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local. independent. fresh.

october 7-13, 2020

entertainment eat & drink

quick, easy meals

october

festivals & events

hiking

treebillies of tahoma

public

art tour

hunt for the hike

sierra lake of gold tahoe

history arts Donation

GIVEAWAY

fall trek to

hope valley delivering the fun since 1982

Donate to Tahoe Weekly for a chance to WIN a work of art

FROM ANDY SKAFF

For every $35 donated, you will have a chance to win! See back cover for how to donate.


fun. unique. everywhere.

October 7-13, 2020

Volume 39 | Issue 22 TM

14

P.O. Box 154 | Tahoe Vista, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 TheTahoeWeekly.com Facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly @TheTahoeWeekly

SUBMISSIONS

19

Events & Entertainment Submit at TheTahoeWeekly.com Click on Events Calendar Editorial Inquiries editor@tahoethisweek.com Entertainment Inquiries entertainment@tahoethisweek.com Cover Photography production@tahoethisweek.com

SUBSCRIBE

to our monthly e-newsletter at TheTahoeWeekly.com

in this issue

making it happen Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102 Sales & Marketing Manager Anne Artoux anne@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110 Art Director Alyssa Ganong production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106 Graphic Designer Justeen Ferguson graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101 Entertainment Editor Sean McAlindin entertainment@tahoethisweek.com Food Editor Priya Hutner priya@tahoethisweek.com Family Editor Michelle Allen michelle@tahoethisweek.com Copy Editor Katrina Veit Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green, Lisa Michelle, Cam Schilling, Alex Silgalis

bears & wildlife BEAR EMERGENCIES BEAR League (530) 525-7297 (24 hours) | savebears.org A bear walking nearby or through your yard is not an emergency unless it is trying to enter your home or car. INJURED ANIMALS Lake Tahoe Wildlife Center, South Shore (530) 577-2273 | ltwc.org The Wildlife Shelter, North Shore (866) 307-4216

TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Wednesdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/ TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

Johan Martin

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E-NEWSLETTER

OCTOBER 7-13, 2020 FEATURES Fall trek to Hope Valley

TAHOE’S AUTUMN SHOW OF COLOR FROM THE PUBLISHER

Fall, specifically that short window of time when the colors change in the Sierra, is one of my favorite times of year. I become as excited as a kid on Christmas morning rushing to see what presents are under the tree when that first hint of color emerges. Then, I try to hit as many of my favorite spots for fall color until it disappears. My top three must-do fall color outings each season are the Ophir Creek Loop in Tahoe Meadows, the Spooner Lake loop trail and anywhere in Hope Valley. This year, I was fortunate to receive an invitation to visit the newly renovated Wylder Hope Valley resort in late September, which added to my excitement to visit one of favorite spots in Hope Valley, the former Sorensen’s Resort. Twenty-four hours in Hope Valley was a nice break from the daily grind but wasn’t nearly long enough to hit all of my favorite spots. If you have a chance to get away for more than a day trip, I recommend at least a couple of days if not longer at Wylder Hope Valley. Read about my trip in “Fall trek to Hope Valley” including stops in historic Markleeville, the new Cutthroat Brewing Company, Snowshoe Thompson Cave and a stay at Wylder’s Hope Valley. Writer Kayla Anderson has embarked on a different kind of tour – a tour of the public art of the Tahoe Sierra. With forest closures on and off again and changing constantly and many recreation areas closing, I thought it would be good time for locals and visitors to get out and explore the local public art in our communities. For the first part, Kayla explores some of the art in Kings Beach, Tahoe Vista and Northstar, and she’ll be covering our other communities in upcoming editions.

WIN AN ANDY SKAFF PAINTING Andy and Lois Skaff have generously donated an original piece of art in our next donation giveaway to benefit Tahoe Weekly. The 30” x 30” painting titled “October Gold III” is valued at $3,000.

Gold Lake Legend

6 10

GET OUTSIDE Sightseeing

4

Lake Tahoe Facts

5

Events

6

THE MAKERS Public Art Tour, Part I

12

The Arts

13

THE LINEUP Treebillies

14

October Music, Events & Festivals

15

Live

15

FUN & GAMES Horoscope & Puzzles

16

EAT & DRINK Five quick, easy meals

17

Tasty Tidbits

17

Roasted Fiddleheads or Brussels Sprouts

18

Boeger Winery

19

I’m honored that the Skaff ’s reached out to us and offered to donate one of Andy’s masterworks. Andy is known for his vibrant, light-filled paintings, which is reflected in “October Gold III.” It’s simple to enter to win. For each $35 donation, you’re entered into the drawing for this amazing piece of work. The more you donate, the better your chances for winning. Donations are not taxdeductible. No purchase is necessary, entry is by donation only until Nov. 9. | askaff.com

on the cover An explosion of fall color in Hope Valley. | Photography by Andrew Lipschutz

DONATE paypal.me/TahoeWeekly Checks: P.O. Box 154, Tahoe Vista, CA 96145 (email address is required for notification) 

3


LAKE LEVEL Lake Tahoe Natural rim 6,223’

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Readings taken on Friday, October 2, 2020 ELEVATION :

RESERVOIR CAPACITY

6,226.39 |

IN 2019:

C PACITY CITY:: 40 CIT 0,870 0 BOCA 12,362 CAPA

PROSSER 11,061

Explore Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly Gondola with local exhibits and programs. South Tahoe

Fannette Island

Emerald Bay

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov Lake Tahoe’s only island is located in Emerald Bay & is home to an old tea house. Boat access only. (Closed Feb. 1-June 15 for nesting birds.) TART/South Tahoe

Heavenly

West Shore

Tallac Historic Site

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World” as the summer retreat for three San Francisco elite families with the Baldwin Estate, Pope Estate & Valhalla. Grounds open yearround. South Tahoe South Lake Tahoe

Truckee

North Shore

northtahoebusiness.org Kings Beach is a popular spot for dining and shopping with the North Shore’s largest sandy beach located in the heart of town. Free parking at North Tahoe Beach, Brook Street, Minnow and the Christmas Tree lot on Hwy. 28. TART

North Lake Tahoe Demonstration Garden

Incline Village

Summer | Free (775) 586-1610, ext. 25 | demogarden.org Demonstrations of lake-friendly landscaping using native and adaptive plants, water conservation, soil stabilization techniques, defensible space from wildfires & BMPs. Self-guided tours & clinics. TART

North Tahoe Arts Center

Tahoe City

(530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

Tahoe Art League Gallery

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org Featuring local artists, workshops. South Tahoe

4

truckeehistory.org | truckee.com Settled in 1863, Truckee grew quickly as a stagecoach stop and route for the Central Pacific Railroad. During these early days, many historical homes and buildings were built including The Truckee Hotel (1868) and the Capitol Building (1868). Stop by the Depot for a walking tour of historic downtown. Paid parking downtown. TART

Vikingsholm Castle

Emerald Bay

6,227.86

225

200,000 AF

125

175

150,000 AF

100,000 AF

75

50

TROA.NET

Measured in Acre Feet (AF)

Tahoe Science Ctr OPENING TBD

Gatekeeper’s Museum

Tahoe City

Truckee River | FLOW AT FARAD 465 (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Featuring historic photos, the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum and historical memorabilia. TART

KidZone Children’s OPENING TBD Museum

Incline Village

225

200,000 AF

Tues.-Fri. & by appt. | Free (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org University of California, Davis, science education center at Sierra Nevada College. Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. Ages 8+. TART 175

Truckee

150,000 AF

25

IN 2019:

Measured in Cubic Feet Per Second (CFS)

2 PROSSER 11,061 CAPACITY: 29,840 (530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov CAPACITY: C 9,500 5 features exhibits DONNER 4,690 The Emigrant Trail Museum and artifacts on the Donner Party (1846-47) at 8 INDEPENDENCE 1,3763 CCAPACITY: 18,300 Donner Memorial State Park. See the towering Pioneer Monument. A TART 20,400 40 MARTIS 1,052 CAPACITY:

Truckee Railroad Museum OPENING TBD

Measured in Cubic Feet Per Second (CFS)

TROA.NET

Truckee

Sat.-Sun. & holidays truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com Learn about the historic railroad. Located in a caboose next to the Truckee Depot. TART

Truckee

Tues.-Sun. | Locals’ first Tues. half price (530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org Interactive exhibits, science & art classes for kids up to age 7. BabyZone & Jungle Gym. TART

Find more places to explore

Lake Tahoe Museum

VISITORS’ CENTERS

South Lake Tahoe

Museum of Truckee History

East Shore

6,226.39 |

CAPACITY: C 226,500

Emigrant Trail Museum

Thunderbird Lodge CLOSED

High Camp OPENING TBD

Kings Beach

465

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry and settlers. South Tahoe

Parking fee | parks.ca.gov (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Sugar Pine Point State Park is home to the historic Ehrman Mansion (summer tours), see boathouses with historic boats and General Phipps Cabin built in the late 1800s. TART

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Aerial tram rides with views of Lake Tahoe, Olympic Heritage Museum, events and more. Ticket required. TART

STAMPEDE 19,9661

FLOW AT FARAD

(530) 543-2674 | fs.usda.gov Features Stream Profile Chamber to view slice of Taylor Creek, nature trails & more. South Tahoe

May-October | thunderbirdtahoe.org The former Whittell estate. This magnificent lakefront home features the Lighthouse Room, Old Lodge, 600’ underground tunnel (with a former lion cage) and Boat House, home to the “Thunderbird,” a 1939 wooden boat. Ages 6+ only. No on-site parking. Tours by reservation only.

Olympic Valley

|

125

North Shore

Summer | (530) 583-3279 | terc.ucdavis.edu This 1920s-era building features a history of the field station, current UC Davis research projects, interactive exhibits and demonstration garden. Ages 8+. TART

Taylor Creek Visitor Center South Lake Tahoe

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views. Ticket required. South Tahoe

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

Tahoe City Field Station

Truckee River C PACITY CAPA CITY:: 40 CIT 0,870 0 BOCA 12,362

Readings taken on Friday, October 2, 2020

ELEVATION :

100,000 AF

Eagle Rock, one of the lake’s famous natural sites, is a volcanic plug beside Highway 89 on the West Shore. Trail to top is on the south side. TART

visittahoecity.com Popular for shopping and dining with historical sites. At the junction of hwys 89 & 28, visitors may see the Tahoe City Dam, Lake Tahoe’s only outlet, and Fanny Bridge. Peer into Watson Cabin (1909) for a glimpse at pioneer life. Free parking at Commons Beach, Grove St., Jackpine St. and 64 acres at Hwys 89 & 28. TART

RESERVOIR CAPACITY

75

West Shore

North Shore

50

Eagle Rock

Tahoe City

CAPACITY: 18,300 C 8

LAKE LEVEL A 20,400 40 MARTIS 1,052 CAPACITY: Lake Tahoe Natural rim 6,223’

25

Drive through one of the area’s natural wonders at Cave Rock, the neck of an old volcano. The area is named for the small caves above Highway 50 that were cut by waves when Lake Tahoe was 200 feet higher during the ice ages.

CAPACITY: 29,840 2

INDEPENDENCE 1,3763

Check schedules & openings before visiting. East Shore

CAPACITY: C 226,500

The golden hues of fall begin to emerge along the Ophir Creek Loop Hike in Tahoe Meadows near the top 9,500 5 DONNER 4,690 CCAPACITY: of Highway 431 above Incline Village, Nev. Learn more at tahoerimtrail.org. | Katherine E. Hill

ATTRACTIONS Cave Rock

Measured in Acre Feet (AF)

SIGHTSEEING STAMPEDE 19,9661

6,227.86

Truckee

Thurs.-Mon. | (530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org Housed in the original Depot, built in 1901. Exhibits cover different eras in Truckee history. TART

Old Jail Museum

Truckee

at TheTahoeWeekly.com

Kings Beach Kings Beach State Rec. Area (Thurs.-Mon., July-Aug.)

Incline Village 969 Tahoe Blvd. (800) 468-2463 Stateline 169 Hwy. 50 (775) 588-4591 Tahoe City 100 N. Lake Blvd. (530) 581-6900 Truckee 10065 Donner Pass Rd. (Depot) (530) 587-8808 U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village

Open by appt. | (530) 659-2378 | truckeehistory.org One of a few surviving 19th Century jailhouses used from 1875 until May 1964 (summer tours). TART

855 Alder Ave. (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

Olympic Museum OPENING TBD

U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Squaw Valley, host of the VIII Winter Olympic Games in 1960, celebrates its Olympic History with the Tower of Nations with its Olympic Flame and the symbolic Tower of the Valley at the entrance to the valley. The Olympic Museum at High Camp features historic memorabilia and photographs. TART

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe 35 College Dr. (530) 543-2600

3080 N. Lake Blvd. (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Rd. (530) 587-3558

TRANSIT North Tahoe & Truckee (TART) | laketahoetransit.com South Tahoe | tahoetransportation.org

Parking fee | (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle (summer), see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island (the Lake’s only island), home to an old Tea House. TART/South Tahoe

Watson Cabin

Tahoe City

(530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Watson Cabin, built by Robert Watson and his son in 1909, is the oldest building in Tahoe City and on the National Register of Historic Places. (summer tours). TART

MUSEUMS Donner Summit Historical Society

Soda Springs

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org At the corner of Old Hwy 40 & Soda Springs Rd. 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40. TART

Boots McFarland by Geolyn Carvin | BootsMcFarland.com


October 7-13, 2020

lake tahoe facts |

Read about how the lake was formed, Lake Tahoe’s discovery, lake clarity and more at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on Explore Tahoe.

GRAY ’S CROSSING

COYOTE MOON

TAHOE DONNER

Truckee

DONNER TAHOE DONNER LAKE

Truckee Truckee

Email

anne@tahoethisweek.com for details

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Incline Village

N

North Shore

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PLUMAS PINES

AIRPORT

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Your business’

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GRAY ’S CROSSING

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COYOTE MOON PONDEROSA COYOTE MOON

Donner

DONNER LAKE

OLD GREENWOOD TRUCKEE GRAY ’S CROSSING AIRPORT COYOTE MOON TAHOE DONNER

TAHOE DONNER

Incline Village Incline Village Crystal Incline Village Kings Bay WHITEHAWK Tahoe Vista RANCH Crystal Beach Carnelian BayTahoe Vista NAKOMA Crystal Kings Bay Olympic Tahoe Vista POINT FEATHER Kings Crystal Bay Beach BOAT LAUNCH SIERRA Carnelian Bay Valley RIVER PARK BOAT CO. Kings Beach DEEPEST Bay Olympic Carnelian Bay COON ST. POINT SANDDEEPEST BOAT LAUNCH SIERRA Beach Olympic TAHOE COON ST. NORTH Valley Carnelian Bay CITY HARBOR BOAT CO. POINT Marlette BOAT LAUNCH TAHOE SIERRA RESORT AT DEEPEST Valley Olympic Lake BOAT CO. COON ST. Tahoe SAND SQUAW CREEK POINT BOAT LAUNCH SIERRA NORTH Dollar Hill TAHOE CITY HARBOR Valley LAKE TAHOE VISTA SAND City BOAT CO. TAHOE RESORT AT MARINAS NORTH FOREST TAHOE CITY REC AREA HARBOR Tahoe SQUAW CREEK TAHOE SAND Alpine RESORT AT Dollar Hill NORTH CITY LAKE HARBOR TAHOE VISTA Tahoe City SQUAW CREEK TAHOE TAHOE TAHOE NV Dollar Hill RESORT AT CITY Meadows FOREST REC AREA LAKE TAHOE VISTA City Tahoe SQUAW CREEK Alpine Dollar MARINA Carson FOREST Hill RECTAHOE AREA LAKE TAHOE VISTA City Meadows Alpine CITY City Sunnyside FOREST TAHOE REC AREA MARINA BOAT RAMPS Carson AlpineMeadows CITY SUNNYSIDE TAHOE MARINA Carson City CITY Meadows Sunnyside il Spooner Lake a MARINA Tr Carson City Sunnyside SUNNYSIDE City il SUNNYSIDE Sunnyside ra GRAEAGLE MEADOWS

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Zephyr Cove CAVE ROCK Cave Rock South EDGEWOOD CAVE ROCK Lake Tahoe Zephyr Cove TAHOE EDGEWOOD CAVE ROCK Stateline Emerald Bay Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F Zephyr CoveSouth TAHOE Fannette Island South Lake Tahoe Zephyr Cove SKI RUN Emerald Bay Lake Tahoe South Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F Fannette Island LAKESIDE Stateline Emerald Bay TAHOEEagle Lake Tahoe SKI RUN Fannette Island Stateline Lake KEYS Emerald Bay64.9˚F BIJOU SKI RUN Average Surface Temperature in July: Watershed Area: 312 square miles

CAMP RICHARDSON

Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet Average Snowfall: 409 Tr ail R i minches Ta h oe

Permanent Population: 66,000 T Ta h oe

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Learn about the natural history of the Tahoe Sierra

at TheTahoeWeekly.com

TAHOE LAKESIDE KEYS LAKESIDE

KEYS

Stateline LAKESIDE BIJOU

PEAKSouth Shore

Leaf Lake

FREEL Meyers TAHOE PARADISEPEAK FREEL LAKE TAHOE Meyers AIRPORT PEAK LAKE TAHOE Meyers Echo Lakes AIRPORT LAKE TAHOE

LAKE TAHOE

Kirkwood Kirkwood

LAKE TAHOE

Average depth: 1,000 feet Maximum depth: 1,645 feet Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

Natural rim: 6,223’

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Shoreline: 72 miles FREEL PEAK

Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

TAHOE PARADISE

TAHOE PARADISE

TAHOE PARADISE

Kirkwood

EDGEWOOD TAHOE

BIJOU CAMP RICHARDSONBIJOUFREEL

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT Fallen

Lake Clarity: 2019: 62.7 feet avg. depth. 1968: First recorded at 102.4 feet

Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

Cave Rock

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Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California.

Volume: 39 trillion gallons

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YOUR BUSINESS COULD

SPONSOR THIS PAGE

LAKE

Hope Valley TAHOE Markleeville

Kirkwood Hope Valley Hope Markleeville Valley Markleeville

Hope Valley Markleeville

Why is the lake blue? The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and the blue light is scattered back.

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

GET outside

Email news to editor@tahoethisweek.com

Courtesy Heavenly Mountain Resort

the outdoors | recreation | events | mountain life

Heavenly to

open California side first

Heavenly Mountain Resort has announced plans to open on Friday, Nov. 20, with a focus on the passholder early-season experience. For the first time in more than a decade, the resort will open with skiing and riding on the California side of the resort, including the iconic Ridge Run, according to a press release. A revised opening approach will provide passholders with more early-season skiable terrain – and the ability to open additional terrain faster, as well as free and convenient parking in the California Lodge Base area. Heavenly plans to have beginner and intermediate trails open for skiing and snowboarding available via the Gunbarrel Express, Powderbowl Express, Canyon Express and Patsy’s chairlifts. Vail Resorts will not begin selling daily lift tickets until Dec. 8. The plan for Heavenly’s opening includes green trails Patsy’s and Maggie’s and the blue trail Ridge Run, which is a favorite for its sweeping views of Lake Tahoe. While there will be no skiing or riding access available in the early season from the Heavenly Gondola, the gondola will be open for sightseeing access. Complimentary shuttles will run between the Heavenly Village Base Area and California Lodge Base Area. The resort plans to open for skiing and riding from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and operate sightseeing from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. | skiheavenly.com

eve nts Lily Lake Trail building Angora Lakes Road South Lake Tahoe | Oct. 7, 9, 11, 14

Help build the LIly Lake Trail with Tahoe Area Mountain Biking Association. Bring a lunch and water. 8:30 a.m. Free | facebook.com

Truckee Community Storytime Facebook | Truckee | Oct. 7, Oct. 14

Join Truckee Library on Facebook Live for extra special Storytimes with local local community leaders. 10:30-11 a.m. Free | (530) 582-7846, madelynhelling.evanced.info

CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

6

Fall trek to Hope Valley S TO RY & P H OTO S BY K AT H E R I N E E . H I L L

S

ubtle hints of yellow-tinged leaves and pops of orange on a distant mountainside beckon me each fall to get out and explore the Tahoe Sierra. Fall colors are fleeting, lasting only a few short weeks, if we’re lucky, before disappearing for another year, which feeds by excitement and anxiousness to get out and explore before it’s gone. I recall seasons where the colors changed and within days were gone and others when the fall color lingered for more than a month. No matter how long they last, they are a gift to look forward to and relish, taking in as much of it as I can. My favorite place to visit each fall is Hope Valley and the surrounding areas. Located only about 30 minutes from South Lake Tahoe, it feels like a world way. Sweeping views of gold in Hope Valley.

SNOWSHOE THOMPSON CAVE

Cabins among the aspens at Wylder Hope Valley.

In late September, I luxuriated in a midweek trip to the newly renovated Wylder Hope Valley, formerly Sorensen’s Resort, to indulge in my fall obsession and enjoy a respite from the daily grind of running a small business during a pandemic. I invited my sister Michelle Allen, and my 7-year-old nephew Anikin to join me. Both also needed a break from the pandemonium the pandemic has wrought on our lives, our work, our homes and school. We followed Highway 89 down the West Shore of Lake Tahoe from our homes on the North Shore toward the South Shore, catching tiny glimpses of color along the route. As we made the turn outside Meyers to continue on Highway 89, my excitement intensified. The climb over Luther Pass brings with it more stands of color in the distance until we catch the first sight of Hope Valley below. The colors had just started to emerge, but in the distance we could see it – pockets of yellow aspens along the West Fork of the Carson River and stands of orange along Highway 88. We arrived at Picketts Junction – the intersections of Highways 88 and 89 – and decided to head to Markleeville about 12 miles away for lunch. Continue to follow Highway 88 and enjoy splashes of fall colors, turning at the Woodfords junction on Highway 89 to reach Markleeville, the small hamlet full of history.

Peering inside the historic log jail.

MARKLEEVILLE Our first stop was the Alpine County Chamber of Commerce where I chatted with executive director Becky DeForest for some tips on places to explore and she told me about their Fall Photo Contest, the Historical Walking Tour and the county’s recent rating as the No. 1 spot for the most disc golf courses per capita – Turtle Rock Park in Markleeville, Kirkwood and Bear Valley. We headed out to check out some of the historic stops in town including the Alpine County Museum overlooking the town. While the museum remains closed, the complex is worth stopping by to see the Old Webster School (1882) and peer into the historic log jail (1875) with its thick iron bars and door. Anikin was impressed by the iron bars stating that no one could possibly break out of that jail, but he was even more impressed by an old outhouse on the edge of the complex he declared must be at least 100 years old. By this time, we were famished and headed to the newly opened Cutthroat Brewing Company for lunch. We sat outside on their deck, ordered a beer and a hard kombucha and dove into the Pickle Fries when they arrived. I enjoyed the Forager Salad, while Michelle ordered the Mahi Mahi Fish Tacos with a cheese pizza for Anikin. The food was delicious and fresh and is worth the drive itself.

Heading back toward Wylder to check in we stopped along Highway 88 at the trail for Snowshoe Thompson Cave. We had been talking all day in the car about Snowshoe Thompson, the legendary mail carrier who crossed the Sierra 180 miles roundtrip on skis to carry the mail from Genoa, Nev., to Placerville from 1856 to 1876. There’s no sign along the road for the trailhead, but my Apple Map app worked great and directed us to the turn into a large dirt parking area on the northwest side of the road. The half-mile roundtrip trail begins just beyond the interpretive sign in the parking lot. Follow the trail behind the sign and cross the small creek the left next to a large boulder. From there, look for the yellow and white California Trail markers in the trees to follow the trail. Look up in the trees; the markers are placed high enough to account for snow. We put Anikin in charge of finding the markers and leading us to the cave, one of his favorite things to explore. Within 10 minutes, we arrived at the entrance and Anikin eagerly scrambled over the boulders to get inside the small cave where he imagined what it would have been like to shelter in the cave during a winter storm as Thompson is said to have done. The afternoon was waning by this time, so we headed to Wylder Hope Valley for our stay.

WYLDER HOPE VALLEY Nestled along the West Fork of the Carson is the historic resort now known as Wylder Hope Valley. Opened in 1926, Wylder has renovated and upgraded the cabins and grounds of the resort, including adding a deck outside the popular Sorensen’s Café. What’s changed is upgrades to the interiors making them comfy, cozy, efficient and inviting as they seemingly have thought of a guest’s every need, what hasn’t changed are the quaint cabins nestled along a babbling brook


October 7-13, 2020 GET OUTSIDE

RENTALS | TOURS | LESSONS | SALES | DELIVERY

Fall outings EAST SHORE Clear Creek Trail Spooner Summit trailhead | 6 miles RT Easy-Moderate

situated between stands of Aspens with hammocks, swings and chairs placed to enjoy the best views. We stayed in the Sierra House surrounded by a forest of Aspens, boulders great for climbing according to Anikin, and the brook. After exploring the newly renovated Sierra House, we set out to explore the grounds. Trails meander throughout the property inviting guests to explore, which is just what we did finding chairs to enjoy the views, a swing set crafted from logs and a viewing deck near the top of the property. Dinner was calling and we made the short walk to Sorensen’s Café, which we had been looking forward to all day. The restaurant is a local favorite with a selection of hearty fare. We relished our meals of Chicken Marsala and an Eggplant Napoleon on the outside deck, with butter pasta for Anikin, enjoying the views of yellow Aspens at sunset. We topped off the day with a Brownie Sundae and ice cream for Anikin, a reward for finishing his schoolwork during dinner.

Fall colors are fleeting, lasting only a few short weeks, if we’re lucky, before disappearing for another year, which feeds by excitement and anxiousness to get out and explore before it’s gone.

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The next morning, I arose early as I always do and set out with my coffee to enjoy the morning light on the fall colors and explore Popo’s Trail, which connects the cabins to Wylder’s nearby campground with tent and RV sites, a vintage Spartan camper and seven yurts. After my morning outing, we headed down to the cafe for a hearty breakfast to start the day and conclude our trip. Before leaving, general manager Annelle Kapp gave us a tour of a couple of the yurts at the campground. The yurts are as nicely appointed as the cabins with wood stoves and comfy accommodations. Kapp also told us the Wyler is taking over operations at Hope Valley Cross County at Picketts Junction and will be offering snowshoe and cross-country ski rentals, as well as possibly snowmobiling. Our 24 hours in Hope Valley was satisfying for the mind and soul and we were sorry to leave Wylder’s, half-joking that we should stay for a week. We headed out to explore the fall colors emerging along Blue Lakes Road off Highway 88 before we pointed the car north back to school and work. Wylder Hope Valley is open yearround, with the campground open until around Oct. 19 this year. Reservations are available online and dinner reservations are recommended for Sorensen’s Café. | wylderhotels.com/hope-valley, alpinecounty.com 

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eve nts

Auburn Ski Club looks to winter

Courtesy Sierra State Parks Foundation

Auburn Ski Club Training Center is echoing what other ski areas are doing for the winter 2020-21 season with an emphasis of visitor and staff safety.

Place your bet for snow The Sierra State Parks Foundation is hosting the First Day of Snow Bet to raise funds for the foundation through Dec. 31. Think you’re in tune with nature or with Lady Luck? Buy a guess (1 guess = $5) and choose a date. The first snow date will be determined when it snows 1 inch in front of the Pioneer Monument at Donner Memorial State Park. The lucky winner will win a prize bag with a Lake Tahoe Backpack, Emerald Bay Vikingsholm Puzzle, Lake Tahoe Water Bottle and Sugar Pine Point State Park Bucket Hat. | Enter Sierra State Parks Foundation on Facebook

ALL RIDES ARE FREE! Just hop on the bus.

Taylor Creek closed The U.S. Forest Service has closed Taylor Creek until Nov. 2 due to public health concerns from potential crowds due to the pandemic, as well as interactions with bears, due to the fall spawning of Kokanee salmon. Visitors flock to the creek to observe the fall spawning, which also provides a natural food source for black bears. The risk of bear-human interaction combined with anticipated crowding and inability to maintain distance requirements have led to the closure.

TART Daily Regional Routes TART Night Service TART Truckee Local Route

Covid-19: Social distancing and safety precautions are in place to keep riders and drivers safe.

TahoeTruckeeTransit.com 8

The temporary closure order prohibits the public, including photographers, from entering the Taylor Creek area from Fallen Leaf Dam to the marsh area where the creek empties into Lake Tahoe. Parking areas at Taylor Creek Visitor Center, Taylor Creek Sno-Park and the nearby pump station will be closed and parking on the shoulders of Highway 89 near the bridge that crosses Taylor Creek will be prohibited.

Download the closure map at TheTahoeWeekly.com As well, portions of the Rainbow Trail are still under construction for a trail improvement project and the area remains closed. | fs.usda.gov

“The key to getting on snow is controlling our capacity,” ASC announced in a press release. “Athletic programs and access to the Training Center will be tightly scheduled and staggered to maintain distancing and stay within capacity limits.” Guests need to plan on using their car for equipment storage and getting ready to go out on the trails. Indoor areas will be limited or closed depending on local guidelines and The Green Building will be used as a warming hut. Restrooms will be available in the maintenance shop and indoors as restrictions allow. Cross-country season trail passes will be blacked-out at times or have scheduling restrictions according to trail capacity. Trail capacity will be gauged by team schedules and total groomed kilometers. A black-out calendar will be available online. | asctrainingcenter.org

Homewood refurbishes

Ellis chair

Along with new policies and procedures that align with federal, state and local public health guidance for the 2020-21 winter season, Homewood Mountain Resort has made significant investments in new technology and on-mountain upgrades with an anticipating opening day of Dec. 11. Upgrades include RFID lift ticketing and scanning, and refurbishment of the popular Ellis chairlift. The resort has also committed to reducing skier visits and has capped season pass sales. Investments in new RFID technology will allow for seamless lift access, easy reloading of lift tickets online and kiosks for contactless lift ticket pick-up. The first phase of the Ellis chairlift refurbishment project, completed before the 2020-21 season, will reduce ride time by nearly 4 minutes, providing access to popular intermediate and advanced terrain. When purchasing a lift ticket this season, guests will also be required to reserve a parking space. This will help facilitate reduced on-mountain capacity. Season passholders won’t need to make a parking reservation to park at the resort. As well, all lift tickets sales will be capped each day throughout the season and lift tickets will not be available for purchase at the resort.

To start the season, only private lessons will be offered by advance reservation only. Equipment rentals will also be available with advance online reservation. All rentals will be pre-teched for each guest prior to pick-up, and indoor capacity will be limited in the rental shop. Skiers and riders will also be asked to self-group and ride lifts only with those they arrived with, and indoor dining will be limited with hot food and grab-and-go options available through online ordering. | skihomewood.com

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6

Mommy and Me Barton Health South Lake Tahoe | Oct. 7, 14

An ongoing support group for new mothers and their babies. 1-2 p.m. Free | (530) 539-6620, bartonorthopedicsandwellness.com

Tahoe City Explorathon Downtown Tahoe City | Oct. 7-14

A month-long digital activity challengebased event. Earn points for completing activities. Free | visittahoecity.org

Community Flu Vaccination Clinic South Tahoe Senior Center South Lake Tahoe | Oct. 8

Cost is $10, although no one who is unable to pay will be turned away. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. $10 | (530) 541-3420, bartonhealth.org

Preschool Storytime Instagram | Truckee | Oct. 8

Get ready to read, dance, sing, and play with this Storytime for preschoolers, happening live on Instagram each week. 10:30-11 a.m. Free | placer.ca.gov

Community Flu Vaccination Clinic Tahoe Valley Elementary School South Lake Tahoe | Oct. 8

Cost is $10. All individuals may receive a flu vaccine, regardless of ability to pay. Wearing masks is required. 3-6 p.m. $10 | bartonhealth.org

Entrepreneurs Assembly Roundtable Mountain Workspace Incline Village | Oct. 8

Join this fast-growing, mentor-facilitated business round table group, and learn how to start or grow your company. 6-9 p.m. Free | eventbrite.com

Virtual Gala Online | Incline Village | Oct. 9

Sierra Nevada University’s biggest fundraiser is virtual this year. Order a pre-made dinner by Chef Aarin Zendner to be delivered. 5:30 p.m. $150-$ | sierranevada.edu


October 7-13, 2020 GET OUTSIDE

Courtesy Truckee Donner Land Trust

eve nts

New back-country huts near completion The Truckee Donner Land Trust is working to complete new back-country huts at 7,600foot Frog Lake on Donner Summit in time for the 2020-21 winter season. Improvements at the nearly 100-year-old Eschenbach Stone House, as well as infrastructure work in preparation for the installation of new modular sleeping huts designed by SageModern are moving ahead with installation of the huts expected by midOctober, according to the Land Trust. If the weather cooperates, look for a grand opening announcement in the coming months, along with a new web page to take overnight reservations at one of the new huts – the Albert M. Rockwood Bunkhouse, Ted R. Hut and Morgan Family Hut, according to the Land Trust. The Albert M. Rockwood Bunkhouse is a duplex with two separate units and a shared bathroom and each unit sleeps 4 to 6 people. The Ted R. Hut is one large space for groups of 8 to 12 people. Both are open year-round. The Morgan Family Hut will be open for summer-use only. The huts features flush toilets and warm/cold water, electricity and heating using a combination of solar and propane to power battery packs, and there will be drying racks for boots, clothing, climbing skins, etc. The refurbished Eschenbach Stone House, which dates back to the 1930s, will serve as a common area and will have a commercial grade kitchen. Guide quarters for guide services will be also located there. There will also be a full-time hut master on site to check in guests, help with ski conditions and maintain the property. There will be two-night minimums for each unit and will not be available for rent by bed. “Pricing TBD, but it will be more expensive than a Sierra Club hut locally, less expensive than a local hotel room,” according to Greyson Howard, communications director for the Land Trust. The Frog Lake property is now open to the public, conserved by the Land Trust, and visitors can use the new Blue Dot Trail. The primary access to Frog Lake is through the Pacific Crest Trail to the Donner Lake Rim Trail. Take the DLRT to the Warren Lake Trail, following it (with a stout uphill) to its intersection with the Red Dot Trail. The Red Dot Trail continues mostly downhill to Frog Lake Road and the Blue Dot Trail, a few hundred yards to the west. It’s about a 3.5-mile trek from I-80. | truckeedonnerlandtrust.org

Baby Storytime

Tahoe Rising

Facebook | Truckee | Oct. 12

Virtual | Incline Village | Oct. 14

Join Miss Amy for songs, books, and early literacy tips for babies during this Facebook Live event. 10:30-11 a.m. Free | (530) 4702695, mynevadacounty.com

Virtual Music Together with Brooke Zoom | Truckee | Oct. 13

This music class is for parents and children to enjoy. Enjoy interactive songs to do together in the comfort of their homes. 11-11:30 a.m. | kidzonemuseum.org

Attendees of the three Tahoe Rising virtual events will discuss challenges facing Lake Tahoe in this current pandemic – from economic, community and environmental perspectives. Keynote speakers will share their wisdom from around the country. Panel sessions with those experts combined with local Tahoe leaders enhance these conversations. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. $20-$35 | tahoeprosperity.org

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THE SEARCH FOR THE

Sierra lake of gold

MARK’S COLUMN IS

SPONSORED BY

S TO RY BY M A R K M c L AU G H L I N

s there a lake in the Tahoe Sierra lined with gold? Humans have been seduced by that precious metal since antiquity. This rare element has changed the course of history; instigated war, inspired colonialism and generated countless world-changing events. The 19th Century California Gold Rush itself instigated humanity’s largest voluntary migration ever. Beginning in 1849, tens of thousands of adventurous gold seekers traveled to the former backwater province of Mexico to claim their overnight fortunes. No matter how bad the news about danger and hardships in the foothill mining camps, gold fever drew the hopeful like moths to light. Prospectors explored every ravine looking for “color.” Some got rich; most went bust. The rainy season arrived early in the fall of 1849 and it wasn’t long before high water forced miners working foothill streambeds to call it quits until the following spring. Most headed to San Francisco to wait out the winter storms. In November, just before heavy snowfall buried the Sierra in a deep mantle of white, a man named Thomas Stoddard stumbled into a tiny mining camp on Frenchmen’s Bar, located several miles from the small town of Washington near the Yuba River. Stoddard’s clothes were tattered and torn, testimony to days lost in the mountains. After he rested and wolfed down several plates of grub, Stoddard told the curious miners his amazing story. Stoddard had been traveling with an emigrant wagon train, but he got lost one day while hunting game for the group. He spent hours searching for his friends and calling for help, all to no avail. After crossing a boulder-strewn granite ridge near Yuba Pass, Stoddard observed a small lake in the valley below. He needed water and a place to camp for the night, so he made his way closer. The miners listened intently as Stoddard claimed that on reaching the water’s edge, he saw that the shoreline and lake bottom were lined with large nuggets of pure gold. He jubilantly filled his pockets and gathered up all the gold he could carry. Unfortunately, he was attacked by Indians and forced to abandon most of his treasure as he ran for his life. The miners were rightfully skeptical of the story, but Stoddard showed them a hefty pouch of high-quality gold claiming it was evidence of his discovery.

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Stoddard’s tale about his strike spread like wildfire throughout the mining district. Many of the men were dead broke and all were tired of working endless hours standing in cold streams of frigid snowmelt. Most of the miners considered the story so outlandish that many believed

The miners listened intently as Thomas Stoddard claimed that on reaching the water’s edge, he saw that the shoreline and lake bottom were lined with large nuggets of pure gold. Stoddard a victim of gold fever. But others pointed out that Stoddard’s golden nuggets provided convincing argument. The prevailing theory at the time was that the source of California’s gold lay farther up in the mountains. Prospectors noticed that gold became coarser as they ascended streams and naturally assumed that there was some location in the High Sierra from where it all originated. Maybe Stoddard had really found the true mother lode. Stoddard wanted to organize a company of miners and immediately return to

HO M E I M P R OV E M E N T

Sardine Lake in the Lakes Basin Recreation Area. | Mark McLaughlin

the lake of gold, but snow was beginning to pile up in the mountains and none of the men were willing to risk a search party during a Sierra winter. Skis had yet to be introduced to the region, without which travel was impossible. For seven long months, the anxious miners waited for the Sierra snowpack to melt and open up the back country to exploration. In early June 1850, a select company of 25 men accompanied Stoddard in search of the fabled body of water. Following right behind them were hundreds more men, all determined to keep Stoddard in sight. Stoddard led the party to the divide between the North Yuba and the Feather River’s Middle Fork. He scrambled over the rugged terrain, confident that the lake was in the upper reaches of the watershed. Right behind him streamed a riot of rowdy miners, all anxious to get their fair share. But soon Stoddard began to wander, less sure of his direction. At one point, he led them to a large lake that he claimed was the spot, but there was nothing there except disappointment. Exhibiting their characteristic sense of humor, the miners named the pond “Gold Lake,” a designation it holds to this day. It now became evident that Stoddard was incapable of leading the mob to the elusive lake. The journey had taken its toll on the men, mules and horses following

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the wayward Stoddard. Many of the pack animals were weak from crossing snowfields and climbing steep trails. Others had slipped and fallen to their deaths into the precipitous canyons. The original company of 25 selected men was now badly organized and overwhelmed by hordes of camp followers. Soon there was open rebellion. It’s easy to imagine Stoddard shaking in his boots as a miner’s court of mountain justice was convened. Tempers were running hot and a decision was reached to hang the man who had made fools of them all. The sentence was suspended for one day, however, because there were still some among them who believed that the mythical lake existed. Some considered Stoddard crazy, others concluded that he had never visited the lake and a few believed his story true but thought his sense of direction worthless. Nevertheless, Stoddard was informed that he had been given a last chance to locate the lake or be hanged from the nearest tree limb. Today the location of Stoddard’s reprieve is known as Last Chance Valley.

Read more local history at TheTahoeWeekly.com Crazy or not, Stoddard had enough wit to slip quietly away during the night and retrace his steps to the relative safety of the mining camps below. Meanwhile, the story of Gold Lake was still raging throughout the mining district. Thousands more closed their businesses and abandoned towns such as Nevada City and Maryville. It was a virtual human stampede into the mountains, everyone searching for the fabled basin heaped with gold. The wild excitement gripped the miners for about two months, but after fruitless exploration in what is today Lakes Basin Recreation Area of Plumas County, the throngs of disheartened men headed back, prospecting along the way. Ironically, the so-called Gold Lake fiasco led prospectors north of the early diggings, which resulted in a series of rich first strikes at Nelson Point, Spanish Flat, Rabbit Creek and other locations in the northern Sierra.  Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@thestormking.com.


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THE makers

creative awareness | arts & culture | the makers movement

Tahoe Sierra Public Art Tour, Part I K I N G S B E AC H , N O R T H S TA R & TA H O E V I S TA S TO RY & P H OTO S BY K AY L A A N D E R S O N

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the first part in a series on

public art in the Tahoe Sierra.

“Wild Lupine” by Rory Canfield.

T

he Tahoe Sierra is full of art — and it’s not just in galleries. The energy of Big Blue and the surrounding forest seem to draw in creative minds who figure out how to leave their mark in interesting and innovative ways. If you look closely, you may notice the public art that’s available to appreciate anytime. The first part of Tahoe Weekly’s series on public art tour of the Tahoe Sierra explores the art of Kings Beach, Northstar and Tahoe Vista.

Share your favorite public art @TheTahoeWeekly on Facebook or Instagram #tahoepublicart

Artist Rory Canfield felt like the dull wall “could use some love” and collaborated with Lady Luck owner Bradley Sherman to paint it in 2018.

Kings Beach

“Estrella” by Roger Berry.

Lake Tahoe statue At North Tahoe Beach on Highway 89 in Kings Beach sandwiched between the parking lot and the lake are two large rocks shaped as Lake Tahoe, one is a cutout of the other. They also double as a simple topographical map with a few facts about the average temperature of the lake, its depths and actual size.

Mosaic Fish Sculpture At Lanza’s Restaurant next to Safeway, a large shimmering mosaic fish sculpture pays tribute to the lake’s inhabitants. Titled “Brook Trout No. 1,” this illuminating 3-D piece is the work of Truckee River artist Peter Hazel, who combined his love of nature and craftsmanship by merging ceramics, tile and glass into this gorgeous iconic sculpture.

Kings Beach Roundabouts Most notable in the heart of Kings Beach are two sculptures in the two roundabouts along Highway 28, a project of Tahoe Public Art and North Tahoe Business Association. The project resulted in Roger Berry’s “Estrella” at the Bear Street roundabout and Brett Moten’s “Daow Aga” at the Coon Street roundabout.

King Building Mural “It’s beautiful, isn’t it?” a familiar face asks me as I’m snapping a picture of the side of a large brick building that houses Kings Café and Coldwell Banker. “I think it’s been around for at least 20 years, as long as I’ve been here,” he says. 12

The North Tahoe Beach statue.

I nod, thinking the same thing. I never really looked at it close enough to notice the phrase: “Clear Air, Clear Water, Clear Hearts,” scrolled at the bottom. This is the work of local renowned artist Susie Alexander, who also painted an exhibit in KidZone Museum in Truckee.

There are definitely a few other public art pieces in Kings Beach, like the sailorstyle heart painted on the side of Lucky 7 Tattoo & Piercing or the brightly painted skateboards stacked up on each other and displayed on the side of the road heading up to Crystal Bay, Nev. Like art itself, I believe that what you consider art is subjective and it’s good to keep an eye out to see the beauty around you.

Tahoe Vista

“Wild Lupine” Mural

Galis Dungals

On Brook Avenue across from La Mexicana, sharing a parking lot with Lady Luck, Rory Canfield’s vibrant “Wild Lupine” mural still stands, sharing bright yellow rays of sunshine splashing on purple lupines reaching for the sky. Canfield felt like the dull wall “could use some love” and collaborated with Lady Luck owner Bradley Sherman to paint it in 2018.

Galis Dungals, or traditional Washoe winter huts, have been recreated at several Tahoe locations. The conical structures are supported by a frame of poles lashed together, then topped by layers of cedar bark and one sits at the entrance to the Tahoe Vistana Inn in Tahoe Vista.

Painted Mandala There’s something soothing about local resident Nicole Stirling’s painted mandalas, which can be found and claimed from some of Tahoe’s oddest places. However, if you happened to miss any of Stirling’s art drops, her style of art is on permanent display on the storefront of Tahoe Central Market. Her colorful half-mandala adds a perfect subliminal beckoning to what’s inside: fresh produce, a smoothie bar and healthy comfort food.

Northstar Curated collection From blue butterflies fluttering up the wall next to the upstairs bar to Andy Warhol’s “Marilyn Monroe with Diamond Dust” silkscreen — and pieces from other famous painters — Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe’s lobby is a treasure trove. Salon D’ Art curated most of the pieces and offer a self-guided art tour through the free Salon D’Art mobile app available to download from the Apple store.

The Suzie Alexander fish mural on the side of the King Building; ABOVE: Nicole Stirling mandala in Tahoe Central Market’s storefront.

Highway 267 Pop-Up Root Sculpture On Highway 267 heading south toward Kings Beach, there’s a guerrilla art piece that easy to miss if you’re not looking at the right place at the right time. However, whenever I’m driving to Kings Beach and I see it up on the bank, it always makes me smile. Use our Public Art map to create your own art tour

at TheTahoeWeekly.com

As you are driving up the summit southbound, before approaching the passing lane near the top, look left. On the embankment, there’s an old tree root and in the center of it someone carved out a heart and painted it red. This blazing heart just sits in its barren spot seemingly welcoming travelers with a message of love into the Tahoe Basin. However, it’s a bit harder to see heading downhill to Northstar. If pass the digital roadside incident sign, you’ve missed it. | Share your favorite pieces @TheTahoeWeekly on Facebook or Instagram #tahoepublicart 


October 7-13, 2020 THE MAKERS

The Sierra State Parks Foundation has partnered with local artists for a unique fundraiser. Make a $500 donation to the Foundation and receive one preferred side of your bear box painted by a local artist. You may work directly with the artist to get more sides or the entire bear box painted. Three hundred dollars of each donation will go directly to the Sierra State Parks Foundation. Information on participating artists and designs are available online. | sierrastateparks.org

Roberts

releases new

book

Suzanne Roberts a travel writer, memoirist and poet has released “Bad Tourist: Misadventures in Love and Travel” from the University of Nebraska Press. Both a memoir in travel essays and an anti-guidebook, “Bad Tourist” takes us across four continents to 15 countries, showing us what not to do when traveling. Fearlessly confessional, shamelessly funny and wholly unapologetic, Roberts offers a refreshingly honest account of the joys and absurdities of confronting new landscapes and cultures, as well as new versions of herself. Raw, bawdy, and self-effacing, “Bad Tourist” is a journey packed with delights and surprises – both of the greater world and of the mysterious workings of the heart. Roberts will be part of Sierra Nevada University’s Writers in the Wood series on Oct. 9 and 10 at 5 p.m. on Zoom. Register sierranevada.edu. | nebraskapress. unl.edu, suzanneroberts.org

Performing arts center eyed The nonprofit Tahoe Regional Arts Foundation has submitted an application to develop a 22-acre parcel of land near the entrance to Northstar California as The Stages at Northstar, a visual and performing arts center. The Tahoe Regional Arts Foundation has already reached a sublease agreement with Vail Resorts for development and use of the property for up to 80 years. The Tahoe Regional Arts Foundation is seeking approval from Placer County to build the performing arts complex featuring a 150-seat studio theater, 150-seat multiuse room for visual arts and special events, 650-seat proscenium theater and 2,500-seat outdoor amphitheater, according to a press release. Estimated to cost $60 million to complete, once operational The Stages is expected to generate nearly $4 million annually in economic output, according to the release.

Photo Credit | Photographer?

Bear Box Art fundraiser

Courtesy Tahoe Regional Arts Foundation

Courtesy Sierra State Parks Foundation

Email news to editor@tahoethisweek.com

“Ken Aronson and Leigh Golden know the opportunities the airport offers our youth - a place to learn, innovate and become inspired. I’m proof.” Blake Sortor, 23 year-old corporate pilot raised in Truckee and inspired at the Truckee Tahoe Airport.

AronsonGoldenforTruckeeTahoeAirportBoard.com Paid for by the Committee to Elect Aronson & Golden FPPC #1428476

Placer County will review the project including a comprehensive environmental review with opportunity for public comment. A capital campaign is underway by the Tahoe Regional Arts Foundation to raise the $60 million needed for construction. The fundraising efforts will include naming rights and other opportunities for donors. | tahoearts.net

t he a rt s Alpine County Fall Photo Contest Alpine County | Markleeville | Oct. 7-Nov. 1 (530) 694-2475, alpinecounty.com

Call for Artist Submissions Glass Garage Collective Stateline | Oct. 7-March 6

1 p.m. | glassgaragecollective.com

20 years

e o h a T u o y k Th a n Celebrating 20 Years

of service to the Lake Tahoe Boating Community

Rasjad Hopkins art exhibit Scott Forrest Fine Art Studio South Lake Tahoe | Oct. 7-31

10 a.m.-4 p.m. | (310) 213-3333, facebook.com

Meet the Artist, Michael Parkes Marcus Ashley Gallery South Lake Tahoe | Oct. 9-10

12-5 p.m. | (530) 544-4278, facebook.com

Writers in the Woods Zoom | Incline Village | Oct. 9-10

5 p.m. | (775) 831-1314, sierranevada.edu

Writing from the Senses Zoom | Tahoe City | Oct. 9-Oct. 11

7-9 p.m. | (530) 470-8440, communityofwriters.org

Call Steve at (775) 287-1089

for our full service, low rate guarantee.

TahoeBoatManagement.com 13


TheTahoeWeekly.com

THE lineup live music | shows | nightlife

festivals | entertainment

Treebillies of Tahoma S C R E W BA L L F O L K C O M E DY S TO RY BY S E A N M c A L I N D I N

“L

aughing is just something that’s good,” says Treebillies’ off-the-wall guitarist Jonny Yocum. “We’re equally trying to entertain ourselves as other people.” Yocum and his longhaired sidekick, Ryan Roemer, grew up playing music and cracking jokes in the tight-knit West Shore hamlet of Tahoma. “I remember when I was a little guy. I’d go outside at night and hear music and it was The Roemers,” says Yocum. “I’d sneak over to their house to listen. We always hung out whenever we could. It feels like the world keeps pulling us back together to play.” Watch Treebillies perform

“The Chelette Song” at TheTahoeWeekly.com

As teens, they recorded freestyle raps on an old 8-track in Pocket Moss Crew. That project fused with hard-rocking Moondog Squad to form freak-wild, funk band Savage Patch Kids. When Yocum moved to Humboldt County to groove with gypsy jammers Liquid Kactus, Roemer joined the rootsy Tim High & The Mighty with his shredding lead guitar. In recent years, they’ve been regulars at local open mics hosted by West Shore Pizza in Tahoma and Rosie’s Café in Tahoe City. “It’s so small and so interconnected,” says Roemer of the West Shore music scene. “Everyone who plays around town

SLAMGRASS

“ We’re stay-at-home guys who write songs about the life of Tahoe … We’re telling the stories of this place. It gives people a glimpse of the lowlife, local lifestyle.” kind of knows each other. We have our own thing over here and we’re all kind of close in a certain way.” To tell the truth, Treebillies might never have existed if it weren’t for their friend, Michael “Mandolin Mike” Jay, who unexpectedly died in June. “It was his prolific lyricism and overall go-get-it, pop-up party attitude,” says Yocum. “He could make stuff happen out of nowhere. ‘Every gig is the biggest gig of our lives’ is my favorite Mikey quote. It didn’t matter if it was a parking lot or The Coliseum. When he left us, it kind of lit a fire under our asses to make Treebillies as good as we could.” Friends and family held a musical memorial at Skylandia State Park in August.

14

–Jonny Yocum “He was definitely the guy who got it started for me,” says Roemer, who played with Jay in zany folk humor collaborative Google Mountain Resort. “He’d just go for it. He was my confidant and leader. He had a fearless attitude toward getting up there and being funny.” As Treebillies, Roemer and Yocum play an assortment of rollicking, roguish originals alongside rip-roaring covers of Grateful Dead music and outlaw country classics by Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson. “It’s a stoner kids’ interpretation of bluegrass hillbilly music,” says Yocum. “Trees can have a double meaning after all.” Treebillies’ compositions are born of real-life people and places from the Sierra Nevada. There’s “The Chelette Song” about a hard-ass, union-bleeding, mountain man who drinks whiskey from a jar with a dead snake in it. Another called “Down Town Tahoma” gives a humorous tip of the hat

to comrade townie bands Chile Verde and Dead Winter Carpenters. “We’re stay-at-home guys who write songs about the life of Tahoe,” says Yocum. “If you can name it, we probably wrote a song about it. This doesn’t have anything to do with the outside world, really. We’re telling the stories of this place. It gives people a glimpse of the lowlife, local lifestyle.” To earn a living, Yocum and Roemer do tree work and construction respectively. “A lot of our songs are blue collar,” says Yocum. “We sing for the working man.” Part of the Treebillies’ charm comes from a penchant for dressing in bizarre costumes including ghillies suits and taco hats. With their sidesplitting onstage antics and zany get-ups, the duo channels goofrock masters such as Spinal Tap, Tenacious D, Cheech & Chong and G.W.A.R.

“We’ll do anything that adds some personality,” says Yocum. “We’re not what you would expect. People can’t not smile when we’re doing our thing because we’re cracking up at ourselves. We just have fun. It’s not too serious for us, but it’s always the biggest gig of our lives. We’re a monster machine of campfire party bluegrass kids.” Since the pandemic put a damper on night life, Treebillies have been playing sitdown gigs at Alibi Ale Works in Incline Village, Nev., and Truckee. While it’s not as rowdy as their usual outings, the shows have given them a chance to dial in a oneof-a-kind music and comedy routine. “Music is the most important thing on the face of the planet,” says Yocum. “I’ve been waiting my whole life to be quarantined with my guitars. I love it. I just don’t like why it’s happening. Music is medicine in my eyes.” | Treebillies music on Facebook.  Sean McAlindin is a writer and musician living in Truckee, who loves a secret powder stash just as much as a good jam. You can reach him at entertainment@tahoethisweek.com. Other writings and original music are available at seanmcalindin.com.


October 7-13, 2020 THE LINEUP

T A H O E

Enjoy the Corley Ranch Harvest Festival on Oct. 31. | Courtesy Corley Ranch

Many events in October have moved to virtual formats or have been canceled due to ongoing restrictions on large gatherings. These events listed below are still being held as of press time, but events may be still be canceled, so check in advance for schedules. Distancing guidelines remain in the place and masks are still required in Nevada and California. For the most up-to-date information, visit the Events calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com. OCTOBER 2020 EDITION

Virtual Bay to Black Rock Run Until Oct. 17 | virtual

race178.com

Trails & Vistas “Art Within Nature” Until Oct. 18 | virtual

trailsandvistas.org

Tahoe City Explorathon Until Oct. 18 | area venues

visittahoecity.org

Carson Canyon Railbike Tours Until Oct. 31 | Carson City Eastgate Depot Carson City, Nev.

vtrailway.com

Halloween Reimagined: The Purple Pumpkin Pursuit

Community of Writers Alumni Reading Series

Oct. 9-31 | area venues | Reno/Sparks, Nev.

Oct. 22 | virtual

pumpkinpalooza.org

Tahoe Art Walk

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company

Oct. 10 | self-guided | South Lake Tahoe

Oct. 27 | University of Nevada, Reno

maketahoe.com

Legion Sports Fest

Oct. 10 | Wilbur D. May Arboretum | Reno, Nev.

Oct. 24-25 | Resort at Squaw Creek | Olympic Valley

mayarboretumsociety.org

Boonanza Drive-Thru Trick or Treat

Oct. 10 | virtual

Oct. 29 | Centennial Sports Complex Carson City, Nev.

nevadawilderness.org

Tahoe Rising Oct. 14 & 28 | virtual

tahoeprosperity.org

Andelin Farms Fall Festival

Third Thursday Wine Walk

Until Oct. 31 | Sparks, Nev.

Oct. 15 | area venues | Gardnerville, Nev.

Ferrari Farms Fall Festival Until Nov. 1 | Reno, Nev.

ferrarifarms.org

Carson City Wine Walk Oct. 3 | virtual | Carson City, Nev.

visitcarsoncity.com

Reno Philharmonic “Out of the Silence” Oct. 3-4 | livestream

renophil.com

Writers in the Woods Oct. 9-10, Nov. 13-14 | virtual

sierranevada.edu

UNR Ski Swap Oct. 9-11 | Reno Sparks Convention Center

unrskiswap.com

Writing from the Senses, An Intensive Weekend with Janet Fitch Oct. 9-11 | virtual

communityofwriters.org

legionsportsfest.com

Wild & Scenic Film Festival

Until Oct. 31 | Corley Ranch | Gardnerville, Nev.

andelinfamilyfarm.com

unr.edu

Fall Bulb Festival

Corley Ranch Harvest Festival corleyranch.com

communityofwriters.org

Facebook Main St Gardnerville

visitcarsoncity.com

Ghost Train Oct. 30-31 | Mills Park | Carson City, Nev.

wildhorsetheater.com

Haunted Halloween Steam Train of Lights Oct. 30 & 31 | Virginia City

virginiatruckee.com

Reno Bridal & Beauty Expo & Greater Reno Women’s Expo

Drive-Thru Trick or Treat

Oct. 17, 18 | virtual

Oct. 31 | Bertie’s Hot Chicken | Incline Village, Nev.

lockettshows.com

Hauntober Parade

Oct. 17, 18, 24, 25 | Virginia City Depot

Oct. 31 | C Street | Virginia City

ACTRA Wrangler/Professional’s Choice National Finals Oct. 17-24 | Reno-Sparks Livestock Event Center Reno, Nev.

actra.org

Truckee River Day Oct. 18 | Area venues

truckeeriverwc.org

High Fives Golf Tournament Oct. 19 Gray’s Crossing | Truckee

highfivesfoundation.org

Lake Tahoe Wildlife Care Wild & Free Fundraiser Oct. 20 | virtual

ltwc.org

OCTOBER 8 | THURSDAY Live Music Cottonwood Restaurant & Bar, Truckee, 6 p.m. Live Music Under the Tent Bar of America, Truckee, 8 p.m. Open Mic Classic Cue, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.

OCTOBER 9 | FRIDAY Live Music Cottonwood Restaurant & Bar, Truckee, 6 p.m. Live Music Under the Tent Bar of America, Truckee, 8 p.m.

OCTOBER 10 | SATURDAY Mudd Bonz Casey’s, Zephyr Cove, 6-9 p.m. Live Music Under the Tent Bar of America, Truckee, 8 p.m.

Bertie’s Hot Chicken on Facebook

Pumpkin Patch Trains virginiatruckee.com

l i ve

visitvirginiacitynv.com

Nevada Day & Nevada Day Fall Fest Oct. 31 | Arlington Square | Carson City, Nev.

nevadaday.com

Now open at

25% capacity Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

Spooky Short Films Oct. 31 | Piper’s Opera House | Virginia City

pipersoperahouse.com

Hunt for the Spirits Scavenger Hunt Oct. 31 | Virginia City

visitvirginiacitynv.com

Virginia City Cemetery Tour Oct. 31 | self-guided | Virginia City

visitvirginiacitynv.com

The Dark Divide Oct. 7-8 Possessor Oct. TBD Stevie Nicks 24k Gold Concert Film Oct. 21 Disrupted Nov 11-15 No Time to Die Opens Nov. 20 Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

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YOUR BUSINESS COULD

SPONSOR THIS PAGE

Michael O’Connor, Life Coach Astrologer SunStarAstrology.com

Your business’

LOGO here

Email for details

EARTH

AIR

WATER

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22)

Although you are taking new leads and strides, you also feel inclined to lay low. Dealings with others, especially men, may be extra taxing of late. Although you do feel confident deep down, you have and continue to contend with a barrage of low-lying fears.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21)

While you are not the only one seeking retreat, you are among the first. However, you are not willing to simply drift and dream. Rather, you will be keenly focused to investigate, learn and get answers. You are determined to think for yourself and will not gladly suffer interference from others.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21)

Truth and justice for all are cornerstones of your principles. You tend to feel a sense of obligation to be of service to others by sharing your interpretations and understanding of things. Success in doing so includes appreciating that your truths are, in fact, interpretations.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19)

You naturally yearn to be seen, recognized, acknowledged, heard and heeded too. You are a warrior at heart and you may notice that you are quite in touch with this aspect of yourself these days. At worst, you have a ‘take no prisoners’ attitude. Positively, you are able to see things more clearly than usual and you want to.

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19)

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20)

anne@tahoethisweek.com

FIRE

Horoscopes Puzzles

Among your gifts is the unique ability to be both a creative, critical thinker and yet to remain detached. You instinctively advocate perspectives that support securing the rights, freedoms and liberties of people as individuals. Your focus of late is to exercise critical thinking even more than usual. Soon, you will feel compelled to share your views.

You are undergoing a process of change. Positively, it is supporting you to feel humbler and more appreciative of the significant people in your life. Seeing a bigger picture and seeing through popular interpretations for the sake feels important. Doing so however, could prove increasingly complex for a while. Avoid drawing conclusions and be kind to yourself.

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20)

You will feel the shift this week to a more sober and serious attitude. Positively, you will feel charged and determined to make some important decisions and power moves. Outer realties and circumstances are triggering your response as you assess how you can best secure your position and that of your family.

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21)

A creative work focus continues. Yet, it will shift from an emphasis on your home or living environment to your relationships. Money and finances will factor-in. Private conversations will also prove more satisfying and you will prefer facts over theories.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21)

With Venus entering Virgo, the emphasis will be on a more conservative mood. Gathering knowledge by way of research especially, but also via conversations, will prove satisfying. You are probably wise to listen, receive and reflect more than express for the sake of preserving your energy.

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22)

With so much drama in the world, it may feel extra difficult to maintain your poise and balance. Yet, it is for this reason that it is much more important, as well. You will become increasingly eager for new information. While open to alternative perspectives, you may notice your opinions to be quite fixed.

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23)

A steady stream of new thoughts, ideas and insights are activating you mind. In turn, your imagination may be working overtime and you are wise to keep it in-check regarding conclusive attitudes. Investment and professionalism describe the focus of your strategy.

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22)

You are focused on establishing a whole new sense of balance in your life. This includes strengthening your foundation. In turn, this includes cleaning corners and clearing the clutter, whether literally, regarding unfinished business or to loosen the grip of fixed perceptions.

To alleviate fear about a low harvest, bulb growers gave a state-ofthe-onion address.

CryptoQuip

Hocus Focus differences: 1. Bear has been added, 2. Window is wider, 3. Pants are longer, 4. Flowers have been added, 5. Bushes have been added, 6. Tree has additional limb.

16


October 7-13, 2020 EAT & DRINK

EAT &drink

Email news to editor@tahoethisweek.com

Crepes & Craft

food & libations | recipes | delicious events

Courtesy Crepes & Craft

food truck opens

Indulge in a selection of sweet and savory crepes and artisan-crafted sandwiches prepared with locally-sourced ingredients with the new food truck, Crepes & Craft, located at South Lake Brewing Company. The food truck is the brainchild of coowners Nick Giordano and Eric Mutell. The menu features sweet and savory crepes like the Herban Truffle, Salmon Spanakopita and the Harambe with chocolate hazelnut, Grilled Cheese and Salmon Sliders, and craft sandwiches like the Italian Stallion, Full Monty and the BBQ Jackfruit. Crepes & Craft is open from noon to 3 p.m. and from 4 to 7 p.m. from Thursday to Monday at South Lake Brewing Company at 1920 Lake Tahoe Blvd. in South Lake Tahoe. | crepesandcraft.com

Five quick, easy meals S TO RY & P H OTO S BY P R I YA H UT N E R

I

t’s 5 p.m., a low grumbling in the stomach begins. Hunger has set in. You open the fridge and there is nothing ready to eat. Making dinner at the end of a long day can be a daunting exercise. While takeout is an option, the cost can add up and impact the budget. Making meals that are healthy and satisfying in 30 minutes or less isn’t as hard as it sounds. Here’s my tips and techniques to prepare five quick and easy meals that taste delicious. What does it take to make a meal in minutes? A plan, shopping in advance, prepping, cooking and a few essential kitchen appliances. There are two appliances that I can’t live without: The Instant Pot and a rice cooker — both save time and energy. I don’t make rice in my Instant Pot. I prefer the flavor and texture

The key to making easy meals is to keep it simple. Prepping vegetables is the most time-consuming task next to cooking the meal.

tasty tidbits Foam Fest Truckee | Oct. 7-14

For $30 receive a Foam Fest mug and one 16-ounce beer at each participating location in October to support Achieve Tahoe: Truckee Brewing Company, Alibi Ale Works Truckee Public House and Fifty Fifty Brewing Company. $30 | (530) 581-4161, achievetahoe.com

Tahoe City Farmers Market Commons Beach | Tahoe City | Oct. 8

The Tahoe City Farmers Market is every Thursday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. until Oct. 8. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. | tahoecityfarmersmarket.com

Truckee Certified Farmers Market Truckee River Regional Park | Oct. 13

Every Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. until Oct. 15. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. | truckeecertifiedfa.wixsite.com

El Dorado County Certified Farmer’s Market American Legion Parking Lot South Lake Tahoe | Oct. 13

Tuesdays through Oct. 13. New procedures due to the coronavirus that line up with the state and county guidelines for outdoor events serving prepared and fresh food. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Free | eldoradofarmersmarket.com

Bulleit Bourbon Tasting Gar Woods Lake Tahoe | Carnelian Bay | Oct. 14 Learn about the distilling process and what makes Bulleit Bourbons and Whiskeys unique while sipping on some of their spirits. Complimentary appetizers. Must be age 21 and older. 5:30-6:30 p.m. | facebook.com

Pan-seared salmon in minutes.

seaweed and dashi in my soup if I have it in the pantry. If the idea of cutting up all those veggies is too much, use a bag of frozen mixed vegetables to cut down on prep time. For the soup, add veggies to a big pot of hot water and simmer until tender. Add miso paste, soy sauce and sesame oil to the pot. Make sure not to bring the soup to a boil once the miso is added. Serve with soba noodles — ramen or rice work great, too — and a side of sautéed sesame spinach. Top the soup with scallions, serrano peppers, wasabi, pickled ginger, chili oil and/or Sriracha sauce.

PAN-SEARED SALMON of my rice when prepared in a rice cooker. My top choices for rice cookers are Tiger, Zojirushi or the Korean Cuckoo. A rice cooker grants the ability to cook rice in advance and have it on hand for a few meals during the week. This cuts down on the time it takes to make dinner. It’s also great if you enjoy savory meals for breakfast with prepared rice, perfect for an egg and kimchi breakfast bowl. The key to making easy meals is to keep it simple. Prepping vegetables is the most time-consuming task next to cooking the meal. Many supermarkets offer pre-cut veggies, which will cut down on prep time, but the truth is you can rough cut any vegetable. There are several items I suggest having on hand for ease of dinner preparation. They include onions; garlic (try minced in jar); vegetables such as broccoli, asparagus, spinach and frozen peas; proteins and canned beans. Give these five meals a try and let me know how you made out. Share your meals @TheTahoeWeekly on Facebook and Instagram. Enjoy the tastes of Tahoe

at TheTahoeWeekly.com

MISO SOUP An Asian meal can be simple or complex. For the purpose of this story, we’ll keep it simple. Miso soup with plenty of vegetables and soba noodles or rice is a great (almost) one-pot meal — only because you need to boil the soba separately. For vegetables, I use thinly sliced carrots, celery, green cabbage, onion and scallions. I also add wakame

Cooking salmon is about as easy as it gets. Heat up a pan, add oil or butter or both and sauté the salmon skin side down. Squeeze a half of lemon on top. I also add capers and dill. Put asparagus in the pan and cook it along with the fish. The whole process takes about 6 to 10 minutes, depending on the thickness of the fish. Serve it with rice and extra lemon, salt and pepper.

SPAGHETTI SQUASH Baked spaghetti squash is a two-step process. It usually takes 45 minutes to bake the squash in the oven, so to cut down on time, cut the squash in half and steam it. This takes about 15 minutes in the Instant Pot, a bit longer in a pot on the stove. Scoop out the insides and mix with a touch of olive oil, parmesan cheese, salt, pepper and peas. Put everything back in the shell and bake for 10 minutes. It’s a onebowl meal. If you want dinner to include sautéed spinach, heat up a pan, add olive oil and fresh spinach and sauté for minute or two. Add a dash of salt before eating.

CHICKEN CURRY Chicken Curry can be had in less than 30 minutes. Chop a small onion, red pepper and celery and sauté in coconut or olive oil for 5 minutes. Add thinly sliced carrots and chicken thighs, which I cut into strips because it cuts down on cooking time and cook for 5 minutes. Add a can of coconut milk, yellow curry powder and red or green curry paste. Cook for 10 minutes and check to make sure the chicken is cooked through. Serve with Thai basil or cilantro, scallions, lime wedges and cashews and serve

on rice or rice noodles. Broccoli and snow pea pods work also work well in this recipe. Peanut butter and a dash of soy sauce add a nice flavor to the dish.

MEATBALLS MARINARA This dinner is delicious comfort food on a chilly evening as the days get shorter. The full recipe follows for Meatballs in Marinara with sautéed broccoli and spaghetti.  Priya Hutner is a writer, personal chef and workshop facilitator. She is the owner of the Seasoned Sage, which prepares organic artisan meals for dinner parties and events. She also offers in-home cooking classes, parties and local pop up dinners. As a breath meditation teacher and long-time yogi, she facilitates workshops and classes that focus on gaining a deeper awareness of self. Send story ideas to priya@tahoethisweek.com. | (772) 913-0008, pria78@gmail.com, seasonedsage.com

MEATBALLS MARINARA 1 lb. grass-feed ground beef 1 egg ¼ C breadcrumbs ¼ C parmesan cheese 1 t fresh basil, chopped Salt & pepper to taste 1 jar of organic marinara sauce ½ box spaghetti SIDE DISH 2 C broccoli 2 t olive oil Salt & pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350° F. Set 4 quarts of water to boil. While the water boils, mix ingredients for meatballs together in a bowl. Roll into balls and place on a baking sheet. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes turning over halfway through the baking process. Warm the sauce and when the meatballs are done, add them to the pot of sauce. Add pasta to the boiling water and cook for 5 to 7 minutes until al dente. While the pasta is cooking, sauté broccoli in olive oil and add a touch of salt. Serve meatballs over pasta with parmesan and broccoli on the side. 17


TheTahoeWeekly.com

FROM CHEF SMITTY’S KITCHEN

Roasted Fiddleheads or Brussels Sprouts BY C H E F DAV I D “ S M I T T Y ” S M I T H

I

wasn’t really sure if I should use this recipe or not. I have to be honest and say that I’m not sure what markets sell fiddleheads out here. What are fiddleheads? They are baby ferns common back East in wet areas early in the spring just when all the plants start blooming again. We used to go out in the woods and pick them by the hundreds — not picking more than three or four off the same plant — which (530) 587-3557 10186 Donner Pass Rd - Truckee I remember right, aboutMay 22, 2019 Sunday through Thursdayifnot valid with any otherproduces offer | Expires seven stems. them. After that, you can serve them hot You just have to be careful because there right out of the cooking water with a little are other ferns that look similar but are bacon or vinegar, put them in soup or uneatable and will probably make you sick. follow your favorite recipe. The way to identify a fiddlehead is by its smooth, hairless stem with a pronounced U-shaped groove the length of the stem. We used to go out in the I think they grow possibly near some of the Tahoe streams such as in Blackwood woods and pick them by Canyon, but I wouldn’t be surprised if they the hundreds — not picking were found down in the foothills, too. Why are they called fiddleheads? more than three or four off Because when you look at them, they look like the head of a fiddle or violin — the the same plant — which if head is all curled with a few of what will I remember right, produces become the leaves once the plant opens, at this stage looking more like the screws for about seven stems. the strings. After you pick them, they must be cleaned before you cook them. There is a brown, paper-like wrapper that must be Bacon goes well with them because they JasonsBeachSideGrille.com • (530) 546-3315 removed. Th e wrapper comes off easily, but can have a slightly bitter taste much like 8338 NORTH LAKE BLVD., KINGS BEACH, CA when you are cleaning hundreds for a hotel Brussels sprouts, which the bacon will kind or large crowd, it can be tedious. I did get of neutralize. a lot of kudos when I came up with using As a matter of fact, the recipe below Sierra Community House the dishwasher’s power spray. You can is from a good friend of mine in Ohio, Food Distribution cover the bottom of a dishwasher silverwhom I worked with for many years at the ware tray and then the spray will rinse the Memorial Golf Tournament. He recomFine Italian Food We’re delivering perishable wrap right off . mends white sugar for roasting and brown & Spirits food bags weekly sugar for bacon. He told me they use this in Truckee & North Lake Tahoe. for their Brussels sprouts, but I had to try Find more of Chef Smitty’s recipes it on fiddleheads because I find a lot of at TheTahoeWeekly.com Delivery staff and volunteers similarities in the two, flavor-wise. are following best practices and It was delicious, so if you can’t find any wearing masks. Please follow As for cooking fiddleheads, there are fiddleheads, try this recipe on Brussel social distancing and NOT interact. many ways, but they do need to be cooked sprouts and enjoy.  thoroughly or they can make you sick. To sign-up or cancel, e-mail First, you want to rinse them several times David “Smitty” Smith is a personal chef specializing in dinner food@sierracommunityhouse.org until the wash water appears clean and not parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Locals Love Lanza’s! or call 775-545-4083; Provide full brown. Next, boil them in lightly salted Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., (530) 546-2434 name, address, phone number, water, chicken or vegetable stock for 10 Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. BAR - 4:30 p.m. DINNER - 5 p.m. birthdate and number of people minutes, 20 minutes if you are steaming Contact him at (530) 412-3598 or tmmsmitty@gmail.com.

Famous for our

Mexican Dinners

Lakeview Deck and Patio Open daily for Dining 12-8pm

in the household.

7739 N Lake Blvd - Kings Beach

LanzasTahoe.com ROASTED FIDDLEHEADS OR BRUSSELS SPROUTS From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith 1 lb. fiddleheads or Brussels sprouts 3 to 4 C chicken stock 1 T white sugar 4 to 5 slices bacon ¼ C brown sugar 1 to 2 T white balsamic vinegar (or regular balsamic) Salt & pepper to taste

Kings Beach Full Service on Patio & Takeout orders 12:00pm-8:00pm

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Bar

(530) 546-4539 8345 North Lake Blvd. - Across from the State Beach in Kings Beach 18

Cook the bacon in the oven and let cool. Clean the brown wrapper off the fiddleheads and wash thoroughly — or cut the Brussels sprouts in half. Boil in the chicken stock for 10 minutes. If using Brussels sprouts, just a quick blanch will do. Spread them out on a sheet tray, lightly sprinkle with white sugar and roast in the oven at 300 degrees F for 10 minutes or until the sugar is melted and starting to turn golden. Place the bacon back on a sheet tray; generously sprinkle on the brown sugar and let cook in the oven until the sugar caramelizes, about 10 minutes or so. Let the bacon cool and crumble it up into the fiddleheads. Toss with half the vinegar, adding the rest to taste. Season with salt and pepper as needed.


October 7-13, 2020 EAT & DRINK

W I N E R IE S O F T H E S IE R R A FOOTHILLS

Boeger Winery S TO RY BY BA R BA R A K E C K | P H OTO S BY J O H A N M A R T I N

Restaurant

P lenty of

OUTDOOR SEATING

Reservations Recommended for Dinner

BREAKFAST | LUNCH | DINNER Spindleshankstahoe.com | 400 Brassie Ave, Suite B · Kings Beach | (530) 546.2191

G

reg Boeger’s family is grounded in the wine business. He is the grandson of Anton Nichelini, a Swiss-Italian immigrant who planted one of Napa’s early vineyards 120 years ago. Anton came to California during the Gold Rush and put his shovel to work in pursuit of grape growing instead of mining. A century later in 1972, grandson Greg purchased a former Gold Rush-era vineyard and winery in El Dorado County and founded the county’s first modern winery. The path from Napa to El Dorado is a familiar one to many vineyard owners and winemakers in the Sierra Foothills. Greg had worked harvests at the Nichelini Winery in Napa. His cousins asked him to join the business after he got his bachelor and master of arts in agricultural economics and viticulture at UC Davis. Greg already had started looking for his own property but even in the early 1970s, prices for Napa and Sonoma land were high. “There were plenty of vineyards and wineries there, but no one was really interested in helping someone get started,” Greg recalled. An article in the Sacramento Bee about the experimental vineyards that were being planted in El Dorado County piqued Greg’s interest. He bought the historic Fossati Ranch that was located on land colorfully called The Immigrant Ravine. Vegetables and fruits of all types had been grown there by Swiss, Italian, French and German immigrants and sold to workers in the Gold Rush camps. The Fossati Winery, located on the site, was a thriving vineyard and winery until prohibition in the 1920s. But there was still the original winery and a small, producing vineyard on the Fossati ranch. Greg and his family have worked hard to build Boeger Winery to the booming business it is today. The first tasting room, opened in 1974, was in the historic building that was the family home and winery of the Fossati-Lombardo homesteaders. It was built from stones found when the vineyards were cleared in the 1860s. When you go to taste today, you’ll walk by this 1860’s building and see the Federal stamp on the door that served as the license to produce sacramental wine during Prohibition. Today’s modern 1,500-square-foot tasting room, built in 2001, is a showcase for more than 15 wines made from 30 different varieties from the five vineyards now farmed by the Boeger family.

Sue and Greg Boeger. | Johan Martin

“When we came to this area, there were no established vineyards to speak of, and there was not really a history of what had done well in the old vineyards that survived. Zinfandel, Mission and Muscat were grown for the miners,” Greg said. “I am still trying to find out what grows best in these various microclimates and terroir of our steep and hilly vineyards. There is a place for any variety you want to grow due to the variations in slope, exposure and elevation.” Boeger plants its vines in small blocks that conform to the hillsides without use of terracing. Barbera is the variety that’s planted on the majority of their acreage. Italian and Spanish varietals are highlighted, too, and of course Zinfandel is an El Dorado County star. Greg was one of the first California producers of a varietal Merlot, then almost unheard of. From overhead, the land looks like a herringboned fabric; just the place for Greg to focus attention on the vineyards and grape growing. The next generation of Boeger family members includes Justin Boeger, who assumed the role of winemaker in 2000. With his 1998 UC Davis degree in fermentation science, a lifetime of on-the-job training and internships in two prestigious wineries in the Franconian region of Germany, he is well prepared for assuring that Boeger Winery has not only a place in history but also in the future. Justin has introduced several new wines and winemaking techniques to Boeger Winery. One result is a popular Pinot Noir. Justin’s skill is in making well-balanced wines that you can drink now and also cellar for later enjoyment. Boeger is open daily for tastings by reservations with outdoor seating available. | (530) 622-8094, boegerwinery.com. 

Food, Beer & Wine

Takeout 7 days a week. 11:30am-7:30pm

Truckee, CA 10089 W. River St. (530) 582-5000 MorgansLobsterShack.com

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is an excerpt from the

second edition of the popular guidebook “Wineries of the Sierra Foothills: Risk-Takers & RuleBreakers” available now on Amazon. All sales support Tahoe Weekly.

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Profile for Tahoe Weekly

October 7 to 13, 2020  

An explosion of fall color in Hope Valley. | Photography by Andrew Lipschutz

October 7 to 13, 2020  

An explosion of fall color in Hope Valley. | Photography by Andrew Lipschutz

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