout the city and promot-

WHYYFEST PAGE 12

First Friday, web Missed the galleries? Check out our coverage.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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Fashion forward in Philadelphia FNO PAGE 9 Parrish attracted a younger crowd because of her success on the teen-oriented show. Both the suspenseful plot and the stylish outfits worn by the cast have attracted up to 3 million viewers on a weekly basis. Manzo and Bennett attracted fans of the popular “Housewives” show by posing for pictures and handing out samples of BLK Water. Beyond the designers and celebrities, stylist Karima Renee of Skinny Minority hosted an event at Macy’s to help teach everyday women to embrace their bodies and assist them in finding trendy clothing that is suitable to individual body types.   Renee’s purpose in her company, Skinny Minority, and her mission as a stylist is to show that women can embrace trends without having to succumb to the idea that a person needs to be a certain size or measurement to be fashion-forward. “A lot of women think that...when they see something in a magazine that they have to copy it exactly instead of pulling inspiration from it,” Renee said. Beyond the excitement at Macy’s, many local shops hosted events including special sales, music and free refreshments. Stores such as Kembrel, Joan Shepp and Knit Wit hosted in-store functions featuring local designers. These events were arguably the most active and crowded of the night, with Joan Shepp even reaching the store’s maximum capacity. Kembrel hosted a diverse selection of designers, from Duke & Winston, which is considered to be the “premier casual clothing line for men,” to Pretty Pretty Rebel, a line of punk rock, yet girly designs.   Most of Fashion’s Night Out is very women-oriented, as designs for men aren’t showcased as often. Duke & Winston, presented at Kembrel, showed that there is importance in recognizing menswear designs. “If you think about when you’re out shopping, every shop is for females,” Krista Hayes,

“When

people come to Philadelphia, they have fun with it and love the art.

LED ZEPPELIN 2 SEPT. 11 8:30 P.M. +21 $10-$12 THE BLOCKLEY, 38TH AND CHESTNUT STREETS THEBLOCKLEY.COM/EVENT/141596 Sequels are rarely as good as the original, and with tribute bands, that rule is generally doubled. However, surely even the band itself would be the first to admit that isn’t the point. You see tribute bands because sometimes it’s nice to hear those songs you’ve heard one million times via speakers played blisteringly close to your face as exactly reconstructed as possible. Led Zeppelin 2 will surely play such radio favorites as “Good Times, Bad Times,” “Black Dog,” and yes, “Stairway To Heaven.” While steadily building themselves up the ladder of Led Zeppelin tribute bands, Led Zeppelin 2 has focused solely on delivering to fans a replica of what a typical Led Zeppelin show would have sounded like, assuming said fans were alive four decades ago. Similar in a way that the Dark Star Orchestra recreates Grateful Dead shows, the four Chicagoans that make up Led Zeppelin 2 study old bootlegs of their namesake to further drive home the point that Led Zeppelin is a band that people like. Led Zeppelin 2 is currently on tour across the country, and the show at the Blockley will feature no openers, presumably because an Iron Butterfly tribute act could not be found in time.

Doo-wop draws diverse crowd DOO-WOP PAGE 9

Janel Parrish of “Pretty Little Liars” attended Philadelphia’s Fashion’s Night Out on Sept. 6. | MARISSA PINA TTN communications manager for Duke & Winston, said. “In the [Duke & Winston] store it’s very manly, you could say. We have a dart board, Duke, the bulldog, and so it’s a cool place to just hang out for a bit...There aren’t a lot of men’s boutiques in the city, so I think it’s definitely something that’s going to blow up in Philadelphia.” Philadelphia may not be up to par with New York’s fashion industry Leah Delfiner / designer just yet, but introducing Fashion’s Night Out after New York started it four years ago shows the progress in the city. Philadelphia may also have an advantage in regards to creative freedom in fashion. “In Philadelphia there are so many great designers emerging that it’s like, ‘Wow, Philadelphia has a great team of artists and designers throughout the city that makes this a great capital,’” Leah Delfiner, designer of Pretty Pretty Rebel, said. “It is very creative, that’s the

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

difference between New York and Philadelphia. New York is way corporate, way stiff. When people come to Philadelphia, they have fun with it and love the art.” Philadelphia has begun to prove that it is capable of pushing the limits in regards to fashion and style. Fashion’s Night Out, the continuation of the Philadelphia Collection, the Philadelphia Fashion Incubator and the independent, local designers that are pushing the envelope are showing the potential of Philadelphia becoming a major fashion capital. “[Fashion’s Night Out and the Philadelphia Collection are a] great way to feel connected to the international fashion community and it just shows that Philadelphia really has a priority for fashion and design and they are interested in promoting it more,” Kietponglert said.

soundtrack of Diamond’s youth. “Back then, the music was about love,” Diamond said. “A lot of the music today, I don’t know what it’s about.” Raising about $375,000 during the past six years, the festival has certainly proven successful. “This was the perfect opportunity for us to do outreach in the community,” Four said. “As a nonprofit, most of our programs are funded around federal grants. Our fundraisers are crucial because we don’t get dollars for some of the things we need,” Four said. While bands of yesteryear such as The Del Satins and The Larkings rocked the crowd, rising star LaTanya Gentile crooned a stirring rendition of Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You.” “I lend my voice wherever I can for local charities,” Gentile said. “I perform to connect with people on a different level because music is the epitome of love. Music lets me express myself in ways that I can’t do with mere words,” Gentile added. Although Gentile caters to a younger demographic, 33-yearold attendee Chris Morris preferred the classic performers. “I have always been into entertainment such as old school comedy and music,” Morris

As you might have heard, the Philly Fringe Festival is firing on all cylinders currently. One of the more interesting performances in a festival, Ladies & Gentlemen Improv will be creating large scale rock operas on the fly. Their flyer promises that, “every note, every lyric, every idea, [will be] completely made up, and totally rocked out.” Calling equally upon rock opera purveyors such as Pete Townshend and improv auteur like the Upright Citizen’s Brigade, Ladies & Gentlemen will be offering up comedy that you might sing and learn the words to before the performers themselves. This is the group’s third show, following “Rodgers and Hammerstein Are Dead” and “A Very Special L&G Christmas Special.” The show will also be performed Friday, Sept. 14 and Sunday, Sept. 15 at the same location.

have a weekend dedicated to doo-wop,” Holloway added. As the attendance continues to grow each year, Four remains positive that not only will doowop thrive into the future, but also that her life commitment to soldiers was well worth it. “People need to be aware of the issues and challenges,” Four said. “We are always looking out for new vets. We want to get the word out that if there is any assistance that we can provide, we are there for them,” Four said. “The festival is a great way to spend an afternoon with your family listening to some great music and supporting the men and women who have served this country.” John Corrigan can be reached at john.corrigan@temple.edu.

Student snags Springsteen hug SPRINGSTEEN PAGE 9

was “freaking out” after her hug with Springsteen. She said although she cried onstage, she cried even more after she realized what had just happened. “It felt so unreal, like a dream,” Avallon said. “ I don’t know what I would have done if he gave me the microphone to sing because, even though I know the words, my mind would have drawn a blank because I was just lost in the moment.” Taylor Farnsworth can be Avallon said that her famreached at ily, which has attended numertaylor.farnsworth@temple.edu. ous Springsteen performances, believes that the Philadelphia performances were the best ones they’ve seen. Avallon, who has now been to five Springsteen performances, agrees. “He’s an intense perform-

LADIES & GENTLEMEN PRESENT: ROCK OPERA SEPT. 13 8-9 P.M. $15 FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH, 2125 CHESTNUT ST. FACEBOOK.COM/LGMUSICALIMPROV

said. “Even though I grew up on doo-wop, this is my first time at the festival.” With uncles and best friends serving in the armed forces, Morris appreciates the sacrifice and wants to give back to the soldiers. “As far as I’m concerned, veterans are the real heroes,” Morris said. “To come down on a beautiful day, listening to great music and having some drinks right on the water front…man, there is nothing better. I’m going to have to make this a yearly event,” Morris said. Chief of the “doo wop police” George Felice is one of the co-founders of the festival. “My favorite part of the event is the family atmosphere,” Felice said. “Sometimes you’ll see four generations at these festivals; you’ll see the great grandfather, the grandfather, the father and then the kid. Doo-wop is timeless, brother,” Felice added. Despite the fear that hiphop, rap and pop music will leave doo-wop in the dust, Holloway said, the oldies won’t go down without a fight. “Harvey Holiday still plays doo wop Sunday nights on WOGL,” Holloway said. “Jerry Blavat still brings the old school disc jockeying. On WRDV in Warminster, they

er,” Avallon said. “You can tell by the expressions on his face how into the song he gets.” While she is gaining recognition for her recorded embrace, Avallon still doesn’t know who took the video that has made its way to the Internet. She’s just glad the moment happened. “It was a once-in-a-lifetime chance, and I took advantage of it,” Avallon said. “I’m beyond thankful and grateful that I was lucky enough to have this happen to me.” Jenelle Janci can be reached at jenelle.janci@temple.edu.

DEAD SEA SCROLLS LECTURE: THE ARCHEOLOGY OF QUMRAN AND THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS SEPT. 13 7:30 P.M.-8:30 P.M. $5 THE FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, 20TH STREET & BENJAMIN FRANKLIN PARKWAY FI.EDU/SCROLLS History lesson: In 1947, an undiscovered cave was found containing hundreds of pieces of parchment. These papers were later preserved, studied and named the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Franklin Institute is currently holding an exhibit featuring 20 scrolls, including four scrolls never displayed to the public. Along with the scrolls themselves, other features, such as artifacts from the City of David and many more, are also out for the viewing public. On Sept. 13, Dr. Jodi Magness will be stopping by to hold a lecture on the exhibit. Magness, who is a Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism from the University of North Carolina, will flesh out the Scrolls’ history and field questions. The Institute suggests patrons bring sweatshirts or coats to the exhibit due to the cool temperatures the Dead Sea Scrolls call for.

BOSS HUG Use this QR code above to view the video of Avallon on stage with Springsteen.

TASTE OF NORTHERN LIBERTIES SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS 1:30 P.M.-4:30 P.M. $44 NORTHERN LIBERTIES CITYFOODTOURS.COM/PHILADELPHIA/TASTE_OF_NORTHERN_LIBERTIES.HTML Food tours, like food itself, are usually so good that you never want them to end. Here is a prime example. The tour website promises stops at five different NoLibs eateries in two and a half hours while also stating that walks will be short and not punishing. The food tastings range from homemade jalapeno peppers to hushpuppies and many tastes in between. It will also serve as something of a close-up history tour for those not too familiar with the surrounding areas, as guides will be providing history on the architecture and other longstanding monuments. The tour prides itself on its small size, making sure that each person gets their appetites far more than whetted. Though the title suggests only a taste, the quench for Northern Liberties cuisine will surely be met after this particular foodie tour. – Kevin Stairiker


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

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Pop music: guilty pleasure then and now

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KEVIN STAIRIKER Fear of Music

Columnist Kevin Stairiker discusses the relevance of the “Now That’s What I Call Music!” CDs.

SAMANTHA TIGHE Save and Quit

isten, don’t pretend that you were a fan of “cool” music when you were 10 years old. I don’t care if you had really hip friends or parents – there’s a good chance that, at some point in your life, you were inexplicably in love with a certain kind of popular music. A lot of that can probably be traced back to the “Now That’s What I Call Music” series. “Now That’s What I Call Music!” Volume I was released in the U.K. in 1983 as a doublevinyl collection and featured artists such as Phil Collins, The Cure and Kajagoogoo. Around the time its British counterpart was at the 41st entry, the U.S. decided it would be a good time to start repackaging pop hits to a frothing musical market. The first U.S. version came out in 1998 and, judging by the track list, it really didn’t know what it wanted to be yet. Sure, it had the hits you would expect, like the Backstreet Boys’ perfect “As Long As You Love Me.” But would you believe at song No. 14, nestled between Aqua’s “Barbie Girl” and Everclear’s “I Will Buy You A New Life,” was Radiohead’s “Karma Police”?

PAX convention keeps gamers on their controllers

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ne of the last video game conventions of the year, PAX Prime, took place during the weekend of Aug. 31 to Sept. 2. The convention in Seattle was created by the guys who penned the popular online web-comic “The Penny Arcade.” The gaming convention was first held in 2004 and has since exploded in popularity, enough so that a smaller convention, PAX East, was started earlier this year in Boston to satisfy demand. Much like other large video-game expos, PAX Prime is a gathering where video game developers and companies not only showcase their ideas or current projects, but also make some of their large game announcements in terms of upcoming releases or downloadable content. One of the most popular titles of this year’s expo was “Dishonored,” a firstperson action game created by Arkane Studios and published by Bethesda, the people who gifted the world with “Skyrim.” You control Corvo Atano, a jaded bodyguard-turned-assassin, who was framed for the murder of his employer, the Empress. Sneaking through the open world city of Dunwall, Atano seeks revenge by picking off the men and women who framed him for the murder. The way you choose Atano to silence his targets, through lethal or non-lethal means, is entirely up to the player, with additional mission objectives and information gathered by eavesdropping and surveillance. Did I also mention Atano was granted supernatural powers by a mysterious being known as the Outsider? Scheduled to hit shelves in next month, “Dishonored” is definitely a must-see and a must-buygame. On a more light-hearted note, “Rayman Legends” was also a topic of discussion among attendees, mostly due to the fact that it will be a Wii U exclusive title, the next generation of the Nintendo console. “Rayman Legends” takes the same gameplay and visual style of its predecessor, “Rayman Origins,” with the addition of a new character, Barbara, a Vikinglooking female who wields an axe. Players are able to jump and fight their way through levels, and occasionally will interact with the environment in order to help the characters along the way. I’m eager to get my hands on “Rayman Legends,” but I’m still on the fence about the Wii U. Now, I’m worried mostly because it looks like you’re playing with an oversized Gameboy Advance, and console-wise, it doesn’t look like much of a “step-forward” in terms of gaming, and

Columnist Samantha Tighe recaps the highly anticipated game announcements from the West Coast gamer convention.

Pretty crazy, right? In its American infancy, the “Now” series played it pretty fast and loose, but soon molded itself into the gold standard that we came to expect. I arrived late to the “Now” party. On my 10th birthday, I received my first two CDs and my own CD player. The first CD was Smash Mouth’s self-titled 2001 album, and though it was chock full of hits, I ended up really latching on to the second CD: the eighth volume of the “Now” series. For those unfamiliar with this particular entry, why are you still reading this? Go track it down, because it takes priority over whatever you’re doing right now. It covered every base of what was considered pop music in 2001, ranging from Aaliyah to Sum 41. It followed the basic “Now” formula: The first couple tracks are the main hits, followed by an R&B midsection, and rounding it out are the usually laughable modern rock hits. “Now 8” specifically was loaded with both terrible songs that are fun to listen to, such as The Wiseguys’ “Start The Commotion” and genuinely great songs, like “Clint Eastwood” by the Gorillaz. And if you’re still on

I fear the “Rayman Legends” platform exclusivity will hinder it. If you’re a fan of first person shooters like “Call of Duty,” “Battlefield” or “Halo,” you may also be interested in the upcoming massively multiplayer online game by Sony Online Entertainment. Now, I’m aware that throwing around the term MMO brings up visions of games like “World of Warcraft” and “Guild Wars,” but “PlanetSide 2” is something different. Imagine online multiplayer, the kind you see in “CoD” or “Battlefield,” but, there’s no map confines, no team objectives and no time limit. Instead, you’re actively fighting in a war – you and about 2,000 other players. Same faction members will be able to strategize and pulverize opposition with the promise of almost no-lag, an amazing feat considering the quality of the graphics. It’s a tall order, but “PlanetSide 2” is still currently in the works with beta keys being given out in the droves, so keep an eye on it. Speaking of FPS, there was, of course, a “Far Cry 3” demo set up for curious gamers. The console game boasts a large, open world featuring modern-day pirate antagonists and several pick-andchoose missions. However, the release date has been pushed back until at least early December – a disappointment since it was originally set to launch earlier this month. Last, but not least, are two more popular titles that were on display, but didn’t make that much of a big splash – “God of War: Ascension” and “Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes.” There wasn’t much new information released about either game. “God of War: Ascension” really only broadcasted the main protagonist of the new addition to the franchise, the Furies, evil woman from mostly Roman, but some Greek, lore. “Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes” announced that it will fit in as a prologue to the events of “Metal Gear Solid 5.” The trailer showed the return of Snake, who is still an old man doing some pretty hardcore action, and even granted viewers some segments of gameplay, which didn’t look too bad. So far, it’s been confirmed for the PlayStation 3, and hopefully other consoles will be announced in the coming future. With PAX Prime at an end, it’s relieving to see a lot of highly anticipated games set to go on sale in the coming months. Make sure you check out the titles listed above. Most of them look to be pretty solid.

the fence, track one is Destiny’s Child’s “Bootylicious.” Seriously, it’s a perfect compilation. As of this writing, the U.S. series is up to No. 43, but who is counting anymore? The series is largely useless now thanks to YouTube and the rapidly accelerating disposability of pop music in general. The first track on “Now 43” is the very obvious “Call Me Maybe,” which became massively and achingly popular in June and was treated as the audio equivalent of newly minted vomit by July. By the time “Now 43” came out in early August, the song might as well have been five decades old. The series as a whole has been downgraded from “vital pop music directory” to “thing exasperated parents get their kids when they don’t know them well enough.” The “Now” series represented a very specific, and recent, period of time in popular music where popularity wasn’t governed by charts, but by inclusion on a beyond-arbitrary gift bag of loosely “pop” tunes. There was a period of time in my life when if a song was featured on a “Now” album, I just assumed and accepted that it was popular

and worth listening to. This unfortunate line of thinking led to brief forays into the discographies of such luminaries as Three Days Grace and Murphy Lee, but that’s for another time. But to say that the “Now” series doesn’t serve a clear and important purpose would be a lie. It’s an audio yearbook series. I could dig up any of those CD volumes that I still have lying around somewhere and remember what I was doing at that point. Just scanning the Wikipedia page for “Now 16” reminded me that, wow, I absolutely still know the words to Yellowcard’s “Ocean Avenue” and, yes, Hoobastank’s “The Reason” definitely was the soundtrack to a seemingly endless number of cringingly, worldendingly awful middle school slow dances. Most times, nostalgia should be treated as the crippling social disease that it is. But there’s something about seeing those album covers alone that is comforting. They’re all the same, save for the numbers and the neverending line of color formations. And with some exceptions, no, I wouldn’t call most of these songs music, and definitely not with a firm exclamation point after-

wards. But they’re fun, damnit. Music listening has become this serious business where the hint of mediocrity is instantly dismissed because there’s such a wealth of amazing music at our fingertips at all times. But, with the “Now” series, it’s almost as if mediocrity was the point. And seriously, do you know how much fun that amounts to? Roughly 20 tracks worth. Listen to some of those songs today and have a laugh. It’s good for your health.

5 ONE-“NOW” WONDERS:

“All My Life” – K-Ci&JoJo (“Now 1”) “Lean Back” – Terror Squad (“Now 17”) “Walked Outta Heaven” – Jagged Edge (“Now 14”) “AM to PM”– Christina Milian (“Now 8”) “Somewhere Out There” – Our Lady Peace (“Now 11”) Kevin Stairiker can be reached at kevin.stairiker@temple.edu.

Pizza on the brain

Local artist brings first pizza museum to his slice of Frankford Avenue. KYLE NOONE The Temple News The crowd, anxious to become the first guests of Pizza Brain – the world’s first Pizza museum – stretched around the corner of Frankford Avenue on Sept. 7. After two years of work and planning, Brian Dwyer’s vision became a reality, but not before some pre-opening festivities. After megaphone speeches, a few words from Deputy Mayor Michael DiBerardinis, a raucous introduction from Pizza Brain’s kitchen team, a rendition of “The Star-Spangled Banner” and Dwyer’s final comments, the ribbon was cut. Pizza Brain, 2313-2311 Frankford Ave., was open for business. For the grand opening, four slices were available: the Jane, a plain slice; Forbes Waggensense, Pizza Brain’s take on the classic pepperoni slice; and white pie variations, such as the Lucy Waggle with arugula and the Felix Huppert with caramelized onions. The pizzeria will eventually offer a full menu of artisan pies. Pizza Brain makes thin crust, traditional pizza with premium ingredients, striving to produce pizza reminiscent of what customers grew up eating. Buzz about Pizza Brain has accumulated throughout the community, in some part due to its presence online and through social media. More than 1,000 people confirmed as guests to Pizza Brain’s pizza party invitation on Facebook, leading many to show up early for the opening. “I knew it was going to be crazy over here,” Matthew Kay, who purchased the first slice in

Pizza Brain history, said. “I’m almost obsessed with pizza, but I think these guys are way more obsessed with pizza.” And with Kay’s first order, the register rang and a dream two years in the making was fulfilled. It started about two years ago when Dwyer, a local artist, and a friend, Chris Powell, put together Philadelphia’s first “Pizzacentric” art show, which included different types of art created by around 30 local artists, all dedicated to pizza. “That night kind of changed my life,” Dwyer said, who has loved pizza since he was a kid. The event inspired Dwyer to imagine a pizza place “self aware” enough to celebrate the culture of pizza, and not just the food itself. From there he began assembling a team including head chef Joe Hunter, business manager Michael Carter and space designer Ryan Anderson. “We all basically formed in about four months. We didn’t even know each other before hand,” Dwyer said. “The power of pizza” brought everyone and everything together, he said. The partners and others involved with the project joked about boasting the biggest pizza collection in the country or the East Coast. The jokes continued until one day Dwyer called Guinness World Records. “Someone has done this, right?” Dwyer asked about the project. The surprising answer was that Pizza Brain was the first of its kind. After completing the appropriate channels, Dwyer was officially named the record holder for the Largest Collection of Pizza Related Items by Guinness World Records.

The museum and pizzeria, along with its neighbor, Little Baby’s Ice Cream, occupies a century-old brick building in Kensington. The space is decorated top to bottom, including panels in the floor, with pizza memorabilia varying from vintage comics to LP’s to action figures and practically anything else imagined featuring the Italian pie. For the grand opening, customers of the pizzeria flooded into Little Baby’s Ice Cream where they were treated to free craft beer from Barry’s Homebrew Outlet. The building also features a courtyard behind the shop that includes a unique mural representing pizza and the Kensington community. Dwyer has been a Kensington resident for eight years and sees the neighborhood as the perfect fit for his ode to pizza. “Kensington is a beautiful place, I couldn’t imagine opening it anywhere else,” Dwyer said. “It’s a weird town man, and this is a weird place. We fit right in.” In fact, Pizza Brain has already made waves across the country, being featured in such publications as USA Today, the New York Times and internationally in BBC Travel. As for what’s in store for the future of Pizza Brain, Dwyer has confident, yet simple, hopes. “Lot’s of pizza, lots of smiles and just community, man,” Dwyer said. “This is community building.” Kyle Noone can be reached at kyle.noone@temple.edu.

BRAIN SLICE

Samantha Tighe can be reached at samanthatighe@temple.edu.

Pizza Brain, the first-ever pizza museum, welcomed visitors for its opening on Friday, Sept. 7. | INDIRA JIMINEZ TTN

Use the QR code above to check out a video of the Pizza Brain opening, or visit temple-news.com/ multimedia.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

Connections festival fills Penn’s Landing WHYYFEST PAGE 9 ing their newest public art piece “Open Air,” a large-scale light installation run by the interaction of citizens willing to join the project. Ashley Lippolis, the Program Assistant at the Association for Public Art, said she believes that WHYY’s Connections festival was a great way “to see those interested in art and explain our ‘Open Air’ project because it can be very complicated.” The Connections Festival also gave local artists an opportunity to promote their most recent endeavors in the art com-

munity. Author Bill Campbell sat behind a plastic folding table educating passers-by about his new book “Koontown Killing Kaper,” a tale of the struggle with violence in AfricanAmerican areas of cities around America. It was obvious that many Philadelphians were patiently waiting for Saturday evening when The Great Plaza at Penn’s Landing hosted musical performances by bands that would perk the ears of any music lover. Philly’s own The Lawsuits started the show and warmed up the

crowd for the treats to follow while storm clouds began forming overhead, making the Delaware River look like a scene from “Moby Dick.” Following a short delay as the storm came and went, Chicago’s Maps and Atlases, serenaded the crowd and made it forget about the puddles. In between acts, members of WHYY climbed on stage to remind those in attendance that they “are the future of public media” and the importance of supporting the local institutions that keep art and music alive. While equipment was

pushed and pulled on the stage, stories of fitting into communities were told by WHYY staff members and upheld the theme of connection that the festival promoted. As the rain fell, the world of Twitter bustled with questions of the status of the show and the next act, England’s Frank Turner. Known for his recent performance during the opening ceremonies of the 2012 Summer Olympics, Turner tweeted to Philadelphians to remind them that the rain could “not stop the rock.” As Turner’s acoustic guitar

rang clean, his backing band The Sleeping Souls brought the still-growing crowd to a cheer and promoted a dance-off with his new song “I Want to Dance.” As the rain slowed to a stop, the attendance at the Great Plaza seemed to double for New Jersey’s own Yo La Tengo, an alternative rock band with years of experience. Touring for the promotion of their new release “Stupid Things,” due out Sept. 25, Yo La Tengo led the crowd to sing-alongs and swaying dance moves, while some were on a musical flashback and others an epiphany.

The many events of the Connections Festival helped remind Philadelphians of the importance of art in the city and showed them several ways to access it. Jenine Pilla can be reached at jenine.pilla@temple.edu.


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

PAGE 13

Alex G. Alex Giannascoli of The Skin Cells experiments with multiple instruments and sounds on his solo project. Sophomore Alex Giannascoli, or Alex G., has gained a following from his solo project and full band, The Skin Cells. Giannascoli plays piano, drums and the guitar. | KATE McCANN TTN

JENELLE JANCI A&E Editor Most people abandon their childhood nicknames once they reach a certain age. Alex Giannascoli, or Alex G., ended up embracing his. “When I was younger, I had neighbors named Alex and Chris,” Giannascoli said, a native of Havertown, Pa. “[Alex’s] little brother Chris used to call me Alex G. so we knew he wasn’t talking to his brother.” The name stuck throughout high school, and Giannascoli, a sophomore who plans to declare a major in biology, adopted the name for his solo music project. A member of the noticeably louder project The Skin Cells, Giannascoli’s solo work is easier listening and a chance for him to show off his talents as a multi-instrumentalist, as well as a vocalist. Giannascoli’s soft and sweet vocals float over his instrumentals. Musically influenced by his

brother, who is 11 years older, Giannascoli began playing piano at a young age, adding drums to his repertoire in elementary school and later guitar, which he now considers his primary instrument. Alex G. will be playing at Jolly’s Dueling Pianos and American Beer Bar on Sept. 18.

an effort to not follow traditional patterns with my chord progressions. I mean, I do fall into them anyway, because you can’t help it. If you have a chance to write a poppy song, you’re going to do it because it sounds great. But I kind of make effort to make it a little bit dissonant or something like that, and I know jazz does that also. But they have like a real purpose, and a thought out thing behind it, which is different. I do it Alex Giannascoli / musician kind of randomly. I guess that’s a similarity. TTN: Who would you consider your main musical influences? AG: My first main influence was Rasputin’s Secret Police. When I was in eighth

“If I’m trying

to portray a different atmosphere, I’ll try to think of lyrics that will put you in that atmosphere.

THE TEMPLE NEWS: You seem to have a lot of influences in your music, including a little bit of jazz. Where do those come from? ALEX GIANNASCOLI: I took drum lessons for a year in middle school because I was trying to get into the jazz band. So I’ve been jazztrained on the drums, so I guess that crosses over. I think I make

grade, I saw them play at my high school. I looked them up, and the guitarist for that band does his own solo stuff called “Brandon Can’t Dance,” so I was listening to that. He recorded it all by himself in his house, and I recognized that he did it by himself and thought, “This sounds awesome, I have to do it too.” I guess as far as writing music, I listen to old Courtney Love and Silver Jews. TTN: You don’t hear a lot of people list Courtney Love as a main influence. What do you like about her? AG: I guess that she has really confrontational lyrics. She’s just really hateful in all of her songs, and it’s awesome. She’s got a lot of guts. She’s so cool. TTN: When you’re making music, do you record everything yourself? AG: For like 90 percent of them, I’ll just do it myself. I’ll write it on guitar, and then I’ll either record a guitar part or I’ll record a piano part first.

I don’t have a bass, so I record the electric guitar and I use this effect on the computer where I can turn it down like 12 pitches so it’s like an octave lower so it sounds like a bass. I’ll usually record the vocals last. That differs. Sometimes I’ll write the lyrics before I record it, or I’ll write them as I’m recording it. TTN: That’s really cool that you sometimes think of lyrics as you’re recording them. Do you have a particular place where you draw inspiration from for your lyrics? AG: Sometimes, I just like, pull them out of my a--, but other times I’m just trying to convey a particular feeling or something like that. If I’m trying to portray a different atmosphere, I will try to think of lyrics that will put you in that atmosphere. TTN: You’re pretty prevalent among the houseshow scene at Temple. What do you like about playing house shows? AG: I guess because you sort of like know everybody, it’s not that threatening, which

is cool. You look around, there’s like this giant posse that welcomes you. Whether they’re too drunk or whatever – they’re not going to judge you too hard. Also, there’s not a lot of pressure to be great. People are just going to listen to you if they want to listen to you, or they will do their own thing. It’s super casual, which is something that’s really nice. The people are just enjoying music and making music because they like it, which is awesome. Jenelle Janci can be reached at jenelle.janci@temple.edu. *Disclaimer: Assistant Photo Editor Abi Reimold has recorded backup vocals for Alex G. She was not involved in the assigning, reporting or editing of this story.


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PAGE 11

Pop music: guilty pleasure then and now

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KEVIN STAIRIKER Fear of Music

Columnist Kevin Stairiker discusses the relevance of the “Now That’s What I Call Music!” CDs.

SAMANTHA TIGHE Save and Quit

isten, don’t pretend that you were a fan of “cool” music when you were 10 years old. I don’t care if you had really hip friends or parents – there’s a good chance that, at some point in your life, you were inexplicably in love with a certain kind of popular music. A lot of that can probably be traced back to the “Now That’s What I Call Music” series. “Now That’s What I Call Music!” Volume I was released in the U.K. in 1983 as a doublevinyl collection and featured artists such as Phil Collins, The Cure and Kajagoogoo. Around the time its British counterpart was at the 41st entry, the U.S. decided it would be a good time to start repackaging pop hits to a frothing musical market. The first U.S. version came out in 1998 and, judging by the track list, it really didn’t know what it wanted to be yet. Sure, it had the hits you would expect, like the Backstreet Boys’ perfect “As Long As You Love Me.” But would you believe at song No. 14, nestled between Aqua’s “Barbie Girl” and Everclear’s “I Will Buy You A New Life,” was Radiohead’s “Karma Police”?

PAX convention keeps gamers on their controllers

O

ne of the last video game conventions of the year, PAX Prime, took place during the weekend of Aug. 31 to Sept. 2. The convention in Seattle was created by the guys who penned the popular online web-comic “The Penny Arcade.” The gaming convention was first held in 2004 and has since exploded in popularity, enough so that a smaller convention, PAX East, was started earlier this year in Boston to satisfy demand. Much like other large video-game expos, PAX Prime is a gathering where video game developers and companies not only showcase their ideas or current projects, but also make some of their large game announcements in terms of upcoming releases or downloadable content. One of the most popular titles of this year’s expo was “Dishonored,” a firstperson action game created by Arkane Studios and published by Bethesda, the people who gifted the world with “Skyrim.” You control Corvo Atano, a jaded bodyguard-turned-assassin, who was framed for the murder of his employer, the Empress. Sneaking through the open world city of Dunwall, Atano seeks revenge by picking off the men and women who framed him for the murder. The way you choose Atano to silence his targets, through lethal or non-lethal means, is entirely up to the player, with additional mission objectives and information gathered by eavesdropping and surveillance. Did I also mention Atano was granted supernatural powers by a mysterious being known as the Outsider? Scheduled to hit shelves in next month, “Dishonored” is definitely a must-see and a must-buygame. On a more light-hearted note, “Rayman Legends” was also a topic of discussion among attendees, mostly due to the fact that it will be a Wii U exclusive title, the next generation of the Nintendo console. “Rayman Legends” takes the same gameplay and visual style of its predecessor, “Rayman Origins,” with the addition of a new character, Barbara, a Vikinglooking female who wields an axe. Players are able to jump and fight their way through levels, and occasionally will interact with the environment in order to help the characters along the way. I’m eager to get my hands on “Rayman Legends,” but I’m still on the fence about the Wii U. Now, I’m worried mostly because it looks like you’re playing with an oversized Gameboy Advance, and console-wise, it doesn’t look like much of a “step-forward” in terms of gaming, and

Columnist Samantha Tighe recaps the highly anticipated game announcements from the West Coast gamer convention.

Pretty crazy, right? In its American infancy, the “Now” series played it pretty fast and loose, but soon molded itself into the gold standard that we came to expect. I arrived late to the “Now” party. On my 10th birthday, I received my first two CDs and my own CD player. The first CD was Smash Mouth’s self-titled 2001 album, and though it was chock full of hits, I ended up really latching on to the second CD: the eighth volume of the “Now” series. For those unfamiliar with this particular entry, why are you still reading this? Go track it down, because it takes priority over whatever you’re doing right now. It covered every base of what was considered pop music in 2001, ranging from Aaliyah to Sum 41. It followed the basic “Now” formula: The first couple tracks are the main hits, followed by an R&B midsection, and rounding it out are the usually laughable modern rock hits. “Now 8” specifically was loaded with both terrible songs that are fun to listen to, such as The Wiseguys’ “Start The Commotion” and genuinely great songs, like “Clint Eastwood” by the Gorillaz. And if you’re still on

I fear the “Rayman Legends” platform exclusivity will hinder it. If you’re a fan of first person shooters like “Call of Duty,” “Battlefield” or “Halo,” you may also be interested in the upcoming massively multiplayer online game by Sony Online Entertainment. Now, I’m aware that throwing around the term MMO brings up visions of games like “World of Warcraft” and “Guild Wars,” but “PlanetSide 2” is something different. Imagine online multiplayer, the kind you see in “CoD” or “Battlefield,” but, there’s no map confines, no team objectives and no time limit. Instead, you’re actively fighting in a war – you and about 2,000 other players. Same faction members will be able to strategize and pulverize opposition with the promise of almost no-lag, an amazing feat considering the quality of the graphics. It’s a tall order, but “PlanetSide 2” is still currently in the works with beta keys being given out in the droves, so keep an eye on it. Speaking of FPS, there was, of course, a “Far Cry 3” demo set up for curious gamers. The console game boasts a large, open world featuring modern-day pirate antagonists and several pick-andchoose missions. However, the release date has been pushed back until at least early December – a disappointment since it was originally set to launch earlier this month. Last, but not least, are two more popular titles that were on display, but didn’t make that much of a big splash – “God of War: Ascension” and “Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes.” There wasn’t much new information released about either game. “God of War: Ascension” really only broadcasted the main protagonist of the new addition to the franchise, the Furies, evil woman from mostly Roman, but some Greek, lore. “Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes” announced that it will fit in as a prologue to the events of “Metal Gear Solid 5.” The trailer showed the return of Snake, who is still an old man doing some pretty hardcore action, and even granted viewers some segments of gameplay, which didn’t look too bad. So far, it’s been confirmed for the PlayStation 3, and hopefully other consoles will be announced in the coming future. With PAX Prime at an end, it’s relieving to see a lot of highly anticipated games set to go on sale in the coming months. Make sure you check out the titles listed above. Most of them look to be pretty solid.

the fence, track one is Destiny’s Child’s “Bootylicious.” Seriously, it’s a perfect compilation. As of this writing, the U.S. series is up to No. 43, but who is counting anymore? The series is largely useless now thanks to YouTube and the rapidly accelerating disposability of pop music in general. The first track on “Now 43” is the very obvious “Call Me Maybe,” which became massively and achingly popular in June and was treated as the audio equivalent of newly minted vomit by July. By the time “Now 43” came out in early August, the song might as well have been five decades old. The series as a whole has been downgraded from “vital pop music directory” to “thing exasperated parents get their kids when they don’t know them well enough.” The “Now” series represented a very specific, and recent, period of time in popular music where popularity wasn’t governed by charts, but by inclusion on a beyond-arbitrary gift bag of loosely “pop” tunes. There was a period of time in my life when if a song was featured on a “Now” album, I just assumed and accepted that it was popular

and worth listening to. This unfortunate line of thinking led to brief forays into the discographies of such luminaries as Three Days Grace and Murphy Lee, but that’s for another time. But to say that the “Now” series doesn’t serve a clear and important purpose would be a lie. It’s an audio yearbook series. I could dig up any of those CD volumes that I still have lying around somewhere and remember what I was doing at that point. Just scanning the Wikipedia page for “Now 16” reminded me that, wow, I absolutely still know the words to Yellowcard’s “Ocean Avenue” and, yes, Hoobastank’s “The Reason” definitely was the soundtrack to a seemingly endless number of cringingly, worldendingly awful middle school slow dances. Most times, nostalgia should be treated as the crippling social disease that it is. But there’s something about seeing those album covers alone that is comforting. They’re all the same, save for the numbers and the neverending line of color formations. And with some exceptions, no, I wouldn’t call most of these songs music, and definitely not with a firm exclamation point after-

wards. But they’re fun, damnit. Music listening has become this serious business where the hint of mediocrity is instantly dismissed because there’s such a wealth of amazing music at our fingertips at all times. But, with the “Now” series, it’s almost as if mediocrity was the point. And seriously, do you know how much fun that amounts to? Roughly 20 tracks worth. Listen to some of those songs today and have a laugh. It’s good for your health.

5 ONE-“NOW” WONDERS:

“All My Life” – K-Ci&JoJo (“Now 1”) “Lean Back” – Terror Squad (“Now 17”) “Walked Outta Heaven” – Jagged Edge (“Now 14”) “AM to PM”– Christina Milian (“Now 8”) “Somewhere Out There” – Our Lady Peace (“Now 11”) Kevin Stairiker can be reached at kevin.stairiker@temple.edu.

Pizza on the brain

Local artist brings first pizza museum to his slice of Frankford Avenue. KYLE NOONE The Temple News The crowd, anxious to become the first guests of Pizza Brain – the world’s first Pizza museum – stretched around the corner of Frankford Avenue on Sept. 7. After two years of work and planning, Brian Dwyer’s vision became a reality, but not before some pre-opening festivities. After megaphone speeches, a few words from Deputy Mayor Michael DiBerardinis, a raucous introduction from Pizza Brain’s kitchen team, a rendition of “The Star-Spangled Banner” and Dwyer’s final comments, the ribbon was cut. Pizza Brain, 2313-2311 Frankford Ave., was open for business. For the grand opening, four slices were available: the Jane, a plain slice; Forbes Waggensense, Pizza Brain’s take on the classic pepperoni slice; and white pie variations, such as the Lucy Waggle with arugula and the Felix Huppert with caramelized onions. The pizzeria will eventually offer a full menu of artisan pies. Pizza Brain makes thin crust, traditional pizza with premium ingredients, striving to produce pizza reminiscent of what customers grew up eating. Buzz about Pizza Brain has accumulated throughout the community, in some part due to its presence online and through social media. More than 1,000 people confirmed as guests to Pizza Brain’s pizza party invitation on Facebook, leading many to show up early for the opening. “I knew it was going to be crazy over here,” Matthew Kay, who purchased the first slice in

Pizza Brain history, said. “I’m almost obsessed with pizza, but I think these guys are way more obsessed with pizza.” And with Kay’s first order, the register rang and a dream two years in the making was fulfilled. It started about two years ago when Dwyer, a local artist, and a friend, Chris Powell, put together Philadelphia’s first “Pizzacentric” art show, which included different types of art created by around 30 local artists, all dedicated to pizza. “That night kind of changed my life,” Dwyer said, who has loved pizza since he was a kid. The event inspired Dwyer to imagine a pizza place “self aware” enough to celebrate the culture of pizza, and not just the food itself. From there he began assembling a team including head chef Joe Hunter, business manager Michael Carter and space designer Ryan Anderson. “We all basically formed in about four months. We didn’t even know each other before hand,” Dwyer said. “The power of pizza” brought everyone and everything together, he said. The partners and others involved with the project joked about boasting the biggest pizza collection in the country or the East Coast. The jokes continued until one day Dwyer called Guinness World Records. “Someone has done this, right?” Dwyer asked about the project. The surprising answer was that Pizza Brain was the first of its kind. After completing the appropriate channels, Dwyer was officially named the record holder for the Largest Collection of Pizza Related Items by Guinness World Records.

The museum and pizzeria, along with its neighbor, Little Baby’s Ice Cream, occupies a century-old brick building in Kensington. The space is decorated top to bottom, including panels in the floor, with pizza memorabilia varying from vintage comics to LP’s to action figures and practically anything else imagined featuring the Italian pie. For the grand opening, customers of the pizzeria flooded into Little Baby’s Ice Cream where they were treated to free craft beer from Barry’s Homebrew Outlet. The building also features a courtyard behind the shop that includes a unique mural representing pizza and the Kensington community. Dwyer has been a Kensington resident for eight years and sees the neighborhood as the perfect fit for his ode to pizza. “Kensington is a beautiful place, I couldn’t imagine opening it anywhere else,” Dwyer said. “It’s a weird town man, and this is a weird place. We fit right in.” In fact, Pizza Brain has already made waves across the country, being featured in such publications as USA Today, the New York Times and internationally in BBC Travel. As for what’s in store for the future of Pizza Brain, Dwyer has confident, yet simple, hopes. “Lot’s of pizza, lots of smiles and just community, man,” Dwyer said. “This is community building.” Kyle Noone can be reached at kyle.noone@temple.edu.

BRAIN SLICE

Samantha Tighe can be reached at samanthatighe@temple.edu.

Pizza Brain, the first-ever pizza museum, welcomed visitors for its opening on Friday, Sept. 7. | INDIRA JIMINEZ TTN

Use the QR code above to check out a video of the Pizza Brain opening, or visit temple-news.com/ multimedia.


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012


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* Offer available to Temple University students only. New personal checking account must be opened by September 24, 2012. To qualify for a $50 reward, a PNC Bank Visa Check Card must be issued to you, and at least 5 purchases made with your Check Card must post to your checking account within 60 days of account opening. Your checking account must remain open in order for you to receive the $50 reward, which will be credited to the eligible account within 60 days after all conditions have been met and will be identified as “CASH TRANS PROMO REWARD ” on your monthly statement. Check Card must be associated with a new Virtual Wallet Student, Virtual Wallet, Virtual Wallet with Performance Spend, Performance or Performance Select account. New account will not be eligible for offer if any signer has signing authority on an existing PNC Bank consumer checking account or has closed an account within the past 90 days. If multiple accounts are opened with the same signers, only one account will be eligible for the premium. For this offer, signing authority will be defined by the customer name(s) and social security number(s) registered on the account. PNC Bank post-it note adhered to front of this publication is required to redeem the offer and must be redeemed at these branch locations: 1908 Liacouras Walk and 3244 North Broad Street. ACHIEVEMENT is a registered mark of The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. ©2012 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved. PNC Bank, National Association. Member FDIC

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LIVING

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Internships replace traditional employment for some shying away from doing internships or co-ops because they believe that they can’t do it or are afraid to put their foot down in defense of their future success. Tuanh Nguyen, a senior international business major, said she had to contend with her family’s culture and the need to pay her rent when seeking to obtain her first internship. “Growing up, we were just expected to do things, like we never got an allowance or anything,” Nguyen said. “I have always been working and paying my bills since I’d gotten out of

high school.” Paying for school and rent while at Temple has been a source of pride for Nguyen. “In terms of finances, I’ve paid for everything by myself,” she said. Confessing that she did not understand the concept of internships at first, she soon decided that she needed to do an internship herself. “When I had just left high school, my career plans were to just do well grade-wise and then get a job and that’s it,” Nguyen said. “But after being in

INTERN PAGE 8

this culture, having my professors push internships and seeing how much experience my friends were getting, I realized that it was a part of getting a good job.” However, at this point Nguyen was already working three days during the week at a daycare and at a nail salon on the weekends, along with taking six courses. She decided that her professional development was more important and, after assessing her finances, decided to leave one of her jobs.

“I spoke to my manager about my future, telling her that I needed to do an internship and couldn’t work there anymore,” Nguyen said. “I’ve found that bosses in general understand when it comes to school, because the next day my boss recommended me to her friend.” Nguyen wound up leaving her job at the daycare to be a sales support and legal assistant

to her old manager’s entrepreneurial friend. “Not only did I learn about the business aspect, but I was exposed to all these little facets of doing things,” Nguyen said. “I really feel that I am much more marketable as an employee now.” Nguyen suggests that students that have to work to support themselves make every

The one with American Sign Language on their resume will open up opportunities in their chosen field.

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effort to gain professional experience. “I have so many friends who lack experience and are taking jobs that they are overqualified for,” Nguyen said. “You just need to clear your schedule and make it work.” John A. Dailey can be reached at john.dailey@temple.edu.

American Sign Language I Sept. 17 – Nov. 26 American Sign Language II Sept. 19 – Nov. 28

MADE PAGE 7

be the ONE Temple Made posters are in the Temple shuttle bus stop on 12th Street.| HUA ZONG TTN selves. Instead, with Temple Made, they’re looking to crowdsource its marketing ideas, which means getting information and input from students and the Temple community, then decide on a marketing strategy. “You make a call out to folks to participate and rather than [push] out what you’re do-

ing, you kind of pull in and you develop from what you can pull in,” Naumoff said. Talking about the future of the campaign, Naumoff said with a hint of excitement in her voice – though she couldn’t “get into too many details” – that they are working on a Temple Made launch event to be held at the end of the month on Main

Campus. “If you’re in and around town...if you happen to go on the subway, if you happen to go to City Hall, there will be ‘game faces’ everywhere throughout September,” Naumoff said. “I mean everywhere.”

It’s never too late to learn another language. Be in high demand by adding American Sign Language (ASL) to your resume. Two ASL on-campus classes are currently being offered through Drexel’s Leading-Edge Language Network. In ASL I, you’ll interact with your teacher and gain information on language, grammar, comprehension and the Deaf Culture. Build upon those concepts and increase your vocabulary in ASL II, where you’ll learn commands, locations, basic directions, and lengths of time.

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Michael Chau can be reached at mike.chau@temple.edu.

SEPTEMBER 10 -14 , 2012 TH

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Bring your completed raffle ticket to any Study Abroad Week event, and enter to win a free iPad! The more events you attend, the more chances you’ll have to win!

WHERE WILL TEMPLE TAKE YOU? Join Education Abroad & Overseas Campuses from September 10th – 14th, 2012 for the 2nd annual Study Abroad Week (SAW), a weeklong event dedicated to study abroad opportunities at Temple! S Kickoff Party on Monday to learn more Attend the SAW about SAW events, then look for us around campus throughout the week hosting special events, leading information sessions and student panels, and sharing free breakfast, coffee, and popcorn. ra for the chance to win an iPad; the more Enter our raffle events you attend, the more chances to enter! Help us say goodbye to SAW at the closing party on Friday to find out if you’ve won the raffle! Visit www.temple.edu/studyabroad/saw for more information and complete event details.


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

Audition mishaps are inevitable

Marcie Anker Starving Actor

Auditions are an essential part to any actor’s life, no matter how perfect, terrible or embarrassing they tend to be.

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uditions – “May the odds be ever in your favor.” There is nothing quite like returning to the theater department after a threemonth vacation. The hugs are a little snugger, the screams a little louder, the smiles a little toothier – the excitement is piqued and it is palpable. However, the genuine enthusiasm about seeing friends is clouded by the fundamental nature of our profession: competition. Theater is a competitive field, there’s no getting around it, and no one ever, ever wants to talk

about it. A brilliant professor of mine once told my class that the minute we graduate from Temple, not only will our colleagues be our competition, but our professors, too. That’s a terrifying thought. Unlike organized sport teams, there is no smack talk, no mortal enemies – for the most part – it is a very professional competition. However, that doesn’t mean that come callback time, the department doesn’t resemble that infamous scene in “Mean Girls” when the girls, in this case all actors, miraculously morph from humans to animals. We’re just professional about it. I’m getting ahead of myself, I should explain these theater words, I’m sure they sound as comprehensible as Parseltongue. An audition is the first step to casting a show; depending on if it’s a musical or play, one will either sing a song or perform a monologue. Sadly, I’ve never auditioned for a musical at Temple – I absolutely would if they got rid of the pesky singing and dancing requirement. But, alas, it’s a “necessity.” Lip-syncing isn’t a reasonable option and using a recording of Kristen Chenoweth is frowned upon, so I’m just plain out of luck on the mu-

sical front. Broadway will have to wait. I digress. After the preliminary auditions come the callbacks. “Hey, I just met you, and this is crazy. But here’s my monologue, so call me back maybe.” Not everyone gets called back – it’s up to the director’s discretion and vision for that particular show. We go from 24 tributes to 12. When I first started auditioning for shows, not getting a callback sent me into instant Sylvia Plath mode: Life wasn’t worth living, school wasn’t worth attending. I was a talentless, useless – a leper, if you will, if I didn’t get a callback. I was having personal apocalypses on a regular basis – forget 2012. I still recall the first time I ever auditioned for a show back in high school. It was “M*A*S*H.” I went into the auditioning room feeling like the queen of the school. I looked cute, so I thought. I had a great monologue, so I thought. And the director liked me, so I thought. What could possibly go wrong? Well. When I was doing my post-audition, checkmyself-out-in-the-bathroommirror ritual, I turned around and – to my horror – I had a massive stain on the back of my jeans. The monthly visitor had

struck again and she showed me no mercy. Needless to say, I didn’t get cast, nor did I ever wear jeans to an audition ever, ever again. Wow, it is almost as embarrassing recounting that memory now as it was then. It was so tragic. After my “incident,” I didn’t audition again for a year and a half because I was so hideously mortified. Unfortunately, in this field of work, “bad” auditions are inevitable, just like in other fields. Sports stars have bad tryouts, businessmen have bad interviews – failure and rejection are two things that no one can escape. What is even more unfortunate is that some incredibly talented actors quit trying after a lousy audition or two – in my case, dozens. For some actors, like myself, auditioning isn’t our strong suit, just as test-taking or interviewing or athletic tryouts aren’t other people’s strong suits. My job isn’t to be a professional “auditioner,” my job is to be an actor, an artist – auditioning is just a means to that end. It pains me to see the new freshmen come in wide-eyed and energetic, fresh out of high school and still buzzing from the high from being the star of their high school plays, ready

to conquer the Temple theater department and watch their spirits crumble into dust before the callboard when they see that they haven’t been cast in a show. I used to be that freshman – it’s devastating. I still feel that familiar pang of disappointment and failure when I haven’t been cast in a show despite my extensive efforts to thwart those feelings by hiding behind the mask of aloofness. As an actor, it is my duty, my privilege, my obligation to the art to keep trying, to keep auditioning for whatever comes my way. When theater alumnus Kunal Nayyar – you might’ve heard of him, he’s just on this little show called “The Big Bang Theory” – came to speak to the department, something he said really resonated with me. He said that if we are actors and acting is what we want to do, what we have to do is audition for absolutely everything. Never pass up an opportunity no matter how small the project may be, or how superior or experienced we feel. If a director cares enough about a show or a scene to produce it, then we should care enough to act in it – don’t let anything be “below” us, because you never know who you might be auditioning

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or performing for. Morgan Freeman could be watching, Meryl Streep could be watching. Hey, you might even end up landing a role on an Emmy Award-winning television show. Now, I claim no expertise in auditioning or acting by any means. I can only speak from personal experience. In theater, we have to learn the art of taking blows mentally, emotionally and sometimes physically. And not only enduring those blows, but also taking them with grace and recovering. Because, let’s face it, sometimes you forget your lines, sometimes you sing off-key, sometimes you aren’t prepared, sometimes you have inexplicable gas and sometimes you have a mortifying stain on your rump – all you can do is keep trying until you get exactly where you want to be. That, and don’t ever, ever wear jeans. Until next time, I bid you farewell my dear, loyal fans. Also, I’m still poor (help me – sad face). Marcie Anker can be reached at martha.anker@temple.edu.

Advice columnist talks convenient dating and safety

Cary Carr Let’s be blunt

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Cary Carr asked students on Main Campus what they wanted to know about college life.

he realization that this is my last year of college is starting to hit me and not because of constant reminders that getting a job out of school will be anything but a breeze. Instead, it’s the freshmen showing me how far I’ve come since the days of awful parties, dorm life and uncomfortable social encounters. As I walked up to countless stu-

dents attempting to spark conversations about what their concerns are and what advice they’re dying to get, I noticed something unsettling: Students don’t know how to talk to each other without turning bright red or stumbling over their own words. And the least confident of all? The newbie Owls – the ones who I assumed to have the most questions about classes, campus life and relationships. As a freshman, I can recall being just as flustered when a stranger approached me. The fear of being judged or taunted would take over, and I would try to escape the situation as quickly and gracefully as possible. But the truth was, I desperately needed the help of my peers. I was clueless on where the best places to eat were, lost on how to get involved in clubs and totally dumbfounded when it came to meeting eligible guys. Now, as a senior, I regret not using my naivety to my advantage and asking every upperclassman how to make my college career more enjoyable. My major tip to those early in their college career is this: Do not be afraid. Us seniors don’t bite. In fact, most of us love to share our knowledge, because let’s face it – we can all be a little bit egotistical. So next time someone

approaches you offering help, take it. It doesn’t matter if you have the remnants of your breakfast’s cream cheese smeared on your face – which I find totally adorable – we’re here as your personal guides, your mentors and, potentially, your friends. Here are some questions I managed to squeeze out of you adorableyet-hesitant students.

Q: HOW CAN I MAKE SURE I’M ALWAYS WITH A GROUP OF PEOPLE WHEN WALKING AT NIGHT? A: I’m glad you asked because

unfortunately, a lot of students don’t even think about their own safety, especially after a long night of drinking jungle juice. Fortunately for you, it’s pretty simple. When you’re going out to a party on a weekend night, many of which are off campus, make sure you bring at least one friend and, before you start throwing back shots of vodka, make a pact to stay together or at least meet back up by the end of the night. Afraid your friend is going to end up wandering off with that cute blonde who will be at the party? Then make sure you know someone else going who lives close by. When it comes down to it, if you don’t have any friends who are willing to make sure you’re safely getting home, then

they’re not the type of people you want to be hanging out with. And as a last resort, you can always ask the owners of the house you’re most likely trashing if you can crash on their couch. Hell, it’s a better option to sleep on their vomit-encrusted floor than traveling through North Philly alone at night.

Q: WHERE’S A GOOD PLACE TO TAKE GIRLS IN NORTH PHILLY ON A DATE WITH A COLLEGE STUDENT BUDGET? A: As a girl, I can assure you that

the cost of two subway tokens in order to get your date out of North Philly is worth it. If a guy escorted me to the Draught Horse or Maxi’s, I would scope out the nearest escape route and subsequently scope out the closest guy who had enough class to bring me to Center City. I understand that we’re all on tight budgets, and it can be hard to charm a girl when you have less than $20 to your name, but there are options out there. My boyfriend and I are huge fans of picnics. Not only are they cheap, but they can be super romantic given the right location. Cook something simple like pasta and chicken, pack it up and then throw in a comfy blanket and surprise your date by bringing her to your favorite Philly park. You get bonus points if you time it out so you’re din-

ing as the sun is setting. We appreciate the little things.

Q: HOW CAN I MEET A GUY WHEN I’M WORKING THREE JOBS AND GOING TO SCHOOL FOUR DAYS A WEEK? A: Are you kidding me? You have

a better chance of meeting a guy than those of us who have enough time to party three nights a week. If I’ve learned anything from my early years at Temple, it’s that no healthy relationships bloom from keggers or clubs. If you have a major you love – which I hope every student does – then your classes can be the perfect dating hot spot. You can meet someone with similar interests and have billion topics to spark a conversation. And depending on your job, it’s pretty easy to meet people at work. As a waitress, I’ve served some pretty cute guys in the past and if you have the courage to ask someone out – and you should because there’s nothing hotter than a confident gal – you can turn your workplace into your mating grounds. Just don’t let your boss know that you’re getting a little more than that measly minimum wage. Cary Carr can be reached at cary.carr@temple.edu. Send questions to advice@temple-news.com.

Fraternity hosts 9/11 Bell Tower vigil Phi Beta Sigma members hold events to commemorate and discuss tragedy. LAUREN HERTZLER The Temple News Sept. 11, 2001 marks a day in history that Americans will never forget. Students on Main Campus plan to reflect on the past 11 years by hosting a conspiracy discussion followed by a candlelight vigil at the Bell Tower. “He was supposed to be there that day but he was late,” recent broadcast, telecommunications and mass media alumnus Kenneth Earle said of his uncle, who sometimes had meetings for work in the World Trade Center. Earle – in sixth grade at the time – said he didn’t understand what was going on. As school let out, phone lines died and rumors spread, he wandered home to Queens with a sky of smoke above him. “It was just craziness really,” Earle said. Eric Francis-Wright, a recent civil engineering alumnus, said, “I remember I didn’t know what was going on. They closed school early and parents were taking kids out of class one by one.” “It felt so eerie coming home that day. It felt different from any other day,” Francis-Wright added. Francis-Wright, also from Queens, had a family friend who survived the horror that day.

“One of my mother’s friends was supposed to go in that day, but he didn’t go in,” Francis-Wright said. “I don’t know exactly the reason why he didn’t go in that day...but he definitely would have been in the building.” Earle and Francis-Wright are both members of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity, the organization in charge of the 9/11 candlelight vigil taking place tonight at the Bell Tower at 9 p.m. “Even though it happened in New York, it was a tragedy for the whole nation,” Earle said. Senior civil engineering major Denzel Golden, president of Temple’s Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Epsilon Chapter, said the purpose of the vigil is to honor those lost in the 9/11 tragedy. “From the firefighters to the police officers, the public citizens and even the armed forces that fought in subsequent battles in the Middle East afterward – we just want to take the time to remember those people and commemorate them,” Golden said. The vigil will host an opening prayer, singers and spoken word performers, Golden said. Golden has also planned a conspiracy-theory discussion in Student Center Room 200C at 7:14 p.m. to take place before the vigil. “We’re going to try to make people more aware of certain things that

are out there,” Golden said. Golden hopes to act as a facilitator for discussion at the lecture-based program, while students engage in an intelligent conversation about 9/11 conspiracy theories. Francis-Wright said that with his civil engineering studies, he has come to see what happened on 9/11 in a different way. He has formed a conspiracy theory by analyzing the buildings he believes were somehow infiltrated before the planes hit. “We’re all intelligent kids, so we don’t always believe everything we hear,” Earle said. “That’s why we want to bring this program. Not to tell people what the answer is, but to form a discussion about it.” “We’re not experts...but we’re learning together,” Golden said. Golden hopes to show movie clips to get attendees’ minds thinking, while incorporating the discussion of why people believe in conspiracies in the first place. “There are a lot of things that don’t add up,” Francis-Wright said. “We just want to have a program to kind of go through why these conspiracies exist and what is the actual science behind an actual conspiracy theory.” Lauren Hertzler can be reached at lauren.hertzler@temple.edu.


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Runners work with new coach Alumnus wins

Pa. amateur title

RUNNERS PAGE 20

too, so I think he’s trying to see if some different things work.” “And I definitely think he’s a lot more verbal and good at motivating us,” she added. “We have a lot of young people too, so I think he’s excited about having a new opportunity.” The Owls’ youth and inexperience in the A-10 Conference is a challenge Bray said he’s looking forward to here at Temple. “The team was on the lower end of the spectrum in terms of the A-10 and the Big East,” Bray said. “I like that challenge of having the ability to build my own program instead of going to another place where there was already success established.” “Being a younger coach, I thought maybe this was an opportunity for me to claim my own stake,” Bray added. In terms of the current rosters, Bray sees a lot of talented youth on both the men’s and women’s teams. What they are missing, he believes, is guidance – something he hopes to provide this season and beyond. Although they are young, the “one key ingredient,” Bray said, is the presence of two-time NCAA All-American redshirt senior Travis Mahoney. “[Mahoney’s] a guy who is a national caliber runner,” Bray said. “So we can use him as an example for the younger guys and younger women on the team as to say, ‘Hey, you can be successful at a place like Temple.’ It takes hard work and dedication, but it’s very possible.” Mahoney said he doesn’t

think it’s easy to transition to a new coach this far into crosscountry training. However, he said Bray has been making the switch a lot less difficult than it might otherwise be under different circumstances “I think he’s had a good impact,” Mahoney said. “He’s been very willing to work with the team and make that adjustment and change easier for us.” Bray has already implemented a new style of training for the student-athletes at school, a regimen that differs from what the team has experienced in past years. “I bring that Midwest toughness mentality to it,” Bray said. “It’s a little simpler, and I’m stressing the recovery more. We’re doing hard workouts, but there has to be a balance. You can’t run easy all the time and be successful. And you can’t run hard all the time and be successful.” Kratchman said Bray’s new training style of what she describes as “breaking up the workouts,” hits on a key area of needed improvement. “He has emphasized a lot more strength and conditioning,” Kratchman said. “I think that’s something we struggled with a bit in the past, so I think that’ll be good for us.” Sophomore Phil Fanz is also enjoying the installation of a new training philosophy for the team. “[Bray] doesn’t kill us in workouts to the point where our bodies can’t handle it,” Fanz said. “He’s not one to focus on

Andrew Mason is a two-time state champion. ANTHONY BELLINO The Temple News

Runners have less than two weeks to work with their new coach before the opener.|SAM OSHLAG TTN FILE PHOTO the times that we hit, just more the effort that we put in. We’ll see more as the season progresses, but as far as I’m concerned right now, I really like him a lot.” The Owls will open their season this Friday at the Friend Invitational at Belmont Plateau, the location both teams practice. In its last year in the conference, Temple will host the A-10 Championships at the location as well. Although Mahoney said he may not be participating in the event – teams sometimes save their top runners for the bigger events of the season – others, including Kratchman, are looking forward to it. “We’re all excited to be able to race there,” Kratchman said. “We’re hosting the confer-

ence, so I think we’re all really fired up to have a really good race and get a little taste of what A-10’s will be like.” For Bray, what he’s most looking forward to is seeing the team compete for the very first time. “I haven’t seen them race, other than [Mahoney] at the national meet,” Bray said. “We’ll have a race plan, and I want to see them execute that plan. I want to see how tough they are, and that’ll give us an indication of what kind of kids we have here and where we need to go from there.” Avery Maehrer can be reached at avery.maehrer@temple.edu or on Twitter @AveryMaehrer.

Freshman earns first career win TENNIS PAGE 20 on Saturday, but captured his first career win and went 2-0 against Navy on Sunday. Hicham Belkssir was another freshman who made his debut at the Navy Blue Invite. Belkssir lost his singles match 6-7, 6-3, 1-0 (10-6) to Bonnies’ junior Javier Ortiz. However, Belkssir united with sophomore Kristian Marquart to win 8-6 in doubles. Despite the doubles victory, Belkssir said he wasn’t happy with his performance. “I don’t think I did well,”

Belkssir said. “I can do better.” Belkssir, a native of Rabat, Morocco, acknowledged that it was only his first match and said he hopes to improve after going 0-6 last weekend. “It was really hot [Friday], and I think he tired out,” Mauro said. “We left Temple at 5:45 [a.m.] It was a long day.” “[Mauro] gave me bananas, which helped,” Belkssir said. “He was cheering us on.” Mauro said that both Belkssir and Paulus will be impact players this season, citing their

Andrew Mason was overlooked by a lot of collegiate high school coaches coming out of high school. Now the twotime Pennsylvania State Champion who graduated after the 2010-11 season is making a lot of them scratch their heads. “Initially I wasn’t highly recruited coming out of high school,” Mason said. “With age and experience I got a lot better, coach [Brian Quinn] helped me mature a lot.” Mason, a Huntington Valley, Pa., native and 2007 graduate of Abington Friends High School – where he was a twotime league champion – won the Pennsylvania Amateur Championship in August 2012 and the Philadelphia Open at Pine Valley in late July 2012. Quinn coached Mason in college and now continues to be his swing instructor for his amateur career. Quinn stressed how much Mason worked on his game in his first two seasons to really lay the groundwork for where he is now. “When he first got here he worked on his game a lot and perfected both his technique and form,” Quinn said. “He has one of the best golf swings I’ve ever seen in my life and continues to improve.” Current senior Devin Bibeau, who was Mason’s roommate at Temple, also saw the growth in Mason’s game from the time he first met him until now. Bibeau credits Mason with leadership that helped Bibeau get his game to where it is now. “When I first came to Temple, [Mason] was a sophomore and he really learned a lot that year,” Bibeau said. “Being around him showed me hard work both on and off the course. Hard work got him to where he’s at right now.” With each season Mason’s scores as an Owl continued to fall, as he was named to the All Atlantic 10 Conference team as a junior and senior. As a senior his 73.9 stroke average

GOLF

success in their home countries. He singled out Belkssir, saying that fans should “expect him to contribute.” “[Belkssir and Paulus] are top players in their country,” Mauro said. A third freshman, Maros Januvka, is listed on the roster, but did not compete at the Navy Blue Invite. Mauro said that another player or two may be added to the team before teamscoring matches begin in February. Both Belkssir and Paulus

said they were not used to the playing surface at Navy. “I’m used to playing on clay courts,” Belkssir said. “This match was on a hard court.” Mauro noted that the day was a milestone for Belkssir and Paulus. “It was a new experience for them to play college tennis,” Mauro said. Evan Cross can be reached at evan.cross@temple.edu or on Twitter @EvanCross.

per round was more than three shots lower than the 76.3 he averaged as a freshman. Mason’s best career finish as an Owl came at the 2010 Lincoln Mercury Intercollegiate Tournament where he finished second with a score of one under par. While Mason never captured a tournament victory at Temple, Quinn said that Mason had the game to win at every collegiate event he competed in as an upperclassman. “The last two years at Temple he could have won every week,” Quinn said. “He just happened to get on a roll and start playing really well at this point in his life.” Mason is now making up for the wins he never got in college. In the last two years he has won the Philadelphia Open Championship two times, the Patterson Cup once and is the two-time defending champion in the Pennsylvania State Amateur Tournament. He was also named the William Hyndman III Amateur Player of the Year in 2011. Mason said he feels humbled by his accomplishments on the course, giving most of the credit to his coach. “The last two years have been really cool for me,” Mason said. “[Quinn] helped me out a lot with my game and has helped me get to where I’m at now.” While Mason may be crediting Quinn with where he’s at now, Quinn sees it as the opposite. “[Mason] really learned how to manage his game and use his abilities,” Quinn said. “He learned how to play smart golf and hit the shot he knows he can hit, not the shot he thinks he could hit.” “Being around [Mason] and seeing him grow as a player since leaving Temple has been an amazing process to watch,” Quinn added. “He really is family to me.” Mason said he doesn’t know what the golf future will hold for him. For now he continues to live in Philadelphia, plans on getting a steady job and continuing his amateur golf career. Anthony Bellino can be reached at anthony.bellino@temple.edu or on Twitter @Bellino_Anthony.

Tryouts provide talent Early mistakes prove costly HOCKEY PAGE 20

than we did last year,” Roberts said. “You either need highend talent up front or you need a deep team. Only a few teams have the type of top talent that can carry a team. To be a successful team you have to have a lot of depth and we feel we have it this year.” The health of junior forward Chris Brennan will be crucial to keeping the team deep this season, Roberts said. “We’re most excited to see an entire season out of [Brennan],” Roberts said. “He went down with a pretty bad concussion in a game against Siena last year, and that knocked him out for a while.” “He was one of the most impressive players who showed up in tryouts last year, and he’s one of the best passers and playmakers we have,” Roberts added. “I don’t think he’s thought of a whole lot this season because he missed so much time last year. I think he can have a big year.” Offensively, the Owls will rely on the scoring of senior forward Sean Nealis, whose breakout season was one of the few highlights of last year’s campaign. The likes of senior forward Joe Pisko, Johnson and freshman Jason Marbaich will also be looked upon for putting the puck in the back of the net,

Roberts said. “We’d love to see a big year from [Pisko] this year,” Roberts said. “From a raw talent standpoint, he is one of the most talented players that we have. We have to find him the right group of people to find what his skill set is.” “He’s a finisher,” Roberts added. “They are guys that some people might criticize them for not doing this and that, but they put the puck in the back of the net. You need guys like that.” The defensive core boasts an experienced group with seniors Trainor, Benedetto and Jordan Lawrence leading the way. Junior Dan Redante made the team in open tryouts with junior hockey experience to his credit. “We had the same amount of defensemen tryout as we had forwards,” Roberts said. “That’s pretty rare. We have a lot of defensemen this year and they’re all talented, including all of the freshmen.” Roberts named junior goalie Chris Mullen as the starter in net following the departure of former goalie Will Neifeld from the team. Sophomore Eric Semborski and freshman Jon Plester will fight for reps on the bench. “It’s [Mullen’s] net until he gives it to somebody,” Rob-

erts said. “He’ll control his own destiny. Other guys will get their chances, but the big games belong to Mullen and it’s up to him to keep that spot.” For a team loaded with seniors, the Owls said the ultimate goal this time around is getting back to the national stage. “On a team level, the goal is to get to nationals,” Lawrence said. “My goal is whatever the team’s goal is. Personally, I want to go out in style. We got there two years ago and it was an awesome experience, and it would mean a lot to get back there again.” For veterans such as Benedetto, this year’s campaign gives the Owls something to prove. “A lot of teams think that our run to nationals was a fluke,” Benedetto said. “We’re trying to prove to ourselves that we can do it. It’s a double-edged sword.” “We care to the point where we want to show that we aren’t the team from last year.” Benedetto added. “We’re a different team now and we’re not going to let teams dictate how we feel we’re performing. That’s up to us.” Andrew Parent can be reached at andrew.parent@temple.edu or on Twitter @daparent93.

FOOTBALL PAGE 20

block in the back on the game’s opening kickoff. Senior running back Matt Brown lost a fumble on the following play, and Coyer lost another on the Owls’ next possession. Two possessions, two turnovers. It was the beginning of what ended up being the ugliest half of football that Temple has played under Addazio since he arrived in December 2010. There were four fumbles and five penalties for 60 yards. There was a botched snap that led to a Temple safety. Overall, the Owls gained 28 yards on offense in the first half. They attempted three passes and completed one for six yards. At the break, Temple was down 26-3. “We just came out and played lazy,” senior placekicker Brandon McManus said. “I don’t know why that is the case, but we knew they were coming up here for a revenge game. They are a young team and an athletic team. They just played harder than us.” “We were very sloppy and we didn’t come out as fired up as we should have been,” Coyer said. “We came out very slow.” Addazio said the message at halftime was to pick up the passing game and eliminate the lackadaisicalness that crippled the team in the first half hour. “I said we have to move the

ball downfield,” Addazio said. “We are down too many points. Throw it down the field, that was the one thing for offense. For defense, we had to get off the field on third down.” “Also, we needed energy and passion,” Addazio added. “We are the ones that created the adversity.” The adversity that Temple created for itself seemed to transfer directly to the other sideline in the second half. Maryland lost a fumble on its first play from scrimmage, leading to a series of the Terrapins’ own mistakes that led to them being outscored 24-10 in the second half. Ultimately, the Owls gave themselves a chance to win with seven minutes left in the fourth quarter when they pulled within two points on a 35-yard touchdown pass from Coyer to sophomore wide receiver Jalen Fitzpatrick. But on the ensuing drive, Temple made its last costly mistake of the game by giving up a 38-yard play downfield on third and long to a pair of Maryland freshmen. The touchdown that capped off that drive sealed it for the Terrapins. Redshirt-freshman linebacker Nate D. Smith said that not getting Maryland off the field on third downs was

something that cost the team all game. “That played a big part today,” Smith said. “That was the key right there. That was [the defense’s] prerogative, so we could get the ball back.” Smith said that giving up big plays, a problem in the team’s season opener to Villanova, too, is something the defense will be working on in the extra time off before Penn State. “I think we all need this bye week,” Smith said. “We’ll get to the drawing board and get back to work. Everybody has to do their job.” McManus said his focus is on putting this game behind him and getting back on the practice field. “I’m sure we want to get back out there,” McManus said. “We’re disappointed in this loss, but we’ll get back out there and get ready for Penn State in two weeks.” Temple (1-1) will travel to Penn State (0-2) to face the Nittany Lions on Sept. 22. In the 81-year history of the rivalry, Temple has never defeated Penn State on the road. Joey Cranney can be reached at joseph.cranney@temple.edu or on Twitter @joey_cranney.


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

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Owls must improve next game Team returns for home tournament A week after dismantling another FCS team with an almost flawless performance, Temple was looking to show everyone that the team is a legitimate competitor in the Big East Conference. Neither team accomplished its goal on Saturday, but Temple somehow managed to look worse doing so in the process. While the 36-27 contest wasn’t decided until Maryland scored with 2:56 left in the game, the Terrapins’ touchdown run was more relieving than impressive. It didn’t prove that Maryland was a better team than Temple, it just proved that its desire to lose the game was slightly less than its competitor. The game was ultimately decided by which team had a worse half. Temple’s first half was worse than Maryland’s second. “This was definitely a game where we thought that we came out really sluggish in the first half,” senior wide receiver C.J. Hammond said. “We made too many mistakes, had three turnovers and a lot of penalties. It was hard to come back from that even though we fought really hard in the second half, we just made too many mistakes in the first half.”

JACOBS PAGE 20

With two fumbles in the team’s opening two possessions, a missed snap that resulted in a safety and 60 penalty yards, Temple was more selfdestructive than overmatched in the first half. Describing the Owls’ start as sluggish would be sugarcoating a sloppy effort, something coach Steve Addazio refused to do. “We created our own adversity today,” Addazio said. “You have got to learn how to handle it. As ugly as that first half was, we were right back in the game in the third period. That’s football. Every Saturday is going to be a dog fight and there is going to be adversity. This time we just happened to create our own in a huge fashion.” After a first half that ended about as bad as possible for Temple, whatever Addazio said in the locker room turned the game around for the better part of the second half. The Owls forced a fumble on Maryland’s first play from scrimmage and followed with touchdowns on their next two drives. However, in a game marred with gaffes, miscues, seven turnovers, 112 penalty yards, a safety and a blocked kick, Tem-

ple was ultimately the worse team. Considering the Owls are playing against a team that really has nowhere to go but up, the team showed that it could be going downhill fast. If any team needed a slap in the face heading into a bye week, it was Temple. By getting pummeled by a very bad Maryland team, the Owls face perhaps the most important game of the season when they square off with Penn State in two weeks. If Temple makes a statement in the game, it can prove that it had a Villanova hangover against Maryland and will be a competitor in the Big East this season. If the Owls lose to the dismal team Penn State is fielding, they will show that they really haven’t changed much from the 2004 team that was removed from the conference, and it could only be a matter of time before it happens again. Ibrahim Jacobs can be reached at ibrahim.jacobs@temple.edu or on Twitter @IbrahimJacobs.

Redshirt-senior goalkeeper Tara Murphy averages 1.57 goals allowed this season. She has allowed eight goals in five games played for Temple (2-4-1).| PAUL KLEIN TTN FILE PHOTO

VOLLEYBALL PAGE 20

said. As soon as the Owls finish “We’re going to most like- the tournament, their sights will ly focus on the little things like turn toward the A-10 schedfundamentals,” Tupuola said. ule. The Owls will host Rhode “The little things is what hurt Island, Fordham, Xavier and us this weekend [against Miami Dayton before hitting the road (OH)].” once again. After the Ganes behome opener, lieves it was Temple immeimportant to diately turns its keep the Owls attention to the at home followTemple Invitaing the tournational on Friday ment to start and Saturday. the conference The school will schedule. It alhost Central lows the team Connecticut, to stay focused Cornell and and healthy, he Navy. said. Temple “That’s didn’t win its Bakeer Ganes / coach the reason we tournament last scheduled the year, and while home tournaany team wants to win every ment, because I wanted to be game they play, they are fo- at home before we start confercused on improving match by ence [play], because I think it’s match. The Owls hope to find less draining on the body,” Gaout just what kind of team nes said. “The girls get to sleep they are throughout those three in their own beds.” games. Temple hopes that starting “I’m looking forward to their A-10 season at home will that tournament,” Ganes said. give them a good start on that “I think it’s going to be a really part of the season. Last year the good indicator for us how we’re Owls finished near the bottom going to hopefully perform in of the conference and are hopthe conference.” ing an early stretch of home

“I think it’s

going to be a really good indicator for how we’re going to hopefully perform in the conference.

games will help them improve on what was a rough season. “It’s going to be really important, especially with the two teams that we start with, Rhode Island and Fordham,” Tupuola said. “This team is totally different attitude-wise, and we know that we have to focus one match at a time and take it slow and not try to do too much.” But the squad isn’t rushing things. As much as they are looking forward to a long stretch of games in McGonigle, they are focused on playing one game at a time. “We want to get better as a program and as a team,” Ganes said. “I don’t want to look forward to our conference games or the tournament because we haven’t even played NJIT yet.” “Especially with the type of team that we have, we have to take it one game at a time,” junior outside hitter Elyse Burkert said. For now, the Owls will take it match by match, enjoying the chance to sleep comfortably at home and not on a 10-hour bus ride. Jake Adams can be reached at jacob.adams@temple.edu or on Twitter @jakeadams520.

Junior goalkeeper Bobby Rosato recovers from a stress fracture in his arm while sophomore Dan Scheck has started both games for Temple (0-1-1). | ABI REIMOLD TTN FILE PHOTO

Coaches shuffle goalies early in season Freshman Shauni Kerkhoff has started the past two games. JOHN MURROW The Temple News Ever since WOMEN’S SOCCER her sophomore season in 2010, redshirt-senior goalkeeper Tara Murphy has seen the most playing time of any Owl goalkeeper. But with the addition of 15 freshmen to the roster this season, Murphy’s position, like every one on the team, has been up for grabs. After Murphy started the first five matches of the season, freshman goalkeeper Shauni Kerkhoff has started the past two, with her first collegiate action in the fifth match of the season against the University of Pennsylvania on Sept. 2. She played the final 11 minutes of the match and recorded one save. The decision to play Kerkhoff for the final 11 minutes was a tough choice, but Murphy was struggling against Penn, coach Matt Gwilliam said. “For the past few years, [Murphy] has led this team and that is something that you can not take away from her,” Gwilliam said. “I was a little worked up at times so my voice cracked because I was extremely nervous,” Kerkhoff said after her first collegiate appearance. In the Penn match, Gwilliam said that along with Murphy not performing her best, he was also trying to get some experience for Kerkhoff against an experienced Ivy League team. After the Penn match, Gwilliam chose to start Kerkhoff against Iona, ending

Murphy’s starting streak of 16 straight matches for the Owls. “Murphy has gotten us to where we need to be right now and she has done well. She has just had a couple of games where she knows she isn’t where she wants her game to be,” Gwilliam said. With her first collegiate start, Kerkhoff shut down the Iona offensive attack while recording the first shutout of her career in the 1-0 Temple victory. Despite the shutout, Kerkhoff admitted that she was a bit nervous at the beginning of the Iona match. “I was shaking, literally, shaking for at least the first 30 minutes of the game,” Kerkhoff said. “But then I got in a rhythm.” In the match, Kerkhoff recorded six saves on six shots on goal from an Iona team Gwilliam referred to as “blue collared.” “[Kerkhoff] had an amazing save at the end that plucked off the post,” senior forward Morgyn Seigfried said. “She had a great first game.” Seigfried scored the lone goal for the Owls in the Iona match, a goal that Kerkhoff said gave her security while in goal. “I knew she would be nervous, but she did well and answered the call,” Gwilliam said. After Iona, the decision for who to start in goal on Sunday, Sept. 9 at Princeton was still in the air, Gwilliam said. “We look at all of our opponents and who we are playing and sometimes we just need to try different people,” Gwilliam said. For the second straight match, Kerkhoff got the start. Kerkhoff saved six of seven

shots in Temple’s 1-0 loss against Princeton. “[Kerkhoff] has stepped up when we asked her to and has done a great job for us,” Gwilliam said. Despite two strong starting performances on the season, Kerkhoff has not been named the starter for the Owls, Gwilliam said. “Senior goalkeeper Gillian Kacsuta is another good, experienced goalie that is on our squad as well,” Gwilliam said. Kerkhoff, surprised to be playing this season, said she is excited for the opportunity. “I only expect to play in matches if I earn it,” Kerkhoff said. On the season, Murphy has started in five of Temple’s matches, allowing eight goals and recording 36 saves. Kerkhoff has been in goal on three occasions for the Owls this season, starting two matches while recording 13 saves and allowing one goal. An interview request with Murphy was denied by Athletic Communications. Both Murphy and Kerkhoff each have a home shutout on their record this season, as Murphy’s came against New Jersey Institute of Technology on Aug. 31 and Kerkhoff’s came against Iona on Sept. 7. After Sunday’s game at Princeton, the two goalies, Murphy and Kerkhoff, have a combined 2-4-1 record in goal. John Murrow can be reached at john.murrow@temple.edu or on Twitter @johnmurrow12.

Sophomore Dan Scheck has played in the place of injured Bobby Rosato. TYLER SABLICH The Temple News While competing for the starting job at goalie, sophomore Dan Scheck said he knows what it takes to win over his teammates and coaching staff. “I think being loud and being able to communicate while making some key saves would show them that I’m ready and that I’m into it,” Scheck said. “I think that would show them that I belong there.” After seeing only one half of action last season as a freshman, Scheck found himself in a competition with junior Bobby Rosato this offseason for the starting goaltender job. “They told us [in the offseason] that no one has a set starting spot,” Scheck said. “You have to come in and work hard and the best man gets the job.” Coach Dave MacWilliams said he believes that the two goalies were evenly matched heading into the season opener, and that both were scheduled to get some playing time. However, the team suffered a minor setback when Rosato suffered a stress fracture in his arm practicing before the opener. The job immediately became Scheck’s. “I think heading into the season Scheck may have even been a little bit ahead [of Rosato],” MacWilliams said. While the Owls hope to have Rosato back in time for next weekend’s California road trip, MacWilliams has become

MEN’S SOCCER

they had 30 shots, but only four a believer in Scheck. “[Scheck’s] come a long on net. That’s excellent defense way since last year,” MacWil- right there. They played big for liams said. “He’s really good at me, that’s for sure.” Senior Billy Kappock, stopping shots. The only area he needs to get better at, as ev- who anchors the Owls defense, eryone does, is commanding said he’s comfortable no matter which of the two goalies is the box.” Rosato started all 19 in net. “I think both [Scheck] and games last season, his first as an Owl after transferring from Rosato have the ability to play UNC Wilmington. He notched at this level,” Kappock said. nine wins, five of which were “They push each other in pracshutouts. He ended 2011 with tice. With either one of them a .750 save percentage and a back there, I feel confident.” The senior leader recoggoals-against average of 1.43. On Nov. 6 against Fordham, he nizes Scheck’s progress and stopped a career-high 14 shots. the hard work he’s put in to An interview request with earn the playing time he’s been Rosato was denied by Athletic given. “He came into the season Communications. Scheck acknowledged fit and ready to go,” Kappock said. “He’s like that, despite the a new Scheck.” competitiveComing ness, he and Rooff an opensato remain close ing weekend in friends. which they went “Before 0-1-1, the Owls the opener he will now look to told me that I Tuesday’s home would do good,” opener against Scheck said. “He Manhattan for told me to make sure I talk a lot to Dan Scheck / freshman goalie their first win of 2012. the defense.” “I think A native of Sayville, N.Y., Scheck helped it’s big because if we win carry Sayville High School to a then we’re at .500,” MacWil20-1-1 record and its first State liams said. “We had two tough Championship. He was named games, so a win on Tuesday All-League as both a junior and would be a good thing for us.” “If we play good defense senior. He is the Suffolk County record holder for most career we obviously have a chance to win,” Kappock said. “If we high school shutouts with 16. Though Scheck has given stay positive and collective as up one goal in his first two a group, we should do fine no starts of the season against matter who we play.” James Madison University and Tyler Sablich can be reached Virginia Tech, he is quick to at tyler.sablich@temple.edu or on credit the Owls’ defense for its Twitter @TySablich. relentless work. “They’ve been great in both games,” Scheck said. “In the [James Madison] game

“You have to

come in and work hard and the best man gets the job.


SPORTS temple-news.com

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

Coach hires assistant in time for opener

Mistakes fatal in ugly loss

Adam Bray is the new assistant track & field coach. AVERY MAEHRER The Temple News

IBRAHIM JACOBS Tuesday Morning Quarterback

Temple created adversity for itself in its 36-27 loss to Maryland.

R

ewind to September 2011 when the Owls went into College Park, Md., and absolutely blew up a sloppy Maryland team behind five touchdowns from Bernard Pierce, and a defense that gave up 240 yards. Most of the starters from both teams graduated after the season, and the rosters of both squads have shifted dramatically in just one year. The Terrapins, led by true freshman quarterback Perry Hills, are a week removed from beating a Football Championship Series team in a 7-6 win, and came into last weekend’s game looking to prove it wasn’t a team that was rebuilding, but competing.

JACOBS PAGE 19

Sophomore wide receiver Brett Pierce tackles Maryland freshman wide receiver Stefon Diggs. The Owls committed four turnovers in the 36-27 loss. | TIMOTHY VALSHTEIN TTN

Owls in need of ‘bye’ out The Owls have a week off after a loss against Maryland. JOEY CRANNEY Sports Editor

F

ollowing a game that featured five fumbles, seven penalties, an interception, a blocked field goal and a plethora of missed opportunities, a week off before taking on its biggest rival may be exactly what the football team needs. Temple (1-1) lost to Maryland (2-0) 36-27 last weekend in a game that was as puzzling as it was memorable for the wrong reasons. The Owls were outscored

26-3 in the first half before answering with a 24-3 run in the second half that ultimately fell short because of too many mistakes on offense and big plays allowed on defense. The Owls will have a bye week before they travel to State College, Pa., on Sept. 22 to take on Penn State in an always highly anticipated matchup. For redshirt-junior quarterback Chris Coyer, the bye week is an opportunity to have more time to review and correct his team’s mistakes. “It can be very helpful if you treat it the right way,” Coyer said. “If you don’t treat it right, it can definitely hurt you.” Coach Steve Addazio said his concern with any bye week after a loss is a tendency to fo-

Seniors hope to find success, redemption after lost season The ice hockey season opens on Saturday, Sept. 15.

FOOTBALL PAGE 18

The Owls will play at McGonigle Hall for three weeks.

After playing 10 games on the road to open the season, the Owls will return to McGonigle Hall to begin an eight game home stand. “I think we’re really looking forward to being home, because it feels like we’ve been gone for a year,” second-year coach Bakeer Ganes said after the team’s loss to Miami University of Ohio at the Miami (OH) Invitational. Temple hasn’t played a

VOLLEYBALL

The Owls seek redemption after a 2011-12 season that included an 11-game losing streak.| WALBERT YOUNG TTN A team stocked with returning players from 2010-11, Temple was quickly marred by injuries, a challenging schedule and tough luck last year. After losing a top defenseman in current fifth-year senior Andrew Trainor to a broken clavicle and separated shoulder in a loss to Florida Gulf Coast University in the second game of the season, the Owls lost the next 10 contests that followed. “Injuries killed us last year,” Roberts said. “When we think and talk about what went wrong last year, we can talk about the losing streak and things like that, but we forget about all the guys we lost.” “Losing Trainor was tough,” senior forward Chris

SOCCER SWITCH, p. 19

The men’s and women’s soccer teams have both shuffled goalies early in the season. SPORTS DESK 215-204-9537

Johnson said. “He’s a big asset. And after losing 11 straight, everyone’s morale was really bad. We came back second semester and met as a team and talked about how we were going to make sure we didn’t lose any more games. It was good to talk it out.” After its 11-game losing streak, Temple played out the season at an even 8-8 record, which included a playoff win in the Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Hockey Association against Delaware. After a six-month offseason, the returning group will get another shot when the puck drops at Millersville. “We have a lot more depth

HOCKEY PAGE 18

RUNNERS PAGE 18

Volleyball returns to host tournament JAKE ADAMS The Temple News

ANDREW PARENT The Temple News When Temple ICE HOCKEY takes the ice at Millersville University for the season opener on Saturday, Sept. 15, it will mark the beginning of what the Owls hope will be a long journey back to the national stage. After a memorable 201011 season that featured the first appearance in the American Collegiate Hockey Association Division II National Tournament in the program’s history, the 2011-12 season was one that the team would like to forget. “Our mindset going into Millersville is redemption,” coach Jerry Roberts said. “We’re so eager to get out and prove that last year was a fluke. It doesn’t matter who we play in that first game, whether it’s a big rival or a team we rarely play, guys are going to come out with everything they have.” In the 2011-12 season that included an 11-game losing streak and ended with a 9-18 record, Temple missed the regional tournament for the first time in six seasons. “Everybody makes regionals and we didn’t,” senior defenseman Matt Benedetto said. “We didn’t expect that to happen.”

cus too much on the previous game and not enough on the next one. “You don’t want to knee jerk to this loss, and grind your team so they don’t have the ability to come back and fight two weeks from now,” Addazio said. “I won’t do that. I will take advantage of the extra time to get some fundamentals and to specifically work with some younger players that we’re trying to get into the game.” “In a bye week, you want to get the jump on your opponent,” Addazio added. “You want to work on fundamentals.” Fundamentally, the Owls have a lot to improve on from the Maryland game. Temple was called for a

CROSS COUNTRY Track & field coach Eric Mobley has hired Adam Bray as the new assistant track and cross country coach, athletic communications confirmed last Thursday afternoon. Bray will replace Matt Jelley, who resigned last month for a position at the University of Maryland. The announcement comes as the program prepares for its final season in the Atlantic 10 Conference before moving to the Big East Conference next fall, and eight days before the team’s opening meet of the season scheduled for this weekend. “I’ve known coach Bray for a long time,” Mobley said. “And he’s had some really good experience with some national caliber type programs. His enthusiasm stood out among all of the other candidates. That enthusiasm will fit right into our program.” Mobley was an assistant coach at the University of Akron from 2002 to 2004 while Bray was a student. Having already met and built a relationship with Mobley was a significant factor in Bray’s decision to move “halfway across the country” to Philadelphia, he said. “[Mobley] told me that he was going to have a job open-

ing,” Bray said. “He wanted me to apply for it, so I applied and went through all of those channels. Knowing him was definitely a draw for me to even look at Temple.” For the past four seasons, Bray volunteered as an assistant at the University of Illinois, during which student-athletes earned several notable accolades including three All-Region (Midwest) performers in cross country, four NCAA qualifiers in track and a fifth-place finish for the cross country team at the NCAA Midwest Regional Championships. Before his stint at Illinois, Bray spent two years in the same position at Maryland. Bray said he is confident his experience at such prestigious and respected institutions will go a long way into contributing to success at Temple. “I feel like being a part of big programs and doing a lot with really talented athletes, I have that mentality to where I want to win,” Bray said. “I don’t want to be average. Attitude is 95 percent of the game and the sport. If you can have that, along with some confidence, and you throw a little bit of talent into the mix, good things start happening to you.” Senior runner Rayna Kratchman said she is glad to see the addition of a new coach. “It’s definitely refreshing,” Kratchman said. “I think he has a little bit more of a different outlook on the training and the season. He’s new to the program

match in the comforts of its home court since November of last season. For the next three weeks the Owls will play eight games at home, including three in the Temple Invitational this weekend and four matches to start the Atlantic 10 Conference season. Ganes said he is hoping that the recent Summer Olympics in London, and the coverage that volleyball received, especially from the likes of sand court duo and three-time Olympic champions Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh Jennings, for those two weeks, will help spur larger crowds to come to the team’s matches. “I think [poor attendance would be] a shame because of

the publicity volleyball had in the Olympics,” Ganes said. The Owls are coming off the Miami (OH) Invitational, losing their final match against the host team on Saturday, Sept. 8. In the past two weekends, Temple has won the Big 5 Tournament and four of its six matches, putting its record at 6-4. Now the Owls are hoping to carry that momentum into the home stand, starting with a Wednesday night match against the New Jersey Institute of Technology. The focus for the team in practice this week will be finetuning the details of the game, senior libero Chelsea Tupuola

VOLLEYBALL PAGE 19

International freshmen debut The men’s tennis season begins with the Navy Blue Invite. EVAN CROSS The Temple News When freshMEN’S TENNIS man Nicholas Paulus woke up early on the morning of Friday, Sept. 7, the day of the first match of his collegiate career at the Navy Blue Invitational, he didn’t know if he was going to be medically cleared to play tennis that day. Cleared one hour before his match against St. Bonaventure, the good news did not trans-

GOLF ALUM, p. 18

Former Owl Andrew Mason is a two-time Pennsylvania State Amateur Champion. SPORTS@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

late into positive results on the court. Paulus lost his first singles match 4-6, 6-3, 1-0 (10-3) to Bonnies’ senior Luis Guevara. “I was nervous before the match,” Paulus said. “But when I began my match, I was just playing my match, like always.” Paulus was not medically cleared until 10 a.m. on Friday because his insurance had yet to be approved. Paulus, who hails from Rheinau, Germany, has only been in the United States for two weeks. Coach Steve Mauro was happy with Paulus’ first-time effort in a new place. “[Paulus] was very ner-

vous,” Mauro said. “He played a really good match.” Paulus also played his first doubles match on Friday, partnering with senior Kacper Rams. They were defeated 8-5 by Guevara and Bonnies’ senior Oscar Yanez. “I can play better than [Friday],” Paulus said. Despite the two losses, Mauro took a positive approach to Paulus’ performance. “[Paulus] showed that he had the capacity to be a very strong player in this conference,” Mauro said. Paulus lost again in singles and doubles against Delaware

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THE CHERRY, ONLINE

For daily updated content on Temple sports, go to thecherry.temple-news.com.

Volume 91, Issue 3  

11 September 2012

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